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Way more tankers come to the sixth boro than you might conclude from tugster.  Here’s a sampling from the past month . . .

Front Clipper, launched in 2017, is a 157351 dwt crude tanker.   She’s currently on her way to Pemex’s Yuum Kak Naab, in Mexican waters, and said to be the world’s largest FPSO.  I’m always skeptical of superlatives.

Chem Singapore (2015) is an oil products tanker, 19996 dwt.   She’s currently in Houston via Altamira MX.

SCF Irtysh, 2009, is a 49,999 dwt oil products tanker, currently in Iceland.

Aitolos is a 2020 114,000 dwt crude carrier.  She’s currently in Corpus Christi by way of Whiffen Head, NL . . . that’s Newfoundland.

Tenacity Venture is 2017 114,439 dwt crude tanker, currently heading for the huge refinery at Pointe a Pierre, Trinidad & Tobago.

NS Laguna is a 2007 crude tanker with a dwt of 1115,831, and currently heading for Point Tupper,  where Jack Ronalds does his work.  I hope to get up there once the border opens again.

Bastille Street is a crude tanker dating from 2011, with carrying capacity of 47,906 dwt.

She’s currently Amsterdam bound.

She looked newer than 10 years old.

All photos, WVD. 

 

Marjorie B. McAllister is one of those tugs that confused me when I first started paying attention.  Below the house is down, and

and here the hydraulics have raised it up to look over Bulkmaster.

Ava M. McAllister‘s elegant lines are shown off as she assists a tanker to the Arthur Kill.

Cohoes on the Hudson River was the launch site of Mary Turecamo, the last tugboat to be built there.

Thomas D. Witte originally had a telescoping wheelhouse to fit under bridges on the Erie Canal and elsewhere, but I’ve never seen photos of that superstructure.

Ever sharp-looking 2006 Pegasus goes to a job.

The veteran Ellen McAllister escorts in a tanker.  I’ll do a tanker post here one of these days soon, maybe later this week.

Capt. Brian heads eastbound on the KVK to a job.

Pathfinder is rarely seen light, but here she heads over to pick up the TUP at the trash transfer station.

Twins . . .  at the 10-year mark . . . looks to need some TLC.

Here was Twins a minute earlier, coming out of a busy but typical traffic pattern on the KVK.  I count five tugboats besides Twins.

The mighty Patrice powers her way east to pick up a job.  Note the crew aboard Chem Singapore.

And to end this post, which of course could go on and on, the 4610 hp Doris powers along a container barge from one NY/NJ container port to another, a local example of short sea shipping.

All photos, WVD.

 

“Scarlet Begonias” has a line “the sky was yellow but the sun was blue…”  Well, you may have noticed the sun this morning here was pink and bluish;  the sky was a uniform gray, and 

that made the water gray as well.  Thank the Canadians . . . well, the smoke from wildfires in western Canada.

 

 

See the WTC1?

 

All photos this morning, WVD.

 

Where’s there’s a “1”, a “2” must follow, right?  Let’s start with Brendan Turecamo on the starboard side of APL Dublin.

Enter a Maersk ship with Bruce tendering the port side.

APL Dublin has Kirby on the stern.

Gerda has Capt. Brian A. on her stern, and

Patrice and

Ava.  That makes a total of four tugboats on Gerda Maersk.

Note the rust stains on Maersk Columbus, a US-flagged ship.

Yet, no tugboats work the port side of Columbus,

 

but on her starboard side, Margaret has been all along, and Kirby has left APL Dublin to assist Columbus as they head for the bridge and Bergen Point.

All photos and interpretation by WVD, who’ll never see this identical concatenation repeated.  Hat tip to all the crews who make this happen.

Can anyone explain the story of the rust stains on Maersk Columbus?

Looking back a year, here‘s where April 11, 2020 found us.

 

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

Sea Fox as a cold front moves across the Upper Bay.

Mary Turecamo off to the next job.

Dorothy J returns from an assist.  I’ve lots more photos of the assist to post soon.

Joyce and James eastbound in the KVK to start the work day.

Dean Reinauer heads over to fuel up.

Kings Point going over to Gowanus Bay.

Brooklyn going to pick up her barge.

Fells Point returning from a job.

The very busy Patrice waiting for a ship as Dobrin heads over to her daily projects.

The always moving Brendan making money, as all these boats and crews are. 

And finally Sea Lion outbound in the Lower Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

Installment 1 was here.  Guess the loa, breadth, and teu?

So far, I’ve seen Ever Focus and Ever Forward . . . although it appears I’ve not posted my Ever Forward photos.  I do that sometimes by chance.

So Ever Fortune . . . entered service in November 2020. 

It’s one of the newest vessels on the seas, with many superlatives in features. 

Patrice sidled alongside to land the docking pilot and

Capt. Brian and Ava M. joined in the effort.

All photos, WVD, who offers proof for earlier statements hereScrubbers remove the nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide. . .  acid rain.

Loa, breadth, and teu?  1096′ x 158′ and capacity of 12118 teu.  Not the biggest, but much bigger than anything here a decade ago, and she moves at max 23 kts!  (26.5 mph).

 

 

Talos.  Know the reference?  I didn’t but will share the response at the end of this post.  It’s entirely appropriate for the very automated  and largest in physical size class of container ships to call in the sixth boro, 1211′ loa.  In fact, another ship of the class is recognized as being (in 2019) as the largest vessel to pass through the new Panama Canal locks.  That ULCV, Triton, has been in the sixth boro several times, once just recently, and I’ve managed to miss it each time. The diminutive tug off the port quarter is Vane’s 95′ Susquehanna with a barge on the wire.

Entering the boro means passing the lighthouse on Norton’s Point, aka Seagate.

Another clue to the length of Talos comes by comparing it to the VZ Bridge tower, which rise up nearly 700′.

 

 

I’ve seen photos of Triton, and it has the same blotchy paint.  Anyone know why?

She headed west on the ConHook Range with four McAllister tugs, although none of a tether.

I chose not to follow her through the KVK, so maybe Capt. Brian A. got on the tether here.

Note the size of ferry JFK alongside Talos. JFK has a loa of 277′.

Talos here heads for Port Elizabeth;  over beynd her is Al Qibla, another ULCV.

All photos, WVD, who offers this link on the five Triton-class boats.

Engine here is the AN Diesel & Turbo B&W 11S90ME-C9&10.

Talos, a robot, . .  . has quite the legacy, which you can learn here.  He was finally defeated by the guiles of MedeaHere‘s the contemporary, non-marine Talos.

Also arriving in port before dawn this morning is the CMA CGM 15000 ULCV I’ve not yet seen, CMA CGM Panama.

 

I recall my first time seeing the KVK, astonished by the density of commercial traffic.  Of course, I’d just come from northern New England’s freshwater meandering rivers, surfable sandy coastlines, and marsh creeks. 

Patrice steamed westbound, light,

Kimberly eastbound,

Josephine,

Daisy Mae, moving a half acre of scows…

Helen Laraway,

Daisy Mae again a few seconds later.

But to put it all together, here are Pegasus, Josephine, and Cape Henry

Pegasus and Patrice,

Josephine, Kings Point, and Cape Henry….

It was a busy morning.  All photos, WVD.

 

This Odfjell tanker has 47 tanks!

I took this recently along the KVK.   Today the 1998 tanker is in the Mississippi River heading for New Orleans.

Guess the age here?

She’s just two years old, launched in January 2019. 

Elandra Willow has departed for the next job, but this morning Elandra Oak arrived in the sixth boro. Here is the rest of the fleet. 

Phoenix Admiral is a regular here, this time arriving after five days from Point Tupper. 

Of the three tankers here, she’s by far the largest.  The other two are 600’x 32′, and Phoenix Admiral is 820′ x 144′.

 

All photos, WVD, who has several times prepared a “random tankers” post and several times left them in the “drafts” folder.

More “threes” here.

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