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All photos here were taken less than an hour after sunrise.  It’s commonly known that the golden hour is the best time for photos.

 

Mary Turecamo also headed out for morning work, not that this is anything but a 24/7 essential schedule.

HMS St Andrews arrives with sunrise on its back. Has the HMS been dropped from the name,

just as port of registry has been changed?

Eastern Dawn slings Port Chester into the dock.

Ellen heads out,

meeting a Vane tug on her way to a job.

Cape Henry comes off the anchorage, westbound on the KVK.

All photos, WVD.

 

Note:  If you haven’t read “my” long comment to yesterday’s ‘SterCrazy 3 post, I added much more info from Robin Denny about the Bug roadster there.

March 23, 2017.    So how many folks are standing at a high point of the Evergreen ship?

Two?  Six?  More?

 

It was something of an optical illusion, because the lower roadbed was in its last days.

On April 2, 2017 . . . Maersk Kolkata was one of the first vessels to “thread the needle” and shoot through the

opening, where a roadbed had been for almost a century.   Time flies.

A week and a few days later, April 11, 2017

the “opening” in the lower roadway had grown to the point that it was difficult to imagine it’d ever been there.

Photos by Will Van Dorp, who did another post in April 2017 showing other vessels “shooting the needle” here.

 

 

I re-learned an acronym  . . . LCTC, or large car and truck carrier.  These included the Wallenius Wilhelmsen orange ROROs with names beginning with T, like Topeka, Tortugas . . .  and so on.  The green ones are HERO type, smaller and more efficient.

She’s 755′ x 106′ and by tomorrow she could be squeezing through the original Panama Canal locks.

 

I wonder if these bow ports see water in rough seas.

 

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s another LCTC, Torino.

And as to continuing impact of Covid-19 on jobs, here‘s info on an announcement from a few days ago of temporary layoffs of WW employees.  I’m wondering if that includes those ILA folks in port who drive the cars and trucks off these ships.

As coronavirus spasms across the globe, affecting all aspects of public activity, container ship runs has been blanked.  But you would not guess so from the string of CMA CGM vessels that came in one sunny day last week.  La Traviata rounded the bend just before 1100.

The teu capacity of this 2006-built ship is said to be 8488 containers.

She was so light that the prop wash splashed froth to the surface.

Ten minutes later CMA CGM Thames appeared.

Thames carries 9200 containers, and was built in 2015.  I’ve never seen either Thames or La Traviata in the sixth boro, which does not mean they’ve not called here before.

 

A few hours later, a third CMA CGM vessel arrived . . . Amerigo Vespucci, one I had previously seen.

The 2010 Vespucci has capacity of 13,344 containers.  She one of the 1200′ vessels that now regularly call here.

That totals to 31,032 teu container capacity represented by a single fleet transiting inbound in less than a quarter of a day!  And to do some math here, that’s about 117 miles of containers stacked end to end, ie., the distance from the Staten Island St. George Terminal to the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

For some perspective, a Korean company will begin operating the largest teu vessels to date . . . 24,000 teu.

So like I said, last week I did not sense that container ship sailings were slowing, which does not mean they are not.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  A new word for a wasteful and polluting practice is coming from pandemic  . . . they’re called ghost flights . . .  Here‘s more on why airlines choose to fly these almost empty planes.

Name the shipping line?

Ships are color-coded after all . . .  all ships of this line are the same color as this one being escorted in by Jonathan C and Miriam Moran.

More and

more clues are here.

Lenient is surely not the first vessels of Evergreen that I’ve watched transit the port waterways., although

it’s the first I’ve seen loaded–or unloaded–in this zoned manner.

 

 

All photos today by WVD, who took these photos a few weeks ago.

More “thanks to” posts already planned, but if you have some relevant photos to share, I’d love to receive them.

 

This is what 13,000 teu looks like coming straight at you in the early morning . .

And when another 8500+ passes you, that’s a lot of boxes, tractors, and stuff.

 

 

 

See the three bridges in the distance . . . Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Williamsburg?     I’d like to see a comparison of the strength to weight ratio of that towline and the cable holding the roadbeds on the bridges?

Lady of the Harbor reaches up, and her assessment is . . . impressive breaking strength.

From here, the tow winds itself toward the Bayonne Bridge, where the big turn to starboard get made, assisted by Jonathan C and that towline, with James D and Kimberly. assisting from vectors needed.

All photos, WVD.

Click here for specs on Cosco’s fleet list.

Today it’s all light, technically.  Other than that, this set is all sizes, all ages, all powers, and all shapes.

Let’s start with  Gabby L., built in 2007 (?), 25.9′ x 13.7′, and rated as 660 hp.

Comparing that, check out Genesis Vigilant, which I first met as Michigan Service, (same order of numbers) 1981, 89′ x 28′, and 3000 hp.

Emily Ann, ex-Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon Roehrig and ex-Diane Roehrig, 1964, 89′ x 28′, and also 3000 hp.

Sea Fox, 2012, 69′ x 24′, and 1400 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002, 78′ x 26′, and 2600 hp.

Fleetmate Thomas J. Brown, 1962, 61′ x 19′, and 1000 hp.

As I said before, technically light but about to engage the Seaspan ship, Jonathan C, 2016, 89′ x 38′, and 6000 hp.

And since we started out with Gabby L, let’s end there also, but you may have to look carefully to the left of the VZ bridge towers . . . . to spot her.  As I said before . . . all shapes and sizes, but they all work a niche in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Believe it or not, I’m way inland and without a camera, and a preference for novelty prompts  a different almost-year-end post together.  Rules I made for myself follow:  go to my archives and select the first photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if the first photo in my archives for each month is a person or an inland structure, I don’t use it;  instead, I go forward in that month to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Susquehanna in a very familiar IMTT on the Bayonne side of the KVK.  She’s currently westbound along the Keys.

February was La Perla, an oyster barge on Peconic Bay.

March was Nathan G on the very southern tip of Manhattan, across from the Colgate clock.  She’s currently working in the sixth boro.

Jonathan C was assisting a box ship out in the wee hours near the start of April.  Right now, she’s in the sixth boro, doing or waiting to do a similar escort.

May began with a NYC oyster boat headed north through the Narrows.

Early June it was Tavropos, in the Stapleton anchorage.  The crude oil tanker is currently off the Tabasco coast of Mexico.  The tanker appeared here previously as Moonlight Venture.

July began with Fishing Creek headed out of the Narrows.  She’s currently near Philly.

In August it was Grande Mariner approaching lock E14.  She’s docked in Narragansett Bay.

In September, actually on September 1, it was Kaye E. Barker southbound across Lake St. Clair with the landmark Renaissance Center ahead.  She’s currently upbound on Lake Huron, possibly getting another load of ore for the season.

October began with me meeting Mrs. Chips bound for the Narrows and point south and ultimately Florida, where she currently is.

November it was Denak Voyager taking on scrap.  That’s the Newark Bay Bridge beyond the ship, and Rebecca Ann lost to the left margin.  Rebecca Ann is currently in the sixth boro, and Denak Voyager has exited the Straits of Gibraltar, heading back to the sixth boro.

And finally, December, it’s a mystery boat for now and an unidentified location. Guess if you like . . . I hope to get back to this photo in 2020.

Maybe tomorrow . . .  last day of the year . . . I’ll do the last photo of each month following the same rules.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Update on the calendar voting, i.e., “polling… 1 through 4”   you’ve now seen the options for each month, but voting remains open, and I’m still accepting candidates for the December page.  And I’m grateful for all the voting so far.

Less than a handful of years back, a buzz could be heard in all the boros about these new ships that were going to arrive.  Well, they did and now seem routine.

Antwerpen Express departed the other day.

She and all the other ULCVs are longer than the Chrysler Building, once the first building to exceed 1000′, is tall.  The Chrysler is now obscured by all the taller buildings in the distance.

The same morning, the next “flower ULCV” departed.   We’ve seen Jasmine, Peony, and Camellia . ..   welcome  . . .

Sakura!!  aka cherry blossom.

The Moran 6000s arelarge tugboats, but here Jonathan C barely extends upward of the bottom paint.

 

Yesterday I drove past a trucking company yard with lots of trailers.  Compared with the “trailer boxes” you see here, that trucking yard was tiny.

“O ship!!” indeed!

 

And the story does not end here;  later Sunday afternoon–the day I took these photos–another ULCV YM Warmth arrived, but I was tied up and couldn’t run out to get a photo.   O ship!!!

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

She’s not pink or blue or green or new, but she’s an ULCV that I saw back out of Bayonne yesterday, and I can imagine all the communications and applications of power to make this happen.

JRT yanked eased under power stern wise, while Mary Turecamo 

and Jonathan C countered that movement just enough to maintain control.

Once far enough out of the docks area, the vectors shifted,

 

and, I’d wager, added bow thruster force to rotate to port,

revealing to me a fourth tugboat–Margaret–that’d been working the obscured side until now.  Seeing three tugs and 15,000 hp arrayed on the bow is a reminder of the days when many tugs would make docking a form of choreography.

 

It was yesterday’s sunny low humidity, but the colors rivaled foliage up in the valleys at peak!  And never have I seen so many figures up on a bridge wing!  I count at least five folks up there.

 

When Monaco Bridge has been pointed safely toward the VZ Bridge, the docking pilot–I presume–departs and

 

 

the ULCV heads for the next port . . . Norfolk in this case.

Using gCaptain’s figure of 48,000 bananas for one 20′ container, Monaco Bridge could carry over 667 million bananas .. . or two bananas for every person living in the country!

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who points out that ONE Ibis is currently at the Global Terminal.

More info on Monaco Bridge:  she was launched in 2018 by Imabari Shipyard in Japan. Her 11 cylinder engine generates 65,576 hp at 76 rpm.   See photo of the shipyard here.

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