You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Jonathan C. Moran’ tag.

Given yesterday’s post, I’ll subtitle this “tugster:  the return.”  From a weather perspective, it wasn’t ideal weather.  From a traffic perspective, I also thought it was not ideal, because I’d hoped a certain ULCV would enter  the boro in daylight, but it had moved in three hours before the sun rose behind thick cloud strata.  

However, it was a busy morning.  And seen through one filter, a certain set of colors dominated. 

Get the picture?

It’s time to meet the incoming ships, 

 

There’s work around that bend.

Just count them:  all four Moran 6000s as well as Margaret and Kimberly . . . farther away and along the right side of the photo.

I don’t believe I’ve seen all four 6000s in the same frame before, as above.

The morning had brightened a bit as they escorted in the box ships.

 

 

 

 

It’s always good to get away, but it’s even better to get back.  All photos, WVD.

Here comes Jonathan C around the stern of an incoming ship . . .

 

This turn would have been fun to see from the air, from a stable platform like a helicopter or drone.

The container ship is called Athens Express.  And of course that is Kimberley Turecamo.

 

 

She was inbound yesterday from the ancient port of Damietta, 12 days and 19 hours behind her.

All photos, WVD.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.  This post is a tribute to the dangerous but vital role pilots play in shipping.

Below, the docking pilot descends onto Marjorie B McAllister.

The transition from the gangway to the jacob’s ladder is tricky.

Here’s a Moran docking pilot, departing the ship after the ship is underway.

This is a small ship, but the distance to the water is still significant.

When assured the adjustment is right,

the docking pilot begins his descent to Jonathan C. Moran.

And finally, see the gangway from this angle . . .

and the pilot about to step across to Ava.

 

All photos, WVD, who wishes all safety.

 

 

Jasmine and Rose are two of eight, all ordered mid-year 2015  At about $120 million each, that’s close to a billion dollar order handed to the Shanghai Jiangnan Changxing Shipbuilding Ltd. co., right across the river from Shanghai proper.  Google-map that to get a sense of the shipbuilding and shipping infrastructure along the mouth of the Yangtze.

Mary Turecamo overtook Jasmine at the perfect moment to give the sense of projected power, while Jonathan C holds back and otherwise guides the stern.

 

 

A few days later, a clone arrives from the Ambrose Channel . . .,

one of the clones that I’ve not yet seen.  I’ve have seen Peony, Camellia, and Sakura.  I believe I’ve yet to see Azelea, Lotus, and Orchid.  I’ve seen some of them come and go, but just didn’t have reason enough to go out to see a clone.

Whenever you see a clutch of tugs like this, you know they’re waiting, and the more tugs, the bigger the escortee.

Maybe someone can instruct me on the air draft of these ULCVs.

JRT delivers the docking pilot.

To conclude with an echo back to the scale posts . . . see the 2014-built Taipei Trader off the port bow of Rose.  Both are container ships but their size is vastly different.  One way to think of it, it would take 13 Taipei Traders to carry the same number of containers as Rose.

All photos, WVD, who wants to know if there is a term used for small “feeder” box boats like Taipei Trader.

 

Here are all the previous installments of this title, going back to 2007.

Yesterday I caught one of these megayachts heading inbound in the Ambrose Channel.  Without the zoom, it looked even bigger, even sci-fi . . .  It was Lady Lara.

And big it is, compared with the Moran 6000hp tugboat. . . . maybe Jonathan C. Moran.  Let’s do a tale of the tape:  Lady Lara:  299’loa x 49′ x 13’draft.  She powered by two MTU 16V4000s that generate a total of 5178hp.  I’m not sure what else is in the engine room.  Jonathan C. Moran:  89′ x 38′ x ? draft.  She’s powered by two EMD ME 12G7-T3s that generate 6000hp.

Lady Lara entered the Narrows after overtaking Cosco Shipping Rose.

Simplified tale of the tape:  Lady Lara:  299’loa x 49′ x 13’draft, 5178hp.  Cosco Shipping Rose:  1201’loa x 157′, 65254hp!

 

Rose departed Shanghai on May 13.

All photos, WVD, who would love to know the particulars of the ULCV engine that generates that 65000hp.

The yacht owner is Alex Mashkevitch.

All photos here were taken less than an hour after sunrise.  It’s commonly known that the golden hour is the best time for photos.

 

Mary Turecamo also headed out for morning work, not that this is anything but a 24/7 essential schedule.

HMS St Andrews arrives with sunrise on its back. Has the HMS been dropped from the name,

just as port of registry has been changed?

Eastern Dawn slings Port Chester into the dock.

Ellen heads out,

meeting a Vane tug on her way to a job.

Cape Henry comes off the anchorage, westbound on the KVK.

All photos, WVD.

 

Note:  If you haven’t read “my” long comment to yesterday’s ‘SterCrazy 3 post, I added much more info from Robin Denny about the Bug roadster there.

March 23, 2017.    So how many folks are standing at a high point of the Evergreen ship?

Two?  Six?  More?

 

It was something of an optical illusion, because the lower roadbed was in its last days.

On April 2, 2017 . . . Maersk Kolkata was one of the first vessels to “thread the needle” and shoot through the

opening, where a roadbed had been for almost a century.   Time flies.

A week and a few days later, April 11, 2017

the “opening” in the lower roadway had grown to the point that it was difficult to imagine it’d ever been there.

Photos by Will Van Dorp, who did another post in April 2017 showing other vessels “shooting the needle” here.

 

 

I re-learned an acronym  . . . LCTC, or large car and truck carrier.  These included the Wallenius Wilhelmsen orange ROROs with names beginning with T, like Topeka, Tortugas . . .  and so on.  The green ones are HERO type, smaller and more efficient.

She’s 755′ x 106′ and by tomorrow she could be squeezing through the original Panama Canal locks.

 

I wonder if these bow ports see water in rough seas.

 

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s another LCTC, Torino.

And as to continuing impact of Covid-19 on jobs, here‘s info on an announcement from a few days ago of temporary layoffs of WW employees.  I’m wondering if that includes those ILA folks in port who drive the cars and trucks off these ships.

As coronavirus spasms across the globe, affecting all aspects of public activity, container ship runs has been blanked.  But you would not guess so from the string of CMA CGM vessels that came in one sunny day last week.  La Traviata rounded the bend just before 1100.

The teu capacity of this 2006-built ship is said to be 8488 containers.

She was so light that the prop wash splashed froth to the surface.

Ten minutes later CMA CGM Thames appeared.

Thames carries 9200 containers, and was built in 2015.  I’ve never seen either Thames or La Traviata in the sixth boro, which does not mean they’ve not called here before.

 

A few hours later, a third CMA CGM vessel arrived . . . Amerigo Vespucci, one I had previously seen.

The 2010 Vespucci has capacity of 13,344 containers.  She one of the 1200′ vessels that now regularly call here.

That totals to 31,032 teu container capacity represented by a single fleet transiting inbound in less than a quarter of a day!  And to do some math here, that’s about 117 miles of containers stacked end to end, ie., the distance from the Staten Island St. George Terminal to the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

For some perspective, a Korean company will begin operating the largest teu vessels to date . . . 24,000 teu.

So like I said, last week I did not sense that container ship sailings were slowing, which does not mean they are not.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  A new word for a wasteful and polluting practice is coming from pandemic  . . . they’re called ghost flights . . .  Here‘s more on why airlines choose to fly these almost empty planes.

Name the shipping line?

Ships are color-coded after all . . .  all ships of this line are the same color as this one being escorted in by Jonathan C and Miriam Moran.

More and

more clues are here.

Lenient is surely not the first vessels of Evergreen that I’ve watched transit the port waterways., although

it’s the first I’ve seen loaded–or unloaded–in this zoned manner.

 

 

All photos today by WVD, who took these photos a few weeks ago.

More “thanks to” posts already planned, but if you have some relevant photos to share, I’d love to receive them.

 

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