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Happy independence day.  While taking your coffee break, give this document signed by fallible but brave men 246 years ago a read….

I took these photos a decade ago on

a memorable night

in the sixth boro.

Later I posted my first “illuminations” post, reprising language from one of the 56 signers of that document, who put aside their petty disagreements to unite on what they considered common ground despite their differences.

Like I said, from one fallible person to all the rest of you fallible folks, happy independence day.

All photos, WVD.

They come, they go . . . and we never get to know more than the names, unless something unusual happens, as was the case with Ever Forward.  More on that at the end of this post.  Some names are intriguing, like CMA CGM Osiris, likely among the newest cargo ships calling in the sixth boro, part of the CMA CGM Zephyr class. 

 

Chipolbrok–the name– made no sense until I looked up its origins.  The agreement has been around longer than I have!!

Bulk carriers have the best names . . .  like Common Luck. 

Maersk Vilnius is a regular in the boro, last posted here in January. 

So is MSC Tomoko, although I’ve not posted any photos of her before. 

Fairchem Copper has never appeared here before, although sister Fairfield tankers have

Ortolon . . . that’s a word origin I never suspected!  Making sense of Ortolon Coco, that defeats me.  

Ice Fighter . . .  I saw this and immediately thought of Ice Babe Base of many years ago.

I started with a CMA CGM Zephyr, so it’s a good place to end . . .  and they crossed paths in the boro:  Osiris, meet Apollon.

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s the story I alluded to earlier:  a graphic novelist —Jordan Crane–had his latest book printed overseas and it–along with other new books–was traveling back to the US aboard Ever Forward.  Crane also had a book tour planned, where he would distribute copies of the new book.  Well, Ever Forward messed up those plans!  Long term though, this delay revealed this story, and that may just boost his sales, like a double-printed postage stamp or doubly-struck coin. Well, if I were Crane, I would play up this angle.  And Ever Forward, it appears she’s back in Baltimore.  I’ll bet the pilot and crew will be very nervous around the Craighill Channel. 

 

I’ve used this title a dozen times before, but never have four relatively recent hulls shared sixth boro waters until now, at least not that I’m aware of.

So let’s start here with an obvious logo and a name I couldn’t quite parse, Viking

Octantis, until I realized it was named for a star visible in the Southern Hemisphere. 

From here, they head north and are expected on the Saint Lawrence by the end of April.  This is the vessel that is supposed to transform cruising in the Great Lakes, including Lake Superior, using Milwaukee as its hub for the summer months.  I can say from experience that Milwaukee could be a great city for this. Here, here and here are more Milwaukee posts previously on tugster.

I understand that Blount tried Lake Superior with their vessels years ago, but Viking will bring in a few hundred guests at a time.  Other itineraries explain the name, as they will sail under the southern skies.  As of this writing this 2022 vessel is still at the passenger terminal, unfortunately, stern to land, and I wanted to see the bow. She was delivered from the VARD Shipyard in Søvik NO in January 2022.

As of 1130 today, she  headed for sea, for Charlottetown PEI, specifically.

Another 2022 vessel arrived in the sixth boro yesterday, USCGC Clarence Sutphin WPC-1147, the 47th Sentinel-class cutter has delivered to the USCG.  After christening, WPC-1147 will head off to Bahrain.

Christening is here most likely because the namesake was a Queens native.  I thought that learning this would help me understand the origin of this major street near where I live, but it seems both street and hero  have names traced back to the old country.  The new cutter overtook the container ship under the VZ Bridge.

While we’re looking at hulls delivered in 2022, here’s another, with noticeable style-cousins already working in the boro.  I’ll let you look for the similarities in superstructure.  James K was recently delivered to Weeks, as reported here

She’s been hauling dredge scows the past few days, as was the case Easter morning at first light.

 

See the resemblance certainly with James E. Brown?  Rodriguez Boatbuilders needs their history site updated.

Another fairly new hull in town, possibly calling in PoNYNJ for the first time is CMA CGM Osiris.  I’ve not yet seen it, but she may depart today.

All photos, WVD.

 

It’s hard to beat morning light for drama, as is the case here with QM2 getting assisted by James D. and

Doris Moran into her berth in Red Hook, as I shoot into that light.

Taken only a few minutes later, this photo of FV Eastern Welder dragging the bottom in front of the Weeks yard had me shooting with the rising sun behind me.

Bayonne dry dock is full of business.  Note the formerly Bouchard tug Jordan Rose and Cape Wraith off its bow.  I’m not sure which Miller’s Launch OSV that is.  To the left, that’s Soderman.

Hyundai Speed and Glovis Sirius shift cargo.

More shooting into the light here toward Bay Ridge, where lots is happening.

Torm Louise‘s color just looks cold.

Afrodite has been around the world several times each year since the hoopla of her moving Bakken crude from Albany has subsided.  Note the unidentified formerly Bouchard tugboat to the extreme left.

 

And with the drama of morning light, wild clouds form the backdrop to three tugboats seeing CMA CGM Pegasus out the door on a windy day.

All photos earlier this week, WVD, who feels fortunate to live in a place like this where my drama exists only in photos.

Wow!  It’s time to flip the calendar to March 2022 already; that means flashing back to March 2012.  A photo of Bow Chain on the KVK seems a good place to start, for reasons apparent at the end of this post.

Since these “retro” posts highlight what’s no more to be seen, this is a good one, Brendan, a 6140 hp tug that now is Cindy Rose.

Sea-land Racer dominates the foreground, but look at the unmistakable Viking farther back.

Yes, I mean this Eklof-KSea-Kirby 4300 hp Viking, dismantled a few years ago already.

This 3900 hp Brendan still works daily in the boro.

Also passing the Sea-land Racer is this 1900 hp Pegasus, when she looked as she had coming from the shipyard without an upper wheelhouse.  Pegasus is still a busy machine in the port.

2012 was the year I decided to see the Panama Canal before the new sections opened.  In the middle ground here between the Miraflores locks and the ridge, you can see the mounds of dirt on the middle distant ground.  Those mounds represent dirt displaced digging the new channels.

In the farther lane, Pacific-bound it’s Nord Snow Queen and nearer . . .  Atlantic Polaris.  And again in the photo below, see the dirt removed to create the new channel.  As of this writing, Atlantic is at the dock in Houston and Nord between the ancient, now-Russian port of Novorossiysk and wherever she will be able to enter port.

See more dirt on the nearer ridge?  And the traffic, like Chiquita Schweiz and now called Schweiz Reefer, it continues night and day

Tugboats–see many of them here–have a greater role in the new Panama Canal channels, replacing the locomotives evident in some of the photos above and below, but they were already plentiful pre-expansion.  Here Veraguas 1 heads Pacificward…

assisting Bow Summer in accompaniment with

locomotives aka mules, once supplied by GE but now sourced elsewhereEver Dynamic, like the Odfjell parcel tankers whose names begin with “bow” [no doubt named for the renowned bowsprite],

are as likely to be seen in any major port as in the sixth boro. Ever Dynamic had been in the sixth boro just a month earlier than here, making me almost feel like it was welcoming me to Panama, which I found a very hospitable place.  Bow Summer as of this writing waits outside a South African port. Ever Dynamic was dismantled in Alang almost exactly two years ago.

All photos, WVD, in March 2010.

Sea-land Racer and Viking have both been dismantled in the past five years, Racer in Alang and Viking in Texas.

 

Someone asked a question about nomenclature the other day and it may have been on FB.  The name I know is “shipside door,” and it appears to be used in cases that the pilot’s ladder would exceed 9 meters (29.5′). 

In that case the pilot would enter/depart the ship via the shipside door.

Sometimes a combo of companionway and pilot’s ladder is used.

Other times it’s the shipside door and a ladder as below and

below.

Here’s one more batch.

Note the ladder above and the winch reel below.

 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who hopes this adds some nomenclature. 

Snow is the norm in January in the sixth boro, and we’ve just had unusual weather.  On January 2, I was splitting NY wood wearing a t-shirt in the balmy almost 60 degrees.

As you may have guessed, I slipped my noon deadline today because I wanted some evidence of the normal snow accumulation that happened overnight.

Enjoy the results.

Decks are cleared, but snow blown into the outside of the bulwarks is just decorative.

Docklines and footing DO need to be cleared so that

operations proceed with safety.

 

If you’re not accustomed to this weather, you may not appreciate how unpleasant this pretty stuff can be,

especially if, as I hadn’t, you’ve not waterproofed your boots.  Wearing the right clothes and footwear, helps you stay warm and safe.

 

Bollard pull remains the same, a little snow notwithstanding.

All photos today, WVD.

 

Consider this to be in the spirit of Dawn 2021.  I wasn’t there at dawn because the ship I wanted to catch–CMA CGM Von Humboldt–departed in the 0’darks, but I arrived a bit later, cold notwithstanding.

The first tugboat I photographed in 2022 was Zeus!  Truth be told, her profile against the Raritan highlands was unmistakeable, but I was a half hour too late for a better shot;  I hadn’t expected a traffic tie-up.  She’s headed for Hampton Roads and beyond.

The second and third are Bruce A. McAllister and 

Ava M, going to the Narrows to see someone about a ship

Next it was Brendan Turecamo assisting a Liberian-flagged tanker, Horizon Thetis.  If you want some interesting origin stories, check a mythology text about the relationship between Zeus and Thetis

Chemical Petrochemical Trader with Brownsville as the prime mover was next.

A while later Bruce A and 

and Ava M came in with their catch, Ever Far.  I’ll put up more photos of this new Ever F-class vessel later. 

And finally, it’s my first view ever of Centerline’s Rubia, ex-Denise A. Bouchard.  If you look closely, you can see Centerline’s lion on the stack. And the name Rubia . . . that’s Spanish for “blonde”… hmmm;  it looks more platinum to me.

All photos, January 4, 2022, WVD, who finds it interesting what cold, clear winter temperatures do to photos.

Photos from the sixth boro . . . although I’m a thousand miles away and in the eastern mountains…  1974 ex-Exxon Ocean State and

and slightly smaller 1975 ex-Exxon Granite State, now Marjorie B. McAllister and Brendan Turecamo.

The 1999 ex-Crosby Knight now Stephen Dann was pushing a Centerline barge. 

The 2009 ex-Allison Crosby is now Mount St. Elias, is one of the Kirby boats in the boro that I perceive as a winter boat.  Where was she all summer?

 

The 1975 Robert IV has been in the boro since 1989.  Where was she for her first decade?

And finally, the 2020 Janice Ann Reinauer is the newest,  largest, and most powerful tugboat in this post, here overtaking the 2010 6589-teu Maipo.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Floating cranes have been featured here before, but never have I posted photos of a crane so sweet.  Let me explain.

For starters, though, Brendan Turecamo had the barge alongside

and was headed up the North River along my same route.

I hadn’t much of an idea what their destination was until

I saw this sign, name or not, but it told me where it was going.  Double click on the image if you must.  Flo-Sweet 2 could have only one goal, as there’s only one place left in the greater sixth boro for sweet commodities. Sweet nothings, of course, have a place everywhere, but I digress.

beyond WTC1 to ASR in Yonkers.

All photos, WVD, who wonders whether any western Louisiana sugars get further processed along the hudson.

 

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