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It was my first time to see her.  She arrived this morning after a monthlong voyage from Busan, which she departed on December 17.  With her containers all squared away, I’d gather she has delivered a full load.

CSCL operates eight of these vessels, valued at $117 million each.

The sight of these giants gives pause.  China’s  first container ship, Ping Xiang Cheng, launched in 1978 for a route between Shanghai and ports of eastern Australia carried 162 containers!  Their first service to US ports came in 1981.

Who then could have imagined these.

Mariner gear in 2021 . . . it’s not what I’d expect.

With the two crew above and these four, this must be half or more of the deck crew. 

 

For an afternoon’s reading, click here for an analysis of the shipyard which builds these behemoths and many other types of ships.

All photos this morning, WVD.

Here are the previous  iterations of this title.  Keep in mind that the long lens foreshortens these scenes.  The scene is this:  MSC Alicante has just entered the KVK heading west.  Note the Vane Potomac hurrying away to the east.

The “N” vessel is AthenianJRT is along the port side of MSC Alicante.

 

Note that JRT is along the port bow quarter.

To compare, Athenian has teu capacity of 10000, and MSC Alicante, 5550. The photo below belies the fact that their relative dimensions are 885′ x 131′ v.  1145′ x 149′ respectively.

Brendan Turecamo peels off Athenian

When my attention turns back to the west, I notice another container ship by the Bayonne Bridge, Brendan has replaced JRT alongside the MSC, and Jonathan C Moran on a sternline.

See the whitewater wake forward of Jonathan C?  She’s racing the engines astern.

 

Gunhilde Maersk has a 7000 teu within its 1203′ x 140′ dimensions.

 

Dense traffic . . . it’s just another day on the KVK.

All photos, observations by Will Van Dorp.

A new tug in town . . .  Osprey?  Built in 1961, she’s a sibling of Kodi.  Photo thanks to Tony A.

B & B . . .  it’s Brendan Turecamo in the distance and Bruce A McAllister.  It turns out they are not clones:  Brendan is a year newer, and Bruce A. is few feet longer and packs a few more horses.

Curis Reinauer is the third tug to carry that name.  This Curtis dates from 2013.  The previous one was sold to Nigeria, and the one before that has been reefed.

Emily Ann dates from 1964;  she appeared on this blog just a few weeks ago but out of the water then.

Mister Jim, 1982,  has been in the sixth boro for about eight years. 

Doris Moran, also 1982, is a powerhouse.

Navigator, 1981, is the only boat currently operated by Balico Marine Services.

Gulf Coast, 1982, got her upper wheelhouse up at Feeney‘s on the Rondout.

Patrice, 1999, has so far spent half its life working on the Great Lakes.

Shannon McAllister is a rare one in the sixth boro, but she passes through here once in a while. like this week. She dates from 1991.

Thx to Tony for that first photo;  all others, WVD.

It’s winter, and that’s when I did all the previous posts by this name.  It makes sense, since this is the northern hemisphere.   Saint Louis registered Saint Emilion pushes a light A87 for refilling. Poor air quality days have the benefit that backgrounds beyond a half mile are obscured.

On the same foggy morning, Lois Ann L. Moran takes it slow, waiting for its berth.  Brendan Turecamo assists alongside barge Philadelphia.

Normandy assists in keeping the barge off the dock

as  Genesis Vigilant moves astern.

 

They cross, and the Moran unit goes into the same dock.

 

Once they’re in, Charleston-registered Sea Eagle sails past with Philadelphia-registered TMI-17. In the distance, Normandy assists the genesis unit into a new dock.

 

All photos, WVD.

If you follow this blog, you know I look for novelty:  new vessels, new roles, new perspectives I don’t always even initially or ever understand.  Here’s for me a new boat, Cape Fear, 2018, another Sassafras class tug.

 

Brendan Turecamo, 1975,  has appeared here many times, but in the past week, I’ve seen her in two configurations, doing ship assist below and

slinging barge Connecticut below.  Yes, it’s the same tug, house down or house up.

With the bronze monument, aka Teardrop Memorial, in the background, Marjorie B. McAllister delivers nearly a dozen rail cars on NYNJ100

to cross over the harbor from NJ to NY. The run is usually performed by Brown tugs.

Chemical Pioneer, a sixth boro icon, here is assisted into the anchorage by  . . . Franklin Reinauer.

Matthew Tibbetts stands by as Dylan Cooper (correct me if I’m wrong) with RTC 108 lighters Gulf Coral. 

Taking a break from the dredge project over by Sandy Hook, Neptune travels west in the KVK.

Sea Lion pushes a barge westbound on the East River, past the old banana pier and Vladick Houses of the Lower East Side in the background.

Ivory Coast stands by with an Express Marine (former owner?) barge over in the Wallabout section of the East River. 

Christian Reinauer and barge RTC 145 stand by over in the anchorage below Fort Wadsworth.

And finally . . .  over in Red Hook, Eastern Dawn hangs alongside Meaghan Marie. Stand by for a new paint job of Eastern Dawn.

All photos, any errors, solely mine, WVD.

A big bridge and two large ships, Atlantic Sky , a

CONRO vessel, and

Hyundai Speed, part of the Together class of 13,082 teu vessels out working the oceans since 2012 already. 

Can anyone help me understand the yellowish tinge to that plume?

 

In contrast to a fully loaded Hyundai Speed,the 2012 Al Qibla had some vacancy although she’s capable of 13500 teus.

 

This is the wall of containers this bridge was raised for.

CMA CGM Mexico, and sister ships of the Argentina class, are the current biggest behemoths of the sixth boro.

YM Width (14000 teu) and

YM Warmth, 13892 teu,

are both CSCB in Taiwan built.

My vantage point, 20 years ago, would have been quite different.

All photos, WVD.

About two months ago, CMA CGM Brazil called in the sixth boro.  She’s one of four 15000 teu vessels, the largest ULCVs to date to call here.  Recently, the next one visited, CMA CGM Mexico.   Technically, her capacity is 15,128 teus.

I’ve stated this before:  a vessel this size makes the boro’s largest assist tugs look small.  In the photo below, notice that Brendan Turecamo‘s upright mast barely extends above the hull lettering.

If I heard the numbers right on the VHF, the ULCV had 42′ reaching toward the channel bed and just shy of 200′ reaching up toward the bridges, Bayonne and VZ.

Up close, she could be divided into the bow and bridge,

the midbody, and

the stern.

Note the small white fishing boat alongside just forward of the first tug.

All four Argentina-class ships are working;  the first to arrive in NYC was the last to come off the ways.  They were all built at Hyundai Samho Heavy Industry Shipyard, which would be a fascinating place to visit.

She stacks containers 20 across.   Compare that with 16 across as the largest I saw here 10 years ago.

When the assistance with the curves from Port Elizabeth to Con Hook is complete, all four tugs cast off and return to the base.

Here‘s more on the Hyundai shipyard.

All photos, WVD.

By the way, the engine here is MAN 11G90ME-C with scrubbers,  generating just over 92,000 horsepower.  I’d love to know more. 

The first boat I saw in the morning fog was buff and green . . .  Meaghan Marie, moving what appeared to be a Cashman spud barge.

Meeting her was Vane’s Philadelphia.  I’m curious . . . do any readers have a photo of a Vane unit operating on thew Great Lakes or arriving there via the Saint Lawrence?

I could hear Shannon Dann‘s EMDs throbbing as she moved Weeks 105

Pathfinder moved light trash containers to a marine transfer station.

A light Treasure Coast headed from Duraport to the Upper Bay.

Seeley pushed sand scow Weeks 250 eastbound.

As the sun started to burn through the morning clouds, Janet D made her way to a job.

Pegasus returned from a job, out ahead of two Moran assist tugs.

St. Andrews got underway from the Centerline dock.

Brendan headed off to an assist.

And just as I needed to leave, Franklin showed up to assist Gracie out of her dock.

All photos, WVD.

This ship came into the harbor recently.  Guess the company?  A USACE boat and a small fishing boat came in ahead of the ship, as did

(l to r) Brendan Turecamo, Fort Schuyler, Alex McAllister, and NS Leader.

You may be surprised when I tell you which company runs the small container ship . . .

 

Maersk Bahamas, launched in Guanzhou in 2016.  According to Baltic Shipping, she’s already operated under the following names, if I understand this correctlyGuangzhou Wenchong 4, Nobsepena, Oor, Nor Serena 8, and Nord Serena.

Now some of those are so close that I’m thinking there’s more to the story I’m not getting.  The stack, even in the first photo is Maersk blue, but the flat gray hull and bright red cranes and trim, that I’ve never seen on a Maersk vessel.

In this photo of a busy west end of the KVK and taken 10 minutes after the photo above, the Maersk blue stack is clear.

While I work away my backlog of photos, here’s one I barely caught with an intriguing name:  Mr Tigris.  I’m thinking there should be a sister vessel . . .  Ms Euphrates.  And how about cousin or half sister Ms Karun.

If the Karun is new to you and if you’re looking to explore via your computer, take a slow (actually relatively fast and comfortable) trip up the Karun from its “mouth” in Khorramshahr up to Ahvaz.  Notice all the hulks in shipyards along the lower parts of the river. All this fits into my mindset these days as I’m revisiting and revising My Babylonian Captivity, which was unfolding exactly 30 years ago.

All photos and text, WVD.

Yesterday the KVK was a crowded place.    Notice anything else unusual about this photo?  Fort Schuyler is disappearing off to the left, and Brendan Turecamo is assisting the vessel off to the right.

In the distance tanker NS Leader was escorted in by a McAllister tug to port and a Reinauer tug to starboard.  Reinauer?  Assisting tankers?

Go, Jill!

The 1967 2200 hp 91′ x 27′ tug pushes barges, assists barges,

and this was my first time to see her assisting a tanker.  As I said, at that hour yesterday, lots of assisting was needed.

As to the tanker, the 2007 Korea-built 817′ x 144′ tanker specializes in crude. She came here came from Point Tupper.

To port, Alex was assisting with its 4300 hp and 87′ x 35′ dimensions.

And crowded it was.

All photos yesterday by WVD.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

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