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This Bob Hill OT/B creation juxtaposes well with the ever-changing skyline of lower Manhattan, as seen from the East River.

Meredith C. is timing her eastbound trip with a fair tide through the Gate.

Catching the same tide, it’s Evening Star.

Farther SW, Gracie M. makes her way around Bergen Point.

Evening Breeze is a Bouchard new build, only recently arrived here.

On this sunny morning, Janet D pushes a Hughes construction barge past

an inbound scrap bulker.

And in closing, notice the soft spring colors of the trees along the KVK as

Dylan Cooper pushes her barge into the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose energy level is rising along with the outdoor temperatures.

Spring means warming temperatures–slowly in the watery realm–and more non-work boats.  Fishermen are usually first, but then I watch for the first long-distance sailors or yachters coming to the land reclaimed from snow and ice.  In a bit, the harbor will be giddy with seasonal users.

I watch the magenta targets on AIS, and here’s the first long-distance sailboat that I’ve noticed so far this year.

If you can identify the flag, you’ll know her registry.   Answer follows.

This local boat was also out.   You rarely see folks sailing in winter, but it does occur.

Evening Star uses the East River all year round, unlike the sloop over on the Manhattan side.

The mystery first-foreign-rivalhas an English name, that my head has transformed into Snow Bird.  

Here’s  that flag again and some lettering on the boom.

And the flag is Czech Republic . . ..

Click here for info on the vessel.  Welcome to NYC, Miroslav.  Snehurka is Czech or Slovenian (?), I gather, for  . . . . believe it or not, Snow White.   Does that mean there might be seven diminutive crew below?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been a few months to do a sixth-boro look around here.  Of course it’s never the same.  Never. Not even from one day to the next.  Let’s start with Weeks tug Elizabeth.  If I’m not mistaken, this machine’s carried that name ever since it was launched in 1984.

James William has been a regular in the sixth boro the past five years or so, but she started  as a Moran tug in 2007.   Note the eerie fog around the base of the Staten Island-side bridge tower.

Choptank [which the pesky auto-correct insists should be spelled Shoptalk] passes in the foreground;  Mary H in the distance. Choptank is back from several years in the Caribbean.

Paula Atwell is almost 20 years old, having started out as Crosby Express.

Northstar Integrity . . . quite the mouthful of syllables . . . seemed an unknown to me, until I realized I knew her as Petrel . . .

Not long ago I caught Marjorie at work on the Hudson down bound.

Mary Gellatly emerges from the fog.

Evening Star rests B. No. 250 at anchor with Brooklyn in the background.

Mister T heads for the mooring . . .

All sixth boro photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a backlog of so many collaboration photos that I might be alternating much-appreciated “other peoples photos” posts for a while.

 

 

Genesis Vision has just gone onto the wire from alongside, and

tightens it, moving the barge outbound for Florida.  Click here for a 2013 photo of Genesis Vision as Superior Service.

Stephen Reinauer steams out to the Lower Bay to stand by with a barge just

vacated by Timothy L.

McKinley Sea returns in the direction of its barge out in the Upper Bay.

Hunting Creek provides a needed boost as Pokomoke moves Double Skin 39 out of the dock at IMTT.

In the fog, there’s a negotiation going on between Evening Mist and Evening Star that took me a bit to figure out . . . Ah . . .

Star goes into the notch of B. No. 250, and then Mist assists in the 180 degree turn.  Note the pink ribbon on Mist’s stack?

My father would say, “Dean‘s lit up like a Christmas tree.”

Helen Laraway . . . assisting?

 

The truth about Helen is that she was waiting as Anthem was departing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m guessing Eric R Thornton is off in search of some scrap waiting in

the Bronx maybe?

It’s been a long while since I’ve seen Penn No. 6, and here she and Normandy are made up to Penn No. 121.  See those four shore cranes against the sky?  Here’s a post I did on them almost a decade ago.

 

Here’s B. No. 250 eastbound for the Sound, with

Evening Star in the notch.

Some people would be pleased with this juxtaposition: MTA’s Highbridge Yard, with Harbor II, MetroNorth, and the 44th Precinct Police Station!

Barbara Ann holds station at the University Heights Bridge, with the unmistakeable Hall of Fame for Great Americans dome over the treeline.  That’s a place I’ve yet to visit, one of many places in the five boros.

Ditto . . . Ireland on the north side of that bridge.

 

And to conclude for another day . . . it’s Penn No. 91 with

Skipjack in the notch.

Oops!  All photos by Will Van Dorp . . . from aboard Manhattan II.

This post follows on one I did seven and a half years ago, here.

The first photo--Donna J. with B. No. 272— comes thanks to Jed, whose Caribbean tugs you may recently have seen here.   Donna J. is moved by two EMD R20-710G7C-T3 generating 10,000 hp.  Also notable is her fuel capacity of 301,504 gallons of fuel, which if I used the right formula, converts to 1055 metric tons of diesel.

Here are more recent Bouchard units photos starting with Jane A. with B. No. 225 on the North River,

Evening Star passing IMTT Bayonne,

Boys crossing the southern tip of Newark Bay,

Buster with B. No. 255, 

Ellen with B. No. 280 in the same anchorage same day,

Buster and Evening Mist . . . and how about the one to the left?  Guesses?

It’s Doris Moran last week.

Thanks to Jed for the photo of Donna J;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Barges “1” was years ago.  And here are previous posts that in some way focus on some sort of barge.  But the two photos below, which I took in May, prompt this post.  I can’t identify this Bouchard barge, but look at the size of the yard worker in comparison.

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It’s quite likely this is not one of their largest barges, but it is indeed sizable.

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The B. No. 260 is 350′ loa and slightly different design although a similar deep notch.

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The B. No. 220 is 404′ –here along with Normandy and Bouchard Boys–and

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B. No. 280 is 399′.  I’m not sure which tug is driving it.

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Frederick Bouchard here is powering B. No. 264–350′–

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Evening Tide with B. No. 262--350′– and

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the 317′ loa B. No. 250, pushed by Evening Star.  My point was how large and capacious these barges are . . . ,

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and that is measured in barrels of capacity, not feet.  For these barges then, here’s that info:

B. No. 250                    = 59,000 brls

B. No. 260, 262, 264  =  60,000

B. No. 280                    =  80,000

B. No. 220                     = 110,000 brl

 

In many situations, fuel is measured in metric tons, as covered here.

And this tangent started out with photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

Picking up this retrospective post with the beginning of May 2015, it’s a nearly 40-year-old and tired Barents Sea, waiting then as now for what’ll likely be a “fish habitat” future.

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The end of May saw Quantico Creek move Mary Whalen to its public space over in Atlantic Basin.  Was there a docking pilot calling it out from the drone?

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Here’s first glimpse of an early June trip I’ve never reported on via this blog.  More on this vessel will appear soon–currently working in the Dominican Republic.  The red vessel in the distance is F. C. G. Smith, a Canadian Coast Guard survey boat.

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Eastern Dawn pushes Port Chester toward the Kills.

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July opens with the ghost of Lafayette arriving back in the harbor aboard L’Hermione. Click here for the set of posts I did about this person. 

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I’m omitting a lot from my account here;

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The end of July brought me back to the south bank of the KVK watching Joyce D. Brown go by.   July was a truly trying month . .  is all I’ll say for now.

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In early August Wavertree awaited the next step into its rehab, and I

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made a gallivanting stop in New Bedford, a place I’d not visited in too long.

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All photos by will Van Dorp.

While I was out documenting the excitement of the annual merfolk migration, there was an equal amount of excitement on all the waters that comprise the sixth boro.  Of course, your focus is your choice.  All photos here were taken by David Grill and used with permission.

Pegasus

Pegasus’ last run for now.  See the note on the left sidebar.

The Liberty Challenge brought in racers from all over the watery parts of the globe.

Outrigger Canoe Race

Outrigger Canoe Race

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Vintage and contemporary petroleum vessels populated the KVK.

S/V Wavertree

S/V Wavertree and Evening Star

Another historic vessel off for a re-fit

Lehigh Valley 79 moved by Freddie K Miller.

Hats off to the passengers and crew of Pegasus and all the others out enjoying what makes NYC special .

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It’s Gerry Weinstein, showing evidence of being in the engine room and

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and Pamela Hepburn.

Captain at the helm

Captain at the helm

 

By the way, if you haven’t read–and don’t own– Ben Gibberd’s book of profiles, I highly recommend it. It has great photos by Randy Duchaine.

For the photos in this post, hats off for David Grill.

If you think the sixth boro has a wide variety of tugboats, you’ll agree it’s also surrounded by a variety of land–boro–scapes.

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l to r:  Thomas J. Brown, 1962 and Joyce D. Brown, 2002

from obscure to iconic.

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Eastern Dawn, 1978.  Previously Delta Mule and Grand Eagle

Here’s the Brooklyn passenger terminal and

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Evening Star, 2012

the anchorage in mid-Upper Bay,

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Nanticoke, 2007

Brooklyn Navy Yard,

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Bridgeport, 1982.  Previously, Dragon Lady and others

Williamsburg,

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Miss Gill, 1970.  Previously Mister Mike, Samson, and other.

Bayonne,

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Eric R. Thornton, 1960.  Previously Roger Williams

east end of Wall Street,

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Pelham, 1960.  Previously Little Joe, Tucana, and other

entrance to the Kills showing the Bayonne Bridge and obvious modifications to the bases,

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Eastern Dawn again

and finally the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges.

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the Browns again

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

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