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Cosco Prince Rupert came into town recently 27 days out of Pusan, Korea.

She was launched in South Korea in 2011, has dimensions of 1095′ x 141′, and has container capacity of 8208.  By current standards, she’s upper medium-sized calling in the sixth boro of NYC.

Prince Rupert’s namesake?  He was the first governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

JPO Capricornus, 2005, 865′ x 106,’ teu capacity of 4132 . . .  makes her a smaller size calling these days.  She was a week out of Cartagena upon her arrival in NYC.  She was built in South Korea.

 

Atlantic Sky, a CONRO vessel with capacity of 3800 tea and 1300 vehicles, was launched in 2017 in China.  The tape has her at 970′ x 121′.

 

 

 

Ever Leading launched in 2012 in South Korea.  She has 8452-teu capacity and has dimensions of 1099′ x 151′.

 

Zim Ukrayina  was launched in 2009 in the Philippines.  Her dimensions are 849′ x 105′ and her teu capacity is 4360.

She made the voyage from just north of  Hong Kong (Da Chang Bay) to NYC in 40 days.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Only 13 months ago, Cosco Glory could not have entered Port Elizabeth.  Now the +14,000-teu boats –more accurately called NYC’s 1200-footers, have become routine like T. Roosevelt, J. Adams, and Chongqing.

The geese are not even spooked.

Jonathan takes the starboard, and Kirby . . . port

while JRT and Margaret leverage the stern.

 

 

 

 

As of this writing, this crewman has most recently been treated to views of the Savannah waterfront.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Click here for the first installment of this story . . .

Tuesday 0630.  Note here that crews have already begun lowering the booms of these new gantry cranes in order to fit under the VZ Bridge.

Wednesday 0915.  Plans were to begin the transit, but an anchor windlass refused to cooperate.

Wednesday 1030.  And the fog began to descend.

Thursday 0630.  It was a glorious morning.

Thursday 1000.  It’s a go.  That’s Media Boat 4 in the foreground.

1026.  I read there’s a 10′ clearance, but my perspective–faulty–said otherwise.

1027.  Yup . . . plenty clearance.

1140. near the Bayonne Bridge

1141.  James D. Moran in the hard hat area.

1146.

1147.  Under the bridge and then a turn into Port Elizabeth.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Read a Staten Island Advance article here.

 

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments.  And here are names and numbers of all who have all paraded in front of my lens recently.

Amy Moran, 1973, 3000hp

Joan Turecamo, 1980, 4300.

James D. Moran, 2015, 6000.

Jonathan C. Moran, 2016, 6000.

Marie J Turecamo 1968 and 2250, and James Turecamo 1969 2000 or 1800 or 1700

Marion Moran 1982 and 3000 4610

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Jonathan C Moran has appeared here plenty of times afloat, and once in dry dock as seen from her stern.

The size and depth of her hull can be better appreciated, I believe, when seeing her from the bow, with workers showing scale.

Then I was especially fortunate to have her siblings–maybe James D. here–pass by in the KVK, several hundred feet beyond the dry dock.

Then seconds later, another sibling–Kirby–passes as she

keeps pressure on the stern of MSC Chicago.

This is my first view of the amount and configuration of submarine fendering on this tug.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a good view of the props on a z-drive boat.  The 8.5′ props are part of the Schottel SRP 1515 FP drive system.  Note the port-a-potty between the stacks, a dry-dock worker convenience?

The scale of the cranes at Howland Hook belies the fact that Jay Michael and Bosco, passing Shooters Island, are still at least a mile closer to the lens than HH port.

In different light, here’s a Bosco closeup.

James E. Brown before dawn;  the structure like a lighthouse beyond JEB‘s stern is the control tower at Newark Airport, which celebrates its 90th anniversary this coming October.

The Statue salutes Little C.  I’ve often tried for a photo that suggests the Statue’s eyes are fixed on something in the foreground, and I’d say here Little C has helped me make that happen.

Barge John Blanche is returned homeward through Hell Gate by Diane B.

OK . . .  Is it Joan or Doris?

I’ll stop here.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Given the number of posts I’ve done on names, you’re right to assume they fascinate me.  Of course, the names are just placeholders, but much preferable these names to numbers.   This recent salt ship, for example, could be called Ever Lion . . . if Evergreen had chosen to use animals rather than qualities for their “L” class.  I suppose “ever lion” might be misunderstood for “ever lying,” not a great name for several reasons. Ocean Lion used to be called Ocean Lyra, in fact.

I was planning to do a whole series of these Evergreen ships, but I missed Ever Liberal, Ever Legend, and a few other ones that recently called in the sixth boro.

Leader surprised me . . . the hull was black . . . but maybe that was a primer coating.

Global Andes . . . an intriguing name.

Genco Warrior . .  another one of their ships is called Knight . . .

Grouse Arrow seems to assume the opposite perspective, not predator but prey or rather projectile to render a being prey.

Tugela is a river in South Africa. That fleet uses place names all starting with T.

Obsidian . . . well, a mineral name seems appropriate for a mineral carrier.

The best name I’ve seen this fall is El Babe.  I’d pronounce it as one syllable, even though it’s probably intended as two.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who accepts the fact that it’s okay to miss a lot of traffic.

But here’s one more from Alaska, New General, thanks to Bob Heselberg. She’s in Skagway Alaska, loading ore for Asia.  Taken Dec 02 2017.  Thanks, Bob.

 

. . . in this case, Moran ship-assist tugs in the sixth boro.

Jonathan C leaves the waving lady to port,

James D waits with Brooklyn to port,

Margaret waits over closer to Red Hook,

Miriam treads water over along Bay Ridge,

JRT prepares to head dockside,

Kirby goes to the next job

Jonathan C and Kirby heading out to meet a ship,

Jonathan C prepared to exert counterforce,

And we’ll end with Margaret and James D following a box boat into the Kills.  All this you can see repeatedly every day of the year in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you all a happy, safe, healthy, and thriving 2018.

 

Here are dozens of previous posts in this series.

I put this one up today specifically in response to a comment by a dear friend Rembert, who commented here about the apparent high center of gravity on American tugboats.  Mein Schiff 6, which is 969′ x 139′, appears to be quite “tall” but largely because of its verticality.

TUI operates Mein Schiff 7.  I’m guessing the “Leinen los”  here translates to the Dutch lekko [itself an approximation of the English],  the English “cast off.”

Here, from a different angle, is TUI’s logo projected overtop USNS Gilliland.

Steel–a great name–has similar vertical sides,

as does Orange Star, a transporter of my favorite beverage.

Ditto Denak Voyager.

For tugster, here’s an unusual shot of Avra, at the dock at night.

Let’s conclude with Navigator of the Seas, 1021′ x 127,’ so appearances aside, N o t S is actually less beamy than Mein Schiff 6.  Note the Chrysler Building in the photo below?

All photos by Will Van Dorp,who’s been unable to find air draft, particularly on Mein Schiff 6 and  Navigator of the Seas.  Anyone help?

And if you fans of the NYTimes missed Annie Correal’s story about shipping vehicles to Haiti out of Red Hook aboard Beauforce (replacement for Grey Shark?), click here to read it.

 

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