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Someone asked a question about nomenclature the other day and it may have been on FB.  The name I know is “shipside door,” and it appears to be used in cases that the pilot’s ladder would exceed 9 meters (29.5′). 

In that case the pilot would enter/depart the ship via the shipside door.

Sometimes a combo of companionway and pilot’s ladder is used.

Other times it’s the shipside door and a ladder as below and

below.

Here’s one more batch.

Note the ladder above and the winch reel below.

 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who hopes this adds some nomenclature. 

Quick photo tribute to the variety of the sixth boro . . . with Kirby and Jonathan C. heading for an assist,

Diane B moving petroleum product to the creek terminals,

James E. pushing a mini scow,

Durham moving a scow named Wheezer,

Curtis returning fro the base to her barge,

Gregg assisting Lady Malou, now heading from the sixth boro to Panama,

B. Franklin returning to her barge,

another shot of Durham pushing Wheezer,

and here, finally my first close-up view of this Osprey.

All photos, last week, WVD, who found this story of a bizarre deal involving the Canadian CG buying a light icebreaker from Turkmenistan!!?

 

I’m surprised I’ve not used this title in almost a year, since the thought often comes my way that some very busy waterways exist in the sixth boro.  Like below with the four Moran tugs and one tanker.  Since three are headed to the left, you might be wondering why.  Easy . . .  those three–JRT, Kimberly, Margaret— are assisting an incoming ship, the single tug, Jonathan C,  in the foreground heading to the right will soon assist another ship coming in.  Polar Cod–a great name–is transferring petroleum product.

Here’s that incoming ship, exciting the birds as the ship and maybe stirring up the menhaden and their predators below.  We’ll get back to this.

Here’s a closer up of that fish/bird stirring ship, a torrent called Torrente.   Portside the ship is Mary Turecamo, and starboard, it’s the Belford-based Osprey

And here’s the most dense photo, eight tugboats from four different companies, two loaded container ships, and one tanker, all in less than two miles of waterway.

Getting back to all those birds and fish in the Con Hook Range . . .  a lot of people in small boats are putting their baited hooks in the water there.

Unrelated:  An unconfirmed report with this photo below says the 1912 Argo sank in Long Island Sound off Wading River NY on November 1.  Can anyone confirm that this happened?  I looked for a report but couldn’t find one anywhere.  To see a photo I took of it underway in the sixth boro just over 10 years ago, click here. And here, taken in June 2011.

The photo below was posted by Steve Adkins and said to be taken by USCG responding to the distress.

All photos except the last two, WVD.

The juxtaposition of small craft with the larger vessels in the sixth boro can be dramatic, like when the small fishing boat barely rises above the boot stripe on the ship.

Here’s another, where the small craft is about 1.5 teu or less.

The guy on this Sea-Doo would be minced if his Sea-Doo engine or jet stopped doo-ing.  He’s tiny beside the tug, which itself

is not that big beside the ship.

This “small” NYPD boat might be over 50′ loa but still small beside the 1200’+ of the regular ULCVs.  By the way, I’d not read this story about 52′ ex-NYPD launch No. 5 until now.  I saw No. 5 on the Hudson back a few years, and you can see it here . . .  if you scroll.

I caught this blurry pic of a harbor small craft donning its invisibility cloak a few days ago. 

That, dear readers, is a pontoon boat running from somewhere east of Norton Point across Gravesend Bay and into the Upper Bay before a storm.  A pontoon boat!!

Thank the clean waters for the schools of fish in the harbor and all these small recreational boats out to snag them.

And finally, talking small, this appears to be the new color of the line boats here handling boom along Bayonne’s KVK Riviera.  I love that high-visibility chartreuse color.  Here‘s a job ad if you’re interested.

All photos, large and small, WVD.

And thanks to Phil Little, here’s a story about a harrowing voyage from Long Island to Bermuda in a Grover 26.

I regularly read the Brooklyn Eagle, and I’m happy to share this great photo

of a young child happily asleep as the family harvests reeds on Lake Titicaca, as credited.

Assisting on the stern is a recent transplant to the sixth boro.  The 2008 4000 hp and 77′ x 34′ Gregg McAllister appears to be substituted in while the newer, more powerful, and larger Capt. Brian is temporarily benched.

Notice the bit of tugboat stern to lower left on the photo above?  Assisting nearer the bow is Ava M McAllister

Jonathan C. has a line running up to the bow of the  MSC ship.

No line here, but James D. follows closely on the stern of a tanker.

With a lione to the stern, Kirby assists

Cosco Hope as it heads out with a destination given as Savannah.  Pick a number in Savannah and get in line.

And finally, here’s another shot of Gregg McAllister.  Note in the photo below, the eye of the line is just going up, as

crew of the ship haul it up in order to make it fast.

All photos, WVD, who wants to point out that these assists happen 24/7/365, no matter the weather, temperature, wind force, or hour.

Just photos will appear here today, and I realize I’m contradicting that statement by writing this sentence and the others.  However,  inspiration was failing me, so I decided this post should be not photo-driven, but photo-dominated.  Names are provided in the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday started sunny, but then clouds moved in.

The sixth boro offers many vistas.  Enjoy a few, starting with Sarah D towing a deeply loaded scow past Bay Ridge. 

At sunrise, Atlantic Salvor and Patrice McAllister head in the same direction for different tasks past Stapleton Heights.

Jonathan C works shipside on the ConHook range in the sixth boro

Julie Anne heads north or so inside the VZ Bridge.  I should know what buoys are there, but . . . I don’t.

Sarah D again and here shipside in the KVK.

Mary Turecamo assists alongside a rust-flecked box ship.

Seeley pushes Weeks 250 eastbound in the Kills.

Kirby Moran, Patrice McAllister, and Gregg McAllister assist another box ship, as Marie J Turecamo heads in their direction.

Sea Fox moves a barge past Global terminal in Bayonne.

Navigator rotates clockwise away from St George and heads north.

And finally, Charles James stands by with a scow off Sunset Park.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

I happened onto a very busy sunrise this morning, five ships of which two were ULCVs and a half dozen of so tugboats can be seen.

The first ULCV was CMA CGM Chile,

and the light, as last night’s Hunter’s Moon settled in the west, was perfect.

Marie J Turecamo and Margaret Moran assisted,

Here were Mexico and Brazil.

The sixth boro terminals are doing something right, because no backups as in southern California and Savannah are happening here.

All photos, WVD.

Timothy (1979 and rebuilt 2009) and Janice Ann (2020),

Marjorie B. McAllister (1974),

Jonathan C. (2016) and Doris Moran (1982),

Colonel (1978),

 

Cape Canaveral (2019),

 

Philadelphia (2017),

Capt. Brian A. (2017),

 

All photos of a busy place, WVD.

 

See the note at the end of this post.

Traffic in the harbor of NYC, aka the sixth boro, has a lot of unpredictability.  I tend to do a fair amount of categorizing in this blog. 

For example, this was a surprise.  Usually this vessel–Admiral Richard E. Bennis–shuttles the river between Haverstraw and Ossining,

but here it must have had business in the Upper NY Bay. Bennis had a distinguished but tragically short USCG career.

A more typical sixth boro scene is this:  Jonathan C assisting an 8200 teu Maersk ship out to sea.

The only markings on this ferry is the name, Schuyler Meyer.  Its namesake had a storied life, but my favorite stories relate to his 1991 saving and reimagining tugboat Urger.  That story is mentioned in this article from a few years ago.  It’s expanded upon in Riverhorse by William Least-Heat Moon.

In the warm months, lots of small boats take fisherfolk out to hook what’s schooling.

More containers come into the port escorted by James D., a Moran 6000.

Joyce  D. moves a small deck barge to a shoreside project somewhere.

Andrea takes bunker fuel to a recently arrived ship.

Explorer-class CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci comes in at dawn . . . hazy dawn, with at least four tugboats getting it around Bergen Point.

A warm morning brings an NYPD launch out about

the same time as this small dragger (?) explores the outside of the channel as CSCL Brisbane comes in.

All photos, WVD, of this place that always has a rich variety of traffic…

Now if you have a few free hours, go sit somewhere near the bay, dangle your toes in the water if you like.  Or, read tugster.  Or, a new option has presented itself:  watch this new high-res harbor cam sited near Lehigh Valley Barge 79 aka the Waterfront Museum.  Or  . . . do all three at times you can.  Waterfront Museum does their cam through “stream time live”, where you can also pay attention to shipping at points in the Great Lakes, the Mississippi, and Alaska.

And if you can and if you feel like, send some $$ in the direction of the Waterfront Museum.

I’m preparing a “road fotos” post from last week’s gallivant, but along the way, I walked along a portion of the Lehigh Canal.

 

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