You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Patrice McAllister’ tag.

Franklin crossed over the KVK to

assist Haggerty Girls and RTC 107 out of IMTT.

Patrice just finished assisting a box ship, and then turned around to help a government ship out of port.

Ernest Campbell with no lion yet on its stack.

Kings Points eases Double Skin 307 out of IMTT.

Marjorie B. is about to do a power turn and assist that box ship.

Meredith C. is heading offshore with RTC 135.

And let’s end with a throwback to yesterday’s “golden hour,”

Lincoln Sea and a stealthy Sarah D westbound light just after my first coffee hour.  I have more of these recent golden hour photos…

Here’s a better shot of Sarah D beside a stealthy USS Slater in Albany earlier this month.

All photos, WVD, who is now ready for the big 300.  If you want to assist with a photo of a tugboat, especially one never before seen on this blog –or never before seen in its current or previous iteration, send one along.  I’ll take a few days.

 

Yesterday I mentioned two reasons for early morning photos:  temperature and light.

Ava M looks different too, with its spots illuminating the curved hull.

As I post this, he’s already completely her east coast US run, and is racing eastward across the Atlantic, at 18+ kts.

 

Patrice tagged along until completing the turn at Bergen Point.

 

Again, once west of my vantage point, light washed her anew.

All photos, WVD.

Gunhilde appeared on this blog two months ago here.

Shooting into the sun never works.

On the other hand, what got highlighted was the spray both hawse rinse and  . . . cooling from bow thruster (?).

But what caught my attention later was all the print on forward side of the superstructure.  Going clockwise from lower left, we read no smoking, overfill alarm, high level alarm, wind hi, wind hi hi, overfill alarm, fo overfill alarm, safety first.  Most of those labels are accompanied by a light.  The consumer of this info would be anyone on the deck, either at sea or at docks.

 

 

I’m aware of the many light patterns and what they mean, and so I suppose you need this number to be prepared.  Regular checks are needed.

 

I was also curious about this break in the walkway between the superstructure and the stack area.

Stern design has variety.  For more photos of this 2017 tanker, see my friend Jack’s neck of the woods.

All photos, WVD, who’s letting you know I won’t be re-posting on FB the next few because I’m either on the road or up a river or creek . . . away from wifi.

After a number of “misfires” this past week, I’ve made some changes.

To inaugurate these new protocols, I’m pleased to share photos you’ve sent in.

First, from Great Lakes Mariner, a few photos of Cheyenne in her new Lake Michigan waters.  These photos were taken in Manitowoc, which some of you will recognize from the context.  Here is a post I did on the Manitowoc River.   Here‘s one of many from Sturgeon Bay.   William C Gaynor (1956) has spent her entire life on the Great Lakes.

See the patina red tug to the left is Erich.  You have seen that before here.

 

Next, from John Huntington back in March, Jaguar escorts the 1942 oyster schooner Sherman Zwicker to a berth in Gowanus Bay.  Notice Loujiane in the distance to the left, and I believe Highlander Sea foreground left.   Previously you’ve seen Jaguar here, here, and here.

And is that John D McKean to the far left?

Seeing parts of “US naval vessels to be” transiting the East River has long been common, but extralime recently caught Patrice McAllister doing the tow, now that Gateway Towing has disbanded.  One of the Gateway tugs that used to do this run is now called Meredith Ashton and is currently in Lake Michigan.

 

And finally, from tug Hobo, here is a much improved wheel from the one you saw in one of my posts from yesterday.

Many thanks to GL Mariner, John Huntington, extralime, and Donna at Hobo for these photos.

 

On we go . . .  Alexandra does not appear frequently here. If my count is correct, this is only the third time since and including 2008 that this 120′ x 34′ 4000hp boat’s been posted here.  She’s currently working on a dredging project near Sandy Hook.

An action shot here of Mister T doing what the 82′ x 24′ 2400hp Mister T does.

Pegasus has to be among the cleanest looking boats, a fact accentuated here by the rusty stains on the hull of the tanker beyond her.  Dimensions . . . 75′ x 26′ x 1900hp.

The Browns . . . James  and Joyce, move this car float across between Owls Head and Greenville.  The absence of leaves on the trees shows how long ago I took this and most of these photos.  They are 74′ x 30′ x 1000 and 78′ x 26′ 2400, respectively.

Patrice, 105′ x 34′ 4500, has been here almost 10 years.

Nathan G, 73 x 24′ 1200′, moves a scow  westbound on the KVK.  I’d have guessed her larger than that.

Paul Andrew does the paper barge.  She’s 64′ x 23′ and 1200hp.

And finally, JRT sees one ship out and positions herself for the next job.

Here was my first photo of the 6000hp 89′ x 38′ tugboat back in late 2015.  The photo reminds me I should use the fisheye more often.

All photos, WVD.

Many thanks to Robert Simko and Lee Gruzen for sending me some photos and lots of questions yesterday morning.

This large gray vessel–SS Cape Avinoff (AK-5013)–arrived under tow

from, I believe, National Defense Reserve Fleet on the James River, where it has been used for training.

As SS Cape Avinoff is moved stern first closer to GMD Shipyard in Brooklyn, Chris Kunzmann got this photo.

Many thanks to Robert, Lee, and Chris for use of these photos.  Can anyone confirm why she was moved to a NYC shipyard?

Robert publishes The Broadsheet.  Click here and here for info on GMD Shipyard.

Previous posts involving “dead ships” can be found here.

 

A confusing pic?

This is more clearly Capt. Brian A. and Eric, the two newest McAllisters in the boro, bringing up the stern of Gerd Maersk.

Much less similar, Ellen and Patrice here work the bow of an outbound tanker.

That top photo may be confusing as the ninth photo here is.  So let me conclude by showing the photos taken seconds before and seconds after it.

For all I know, the smaller Brown tug may have been doing some training.  I snapped that top photo when they were neck-and-neck from my vantage point.  Eventually Thomas J. overtook Joyce.  

The phots in between allow one to see how meticulous the paint scheme is on these boats.  I’d love to see the engine room and other interior spaces.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

To continue on from yesterday’s list . . . I’ve done chugster, jetster, even a gangster . . . though you have to search for it here by scrolling a bit,  but the blog is called tugster, and I’m proud of that some chuckles notwithstanding . . . .

This is a cross section for the 250th time, a random sampling of what tugboats were working in the Upper Bay of NYC aka the sixth boro on a given morning earlier this week.   By the way, the 001 version of this title dates from October 2007.

Vane Brothers boats and barges abound.

Hunting Creek stands by a set of four of them, while

Wye River travels light past the ferry racks.

Franklin Reinauer travels light past the count-defying load of containers on a ULCV over in Global.

ATB Freeport and Chemical Transporter transfer cargo over at the east end of IMTT, at

the same time

Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire do.

CF Campbell stands by with Long Island.

 

And passing an unusual but new landmark along the sixth born margins,

Patrice McAllister makes her way west.  Quick . . . name a larger global garment retailer than H & M, and what the initials H & M expand to?  Answers here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose fingers froze and cold tears flowed while having the float-about, look-about.

 

I missed Josephine Reinauer (actually I saw her but couldn’t get a clear shot)  when she visited town recently, but I did catch Jacksonville, the latest Vane machine in the harbor.

For some reason I expected her to look different, but it’s an Elizabeth Anne class tug, which’ll look a lot like most of the rest of the Vane fleet.

Eric and the other McAllister escort tugs have been quite busy recently.

Ernest Campbell has been here about a half year doing bunkering, I believe.

Trevor usually works as a dredge tender, focusing on the Jersey shore this fall.

Brooklyn was called Brooklyn Service when I first discovered the sixth boro.

Daisy Mae is just over a year old.

Normandy came to the sixth born from Colombia a few years ago.

Rowan has been working in the sixth boro of late.

In fact, almost seven years ago, it was Rowan that brought Patrice McAllister into the boro after the tragic fire during her delivery from the Great Lakes to this salt water.  These days, Patrice is looking great.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has heard about but not yet seen Hunter D.

 

The top photo here comes from Brian Thigpen.  Last Monday, the first 13000 teu container ship–OOCL Berlin— entered port, and I missed it.  Bravo to Brian for photographing it.  I suspect soon the 14000 teu and then subsequent records will be set. Escort visible here is Eric McAllister, I think.

With larger ships, escort procedures seem to be changing also, like tugs coming in sets of three and meeting the vessel outside the VZ Bridge.  Just a few years ago, nothing of the the size of Northern Justice–8400 teu–was calling here.

 

I really should get more photos of the ships passing through the sixth boro and heading anywhere from Yonkers to Albany.  Here’s Western Aida along the cliffs of the UWS, 

leaving the Palisades to port once under the GW.

Here’s Spottail westbound on the KVK, assisted by Ellen McAllister and  Bruce A. McAllister,  and soon to pass

Stolt Pride, 2016, showing a new look for Stolt.

Thanks again to Brian Thigpen for use of his photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,389 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

August 2020
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31