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Ships of all sorts call in the sixth boro.  Quick  post today . . .  showing a range of recent callers.

MSC Zlata R,

Grande Torino,

 

Gerhard Schulte, 

 

Elbeborg,

 

and Adrian Maersk . . . each with a smaller vessel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Spring and fog coexist a lot, and from there, the gradation from fog to summer haze is somewhat blurred.  Blue-hulled Oyster Catcher, in the foreground, gives clearest indication that this in not a black/white/gray photo.  I’ve searched online fruitlessly to confirm that Oyster Catcher is an NYC DEP vessel.  When

A panoply of vessels converge in the Narrows as the great gray ULCV approaches from many days at sea.

 

I’ve not been paying attention to how many of these ULCVs have multiple bow thrusters.  Anyone know the horsepower on each?

 

 

 

Three 6000s, one 3900, and two brants . . . all converging along with Cosco Faith.

For scale, notice the 25′-to 30′ outboard passing just to the right of the letter O in COSCO.  More to scale, note the size of engineering crew next to this crankshaft.

I waited for a messenger line for the deckhand to send up the towline, but  . . . it happened after they were out of range for me.

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All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Just for ships and figgles . . . have a glance at 155 and at 55 in this series. While we’re reconnoitering the past, here’s 5.

And here’s springtime 2019.  Might this be the last view I get of tug Viking?  Scuttlebutt’s bumped into me saying so. Her first (I believe) appearance on this blog was over 11 years ago here. She had some near twins, but none evolved quite as she did.

FB has this group I really enjoy called Freighters in the Night;  I could submit this one. Jonathan C escorts an MSC box ship out.

Liz Vinik is a former fleet mate of Viking;  I caught her yesterday entering the kills with a Cashman barge carrying barges. Click here for some photos of previous iterations of this boat.

A dark, slow-to-wake morning like yesterday provides lots of points of light.  Here Joyce D. heads out, likely for her railroad work.

Enjoy these contrasts, Linda L. Miller and Hayward, two specialized boats.

Let’s end with a transient, sporadically seen in the sixth boro, a formerly Pacific Ocean Crowley tug . . .  Morgan,  out of New Bedford.

All photos e-watermarked with invisible metadata as taken by Will Van Dorp in the past month.

 

When Ellen intruded onto my shot of Jonathan C assisting Amstel Stork around Bergen Bend, I first thought she had blown my shots of the assist, but yesterday’s post gave me an idea . . . .  And now that I mention yesterday’s post, here’s another large ATB to throw into the comparison, one that carries 214,000 gallons of fuel.

Compare them.  So here goes:  Ellen entered service in 1967, came to NYC in 2001 and measures 102′ x 29 with fuel capacity of 20,000 gallons.  Currently she brings 4000 hp to her assists.

Jonathan C came off the ways and to the sixth boro in 2016 and the tape calls her at 89′ x 38.”  Her engines generate 6000 hp, drawing from 40,000 gal tanks.

I have earlier photos of Jonathan C, but here’s one from over two years ago.

And since Ellen pre-dates my time in the sixth boro, here’s one I took over 10 years ago.

The photo above by Will Van Dorp.

Quick  . ..  name the ship name the ONE vessel  . . .

The first three photos were taken Sunday by Bjoern of the New York Media Boat.

And if you know the tugs in the sixth boro you have a 75% chance of naming all tugs here too . . .   three of the four 6000 hp tugs by Moran.  I’m not first in pointing out how small the tugs look relative to the 1200′ ONE Stork.  I hope you guessed that right.  The tugs are JRT, James D, Jonathan, and then Margaret farther back.

While we’re on names . . .  Glenn Raymo caught this photo  upriver.

Dodo . . . First ONE Stork and then Dodo.

Over by Shooters Island the other day, I caught Amstel Stork, coming from Port Newark and headed upriver herself.

Jonathan and Miriam assist her around Bergen Point, but here’s my point:  two vessels named “stork” in the harbor the same week!!?  What going on?  And with Dutch as my first language, I read this as Ooievaar van Amsted . . . that big bird name being ooievaar in Dutch.

Recently, vessels with the following names have visited the sixth boro:   NYK Blue Jay    Southern Owl   Stena Penguin  …   See what I mean about a trend that has emerged?  A few years back I saw the Eagle fleet, eg in yesterday’s post, and separate from that . . . Asphalt Eagle.  A few years back I saw a Peacock.

Here are some I suppose I’ll never see:  Subsea Seven has some bird vessels, esp  in diving support.

Millennium Falcon….  oh wait, that might not have launched yet . . .   Magic Victoria was here recently, although my photo was too blurry to use here.  Surfer Rosa . . . that name of the many I’ve posted here will stick with me.   As of this morning, Surfer Rosa is westbound in the Med just outside Algerian waters.

Many thanks to Bjoern and Glenn for use of their photos.

 

Here goes another 3-fer, three cargo vessels making their way again through the KVK simultaneously.  JRT here at dawn assists orange juice carrier Orange Blossom 2 through the ConHook Range.

Jonathan C passes in front of them, returning from assisting another vessel now bound for sea.

Right behind the juice carrier is a box ship.

 

As the juice ship nears midpoint in the KVK, notice a RORO rounding Bergen Point at the west end of the KVK.

As I said, congestion . ..   that’s routine.  Kimberly travels along the starboard bow of the RORO,

Meanwhile, that box ship mentioned earlier has Eric on port

and Capt Brian A. at the stern.

Glovis Safety . . . headed for Philly and as of this moment is midAtlantic on its way to Zeebrugge.

 

As I said . . .   skillful mariners make a congested waterway seem just routine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s that day, and although I’d planned something different, there are a lot of these green containers coming through the sixth boro.  Guess which ship?  Unrelated but something else to guess?  What is the emerald isle of the Great Lakes USA?  Answer follows.

Kimberly Turecamo was on port bow the other day, as

 

James D. and

 

Kirby assist along starboard side.

I believe 30 of the L- series have been built.  Click here (and look on the left nav bar) for their green features.

Go to any world shipping lane and you’ll see them.  The photo below was in Gatun Lake.

Their profile is unmistakeable.

I certainly haven’t even taken a photo of everyone I’ve seen in the sixth boro.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s ingesting green things like basil and oregano today.

Here is the first in this series.  Here’s another.  And from 12 years ago here’s an earlier class of Evergreen C-ships.

Emerald Isle of the Great Lakes . . .  it’s in Lake Michigan . . .  Beaver Island!!

 

All these photos were taken in this order yesterday between 0647 and 0704 EDT.  CMA CGM T. Roosevelt was bound for sea.  As of this moment, she’s off Norfolk waiting to enter the Chesapeake.  If you don’t know, Roosevelt is one of now quite a large number of ULCSs or ULCVs [I’ve read both terms for these behemoths.] calling in NYC’s sixth boro, all 1200′ loa and carrying between 13,000 and 14,500 teu.  By the way, there’s a good graphic of container vessel evolution in that link.

At 0647 she was passing Caddells.  Dawn and dusk shots have lots of lights and their reflections in them.

 

Jonathan C sees her out  . . . .

Imagine the number of tractors–Ottawas or otherwise– needed to move each of these containers out of a port.  Better still, imagine a parking lot of all those tractors parked as close together as you could. I’ll get back to that.

The bow was illuminated by dawn; the stern is quite dark. In the extreme left to the left of Jonathan C, Scott Turecamo had a waiver to move into the KVK to get to her berth with a favorable tide.

 

Note where the docking pilot will exit.

 

When I zoomed all the way out, the camera sees more of what I saw, big picture adjusted for light.  The photo above and below I took just a few seconds apart.

Although the images below relate to Great Lakes shipping, they do illustrate the point I was trying to make with the comment above about tractors needed to move all of these containers all tightly parked in single lot. I’d love to see an illustrator create this image, including the cross county double-decker container train cars.  And I know fuels differ as well.  Of course, an alternative is to make and consume all out machines, tools, toys, etc. aka what we import and export locally.

Again, this is Great Lakes, but I’m guessing this is part of the green oldie-but-goodie deal.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

Quick post today . . . MSC Tamara left the sixth boro today apparently empty, St. John NB bound.

Jonathan C saw her out, and of course

there might be containers deep in the cells, but she looks empty.  She was launched in 2008..  I’ve seen her before, but I don’t believe she’s ever appeared on the blog.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what the story is.

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