You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Kimberly Turecamo’ tag.

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

FB won’t display a preview photo because I made them full size.  Oh well.

Picking up from yesterday, Kimberly released her line on the lower recessed bitt of MSC Bilbao and spun around to head back home.  Jonathan C goes to retrieve the docking pilot.

Victoria Highway comes in . . . .

Life saving steel cage?

 

Lines are prepped for the next job.

Brendan Turecamo is on the stern.

Meanwhile, over in Global, there’s a lot of shifting going on.

See the crane operator’s cabin beneath the rail just to the right of the red/white tip of the rail?  An operator sits there the whole shift shuttling backing and forth lifting and lowering containers more than a hundred feet below.

Frances leaves for her next job.

Emily Ann moves a brace scows  . . . likely to Claremont.

And Bruce A. comes over to  hang on the wall between jobs.

Here ends my spring morning series.  On a day like this, I couldn’t be happier.  I’ve posted only ten percent of the photos I took, of course, in the interest of creating some narrative.  Obviously each of these photos could develop into a narrative in itself.  And other photos creating differing narratives remain in my archives . . . for now.

All photos, WVD.

Following from yesterday, which covered 0900 to 0930, today we pick up from the mystery vessel and do 0930 to 1000.  Identify this blue ship?

Here’s a clue and a hint that traffic is busy, as another vessel comes around Bergen Point.

 

As MSC Bilbao clears the bridge, you get a sense of all the boats over on the NW side of Staten Island.  Anyone know the passenger vessel at the shipyard to the left?  I don’t.

As MSC Bilbao approaches from the west and Adams heads out to sea, a RORO arrives.

The random curves of waves and reflections seem just perfect as a vessel named Bilbao passes by.

 

x

Kimberly has released the line to Bilbao and is about to rotate to starboard and head back west.

All photos, WVD.

 

I recall my first time seeing the KVK, astonished by the density of commercial traffic.  Of course, I’d just come from northern New England’s freshwater meandering rivers, surfable sandy coastlines, and marsh creeks. 

Patrice steamed westbound, light,

Kimberly eastbound,

Josephine,

Daisy Mae, moving a half acre of scows…

Helen Laraway,

Daisy Mae again a few seconds later.

But to put it all together, here are Pegasus, Josephine, and Cape Henry

Pegasus and Patrice,

Josephine, Kings Point, and Cape Henry….

It was a busy morning.  All photos, WVD.

 

All small craft working in January get my attention, but

this one attracted me even more because of its lines.  Is this a one-off or can someone identify the manufacturer?  An indicator of my severe case of cabin fever this year is that I’ve been looking at lots of small boat ads.  I’d really be happy to find a Grover  26 or 28. . . if anyone knows of one that’s available.  

Crewboats, like the one with the cyclopean light,  make their way among lots of other traffic in places like the KVK.

 

As you know, foreshortening compresses space in a frame . . . .

As close as this looks, it’s entirely safe.

Patricia is a small boat in this pond though

NYS Naval Militia Moose 440 patrols year around.

 

All photos, WVD, who’s serious about that Grover built search.

 

Usually the cargo is invisible, but that’s not always true.  I hadn’t even noticed the cargo when I took this photo of Kimberly Turecamo leaning into the rust streaked Maersk container ship.

But above and then below, you too see the cargo.  No attempt even half-hearted has been made to cover that cargo, as was the case here

We’ve seen military vehicles before as cargo, here, here,  and here.

We’ve even seen aircraft as in here and here.

And given that military vehicles make up part of the load, I was not surprised when I saw it was Norfolk registered, i.e., US-flagged but not Jones Act . . . given that it was built in Korea and previously sailed under a British flag.

All photos, WVD.  Keep your eyes peeled because you never know what you’ll see.   By the way, Kinloss arrived yesterday and has already departed;  I don’t know if the military vehicles were discharged in our port.

I know this won’t display on FB blanks out enlargeable photos, so count on coming directly to the tugster wordpress site.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

Bobbie Ann departs the sixth boro with some GLDD equipment. 

Little did I know at the time that Bobbie Ann had left the sixth boro a decade ago, then as Vera K.

Ernest Campbell wrestles along a double hull bunker barge. I wonder why the Centerline Logistics lion has not yet been added to her stack.

When tugs like Mary Turecamo assist a deeply laden tanker, the perspective from the upper wheelhouse is so much different than when assisting a ULCV, with their much higher freeboard.

Sometimes the 46′ x 15′ Rae is just the right size.  Recall Rae‘s role in getting Wavertree back into her berth after the big renovation?

One of the newest tugboats in the boro, Cape Canaveral, 105′ x 36′ and generating 5000 hp, has the most evocative name.

She has two siblings, Cape Henry and Cape Lookout.

Again, is it me?  I don’t believe I’ve seen Justine in a long while. She’s also 105′ x 35′ and 4000 hp.  She has an elevating wheelhouse, which you can see here, scroll.

This is crowded:  (l to r) Diane B, Saint Emilion, Meredith C. Reinauer, Lois Ann L.  Moran, and Pathfinder.

 

Escorting from a distance astern, it’s Kimberly.

And finally, a photo from some time back, Vane’s New York, now working on the Great Lakes, Vane’s only freshwater unit . . .  that I know of.

All photos, WVD.

Not quite half a year ago, I caught Rose from the sunny side.  

This undifferentiated mass in the Ambrose Channel yesterday was quite impressive as well.

As a reference, the towers of the VZ Bridge towers in 693′.  The length of the tugboat in the foreground is just under 90′.

I’ve not pointed out Robbins Reef Light in a while, and that’s part of the Manhattan skyline beyond, also an undifferentiated mass in the morning fog.

The 13,500 teu vessel came off the ways at a Hudong-Zhanghua shipyard about two years ago.

She was assisted in by four tugboats.

 

Margaret, Jonathan C, Kirby, and Kimberly.

 

The three-mile strait called KVK, or the very Dutch name Kill van Kull, is hardly straight.

 

As she rounded Bergen Point, a trailer crossed over from Bayonne to Staten Island, harbinger of what will happen to whatever number of containers leave the ship in the next two days in Port Elizabeth.

All photos, WVD.

Long Island, eastbound, gets overtaken by a small fishing boat.

B. Franklin, light, heads to the Reinauer yard.

Doris Moran, light, heads east.

Ellen McAllister assists a Maersk ship through the channels to her berth.

Helen Laraway heads east to pick up a scow.

HMS Justice pushes HMS 2605 through the KVK.

Charles A. and Matthew Tibbetts follow a ship so that they can assist as needed when called upon.

Ava and Kimberly head out to different assignments.

Brendan Turecamo provides port assist.

Mister Jim follows Seeley.

Gulf Coast has been a Dann Marine vessel since it was launched way back in 1982.

All photos, WVD.

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