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A quick post today, since I’ll spend most of the day without computer, signal, or free time.  The varied and unsettled weather of the recent weeks is evident here as well, the diverse days of summer.

Here are some of the usual workhorses or work oxen of the port.

Brendan Turecamo, 

Normandy, and

Evening Breeze and a couple Bouchard barges.  There must be a shortage of locations to stack the idle Bouchard fleet, still in limbo no matter what engrossing negotiation is happening behind closed doors in advance of July 23, according to this article. 

Continuing with this threat, there’s Normandy and Pelham,

Fells Point, 

Justine McAllister,

Marjorie McAllister with Bulkmaster

Sea Lion and a sailboat under sail, 

Brendan Turecamo

Kirby Moran and Miriam Moran, 

Miriam and a fishing skiff, 

and Kirby, James D., and Miriam, all Moran, and all following an incoming ship. 

More soon . . . WVD.

 

Elli, built in 2010 and with 113k capacity, gets an assist out of the berth from Ellen McAllister.

Kimberly and Brendan assist STI Finchley,  2014 and 38k, out of a dock, and 

and Ginga Cougar, 2005 and 26k, heads into that same dock.

See the blurry name above, and somewhat blurry below?

I’d seen it before in the boro as King David and then King Dorian

 

 

Khawr AlAdid is a crude tanker, 2006 and 106k.

 

When I saw Maersk Navigator on AIS, I’d expected a box ship. 

It’s a tanker, 2016 andn 46k.

Seabreeze is 2007 and 54k.

 

Persepolis, a classical name for a world heritage site,

was launched in 2018 and 74k.

Front Clipper is huge for the harbor, 157k and built in 2017.

And closing it out . . .  all rise for The Judge, an asphalt tanker, 2016 and 37k.

All photos, WVD.

Here’s a tanker with a great name I stumbled upon while looking through the November 2016 archives.  St Aqua . . . i’ll expand that St to “saint,” who we sometimes need  . . .

 

Is this a miniature replica of a tugboat posed beside a green wall?

Not really.  But besides ULCVs like Thalassa Pistis (sea of faith?), even 100′ x 40′ tugboats seem to shrink.

 

Enlarge this photo and you’ll see the folks here heading out to fish implausibly turn their backs to the huge ship not that far away.

She’s has capacity of just under 14,000 teu, 

although she appears to have fewer than that aboard.

The 106′ x 32′ Brendan Turecamo, like the other tugs, appears to be shrunk.

She arrived here from Savannah and Colon Panama before that;  as of dawn Saturday, she’s still in port here. 

All photos, WVD.

I’ve done dense traffic posts, and actually this is one.

The 3-mile strait can get quite busy.

 

Petroleum and all other goods, manufactured and raw, transit.

Key word here is busy.

 

Sometimes large vessels seem to be on a collision course, but that’s just trompe-l’œil ….

Yesterday, at one point it was unusually busy.  Count the tugs and larger vessels here? I count three ships and at least six identifiable tugboats when I blow this photo up.

There’s plenty of room in that 1000′ waterway.

All photos, WVD.

To highlight the variety, this post will focus on size, horsepower, and age.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969, 92′ x 27′, 2000 hp.  All numbers rounded up if  .5 or more.

Brendan Turecamo, 1975, 107′ x 32′, 3900.

Crystal Cutler, 2010, 67′ x 26′, 1500.

Bruce A. McAllister, 1974, 112′ x 30′, 4000.

C.F. Campbell, 1975, 100′ x 31′, 3400.

Ava M. McAllister, 2018, 100′ x 40′, 6770.

Saint Emilion, 2007, 105′ x 38′, 4800.

Christian Reinauer, 2001, 119′ x 40′, 7200.

Magothy, 2008, 100′ x 34′, 4200.

All photos, WVD.

Two blog-related issues:  Sarah Dann and the big blue crane are now below Quebec City.  And, bidding has begun on Grouper and Chancellor.

 

It’s June, and I’m starting my 176th month doing tugster.  Wow!  how many hours might I have put into this now? 

June 2011 saw some interesting sailboats and boats.  This post mentions only a few and covers the first half of the month.

The Dyna-rigged Maltese Falcon was in town, sailing at 20 kts across the harbor and then dousing all sails almost instantly at the push of a button. She’s currently in Messina, IT.

Blue Marlin was in town and spent three weeks loading US tugs and barges sold to Nigerian interests.  Most of these names–Dean Reinauer, Curtis Reinauer, Janice Ann Reinauer, and John Reinauer–have been re-used on quite different tugboats.  “Three weeks to load a Float on-float off . . .?” you might be wondering.

Well, there were some setbacks with ill-fitting cradles.

Eventually, everything found its place and stayed there. 

I recall taking photos from Fort Wadsworth and overhearing some folks concerned “the big orange ship” was sinking.

Sixth boro haze that June made for some dull photos.  If you want to relive the ordeal of loading, click here for the tugster six-part “groundhog day” series.

Reefer Albemarle Island got assistance into the Red Hook terminals from Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran. Currently, the reefer is running between Martinique and Panama.

EPA Bold came into town;  the 1989 USNS Vigorous has changed hands several times and is now operated as Bold Explorer, an EGS survey vessel.

The 2007 Barbara C became Arabian Sea and is currently Saint Emilion.

The 5100 teu Cosco New York gets an assist from Miriam Moran.  Currently, she’s running south along the western Mexico coast.

We began with a luxury sailing vessel;  Black Seal made one run into the sixth boro with a cargo on cacao from Dominican Republic.  The three-masted schooner is currently at a mooring in Pocasset MA.

Let’s lleave it here for now, with all photos, WVD.

 

Because the name and focus of this blog is tugster, you’d expect to see a lot of tugboats, both within the confines of New York harbor, aka the REAL sixth boro, and I hope you are satisfied that you find a plethora of tugboats in installments of this blog.  So here’s Random Tugs #337, post 4877, and the tugboat is Foxy 3 moving an aggregate scow.

In the foreground, it’s Crystal Cutler;  off in the distance it’s Normandy.

Diane B here heads east with a cargo in John Blanche.  I did an article on this unit some years back.

Joyce D. Brown pushes an empty scow east.  Notice anything on the scow that identifies it?  See the end of this post.

James E. Brown passed sister Joyce D. that morning in the Kills.

Franklin Reinauer that morning may or may not have been under control of the author of a tugboat captain who shared his tales a few years back.  I will stay mum. Off to the left, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

HMS Liberty muscled a barge full of bunkers to deliver to a thirsty ship over in New Jersey.

Centerline operates both Liberty above and HMS Justice below.

Susan Miller moves some material and equipment over to the project just west of the St. George ferry terminal.

Brendan Turecamo heads over to the next and the next and the next job.

Bruce A. McAllister assists a container ship into port.

Bergen Point came off the ways at Blount Shipbuilding way back in 1958.

So that scow Joyce was pushing above is called Maria and

this logo says it was once in the Disch fleet, now sold off in many directions.

All photos, WVD.

With Eastern Dawn in the foreground, the massive scale of these box boats is apparent.

Foreshortening gives the illusion that MSC Lauren cannot possibly avoid a collision.

Although this may be her first arrival in the sixth boro, this 12400 teu vessel has sailed the seas for a decade already.

See the crewman near the port bow quarter?

Now you see him?

 

If I recall correctly, she arrived here from Jamaica;  from here she travels to Italy.

Again . . . Linda L. Miller and the 6000 hp tugs show scale.  MSC Lauren is one of 560 container vessels operated by MSC, the second largest shipping company in the world.  Know the largest?  The third largest?  Answers are here.

So here’s a merger of truckster! and ULCVs, a photo I took last week from a parking lot.  I know what was loaded into that 20′ MSC container.  I invite you to guess.  Answer will be posted tomorrow . . . .

All photos, WVD, who is always happy to collaborate.

 

Where’s there’s a “1”, a “2” must follow, right?  Let’s start with Brendan Turecamo on the starboard side of APL Dublin.

Enter a Maersk ship with Bruce tendering the port side.

APL Dublin has Kirby on the stern.

Gerda has Capt. Brian A. on her stern, and

Patrice and

Ava.  That makes a total of four tugboats on Gerda Maersk.

Note the rust stains on Maersk Columbus, a US-flagged ship.

Yet, no tugboats work the port side of Columbus,

 

but on her starboard side, Margaret has been all along, and Kirby has left APL Dublin to assist Columbus as they head for the bridge and Bergen Point.

All photos and interpretation by WVD, who’ll never see this identical concatenation repeated.  Hat tip to all the crews who make this happen.

Can anyone explain the story of the rust stains on Maersk Columbus?

Looking back a year, here‘s where April 11, 2020 found us.

 

FB won’t display a preview photo because I made them full size.  Oh well.

Picking up from yesterday, Kimberly released her line on the lower recessed bitt of MSC Bilbao and spun around to head back home.  Jonathan C goes to retrieve the docking pilot.

Victoria Highway comes in . . . .

Life saving steel cage?

 

Lines are prepped for the next job.

Brendan Turecamo is on the stern.

Meanwhile, over in Global, there’s a lot of shifting going on.

See the crane operator’s cabin beneath the rail just to the right of the red/white tip of the rail?  An operator sits there the whole shift shuttling backing and forth lifting and lowering containers more than a hundred feet below.

Frances leaves for her next job.

Emily Ann moves a brace scows  . . . likely to Claremont.

And Bruce A. comes over to  hang on the wall between jobs.

Here ends my spring morning series.  On a day like this, I couldn’t be happier.  I’ve posted only ten percent of the photos I took, of course, in the interest of creating some narrative.  Obviously each of these photos could develop into a narrative in itself.  And other photos creating differing narratives remain in my archives . . . for now.

All photos, WVD.

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