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She’s not pink or blue or green or new, but she’s an ULCV that I saw back out of Bayonne yesterday, and I can imagine all the communications and applications of power to make this happen.

JRT yanked eased under power stern wise, while Mary Turecamo 

and Jonathan C countered that movement just enough to maintain control.

Once far enough out of the docks area, the vectors shifted,

 

and, I’d wager, added bow thruster force to rotate to port,

revealing to me a fourth tugboat–Margaret–that’d been working the obscured side until now.  Seeing three tugs and 15,000 hp arrayed on the bow is a reminder of the days when many tugs would make docking a form of choreography.

 

It was yesterday’s sunny low humidity, but the colors rivaled foliage up in the valleys at peak!  And never have I seen so many figures up on a bridge wing!  I count at least five folks up there.

 

When Monaco Bridge has been pointed safely toward the VZ Bridge, the docking pilot–I presume–departs and

 

 

the ULCV heads for the next port . . . Norfolk in this case.

Using gCaptain’s figure of 48,000 bananas for one 20′ container, Monaco Bridge could carry over 667 million bananas .. . or two bananas for every person living in the country!

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who points out that ONE Ibis is currently at the Global Terminal.

More info on Monaco Bridge:  she was launched in 2018 by Imabari Shipyard in Japan. Her 11 cylinder engine generates 65,576 hp at 76 rpm.   See photo of the shipyard here.

Back in the sixth boro . . . it’s a head-on shot of Thomas J. Brown, with multiple icons of the harbor behind her.

Mister T pushes some loaded barges out east beneath the 59th Street Bridge in the photo below,

and tows twice as many empties westbound in the next photo.

Mary Turecamo shifts deck cargo barge New York from Red Hook over toward the other container ports of NYC/NJ, keeping a good number of trucks off the roads and bridges.

Meredith C. Reinauer moves RTC 150 out in the direction of the Sound.

Philadelphia pushes fuel barge Double Skin 503 into the Kills, over to where Ellen McAllister assists Genesis Liberty out of her IMTT berth.

Then Genesis Liberty moves GM 11105 around and outbound.

Robert Burton, usually pushing compacted garbage barges, the other day was doing

rock scow duty.

And rounding out this post, Ava M. McAllister, still in her first half year of working in the sixth boro, heads out to escort in a vessel just in from sea.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s been a few months since number 265, so let’s catch up.

Kimberly Poling had brought product upriver via Noelle Cutler, and you can tell some time has passed since I took this photo by the foliage.

Edna A was assisting a crane barge working on the power lines near Hudson NY.

Challenger came in through the Narrows yesterday, delivering a crane barge.  A few years back she delivered what was initially a mystery cargo here.

Eli stood by as salt was transshipped from scow to large truck.

Mister T was westbound for the Upper Bay with four scow to be filled.

Pokomoke brought petroleum upriver.

Memory Motel, the original exotic,  . . . I wondered where she had gone until I saw her high and dry up by Scarano.

Betty D and Mary Kay . . .  they were docked just south of Albany.

Mary Turecamo brought container barge New York from Red Hook to Port Elizabeth . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has many more saved up from the summer and early fall.

I couldn’t leave the earlier post from today dangling as I did.

It was ONE Ibis, the most recent in the series I’ve seen.

 

 

The pink is so vivid that the pink M on James D appears de-colored.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has focused on other birds here.

Related:  At 14,000 teu, these ONE ships are small compared with the latest ones contracted by Samsung for Evergreen . . . giants at 23,000 teu.

 

 

By the way, did anyone get good photos of Triton, the biggest of the big ULCVs to call in the sixth boro so far?  She was coming under the Bayonne Bridge as first light was breaking.  More on that ULCV at the end of this post.

Let me start with two photos I took in Quebec City, over two years ago.

What caught my attention was the Tanzania registry.

Earlier this week I caught the “rest of the story” on this ship while reading the CBC online.  Click on the photo below of the captain to learn why this ship has not moved in over two years, a crew not shanghai’d but rather quebec’d or rather bahamian’d or most accurately, D & D maritime’d….

Now for some random ship traffic in the sixth boro, which no doubt has its own untold stories, how about this long glance at NYK Falcon, fleet mate of ONE Stork and one of the big birds of the harbor.

STI Leblon, a Brazilian reference,  heads out with an assist from Miriam Moran.  Here are many more STI tankers.

Genco Avra gets a partial load over in Greenville.

Nordmaple heads for sea.

Beauforte heads in, as does

Ems Trader.  Ems is a river reference, not an abbreviation.  Mary Turecamo is off her stern.

Did anyone get close-ups of Triton this morning?  I’d love to see them;  meanwhile, I’m hoping to catch her on the way out to sea, unless she leaves in the wee dark hours.  Port of Baltimore has made a big deal about this record-breaking vessel, as did the Panama Canal folks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The AIS image taken early afternoon the Sunday before Memorial Day shows just how crowded the waters between Narragansett Bay and the North Fork Orient Point can be;  pink is recreational boats and the greens, reds, and blues are commercial vessels.  Obviously, given the scale and the fact that the icons are about 100 times larger than the pink vessels they represent, the water is not clogged, although it is congested enough that effective watch standing is essential.

In the sixth boro it can look like the photos in this post.  Anyone operating a small boat–and relative to a 1200′ container ship like Cosco Shipping Peony, a 35′ fishing boat is truly puny.

Tugboats, any of them, are huge compared to small fishing boats.  Mary Turecamo below is 106′ loa and powered by twin engines totaling 4300 hp.

Coming from anchored units there might be a slow moving sailboat.

Summer traffic on the sixth boro is not what it is in the colder months.

 

Sometimes interventions are called for.

Be safe . .  .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to Joseph Chomicz, it’s Capt. Latham in Port Elizabeth .  .  .

standing by the barge Atlanta Bridge . . .  So here’s my question . . . and answer will be located at the end of this post . . .  in quo vadis?

I’ve not seen this boat in a while . . . the 1958 Blount-built Vulcan III.

 

The “D” stands for Derrick Marine of Perth Amboy.

The current Kristin Poling stands by as Aramon is lightered before it enters the Kills.

Doris Moran moves Portland into the Kills, headed here for Shooters Island before following the channel around to the north.

Jonathan and JRT make their way home after an assist.

Mary Turecamo assists a lightered Aramon to a berth on the Arthur Kill.

Many thanks to Joe for the Capt. Latham pics;  all others by Will Van Dorp, who lacked his real camera to document the answer to the “where goest they?” question above.

Some older cargo cranes go San Juan-bound aboard Atlanta Bridge between Capt. Latham and Atlantic Enterprise.

It’s that time of year.

Some small commercial fishing boats do stay around in winter, but

I don’t recall seeing Never Enuff in frigid weather.

Catamarans like Good Karma might sail all winter, but down south ….

 

Jackie C . . . a dive boat?

 

I didn’t catch a name on this trap boat.

 

Nor here . . . .

Twisted Sisters has a load of traps.

 

I caught the name here . . . Renegade.

But not here . . .. although I know it’s a Florida Bay Coaster,

which is roomy inside but insignificant when juxtaposed with a 1200′ ULCV.

And then there are the jet skis . . .

….

This process of assembling this post has suggested a new

series, a summer series

called Mixed Craft, mixed use of the waterways.  Be safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here was the first post of this title.

Yesterday was cold but also windy, and this allowed me to see Sarah D in a role I’ve not posted previously for this boat, although she’s no doubt specialized in the assist role earlier in her career.

Above she approaches the dock on the port side.   The flag direction shows she’s in the lee.  At the hose rack, she drops back and

moves to the starboard side, as Mary Turecamo moves Tennessee into the dock.

 

 

She holds the barge here against the wind and current until all lines are made fast.

This stretch of the KVK was quite busy, so more on the other traffic tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loves this cold clear weather, even though he puts lots of chemical heat packs in his pockets and boots on days like this.

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