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The sixth boro offers many vistas.  Enjoy a few, starting with Sarah D towing a deeply loaded scow past Bay Ridge. 

At sunrise, Atlantic Salvor and Patrice McAllister head in the same direction for different tasks past Stapleton Heights.

Jonathan C works shipside on the ConHook range in the sixth boro

Julie Anne heads north or so inside the VZ Bridge.  I should know what buoys are there, but . . . I don’t.

Sarah D again and here shipside in the KVK.

Mary Turecamo assists alongside a rust-flecked box ship.

Seeley pushes Weeks 250 eastbound in the Kills.

Kirby Moran, Patrice McAllister, and Gregg McAllister assist another box ship, as Marie J Turecamo heads in their direction.

Sea Fox moves a barge past Global terminal in Bayonne.

Navigator rotates clockwise away from St George and heads north.

And finally, Charles James stands by with a scow off Sunset Park.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

I happened onto a very busy sunrise this morning, five ships of which two were ULCVs and a half dozen of so tugboats can be seen.

The first ULCV was CMA CGM Chile,

and the light, as last night’s Hunter’s Moon settled in the west, was perfect.

Marie J Turecamo and Margaret Moran assisted,

Here were Mexico and Brazil.

The sixth boro terminals are doing something right, because no backups as in southern California and Savannah are happening here.

All photos, WVD.

Timothy (1979 and rebuilt 2009) and Janice Ann (2020),

Marjorie B. McAllister (1974),

Jonathan C. (2016) and Doris Moran (1982),

Colonel (1978),

 

Cape Canaveral (2019),

 

Philadelphia (2017),

Capt. Brian A. (2017),

 

All photos of a busy place, WVD.

 

See the note at the end of this post.

Traffic in the harbor of NYC, aka the sixth boro, has a lot of unpredictability.  I tend to do a fair amount of categorizing in this blog. 

For example, this was a surprise.  Usually this vessel–Admiral Richard E. Bennis–shuttles the river between Haverstraw and Ossining,

but here it must have had business in the Upper NY Bay. Bennis had a distinguished but tragically short USCG career.

A more typical sixth boro scene is this:  Jonathan C assisting an 8200 teu Maersk ship out to sea.

The only markings on this ferry is the name, Schuyler Meyer.  Its namesake had a storied life, but my favorite stories relate to his 1991 saving and reimagining tugboat Urger.  That story is mentioned in this article from a few years ago.  It’s expanded upon in Riverhorse by William Least-Heat Moon.

In the warm months, lots of small boats take fisherfolk out to hook what’s schooling.

More containers come into the port escorted by James D., a Moran 6000.

Joyce  D. moves a small deck barge to a shoreside project somewhere.

Andrea takes bunker fuel to a recently arrived ship.

Explorer-class CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci comes in at dawn . . . hazy dawn, with at least four tugboats getting it around Bergen Point.

A warm morning brings an NYPD launch out about

the same time as this small dragger (?) explores the outside of the channel as CSCL Brisbane comes in.

All photos, WVD, of this place that always has a rich variety of traffic…

Now if you have a few free hours, go sit somewhere near the bay, dangle your toes in the water if you like.  Or, read tugster.  Or, a new option has presented itself:  watch this new high-res harbor cam sited near Lehigh Valley Barge 79 aka the Waterfront Museum.  Or  . . . do all three at times you can.  Waterfront Museum does their cam through “stream time live”, where you can also pay attention to shipping at points in the Great Lakes, the Mississippi, and Alaska.

And if you can and if you feel like, send some $$ in the direction of the Waterfront Museum.

I’m preparing a “road fotos” post from last week’s gallivant, but along the way, I walked along a portion of the Lehigh Canal.

 

Someday I’ll have to quantify the tanker traffic in the sixth boro. For now,  just photos of three that moved all within a few hours.  And I have to say again . . . the other five boros and greater geography depend on this watery boro activity. 

Kimberly and Jonathan C assist this tanker from Ust-Luga, Russia.  Check out this port on the Gulf of Finland and what closely neighbors are there. 

 

Lines go on for the docking right across from the east end of Caddell’s.

A bit later, an interestingly named Chem Bulldog heads out. 

 

She’s was heading for the SC port of Charleston.

 

Mr. Leo came in from Portugal, a voyage of just over 11 days.

 

 

She passed SCF Ussuri on her way into the Kills.

All photos, WVD.

 

There’s lots of lifting capacity here, but no towing or pushing capacity.

Philadelphia passes the Manhattan skyline solo.

From the west, Justine and Jonathan head for a job.

 

Magothy passes Helen Laraway, Cape Lookout, and Lois Ann L. Moran

There’s a progression here . . .  more tugboats in this photo than in the previous . . .

See the three guys . . .

here?  I wonder who they are.

Yesterday a hearing had been scheduled in US Bankruptcy Court, and I suppose some report on that is forthcoming . . .

All photos, WVD.

 

 

 

FB won’t display a preview photo because I made them full size.  Oh well.

Picking up from yesterday, Kimberly released her line on the lower recessed bitt of MSC Bilbao and spun around to head back home.  Jonathan C goes to retrieve the docking pilot.

Victoria Highway comes in . . . .

Life saving steel cage?

 

Lines are prepped for the next job.

Brendan Turecamo is on the stern.

Meanwhile, over in Global, there’s a lot of shifting going on.

See the crane operator’s cabin beneath the rail just to the right of the red/white tip of the rail?  An operator sits there the whole shift shuttling backing and forth lifting and lowering containers more than a hundred feet below.

Frances leaves for her next job.

Emily Ann moves a brace scows  . . . likely to Claremont.

And Bruce A. comes over to  hang on the wall between jobs.

Here ends my spring morning series.  On a day like this, I couldn’t be happier.  I’ve posted only ten percent of the photos I took, of course, in the interest of creating some narrative.  Obviously each of these photos could develop into a narrative in itself.  And other photos creating differing narratives remain in my archives . . . for now.

All photos, WVD.

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

I’ve seen blue, orange, and whiteGreen is the only remaining Seatrade specialized reefer I’ve yet to photograph.  The other day I caught Seatrade Red outbound.

Jonathan C. accompanied her out to retrieve the pilot.

Seatrade was established in 1951, and chose to focus on small reefer vessels.  The fleet is comprised of about 50 vessels, but there are only five in the “colour” class of reefer container carriers.

Jonathan C. accompanied her out to retrieve the pilot, and then spun around

for the next job.  I count six people in the photo above.

Seatrade Green just left Tauranga NZ with an ETA at the Panama Canal westside for March 11, so at some point in late March the Green could be back in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD. And below, from March 2012, is a photo of another type of Seatrade reefer, Buzzard Bay.

Barrington Island, which used to be a regular in the sixth boro, is also part of their fleet.

 

Here are some posts that predate this one:  an uncovered cigarette boat in 2008, a shrink-wrapped yacht in 2009, a pilothouse ketch in 2017, Hornblower Hybrid leaving town last year, and there must be more . . .  See it up suspended there after coming off the ship?

The “cradle” is likely a 40′ flat rack like this one, in green.  The green device is an over-height lifting device which is attached to the crane’s spreader bar to handle over high flat racks, like this hull and like the excavator on the OOCL flat rack. (Thx to Cam for the correction. )

Since that standard size is 40′, what does that make the length of the sailboat hull?

Skip Mildrum took these photos last June.

 

I suppose the masts are around somewhere as well. Here are all the previous “cargoes” posts.

Many thanks to Skip for sharing these. 

Postscript:  Since this is a post about boats on ships and ships and boats in the port, why not a ship in a bowl?

 

 

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