You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Brendan Turecamo’ tag.

I’ve been meaning to ask about this lumber on the piers at Red Hook container terminal.  Not quite a year ago an unusual looking vessel called Mozu Arrow deposited these bundles of lumberHere‘s another shot showing all the bundles.  All through the stories of lumber being outrageously expensive,  this lumber stayed here.  In some places, the coverings have ripped off leaving the wood exposed to the weather, wasting away.  Can anyone tell me the story of this lumber and why it hasn’t moved in 11 months.  As of this writing, the lumber carrier is traveling between South Korea and British Columbia, light maybe, having deposited lumber on piers in Busan perhaps?  On second thought, would this vessel travel sans cargo across the Pacific?  What cargo might it be carrying to Canada?

Brendan Turecamo is a regular on this blog;  behold about nine feet of the boat you never see when she’s working.

Here’s a limitation of gantry cranes;  if you have a container ship loaded higher than the cranes can accommodate, getting a last box in place means lifting to the height and then sliding it in aft to fore.  Understand what’s happening here?  The box was lifted farther “back” than the empty slot, and now the crane operator is sliding it in laterally, toward the right in this photo.  Is this a common occurrence on these “tall ships,” to give a new meaning to the phrase?

Do you remember “you go girl” graffiti on a ferry just west of the Bayonne Bridge?  Well, clearly it has shifted over toward the Bayonne, New Jersey, side and is showing a different and more corroded side.  I wonder where she goes next.

From this angle, there appears to be quite a few Reinauer tugs in their yard.  While we’re playing an Andy Rooney and asking questions about everything, has anyone learned more about the WindServe Marine toehold within the Reinauer real estate here?  Isn’t it hard to believe that Andy Rooney has been gone for almost a decade now?

Getting back to the warehouse sheds in Red Hook, is it possible this very experienced tow truck is there to prosecute any violators who choose to trespass and/or dock?  I saw a more intimidating sign and sight in Belfast ME some years ago in the second photo here.

To show location of these signs and the antique tow truck, note it in the wider view photo below.

Shall we leave it here?    I suppose.  All photos, WVD, with conveyance from the New York Media Boat.

 

Barry Silverton first came to the sixth boro five and a half years ago.  Her twin Emery Zidell appeared here earlier this year, and i believe this is the first time to catch the ATB light and head on.

Roughly the same size, Haggerty Girls waits alongside as RTC 80 loads.

Mary Turecamo heads out  to meet a ship.  Mary Turecamo, Haggerty Girls, and Emery Zidell are all over 105′ and 4000 or more horsepower.

Margaret Moran here hangs close to a bulk carrier she’s escorting in.

Like Margaret above, Buchanan 12 is rated at 3000 hp and each has worked under the same name for the same company since coming from the shipyard. Buchanan 12 is a regular shuttling stone scows between the quarries up the Hudson and the sixth boro.

Franklin Reinauer has operated under that name since coming from the shipyard nearly 40 years ago.

I first saw Fort Point in Gloucester here over five years ago.

Joker seems to have become a regular in the sixth boro since this summer.  She used to be a regular here as Taurus.

Known as Brendan Turecamo for the past 30 years, this 1975 3900 hp tug is getting some TLC up on the floating drydock.

All photos here where we leave it today, WVD.

The red upper wheelhouse is no more, although I’m not certain what new paint scheme will evolve, or when Evening Star will become Jordan Rose, as Evening Breeze became Susan Rose.  Follow this transformation we will.

Ellen transformed from Navy gray to McAllister colors 20 years ago.

Atlantic Salvor has worn Donjon blue–almost the same as warehouse blue–for over 20 years.

In a different way, Marjorie B profile varies from a lower to higher wheelhouse depending on the job.

Jill Reinauer has worn Reinauer colors for over 20 years also, although she has seen some modifications of profile more recently.

Brendan is currently in dry dock, but when I took this photo, she was standing by with a large barge. I’ll post a photo of her high and dry soon.

This post began with a Bouchard tug in transition.  It’s fitting to end with one that already looks quite different . . .  Evening Light is now Mary Emma. currently on Narragansett Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

These two boats have a lot in common:  built a year apart in the same shipyard and more.

Without being aboard, I’d say they were products of the same designed and may appear to be twins, 

A surprising feature they share is the telescoping upper wheelhouse that

allows visibility when needed.  

I say they appear to be twins, but if the tale of the tape is correct, Marjorie is about five feet longer, two feet skinnier, and a hundred horses more powerful.  

Both were originally Exxon tugboats until the Exxon brand was removed from the boats after a certain large tanker had an unfortunate encounter with Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound. 

That flexibility was no doubt a selling point for the design.

 

 

 

All photos, WVD. 

A quick post today, since I’ll spend most of the day without computer, signal, or free time.  The varied and unsettled weather of the recent weeks is evident here as well, the diverse days of summer.

Here are some of the usual workhorses or work oxen of the port.

Brendan Turecamo, 

Normandy, and

Evening Breeze and a couple Bouchard barges.  There must be a shortage of locations to stack the idle Bouchard fleet, still in limbo no matter what engrossing negotiation is happening behind closed doors in advance of July 23, according to this article. 

Continuing with this threat, there’s Normandy and Pelham,

Fells Point, 

Justine McAllister,

Marjorie McAllister with Bulkmaster

Sea Lion and a sailboat under sail, 

Brendan Turecamo

Kirby Moran and Miriam Moran, 

Miriam and a fishing skiff, 

and Kirby, James D., and Miriam, all Moran, and all following an incoming ship. 

More soon . . . WVD.

 

Elli, built in 2010 and with 113k capacity, gets an assist out of the berth from Ellen McAllister.

Kimberly and Brendan assist STI Finchley,  2014 and 38k, out of a dock, and 

and Ginga Cougar, 2005 and 26k, heads into that same dock.

See the blurry name above, and somewhat blurry below?

I’d seen it before in the boro as King David and then King Dorian

 

 

Khawr AlAdid is a crude tanker, 2006 and 106k.

 

When I saw Maersk Navigator on AIS, I’d expected a box ship. 

It’s a tanker, 2016 andn 46k.

Seabreeze is 2007 and 54k.

 

Persepolis, a classical name for a world heritage site,

was launched in 2018 and 74k.

Front Clipper is huge for the harbor, 157k and built in 2017.

And closing it out . . .  all rise for The Judge, an asphalt tanker, 2016 and 37k.

All photos, WVD.

Here’s a tanker with a great name I stumbled upon while looking through the November 2016 archives.  St Aqua . . . i’ll expand that St to “saint,” who we sometimes need  . . .

 

Is this a miniature replica of a tugboat posed beside a green wall?

Not really.  But besides ULCVs like Thalassa Pistis (sea of faith?), even 100′ x 40′ tugboats seem to shrink.

 

Enlarge this photo and you’ll see the folks here heading out to fish implausibly turn their backs to the huge ship not that far away.

She’s has capacity of just under 14,000 teu, 

although she appears to have fewer than that aboard.

The 106′ x 32′ Brendan Turecamo, like the other tugs, appears to be shrunk.

She arrived here from Savannah and Colon Panama before that;  as of dawn Saturday, she’s still in port here. 

All photos, WVD.

I’ve done dense traffic posts, and actually this is one.

The 3-mile strait can get quite busy.

 

Petroleum and all other goods, manufactured and raw, transit.

Key word here is busy.

 

Sometimes large vessels seem to be on a collision course, but that’s just trompe-l’œil ….

Yesterday, at one point it was unusually busy.  Count the tugs and larger vessels here? I count three ships and at least six identifiable tugboats when I blow this photo up.

There’s plenty of room in that 1000′ waterway.

All photos, WVD.

To highlight the variety, this post will focus on size, horsepower, and age.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969, 92′ x 27′, 2000 hp.  All numbers rounded up if  .5 or more.

Brendan Turecamo, 1975, 107′ x 32′, 3900.

Crystal Cutler, 2010, 67′ x 26′, 1500.

Bruce A. McAllister, 1974, 112′ x 30′, 4000.

C.F. Campbell, 1975, 100′ x 31′, 3400.

Ava M. McAllister, 2018, 100′ x 40′, 6770.

Saint Emilion, 2007, 105′ x 38′, 4800.

Christian Reinauer, 2001, 119′ x 40′, 7200.

Magothy, 2008, 100′ x 34′, 4200.

All photos, WVD.

Two blog-related issues:  Sarah Dann and the big blue crane are now below Quebec City.  And, bidding has begun on Grouper and Chancellor.

 

It’s June, and I’m starting my 176th month doing tugster.  Wow!  how many hours might I have put into this now? 

June 2011 saw some interesting sailboats and boats.  This post mentions only a few and covers the first half of the month.

The Dyna-rigged Maltese Falcon was in town, sailing at 20 kts across the harbor and then dousing all sails almost instantly at the push of a button. She’s currently in Messina, IT.

Blue Marlin was in town and spent three weeks loading US tugs and barges sold to Nigerian interests.  Most of these names–Dean Reinauer, Curtis Reinauer, Janice Ann Reinauer, and John Reinauer–have been re-used on quite different tugboats.  “Three weeks to load a Float on-float off . . .?” you might be wondering.

Well, there were some setbacks with ill-fitting cradles.

Eventually, everything found its place and stayed there. 

I recall taking photos from Fort Wadsworth and overhearing some folks concerned “the big orange ship” was sinking.

Sixth boro haze that June made for some dull photos.  If you want to relive the ordeal of loading, click here for the tugster six-part “groundhog day” series.

Reefer Albemarle Island got assistance into the Red Hook terminals from Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran. Currently, the reefer is running between Martinique and Panama.

EPA Bold came into town;  the 1989 USNS Vigorous has changed hands several times and is now operated as Bold Explorer, an EGS survey vessel.

The 2007 Barbara C became Arabian Sea and is currently Saint Emilion.

The 5100 teu Cosco New York gets an assist from Miriam Moran.  Currently, she’s running south along the western Mexico coast.

We began with a luxury sailing vessel;  Black Seal made one run into the sixth boro with a cargo on cacao from Dominican Republic.  The three-masted schooner is currently at a mooring in Pocasset MA.

Let’s lleave it here for now, with all photos, WVD.

 

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