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Every day is Thanksgiving, but we dedicate one day to talk about it.  One undeniable detail of the US popular T’giving narrative involves a transAtlantic vessel, Mayflower.  Some of this info about the Mayflower might be new. Less than a decade after arriving in North America, it may have been dismantled and used in a barn building project.  Reference to Mayflower, original and replica, can be found in these previous blog posts.

Of course, instances of earlier thanksgiving in the US exist, like this one from 1607 and involved a vessel named Virginia, in Maine.   My point is . . . it’s a story of migration by ship.

That’s the connection:  this blog features ships, and this post is a sampling of vessels that’ve called in the sixth boro in recent weeks and months, like The Amigo, a 2012 Croatia-built asphalt/bitumen tanker. Cargo in the tanks needs to be kept well above the boiling point to maintain liquidity.

MSC Shirley is a 2000-built Polish-built container ship with a capacity of 2024 teu.

Seaways Redwood is a 2013 South Korea-built crude tanker.  South Korea currently builds the highest percentage of global shipping, although other Pacific Asian countries are in second and third places, as you’ll see in this sampling. 

Grande Texas is a PCTC built 2021 in China, off Ningbo.  She has the capacity of 7,600 ceu (car equivalent units).

Ardmore Dauntless and Ardmore Enterprise, both built South Korea but in 2015 and 2013, respectively.  Enterprise has slightly larger capacity. 

Aruna Berk is a drybulk carrier launched in China in 2011.

Thor Maximus is a 2005 Japan-built drybulk carrier.

ONE Wren is a 2018 Japan-built 14000 teu container ship.

Atlantic Spirit is a McKeil tanker, launched in 2011 from a shipyard in China.

McKeil is a Canadian company.  McKeil tugboats work mostly the Great Lakes;  one company tug visited the sixth boro a few years back here. 

Thundercat is a 2008 crude carrier built in China.  

Given a 1980s cartoon series, I had to chuckle at this name. 

Key Ohana is a 2010 Japan built bulk carrier.  

MSC Agadir is a Korea-built 8886 teu container ship dating from 2012.

Note the scrubbing add-on for emissions.  MSC Shirley, above, also has an exhaust-filtering system.

Northern Jaguar is a 2009 8400-teu container ship built in South Korea.  Small size as it is relative to the ship, the rudder and prop spray size relative to a single container is gigantic;  think of following that down the highway as you would a trailer-mounted container.

Jag Leela is a 1999 South Korea built crude tanker. She appeared on this blog back in 2010 here

Poorly-lit but I include this photo anyhow because it shows Ever Forward, the newest and likely the best-known ship in this post, due to her not moving forward earlier this year.  She’s currently heading south in the Red Sea, getting chased by a friend named Mike

All photos and any errors, WVD, who offers this as an assortment of commercial vessels in and out of the sixth boro. Post 98 in the series appeared here way back in April.

None of these vessels will ever maintain the lasting hold Mayflower has on the US psyche, but the fact is that much of what folks will list as what they are thankful for involves conveyance of vessels like these in and out of the sixth boro.  That’s part of why I do posts like this one.

Happy thanksgiving today.

 

Here are previous posts in the series.

Look closely at the image of William F. Fallon Jr. below;  something is unusual there.

Note that Bluefin below is juxtaposed with the Whale on shore. The Whale might be an interesting location to visit someday.

Bayonne Drydock has Schuylkill high and dry and Go Discovery along the bulkhead.

Hull design and bridge configuration are unusual.  Who designed this vessel?

Big rocks

await some jetty project, I suppose.  Anyone know where?

See the difference in ladder configuration between Charleston and

Jacksonville?  Both boats are Elizabeth Anne class boats, so why the difference in ladders?

Since 2014, October has been breast cancer awareness month, a tradition begun by Moran. 

Other companies like Kirby and Bouchard joined in previous years as well. 

 

This year so far, Stasinos is the only other company I’ve seen mark awareness of the disease this year.  Have I missed anyone?

Finally, getting back to the Fallon photo that led off this post.  Fallon is a pin boat, and yet, she’s attached to the barge Long Island with push gear.  Does this combination really operate this way?  I’m just curious.

All photos and questions, any errors, WVD.

 

Do you have associations with the term “banana boat,” like maybe a song . . . this one?  I’ll bet you’ve sung along.

Get my drift?   Maybe not yet?

I’m no good judge of how common the word “platanos” is in English because it’s been in my vocabulary for too long.

Painted battleship gray and sporting a name like platanos might be considered subterfuge . . . ,

a crude oil carrier getting named as “plantains” . . .  well, bananas.  I know banana boats and this is not a banana boat, even if it comes from that banana-producing area called Point Tupper, right, Jack?

I’m pushing it here, but maybe port of registry should say “maduro,” at least that’s my favorite format.  Maybe the fleet mate is called “papa criolla”?

All photos and warped humor, WVD, whose previous “names” posts can be seen here.

It’s hard settling back into the blog after being in steamy alligatorland for most of the month, and didn’t even expect to be suddenly back.  So my solution, the ether in my air intake, so to speak, is to just somewhat randomly choose and post photos I took in Junes from 2012 through 2016.

Starting with June 2012, behold Sam M and

Buchanan 1.  I recall learning that Sam M made its way to Alaska, and Buchanan 1 . . . to the Rondout.  Would you consider Sam M to be a lugger tug?

June 2013 took me to Philly a few times, where I got photos of  Madeline and Captain Harry in the distance and

Sentry pulling El Rey, San Juan bound.  The two Wilmington Tug vessels still work the Delaware River, whereas Sentry–last I read–flies the Bolivian flag. I should get down to Philly again one of these days.

In 2014 it’s Navigator and

Sabine.   Navigator is still based in the sixth boro and Sabine is in the GOM.

In 2015, it’s Stephen B–still in the sixth boro–and

Evening Star, along with Wavertree during her makeover.  Stephen B still works out of the boro by that name although Evening Star now has started working out of the boro again as Jordan Rose. 

And 2016, it’s Eric McAllister and

a newly arrived Jonathan C Moran.  Jonathan is still here, but Eric is in Baltimore.

All photos in a series of Junes, WVD, who does Junes from 2017 through 2021 tomorrow.

It’s hard to beat morning light for drama, as is the case here with QM2 getting assisted by James D. and

Doris Moran into her berth in Red Hook, as I shoot into that light.

Taken only a few minutes later, this photo of FV Eastern Welder dragging the bottom in front of the Weeks yard had me shooting with the rising sun behind me.

Bayonne dry dock is full of business.  Note the formerly Bouchard tug Jordan Rose and Cape Wraith off its bow.  I’m not sure which Miller’s Launch OSV that is.  To the left, that’s Soderman.

Hyundai Speed and Glovis Sirius shift cargo.

More shooting into the light here toward Bay Ridge, where lots is happening.

Torm Louise‘s color just looks cold.

Afrodite has been around the world several times each year since the hoopla of her moving Bakken crude from Albany has subsided.  Note the unidentified formerly Bouchard tugboat to the extreme left.

 

And with the drama of morning light, wild clouds form the backdrop to three tugboats seeing CMA CGM Pegasus out the door on a windy day.

All photos earlier this week, WVD, who feels fortunate to live in a place like this where my drama exists only in photos.

It’s March in the boro, so Sunday the temperatures surged up to 70, and this morning’s rain turned into snow at 36 degrees;  yesterday was windy, with dramatic clouds scudding across the sky on chilling gusts.  So when Jonathan C. Moran headed back into the KVK after assisting a ship out the door, this was the scene as . . .

she turned into the wind.

Let’s follow her back, seeing her backgrounds:  Doris going for the next assist, QM2 back in Red Hook, a ferry on a Staten island-bound run,

the Manhattan skyline and Robbins Reef Light,

the gray ships along the Bayonne drydock side . . .

and everywhere Jonathan C. getting spindrift blowing back on itself. 

All photos, WVD, yesterday.

Someone asked a question about nomenclature the other day and it may have been on FB.  The name I know is “shipside door,” and it appears to be used in cases that the pilot’s ladder would exceed 9 meters (29.5′). 

In that case the pilot would enter/depart the ship via the shipside door.

Sometimes a combo of companionway and pilot’s ladder is used.

Other times it’s the shipside door and a ladder as below and

below.

Here’s one more batch.

Note the ladder above and the winch reel below.

 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who hopes this adds some nomenclature. 

Quick photo tribute to the variety of the sixth boro . . . with Kirby and Jonathan C. heading for an assist,

Diane B moving petroleum product to the creek terminals,

James E. pushing a mini scow,

Durham moving a scow named Wheezer,

Curtis returning fro the base to her barge,

Gregg assisting Lady Malou, now heading from the sixth boro to Panama,

B. Franklin returning to her barge,

another shot of Durham pushing Wheezer,

and here, finally my first close-up view of this Osprey.

All photos, last week, WVD, who found this story of a bizarre deal involving the Canadian CG buying a light icebreaker from Turkmenistan!!?

 

I’m surprised I’ve not used this title in almost a year, since the thought often comes my way that some very busy waterways exist in the sixth boro.  Like below with the four Moran tugs and one tanker.  Since three are headed to the left, you might be wondering why.  Easy . . .  those three–JRT, Kimberly, Margaret— are assisting an incoming ship, the single tug, Jonathan C,  in the foreground heading to the right will soon assist another ship coming in.  Polar Cod–a great name–is transferring petroleum product.

Here’s that incoming ship, exciting the birds as the ship and maybe stirring up the menhaden and their predators below.  We’ll get back to this.

Here’s a closer up of that fish/bird stirring ship, a torrent called Torrente.   Portside the ship is Mary Turecamo, and starboard, it’s the Belford-based Osprey

And here’s the most dense photo, eight tugboats from four different companies, two loaded container ships, and one tanker, all in less than two miles of waterway.

Getting back to all those birds and fish in the Con Hook Range . . .  a lot of people in small boats are putting their baited hooks in the water there.

Unrelated:  An unconfirmed report with this photo below says the 1912 Argo sank in Long Island Sound off Wading River NY on November 1.  Can anyone confirm that this happened?  I looked for a report but couldn’t find one anywhere.  To see a photo I took of it underway in the sixth boro just over 10 years ago, click here. And here, taken in June 2011.

The photo below was posted by Steve Adkins and said to be taken by USCG responding to the distress.

All photos except the last one, WVD.

The juxtaposition of small craft with the larger vessels in the sixth boro can be dramatic, like when the small fishing boat barely rises above the boot stripe on the ship.

Here’s another, where the small craft is about 1.5 teu or less.

The guy on this Sea-Doo would be minced if his Sea-Doo engine or jet stopped doo-ing.  He’s tiny beside the tug, which itself

is not that big beside the ship.

This “small” NYPD boat might be over 50′ loa but still small beside the 1200’+ of the regular ULCVs.  By the way, I’d not read this story about 52′ ex-NYPD launch No. 5 until now.  I saw No. 5 on the Hudson back a few years, and you can see it here . . .  if you scroll.

I caught this blurry pic of a harbor small craft donning its invisibility cloak a few days ago. 

That, dear readers, is a pontoon boat running from somewhere east of Norton Point across Gravesend Bay and into the Upper Bay before a storm.  A pontoon boat!!

Thank the clean waters for the schools of fish in the harbor and all these small recreational boats out to snag them.

And finally, talking small, this appears to be the new color of the line boats here handling boom along Bayonne’s KVK Riviera.  I love that high-visibility chartreuse color.  Here‘s a job ad if you’re interested.

All photos, large and small, WVD.

And thanks to Phil Little, here’s a story about a harrowing voyage from Long Island to Bermuda in a Grover 26.

I regularly read the Brooklyn Eagle, and I’m happy to share this great photo

of a young child happily asleep as the family harvests reeds on Lake Titicaca, as credited.

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