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0545 at the Narrows . . . in the hazy days of summer . . . nothing beats it.

I had not come here just to beat the heat.

Surprisingly, Turecamo Girls (I believe) delivered the docking pilot.

Then she dropped back, to where one of the 6000s took the stern and

another the bow.

Only a couple hours into the day, another ULCV appeared in the offing . . .

Hyundai Drive, which sounds almost like a car ad framed as an order if you reverse the words . . . .

In the clearer light, you can clearly see Drive‘s crew asisting the docking pilot, boarding from Capt. Brian A.

 

For scale, notice the deckhand on the bow waiting . . .

. . .

for the messenger line.

To digress a bit, in July 2018 Hyundai Jupiter was in the sixth boro, and the company was still called Hyundai.  On March 31, 2020, it rebranded itself as HMM.  Jupiter, 1059′ loa,  had a capacity of 10,000 teu.

In March 2013, Hyundai Grace, a 2007 build, had a capacity of 4571 teu on her 964′ hull.

In April 2009, Hyundai Voyager was in town . . . built in 2008 with the same dimensions as Grace.

So in a decade, typical Hyundai (HMM) vessels calling here have increasing carrying capacity by nearly 300%. If you consider HMM calling elsewhere, the increase has been greater than 500%.

All photos, WVD.

Glovis Cosmos has a beam of 105′.  YM Warmth . . . 167′.  Of course, we’re looking at the pier from an angle,so there’s that accentuating the difference in beam.  We’ll return to YM Warmth.

The next day just after 0600, CMA CGM A. Lincoln appeared around Bergen Point with an entourage of tugboats.

 

 

As big as these 1200′ box ships are, they will be diminshed by the 1312′ size working other ports around the watery globe.

To make my morning even better, Warmth was bound for sea the same time as A. Lincoln.

 

As booming as the ports of NY/NJ seem to be, they’re asking for relief money, as explained here, with the cost of temperature checks on local port workers adding up to $60,000 weekly.

All photos, WVD.  That morning, obviously, two 1200’ers left port in succession.  As I write this [Sunday morning] three of the current sixthboromax vessels are in our fair port.  For a look at the next generation, in this case coming into Rotterdam, check out this video . . . and I’d jump ahead to the 23-minute mark . . . behold the 20,000 teu 1312′ Ever Given.

Two final points . . .  I find it odd that CMA CGM has named these vessels for former US presidents.  Imagine US-flagged ships with names like Jules Armand Dufaure or Charles Dupuy  . . .

And second, for a glimpse of CMA CGM plans in the next two years, check out CMA CGM Jacques Saade,  named for the company founder.

Jasmine and Rose are two of eight, all ordered mid-year 2015  At about $120 million each, that’s close to a billion dollar order handed to the Shanghai Jiangnan Changxing Shipbuilding Ltd. co., right across the river from Shanghai proper.  Google-map that to get a sense of the shipbuilding and shipping infrastructure along the mouth of the Yangtze.

Mary Turecamo overtook Jasmine at the perfect moment to give the sense of projected power, while Jonathan C holds back and otherwise guides the stern.

 

 

A few days later, a clone arrives from the Ambrose Channel . . .,

one of the clones that I’ve not yet seen.  I’ve have seen Peony, Camellia, and Sakura.  I believe I’ve yet to see Azelea, Lotus, and Orchid.  I’ve seen some of them come and go, but just didn’t have reason enough to go out to see a clone.

Whenever you see a clutch of tugs like this, you know they’re waiting, and the more tugs, the bigger the escortee.

Maybe someone can instruct me on the air draft of these ULCVs.

JRT delivers the docking pilot.

To conclude with an echo back to the scale posts . . . see the 2014-built Taipei Trader off the port bow of Rose.  Both are container ships but their size is vastly different.  One way to think of it, it would take 13 Taipei Traders to carry the same number of containers as Rose.

All photos, WVD, who wants to know if there is a term used for small “feeder” box boats like Taipei Trader.

 

Mary Turecamo has the distinction of having been built at Matton Shipyard near Waterford.  She’s a big boat:  106′ loa and 4300hp.

James William was originally Lisa Moran.  She’s 77′ and generates 2800hp propelled by three screws.

Barney Turecamo, built in 1995, was intended to push cement barges.  She’s 116′ and rated at 5100hp.

Brendan Turecamo was launched in 1975.  She’s 106′ and her twin EMDs generate 3900hp.

James D. Moran is one of the four 6000hp tugboats that have worked in the sixth boro for the past five years.  She’s 88′ loa.

Notice that all the above boats had some connection with Moran?  Anyhow. Ava M. is the newest escort tug in the boro.  She arrived here about a year ago, 100′ and 6770hp.

Alex McAllister has been in the harbor–I believe–about five years now.  Built in 1985, she is 87′ and 4300hp.

When I first saw Genesis Vigilant, he was a Hornbeck Offshore boat called Michigan Service.  Built in 1981, she’s 99′ and rated at 3000hp.

Josephine might be the newest T of an ATB in the boro.  She was launched in 2018, is 110′, and moves with 4560hp.

Here she was pushing the 347′ loa RTC 83 into a berth at the east end of IMTT, with assistance from Franklin ReinauerFranklin was launched in 1984, is 81′ and generates 2600hp.

All photos, WVD.  Again, sorry I posted prematurely sans any text. Sometimes I’m looking right at something, seeing a word or a number, and just calling it something else.  I believe my brain is becoming like my mother’s.

 

 

 

Stephen Reinauer westbound as the sun heads in the same direction.

Mary Turecamo assists an MOL ship into port.

Ava M pushes toward the pilot’s door on the side of another container ship.

James D heads to the next job amid two container ships in the approaches.

Margaret throttles up alongside.

James William travels toward Howland Hook.

James E. heads, no doubt, for the car float with rail cars awaiting it.

Stephen Dann heads in to get some fuel.

Emily Ann travels light toward the Upper Bay.

All photos from a socially-distanced, physically-isolated, seasonally-adjusted, pent-up energized, freely-masked, and emotionally-stale  WVD.

 

All photos here were taken less than an hour after sunrise.  It’s commonly known that the golden hour is the best time for photos.

 

Mary Turecamo also headed out for morning work, not that this is anything but a 24/7 essential schedule.

HMS St Andrews arrives with sunrise on its back. Has the HMS been dropped from the name,

just as port of registry has been changed?

Eastern Dawn slings Port Chester into the dock.

Ellen heads out,

meeting a Vane tug on her way to a job.

Cape Henry comes off the anchorage, westbound on the KVK.

All photos, WVD.

 

Want to check out Random Tugs 001?  The  001 got added more recently than 2007 because back then,  I had no idea I’d go on.  In the 2007 photo, might that be Mary Turecamo along with the Reinauer tugs, which are also still at work operating out of the sixth boro.  The other morning Mary Turecamo was assisting MSC Maria Elena  . . . . The tugboat has always been known by that name.

The many times renamed and reconfigured Brooklyn approaches from . . .. Brooklyn.  I first saw her as Labrador Sea.

Brendan Turecamo, also renamed a number of times,  takes the back channel out the Kills.  That’s Bayonne in the background and a crane in Port Elizabeth beyond that.

Catching Genesis Eagle out of the notch is a treat.  The third photo here shows a photo of the same boat as Eagle Service in roughly the same place a decade ago, although I was catching the opposite perspective.

 

It’s been quite a while since I’ve seen this particular Mary Gellatly moving around the sixth boro, but here she is, and I  recognize the man with a camera between the wheelhouse and the stacks.

She was previously Vernon C, as in the top two photos here.

Dory is another boat that has changed hands and names and appearances.  See her here . . .  if you scroll.

Dory appears to be working with a Harley barge alongside a ship, bunkering ? . . . Kitikmeot W.

And let’s conclude with one of the newest boats in the harbor . . .  Ava M McAllister, here returning from escorting a c-ship out toward the Narrows.   Click here for photos from her christening half a year ago.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s a dark and soon to be rainy day in the sixth boro, so for your enjoyment . . . colorful photos from yesterday.

This ship uses the old spelling . . .  like Peking v. Beijing.  Know the current spelling?

 

Crystal Cutler came by with Patricia E. Poling, to add some greens to the palette.

 

The Hapag Lloyd box ship was assisted in by James D. Moran and

Mary Turecamo.

So . . . today’s maps would spell this as Qingdao, home to China’s second largest brewery . . . which uses the old spelling too.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

When the temperatures drop and days are short, tug and barges units in the NE get busier than in summer.

RTC 42 here gets pushed by Franklin Reinauer, as Gracie-above–waits at the dock with RTC 109.

 

A bit later, J. George Betz moves her barge B. No. 210 toward the east.

Navigator appears from the east with her barge.

 

Barney moves Georgia toward a Bayonne dock, with assistance from Mary.

 

And Curtis comes in with RTC 81 for more product.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, currently in the state of Georgia, but a few days back when I took these, needed some of that fuel to stay warm. Here from 2007 was my first post by this name.

She’s not pink or blue or green or new, but she’s an ULCV that I saw back out of Bayonne yesterday, and I can imagine all the communications and applications of power to make this happen.

JRT yanked eased under power stern wise, while Mary Turecamo 

and Jonathan C countered that movement just enough to maintain control.

Once far enough out of the docks area, the vectors shifted,

 

and, I’d wager, added bow thruster force to rotate to port,

revealing to me a fourth tugboat–Margaret–that’d been working the obscured side until now.  Seeing three tugs and 15,000 hp arrayed on the bow is a reminder of the days when many tugs would make docking a form of choreography.

 

It was yesterday’s sunny low humidity, but the colors rivaled foliage up in the valleys at peak!  And never have I seen so many figures up on a bridge wing!  I count at least five folks up there.

 

When Monaco Bridge has been pointed safely toward the VZ Bridge, the docking pilot–I presume–departs and

 

 

the ULCV heads for the next port . . . Norfolk in this case.

Using gCaptain’s figure of 48,000 bananas for one 20′ container, Monaco Bridge could carry over 667 million bananas .. . or two bananas for every person living in the country!

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who points out that ONE Ibis is currently at the Global Terminal.

More info on Monaco Bridge:  she was launched in 2018 by Imabari Shipyard in Japan. Her 11 cylinder engine generates 65,576 hp at 76 rpm.   See photo of the shipyard here.

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