You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Patrice McAllister’ tag.

Talos.  Know the reference?  I didn’t but will share the response at the end of this post.  It’s entirely appropriate for the very automated  and largest in physical size class of container ships to call in the sixth boro, 1211′ loa.  In fact, another ship of the class is recognized as being (in 2019) as the largest vessel to pass through the new Panama Canal locks.  That ULCV, Triton, has been in the sixth boro several times, once just recently, and I’ve managed to miss it each time. The diminutive tug off the port quarter is Vane’s 95′ Susquehanna with a barge on the wire.

Entering the boro means passing the lighthouse on Norton’s Point, aka Seagate.

Another clue to the length of Talos comes by comparing it to the VZ Bridge tower, which rise up nearly 700′.

 

 

I’ve seen photos of Triton, and it has the same blotchy paint.  Anyone know why?

She headed west on the ConHook Range with four McAllister tugs, although none of a tether.

I chose not to follow her through the KVK, so maybe Capt. Brian A. got on the tether here.

Note the size of ferry JFK alongside Talos. JFK has a loa of 277′.

Talos here heads for Port Elizabeth;  over beynd her is Al Qibla, another ULCV.

All photos, WVD, who offers this link on the five Triton-class boats.

Engine here is the AN Diesel & Turbo B&W 11S90ME-C9&10.

Talos, a robot, . .  . has quite the legacy, which you can learn here.  He was finally defeated by the guiles of MedeaHere‘s the contemporary, non-marine Talos.

Also arriving in port before dawn this morning is the CMA CGM 15000 ULCV I’ve not yet seen, CMA CGM Panama.

 

I recall my first time seeing the KVK, astonished by the density of commercial traffic.  Of course, I’d just come from northern New England’s freshwater meandering rivers, surfable sandy coastlines, and marsh creeks. 

Patrice steamed westbound, light,

Kimberly eastbound,

Josephine,

Daisy Mae, moving a half acre of scows…

Helen Laraway,

Daisy Mae again a few seconds later.

But to put it all together, here are Pegasus, Josephine, and Cape Henry

Pegasus and Patrice,

Josephine, Kings Point, and Cape Henry….

It was a busy morning.  All photos, WVD.

 

This Odfjell tanker has 47 tanks!

I took this recently along the KVK.   Today the 1998 tanker is in the Mississippi River heading for New Orleans.

Guess the age here?

She’s just two years old, launched in January 2019. 

Elandra Willow has departed for the next job, but this morning Elandra Oak arrived in the sixth boro. Here is the rest of the fleet. 

Phoenix Admiral is a regular here, this time arriving after five days from Point Tupper. 

Of the three tankers here, she’s by far the largest.  The other two are 600’x 32′, and Phoenix Admiral is 820′ x 144′.

 

All photos, WVD, who has several times prepared a “random tankers” post and several times left them in the “drafts” folder.

More “threes” here.

A new tug in town . . .  Osprey?  Built in 1961, she’s a sibling of Kodi.  Photo thanks to Tony A.

B & B . . .  it’s Brendan Turecamo in the distance and Bruce A McAllister.  It turns out they are not clones:  Brendan is a year newer, and Bruce A. is few feet longer and packs a few more horses.

Curis Reinauer is the third tug to carry that name.  This Curtis dates from 2013.  The previous one was sold to Nigeria, and the one before that has been reefed.

Emily Ann dates from 1964;  she appeared on this blog just a few weeks ago but out of the water then.

Mister Jim, 1982,  has been in the sixth boro for about eight years. 

Doris Moran, also 1982, is a powerhouse.

Navigator, 1981, is the only boat currently operated by Balico Marine Services.

Gulf Coast, 1982, got her upper wheelhouse up at Feeney‘s on the Rondout.

Patrice, 1999, has so far spent half its life working on the Great Lakes.

Shannon McAllister is a rare one in the sixth boro, but she passes through here once in a while. like this week. She dates from 1991.

Thx to Tony for that first photo;  all others, WVD.

The backdrop for Patrice and the barge that wants to go its own way is the Bronx.

It’s under the Hell Gate RR Bridge, and

past the WIWTP, which has its own fleet.

I may have seen GT Bulkmaster before, but this is the first time to “see” it.

It appears to yaw one way and then another . . .

 

They round the bend and head into the narrowing between Roosevelt Island and the UES.

All photos, WVD.

Franklin crossed over the KVK to

assist Haggerty Girls and RTC 107 out of IMTT.

Patrice just finished assisting a box ship, and then turned around to help a government ship out of port.

Ernest Campbell with no lion yet on its stack.

Kings Points eases Double Skin 307 out of IMTT.

Marjorie B. is about to do a power turn and assist that box ship.

Meredith C. is heading offshore with RTC 135.

And let’s end with a throwback to yesterday’s “golden hour,”

Lincoln Sea and a stealthy Sarah D westbound light just after my first coffee hour.  I have more of these recent golden hour photos…

Here’s a better shot of Sarah D beside a stealthy USS Slater in Albany earlier this month.

All photos, WVD, who is now ready for the big 300.  If you want to assist with a photo of a tugboat, especially one never before seen on this blog –or never before seen in its current or previous iteration, send one along.  I’ll take a few days.

 

Yesterday I mentioned two reasons for early morning photos:  temperature and light.

Ava M looks different too, with its spots illuminating the curved hull.

As I post this, he’s already completely her east coast US run, and is racing eastward across the Atlantic, at 18+ kts.

 

Patrice tagged along until completing the turn at Bergen Point.

 

Again, once west of my vantage point, light washed her anew.

All photos, WVD.

Gunhilde appeared on this blog two months ago here.

Shooting into the sun never works.

On the other hand, what got highlighted was the spray both hawse rinse and  . . . cooling from bow thruster (?).

But what caught my attention later was all the print on forward side of the superstructure.  Going clockwise from lower left, we read no smoking, overfill alarm, high level alarm, wind hi, wind hi hi, overfill alarm, fo overfill alarm, safety first.  Most of those labels are accompanied by a light.  The consumer of this info would be anyone on the deck, either at sea or at docks.

 

 

I’m aware of the many light patterns and what they mean, and so I suppose you need this number to be prepared.  Regular checks are needed.

 

I was also curious about this break in the walkway between the superstructure and the stack area.

Stern design has variety.  For more photos of this 2017 tanker, see my friend Jack’s neck of the woods.

All photos, WVD, who’s letting you know I won’t be re-posting on FB the next few because I’m either on the road or up a river or creek . . . away from wifi.

After a number of “misfires” this past week, I’ve made some changes.

To inaugurate these new protocols, I’m pleased to share photos you’ve sent in.

First, from Great Lakes Mariner, a few photos of Cheyenne in her new Lake Michigan waters.  These photos were taken in Manitowoc, which some of you will recognize from the context.  Here is a post I did on the Manitowoc River.   Here‘s one of many from Sturgeon Bay.   William C Gaynor (1956) has spent her entire life on the Great Lakes.

See the patina red tug to the left is Erich.  You have seen that before here.

Next, from John Huntington back in March, Jaguar escorts the 1942 oyster schooner Sherman Zwicker to a berth in Gowanus Bay.  Notice Loujiane Loujaine in the distance to the left, and I believe Highlander Sea foreground left.   Previously you’ve seen Jaguar here, here, and here.

And is that John D McKean to the far left?

Seeing parts of “US naval vessels to be” transiting the East River has long been common, but extralime recently caught Patrice McAllister doing the tow, now that Gateway Towing has disbanded.  One of the Gateway tugs that used to do this run is now called Meredith Ashton and is currently in Lake Michigan.

And finally, from tug Hobo, here is a much improved wheel from the one you saw in one of my posts from yesterday.

Many thanks to GL Mariner, John Huntington, xlime, and Donna at Hobo for these photos.

On we go . . .  Alexandra does not appear frequently here. If my count is correct, this is only the third time since and including 2008 that this 120′ x 34′ 4000hp boat’s been posted here.  She’s currently working on a dredging project near Sandy Hook.

An action shot here of Mister T doing what the 82′ x 24′ 2400hp Mister T does.

Pegasus has to be among the cleanest looking boats, a fact accentuated here by the rusty stains on the hull of the tanker beyond her.  Dimensions . . . 75′ x 26′ x 1900hp.

The Browns . . . James  and Joyce, move this car float across between Owls Head and Greenville.  The absence of leaves on the trees shows how long ago I took this and most of these photos.  They are 74′ x 30′ x 1000 and 78′ x 26′ 2400, respectively.

Patrice, 105′ x 34′ 4500, has been here almost 10 years.

Nathan G, 73 x 24′ 1200′, moves a scow  westbound on the KVK.  I’d have guessed her larger than that.

Paul Andrew does the paper barge.  She’s 64′ x 23′ and 1200hp.

And finally, JRT sees one ship out and positions herself for the next job.

Here was my first photo of the 6000hp 89′ x 38′ tugboat back in late 2015.  The photo reminds me I should use the fisheye more often.

All photos, WVD.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,452 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

March 2021
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031