You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Jonathan C. Moran’ tag.

FB won’t display a preview photo because I made them full size.  Oh well.

Picking up from yesterday, Kimberly released her line on the lower recessed bitt of MSC Bilbao and spun around to head back home.  Jonathan C goes to retrieve the docking pilot.

Victoria Highway comes in . . . .

Life saving steel cage?

 

Lines are prepped for the next job.

Brendan Turecamo is on the stern.

Meanwhile, over in Global, there’s a lot of shifting going on.

See the crane operator’s cabin beneath the rail just to the right of the red/white tip of the rail?  An operator sits there the whole shift shuttling backing and forth lifting and lowering containers more than a hundred feet below.

Frances leaves for her next job.

Emily Ann moves a brace scows  . . . likely to Claremont.

And Bruce A. comes over to  hang on the wall between jobs.

Here ends my spring morning series.  On a day like this, I couldn’t be happier.  I’ve posted only ten percent of the photos I took, of course, in the interest of creating some narrative.  Obviously each of these photos could develop into a narrative in itself.  And other photos creating differing narratives remain in my archives . . . for now.

All photos, WVD.

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

I’ve seen blue, orange, and whiteGreen is the only remaining Seatrade specialized reefer I’ve yet to photograph.  The other day I caught Seatrade Red outbound.

Jonathan C. accompanied her out to retrieve the pilot.

Seatrade was established in 1951, and chose to focus on small reefer vessels.  The fleet is comprised of about 50 vessels, but there are only five in the “colour” class of reefer container carriers.

Jonathan C. accompanied her out to retrieve the pilot, and then spun around

for the next job.  I count six people in the photo above.

Seatrade Green just left Tauranga NZ with an ETA at the Panama Canal westside for March 11, so at some point in late March the Green could be back in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD. And below, from March 2012, is a photo of another type of Seatrade reefer, Buzzard Bay.

Barrington Island, which used to be a regular in the sixth boro, is also part of their fleet.

 

Here are some posts that predate this one:  an uncovered cigarette boat in 2008, a shrink-wrapped yacht in 2009, a pilothouse ketch in 2017, Hornblower Hybrid leaving town last year, and there must be more . . .  See it up suspended there after coming off the ship?

The “cradle” is likely a 40′ flat rack like this one, in green.  The green device is an over-height lifting device which is attached to the crane’s spreader bar to handle over high flat racks, like this hull and like the excavator on the OOCL flat rack. (Thx to Cam for the correction. )

Since that standard size is 40′, what does that make the length of the sailboat hull?

Skip Mildrum took these photos last June.

 

I suppose the masts are around somewhere as well. Here are all the previous “cargoes” posts.

Many thanks to Skip for sharing these. 

Postscript:  Since this is a post about boats on ships and ships and boats in the port, why not a ship in a bowl?

 

 

Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

It was my first time to see her.  She arrived this morning after a monthlong voyage from Busan, which she departed on December 17.  With her containers all squared away, I’d gather she has delivered a full load.

CSCL operates eight of these vessels, valued at $117 million each.

The sight of these giants gives pause.  China’s  first container ship, Ping Xiang Cheng, launched in 1978 for a route between Shanghai and ports of eastern Australia carried 162 containers!  Their first service to US ports came in 1981.

Who then could have imagined these.

Mariner gear in 2021 . . . it’s not what I’d expect.

With the two crew above and these four, this must be half or more of the deck crew. 

 

For an afternoon’s reading, click here for an analysis of the shipyard which builds these behemoths and many other types of ships.

All photos this morning, WVD.

Here was the part A.  CMA CGM Argentina, sister toMexico and Brazil, steamed up the coast Sunday evening, making me think I’d miss it.  But it dropped anchor 15 or so miles off Point Pleasant, and stayed there making pattern like this.  Another ULCV was similarly anchored off Jones Beach, and it came into the boro last night.  This raises a question:  are the ULCVs causing a shortage of berth space?

Early afternoon yesterday after three ULCVs–Hyundai Ambition, Cosco Shipping Camellia, Tampa Triumph— left port, Argentina was off like an arrow for Ambrose Channel.

I debated going to see it, given fading light, but … decided I needed a distraction on a Friday afternoon.

I went.  The docking pilots lands from Jonathan C, which then

swings around the stern.

End of the day twilight has its own richness;  here the straight lines of the ship (?!) contrast with the irregular lines of the city.

She’s long, stacked as they were when she left Busan, Korea’s largest port,  on December 9, and nearly dragging her belly through the silt and fluff at the bottom of the channel.

 

And I’ll bet there not more than 30′  clearance with the underside of that bridge down there.

All photos, WVD, whose previous ULCV posts, some of them, can be found here.  And I have other ULCV photos from recently I’ve not posted yet.

Unrelated but followup on the Rotterdam tug Limburgia video that sleepboot posted in a comment yesterday.  The 1942 boat has retired from commercial work and been sold.  You will enjoy looking through the photos on the sale notice.

Btw, “sleepboot” is the Dutch word for “tugboat.”

 

Here are the previous  iterations of this title.  Keep in mind that the long lens foreshortens these scenes.  The scene is this:  MSC Alicante has just entered the KVK heading west.  Note the Vane Potomac hurrying away to the east.

The “N” vessel is AthenianJRT is along the port side of MSC Alicante.

 

Note that JRT is along the port bow quarter.

To compare, Athenian has teu capacity of 10000, and MSC Alicante, 5550. The photo below belies the fact that their relative dimensions are 885′ x 131′ v.  1145′ x 149′ respectively.

Brendan Turecamo peels off Athenian

When my attention turns back to the west, I notice another container ship by the Bayonne Bridge, Brendan has replaced JRT alongside the MSC, and Jonathan C Moran on a sternline.

See the whitewater wake forward of Jonathan C?  She’s racing the engines astern.

 

Gunhilde Maersk has a 7000 teu within its 1203′ x 140′ dimensions.

 

Dense traffic . . . it’s just another day on the KVK.

All photos, observations by Will Van Dorp.

A big bridge and two large ships, Atlantic Sky , a

CONRO vessel, and

Hyundai Speed, part of the Together class of 13,082 teu vessels out working the oceans since 2012 already. 

Can anyone help me understand the yellowish tinge to that plume?

 

In contrast to a fully loaded Hyundai Speed,the 2012 Al Qibla had some vacancy although she’s capable of 13500 teus.

 

This is the wall of containers this bridge was raised for.

CMA CGM Mexico, and sister ships of the Argentina class, are the current biggest behemoths of the sixth boro.

YM Width (14000 teu) and

YM Warmth, 13892 teu,

are both CSCB in Taiwan built.

My vantage point, 20 years ago, would have been quite different.

All photos, WVD.

Not quite half a year ago, I caught Rose from the sunny side.  

This undifferentiated mass in the Ambrose Channel yesterday was quite impressive as well.

As a reference, the towers of the VZ Bridge towers in 693′.  The length of the tugboat in the foreground is just under 90′.

I’ve not pointed out Robbins Reef Light in a while, and that’s part of the Manhattan skyline beyond, also an undifferentiated mass in the morning fog.

The 13,500 teu vessel came off the ways at a Hudong-Zhanghua shipyard about two years ago.

She was assisted in by four tugboats.

 

Margaret, Jonathan C, Kirby, and Kimberly.

 

The three-mile strait called KVK, or the very Dutch name Kill van Kull, is hardly straight.

 

As she rounded Bergen Point, a trailer crossed over from Bayonne to Staten Island, harbinger of what will happen to whatever number of containers leave the ship in the next two days in Port Elizabeth.

All photos, WVD.

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