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Where’s there’s a “1”, a “2” must follow, right?  Let’s start with Brendan Turecamo on the starboard side of APL Dublin.

Enter a Maersk ship with Bruce tendering the port side.

APL Dublin has Kirby on the stern.

Gerda has Capt. Brian A. on her stern, and

Patrice and

Ava.  That makes a total of four tugboats on Gerda Maersk.

Note the rust stains on Maersk Columbus, a US-flagged ship.

Yet, no tugboats work the port side of Columbus,

 

but on her starboard side, Margaret has been all along, and Kirby has left APL Dublin to assist Columbus as they head for the bridge and Bergen Point.

All photos and interpretation by WVD, who’ll never see this identical concatenation repeated.  Hat tip to all the crews who make this happen.

Can anyone explain the story of the rust stains on Maersk Columbus?

Looking back a year, here‘s where April 11, 2020 found us.

 

FB won’t display a preview photo because I made them full size.  Oh well.

Picking up from yesterday, Kimberly released her line on the lower recessed bitt of MSC Bilbao and spun around to head back home.  Jonathan C goes to retrieve the docking pilot.

Victoria Highway comes in . . . .

Life saving steel cage?

 

Lines are prepped for the next job.

Brendan Turecamo is on the stern.

Meanwhile, over in Global, there’s a lot of shifting going on.

See the crane operator’s cabin beneath the rail just to the right of the red/white tip of the rail?  An operator sits there the whole shift shuttling backing and forth lifting and lowering containers more than a hundred feet below.

Frances leaves for her next job.

Emily Ann moves a brace scows  . . . likely to Claremont.

And Bruce A. comes over to  hang on the wall between jobs.

Here ends my spring morning series.  On a day like this, I couldn’t be happier.  I’ve posted only ten percent of the photos I took, of course, in the interest of creating some narrative.  Obviously each of these photos could develop into a narrative in itself.  And other photos creating differing narratives remain in my archives . . . for now.

All photos, WVD.

The other morning was without wind and busy, so this next “hour” is actually 30 minutes, and these are only a few of the photos I took between 0900 and 0930 of this extraordinary morning from my single vantage point.

A team of Dann Marine tugs leave the dock, framing Nicole Leigh at the Reinauer dock.

Vane’s Brooklyn leaves her dock;  notice the Moran barn (red with the white M) and Pegasus at the Metropolitan dock.

Charles D heads to job.

Bulker Maina heads for sea, passing Elandra Blu and

Marjorie comes to retrieve the docking pilot.  Do you see four people in the photo below?  Elandra tankers are based in Latvia.

The calm here is barely broken by MSC Korea.

Brendan waits to retrieve the pilot.  Note the scrubber and its effects on emissions?

Over by IMTT  Glory and Potomac sand by with their barges.

And we’ll leave it here, actual 28 minutes elapsed . . .  name that approaching ship?

All photos, WVD.

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

How about a random sample, as the title says.  Afrodite, launched 2005, and dwt of 53k.  I believe that was Normandy arriving. 

Usma, not US Military Academy because that’s at West Point NY, but a 2007 tanker with a dwt of 53k.

Seameridian, 2001 and right around 50k.

Seaenvoy, same fleet as Meridian, but launched 2017 and 113k dwt.

 

In this twofer, we have Elandra Willow in the distance, a 2019 launch and 50k capacity, and MTM Santos, 2013 and 22k.

Navig8 Guard was launched in 2019 and capacity around 50k.

The “extra-large” stack houses its scrubber technology.

The oldster of the group is Bow Flora, 1998 and 37k.

She’s an Odfjell tanker. 

Lumen N, assisted by Brendan Turecamo, is 2008 and 65k.

 

And rounding out this post, with pirate-preventing guards on the rails,

it’s BW Kallang, of the huge BW fleet.

All photos, WVD.

Sea Fox as a cold front moves across the Upper Bay.

Mary Turecamo off to the next job.

Dorothy J returns from an assist.  I’ve lots more photos of the assist to post soon.

Joyce and James eastbound in the KVK to start the work day.

Dean Reinauer heads over to fuel up.

Kings Point going over to Gowanus Bay.

Brooklyn going to pick up her barge.

Fells Point returning from a job.

The very busy Patrice waiting for a ship as Dobrin heads over to her daily projects.

The always moving Brendan making money, as all these boats and crews are. 

And finally Sea Lion outbound in the Lower Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

I saw the approaching tanker and immediately thought back to a morning before work back in April 2008, reported here.

The water had the same calm, maybe a similar state of tide, as the two tugs and Seamuse floated in. 

 

The homonymous sea mews would apply in this photo as well.

 

As of this writing, the crude tanker is discharging its contents in Sewaren.  To the right on the photo, that’s Seaways Yellowstone, discharging at Linden.

All photos, WVD.

 

A container ship rounds the bend.  It carries containerized cargo, obviously, but not all cargoes fit into a standard container. 

See the irregular aka custom boxes below?

They appear to be two crates for over-high cargo. and anchored on a flat rack.

Here’s a question:  since WEG is a Brazilian coastal city multinational specializing in electrical power and automation products and wind generation, might this be an offshore windfarm related oversize cargo?

MSC Vigo came in

assisted by Brendan Turecamo on the port side.

Here was a cargo that came in a few weeks before.

All photos, WVD.

 

Note the line boat off B. Franklin‘s starboard.  Also, faintly to her port and beyond the green buoy hull down is a Kirby tug, probably one of the Cape-class boats

Actually part of the same scene panning to the left–note the line boat on the extreme right side of the photo–it’s Joyce D. Brown with a crane barge off to do a salvage job.

Not long afterward, Caitlin Ann heads west past Treasure Coast on the blue-and-yellow cement carrier.

Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran bring a ship in.

Kirby Moran follows a ship in with a Reinauer barge right behind.

And again, a few minutes later, Paul Andrew follows the Reinauer unit and the ship westbound.

Resolute, back in the sixth boro, heads out to assist a USN vessel into Earle.

Genesis Victory passes Doris Moran alongside the Apex Oil barge,

Another day, l to r, it’s Barry Silverton, Saint Emilion, and the A87 barge again. Barry‘s sister vessel–Emery Zidell--was in the sixth boro recently, but I got just 

a very distant photo.

 I can’t put names on these vessels, but it’s the Wittich Brothers fleet, formerly (I think) known as Sea Wolf Marine.  And I see Sarah Ann in the extreme left. 

And let’s end on a puzzle . . .  William Brewster with a new paint job.  Last time I saw her, those dark green stripes were red. 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

All small craft working in January get my attention, but

this one attracted me even more because of its lines.  Is this a one-off or can someone identify the manufacturer?  An indicator of my severe case of cabin fever this year is that I’ve been looking at lots of small boat ads.  I’d really be happy to find a Grover  26 or 28. . . if anyone knows of one that’s available.  

Crewboats, like the one with the cyclopean light,  make their way among lots of other traffic in places like the KVK.

 

As you know, foreshortening compresses space in a frame . . . .

As close as this looks, it’s entirely safe.

Patricia is a small boat in this pond though

NYS Naval Militia Moose 440 patrols year around.

 

All photos, WVD, who’s serious about that Grover built search.

 

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