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Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

It was my first time to see her.  She arrived this morning after a monthlong voyage from Busan, which she departed on December 17.  With her containers all squared away, I’d gather she has delivered a full load.

CSCL operates eight of these vessels, valued at $117 million each.

The sight of these giants gives pause.  China’s  first container ship, Ping Xiang Cheng, launched in 1978 for a route between Shanghai and ports of eastern Australia carried 162 containers!  Their first service to US ports came in 1981.

Who then could have imagined these.

Mariner gear in 2021 . . . it’s not what I’d expect.

With the two crew above and these four, this must be half or more of the deck crew. 

 

For an afternoon’s reading, click here for an analysis of the shipyard which builds these behemoths and many other types of ships.

All photos this morning, WVD.

Here was the part A.  CMA CGM Argentina, sister toMexico and Brazil, steamed up the coast Sunday evening, making me think I’d miss it.  But it dropped anchor 15 or so miles off Point Pleasant, and stayed there making pattern like this.  Another ULCV was similarly anchored off Jones Beach, and it came into the boro last night.  This raises a question:  are the ULCVs causing a shortage of berth space?

Early afternoon yesterday after three ULCVs–Hyundai Ambition, Cosco Shipping Camellia, Tampa Triumph— left port, Argentina was off like an arrow for Ambrose Channel.

I debated going to see it, given fading light, but … decided I needed a distraction on a Friday afternoon.

I went.  The docking pilots lands from Jonathan C, which then

swings around the stern.

End of the day twilight has its own richness;  here the straight lines of the ship (?!) contrast with the irregular lines of the city.

She’s long, stacked as they were when she left Busan, Korea’s largest port,  on December 9, and nearly dragging her belly through the silt and fluff at the bottom of the channel.

 

And I’ll bet there not more than 30′  clearance with the underside of that bridge down there.

All photos, WVD, whose previous ULCV posts, some of them, can be found here.  And I have other ULCV photos from recently I’ve not posted yet.

Unrelated but followup on the Rotterdam tug Limburgia video that sleepboot posted in a comment yesterday.  The 1942 boat has retired from commercial work and been sold.  You will enjoy looking through the photos on the sale notice.

Btw, “sleepboot” is the Dutch word for “tugboat.”

 

Here are the previous  iterations of this title.  Keep in mind that the long lens foreshortens these scenes.  The scene is this:  MSC Alicante has just entered the KVK heading west.  Note the Vane Potomac hurrying away to the east.

The “N” vessel is AthenianJRT is along the port side of MSC Alicante.

 

Note that JRT is along the port bow quarter.

To compare, Athenian has teu capacity of 10000, and MSC Alicante, 5550. The photo below belies the fact that their relative dimensions are 885′ x 131′ v.  1145′ x 149′ respectively.

Brendan Turecamo peels off Athenian

When my attention turns back to the west, I notice another container ship by the Bayonne Bridge, Brendan has replaced JRT alongside the MSC, and Jonathan C Moran on a sternline.

See the whitewater wake forward of Jonathan C?  She’s racing the engines astern.

 

Gunhilde Maersk has a 7000 teu within its 1203′ x 140′ dimensions.

 

Dense traffic . . . it’s just another day on the KVK.

All photos, observations by Will Van Dorp.

A big bridge and two large ships, Atlantic Sky , a

CONRO vessel, and

Hyundai Speed, part of the Together class of 13,082 teu vessels out working the oceans since 2012 already. 

Can anyone help me understand the yellowish tinge to that plume?

 

In contrast to a fully loaded Hyundai Speed,the 2012 Al Qibla had some vacancy although she’s capable of 13500 teus.

 

This is the wall of containers this bridge was raised for.

CMA CGM Mexico, and sister ships of the Argentina class, are the current biggest behemoths of the sixth boro.

YM Width (14000 teu) and

YM Warmth, 13892 teu,

are both CSCB in Taiwan built.

My vantage point, 20 years ago, would have been quite different.

All photos, WVD.

Not quite half a year ago, I caught Rose from the sunny side.  

This undifferentiated mass in the Ambrose Channel yesterday was quite impressive as well.

As a reference, the towers of the VZ Bridge towers in 693′.  The length of the tugboat in the foreground is just under 90′.

I’ve not pointed out Robbins Reef Light in a while, and that’s part of the Manhattan skyline beyond, also an undifferentiated mass in the morning fog.

The 13,500 teu vessel came off the ways at a Hudong-Zhanghua shipyard about two years ago.

She was assisted in by four tugboats.

 

Margaret, Jonathan C, Kirby, and Kimberly.

 

The three-mile strait called KVK, or the very Dutch name Kill van Kull, is hardly straight.

 

As she rounded Bergen Point, a trailer crossed over from Bayonne to Staten Island, harbinger of what will happen to whatever number of containers leave the ship in the next two days in Port Elizabeth.

All photos, WVD.

About two months ago, CMA CGM Brazil called in the sixth boro.  She’s one of four 15000 teu vessels, the largest ULCVs to date to call here.  Recently, the next one visited, CMA CGM Mexico.   Technically, her capacity is 15,128 teus.

I’ve stated this before:  a vessel this size makes the boro’s largest assist tugs look small.  In the photo below, notice that Brendan Turecamo‘s upright mast barely extends above the hull lettering.

If I heard the numbers right on the VHF, the ULCV had 42′ reaching toward the channel bed and just shy of 200′ reaching up toward the bridges, Bayonne and VZ.

Up close, she could be divided into the bow and bridge,

the midbody, and

the stern.

Note the small white fishing boat alongside just forward of the first tug.

All four Argentina-class ships are working;  the first to arrive in NYC was the last to come off the ways.  They were all built at Hyundai Samho Heavy Industry Shipyard, which would be a fascinating place to visit.

She stacks containers 20 across.   Compare that with 16 across as the largest I saw here 10 years ago.

When the assistance with the curves from Port Elizabeth to Con Hook is complete, all four tugs cast off and return to the base.

Here‘s more on the Hyundai shipyard.

All photos, WVD.

By the way, the engine here is MAN 11G90ME-C with scrubbers,  generating just over 92,000 horsepower.  I’d love to know more. 

Given yesterday’s post, I’ll subtitle this “tugster:  the return.”  From a weather perspective, it wasn’t ideal weather.  From a traffic perspective, I also thought it was not ideal, because I’d hoped a certain ULCV would enter  the boro in daylight, but it had moved in three hours before the sun rose behind thick cloud strata.  

However, it was a busy morning.  And seen through one filter, a certain set of colors dominated. 

Get the picture?

It’s time to meet the incoming ships, 

 

There’s work around that bend.

Just count them:  all four Moran 6000s as well as Margaret and Kimberly . . . farther away and along the right side of the photo.

I don’t believe I’ve seen all four 6000s in the same frame before, as above.

The morning had brightened a bit as they escorted in the box ships.

 

 

 

 

It’s always good to get away, but it’s even better to get back.  All photos, WVD.

Here comes Jonathan C around the stern of an incoming ship . . .

 

This turn would have been fun to see from the air, from a stable platform like a helicopter or drone.

The container ship is called Athens Express.  And of course that is Kimberley Turecamo.

 

 

She was inbound yesterday from the ancient port of Damietta, 12 days and 19 hours behind her.

All photos, WVD.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.  This post is a tribute to the dangerous but vital role pilots play in shipping.

Below, the docking pilot descends onto Marjorie B McAllister.

The transition from the gangway to the jacob’s ladder is tricky.

Here’s a Moran docking pilot, departing the ship after the ship is underway.

This is a small ship, but the distance to the water is still significant.

When assured the adjustment is right,

the docking pilot begins his descent to Jonathan C. Moran.

And finally, see the gangway from this angle . . .

and the pilot about to step across to Ava.

 

All photos, WVD, who wishes all safety.

 

 

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