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Quick post today . . . If you ask me what has been the biggest surprise since I moved to NYC, discovered the sixth boro’s delights, and began tracking its flora, fauna, and mechanica, I’d say the the orange juice ships.

Orange Sun came off the ways in 2007, and has called in the sixth boro many times.

From my observer’s vantage point, she’s as immaculate as a well-used ship can be.

Even the assist boats keep a white canvas (?) between the rubber rendering and the light-colored hull.

Is that mismatched touch-up paint?

A recent foggy day enhanced the appearance of her buttery color scheme.

It’s fair to say that since seeing my first OJ tanker, my consumption of the juice has increased.  To be fair, I use the word “butter” to describe hull color, but my consumption of butter has not increased.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders why these vessels are managed from Lake Geneva in Switzerland.

 

On a recent foggy rainy day, I caught Elk River bunkering (I believe) Maritime Kelly Anne.  That’s certainly an interesting name, although yesterday Endless Summer topped it, arriving from Brasil.  Might there be a string of ships with movie name references out on the oceans?

I love how fog narrows the depth of field in a natural way.

The same day Genesis Vigilant nosed into an IMTT dock.

Wye River was traveling light on the way to and likely from a barge,

as were Morgan Reinauer,

 Haggerty Girls, and

and Stephen Reinauer.

Brendan was following a ship to Port Elizabeth.

Stephanie Dann was headed for sea and south.

Ellen S. Bouchard was lying alongside B. No. 262, as her fleet and their crews languish.  And exfiltrate?

Catherine Miller moves a Caddell crane  . . . back to the KVK base.

All photos,WVD.

 

 

 

Want to check out Random Tugs 001?  The  001 got added more recently than 2007 because back then,  I had no idea I’d go on.  In the 2007 photo, might that be Mary Turecamo along with the Reinauer tugs, which are also still at work operating out of the sixth boro.  The other morning Mary Turecamo was assisting MSC Maria Elena  . . . . The tugboat has always been known by that name.

The many times renamed and reconfigured Brooklyn approaches from . . .. Brooklyn.  I first saw her as Labrador Sea.

Brendan Turecamo, also renamed a number of times,  takes the back channel out the Kills.  That’s Bayonne in the background and a crane in Port Elizabeth beyond that.

Catching Genesis Eagle out of the notch is a treat.  The third photo here shows a photo of the same boat as Eagle Service in roughly the same place a decade ago, although I was catching the opposite perspective.

 

It’s been quite a while since I’ve seen this particular Mary Gellatly moving around the sixth boro, but here she is, and I  recognize the man with a camera between the wheelhouse and the stacks.

She was previously Vernon C, as in the top two photos here.

Dory is another boat that has changed hands and names and appearances.  See her here . . .  if you scroll.

Dory appears to be working with a Harley barge alongside a ship, bunkering ? . . . Kitikmeot W.

And let’s conclude with one of the newest boats in the harbor . . .  Ava M McAllister, here returning from escorting a c-ship out toward the Narrows.   Click here for photos from her christening half a year ago.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

 

Mary Alice with Witte 1407

 

Brendan Turecamo with container barge New Jersey

Sarah Ann with SMM 105

 

A light Stephen B passing the Lady

Caitlin Ann with SMM 211 and a light Emily Ann

 

Galveston with Petrochem Producer and a surveillance bird

And–to repost a photo from April 2018–guess where Iron Salvor is today . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose curt post today are dictated by a tank low on verbiage today because my reserves are being used on other projects .  ..

Iron Salvor, the one above, is currently in Malta, that English-speaking island in the Med!!

Spring and fog coexist a lot, and from there, the gradation from fog to summer haze is somewhat blurred.  Blue-hulled Oyster Catcher, in the foreground, gives clearest indication that this in not a black/white/gray photo.  I’ve searched online fruitlessly to confirm that Oyster Catcher is an NYC DEP vessel.  When

A panoply of vessels converge in the Narrows as the great gray ULCV approaches from many days at sea.

 

I’ve not been paying attention to how many of these ULCVs have multiple bow thrusters.  Anyone know the horsepower on each?

 

 

 

Three 6000s, one 3900, and two brants . . . all converging along with Cosco Faith.

For scale, notice the 25′-to 30′ outboard passing just to the right of the letter O in COSCO.  More to scale, note the size of engineering crew next to this crankshaft.

I waited for a messenger line for the deckhand to send up the towline, but  . . . it happened after they were out of range for me.

All photos here by your faithful observer, Will Van Dorp.

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Yesterday morning two container ships with length (loa) of 366 meters or more occupied dock space in Port Newark.  To my knowledge, no longer cargo ship has yet called here, and since they’d each been in port more than a day, I figured I’d get some photos of them outbound under the Bayonne Bridge.  One was 366 m x 48 m (144,131 dwt), and the other was possibly 367 m x 42 (116,100).  Either would be great, both would be superb.

And remember last month I had the photos of JRT Moran underway moving astern?  Well, check out the photo of James D Moran below, on a towline with the 367 m Gunhilde.

I’ll identify these tugs (l to r) so that you can trace their evolution in this turn.  James, Brendan, JRT, and Kirby tethered to the stern.

 

Translating that 42 m breadth, I count 17 containers across.

James D efficiently drops the line and pivots to starboard.

 

Here I assume Brendan is still on the portside.  Was Miriam (farthest left) involved all along or simply passing through?

In that clutch of three Moran tugs, 18,000 horsepower labors.

Kirby Moran is still on the towline.

 

x

Ringkøbing sounds like a pleasant place to visit in summer, not really a port.

So here’s a puzzle:  Gunhilde left port around noon yesterday, but by evening she was back after merely traveling to the outside of the Ambrose Channel , making a wide turn to port, and then re-entering the Channel to anchor overnight in Gravesend Bay.  As of this writing, she appears to have set out for Norfolk once again.  Any stories?

Also interesting, if the AIS info was correct, Gunhilde arrived in NYC after a nearly 19-day voyage from Salalah, the old spice and incense port.  Look it up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what Gunhilde‘s air draft is.

And as it turned out, the 144, 131 dwt vessel left port  . . . after dark.

 

I’m not shifting the focus of this blog to photography–although it’s always been photo driven–but it’s fun to shoot what the light allows, which in this case somewhat obscures the identification of the tug in the foreground and highlights in profile the construction over by the Goethals Bridge.  Also, I’ve not forgotten a realization of a few weeks back about there being nothing random;  context here is recent sixth boro.

Anyhow, name that tug?

Meanwhile, north of the GW, it’s Joan Moran (1975) with a coal barge, from what I could tell.

Farther downriver, it’s Atlantic Coast (2007) with a dredge scow.

On that same dredge project, Shannon Dann (1971) stands by with GL 602.

Wye River (2008) waits over by the Palisades,

Sea Wolf (1982) holds steady over by –is that?–Edgewater.

Barry Silverton counts down for an appointment with Fight ALS,

Brendan Turecamo (1975) hangs with Connecticut, and

that brings us back to the first photo, now benefitting from a different light and easily identifiable as

Doris Moran (1982).

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

OK . . . I prematurely published it, so here it is.

Recognize this tanker . . . once a regular in the Hudson River but out in other waters the past few years . ..

I was thinking this post could be called

Afrodite . . . shares the waterways. A sport fish boat, a USCG patrol boat, and migrating(?) swans . . .

escorted past the Bayonne Bridge, where

Margaret Moran escorts her in as other traffic passes …

and Brendan Turecamo helps out . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Not surprisingly, a lot of people were out on the boro the other morning:  speeding out to fish,

descending from Vukovar–a name slipped out of the news–into the crew boat Emily Miller,

sitting watch past BW Shinano,

ditto . . . aboard CMA CGM Tancredi,

and preparing the heaving line . . . .

 

Is that c-ship so long that the curvature of the earth can be seen along its waterline?  Actually that’s Brendan Turecamo moving SSS barge New Jersey over to Red Hook, I believe.

And a little earlier, although I place it last here, Shawn Miller pushed a trickster barge past ConHook Range.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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