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All these tugboats have a common design feature.  I’ll let you figure it out. 

Eastern Dawn pushed a load of scrap westbound in the Kills.

James William showed off her bow as she traveled light toward the Upper Bay.

 

Ditto Buchanan 12, usually confined to pushing up and down the Hudson with a train of rock scows.

 

Robert IV does a plethora of jobs, spot work I think it would be called, from her base at Caddell’s.

Eastern Dawn returns from Newark Bay with a light scow.

 

And finally . . . where’s the tug pushing this deck barge with a boring machine?

It’s the shorty but mighty Jimmy!

And what they have in common is the squared off versus model bow, with knees designed for pushing.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

Happy spring.  All photos in this post were taken in winter two days ago and over a six-hour period.  Before noon, the five boros and the next state were obscured out of existence. I really think they didn’t exist during those hours, just like the imaginary sun crossed (??) the imaginary equator at 11:33 NYC time.  Crossed .  . by boat or chariot or blimp or goat cart . . .  I don’t know.

Kimberly  passed by and Robbins Reef was barely there.  Mariner brought boxes in, and Kirby passed by, and they might as well have been at sea.

Neptune shuttled by, and hints of Bayonne showed themselves.

Justine came by and the sunshine was making progress burning off the moisture.

When Cape Canaveral crossed in front of me, Manhattan was there, albeit like a matte painting;  right, that’s just a movie set, right?

The large gray ship . . . Soderman, that too was a different painted background, this time for Captain D.

Before Mary Turecamo appeared over on the starboard side of New York‘s trans-harbor load  of containers, I had no idea what I was seeing.

It wasn’t until well into the afternoon and–in the near distance–Bert Reinauer passed overtaking the Vane unit that I saw a boat pass by without a hint of fog.  That, however, was mostly due to the proximity

All photos, Friday, WVD.

Winter solstice is one date I pay attention to, and yesterday demanded an undivided portion of it.  I was out on the sixth and primordial boro at sunrise, although when it rose, a gauzy film of stratus filtered the light.  I tinkered with the image a bit to enhance the cosmic eeriness.

Along the Brooklyn shore a classic barque and one of the latest of a classic line awaited.

Notice two tugboats and a lighthouse below?  One tug is shifting a fuel barge, and the other is shifting refuse boxes.

Start of winter or start of summer, the sixth boro is always a busy place.  Notice the fishing boat in this image, along with all the rest?

For some reason, these E-2C aircraft flew the North River up and then down and out over the Lower Bay.

Dutch Girl, a winter regular along with Eastern Welder, was hard at work.

Ava M. crossed the Bay from one job to the next.  Things are always happening on the water.

And all that’s glorious, but less than a quarter mile from the North River, not all seems to be happening well, and that needs to be acknowledged.

All photos, WVD.

 

Laurie Ann Reinauer is pushing RTC 85 for an appointment somewhere the Kills. 

Meagan Ann moves dredge spoils out of MOTBY.

 

Thomas D. Witte stems with another scow as Meagan Ann passes by.

J. Arnold takes the Back Channel over to Claremont.

James William heads for an assist.

 

A fact about Buchanan 12 . . .  it appears she’s had that name and worked for that same company since 1972.  That’s longevity.

All photos, WVD, who’s happy the days are getting longer, with fewer than 200 days until the summer solstice.

 

We’re going west to east to south to farther east in today’s post, starting with the Missouri River north of Omaha by about 50 miles at the port of Blencoe IA.  From here grain and soybeans are barged all the way to the New Orleans area for transshipment to foreign markets.  That’s MV Tony Lippman stemming the current after dropping off some barges with fertilizer ingredients she’s pushed all the way here, fertilizer that arrived in the US by bulk carrier from foreign producers.

MV Tony Lippman is 144′ x 35′.  For more specs on this 1971 build, click here.

These two boats, at the Upper Mississippi River port of Hannibal, almost look familiar, but they are Sir Josie T and Sir Robert.  For more info, click here and see a photo by Tim Powell, frequent contributor on this blog.

CMT on the stack above stands for Canton Marine Towing. Near to far here are Sir Richard and Sir Robert

Now we’re back in the sixth boro and at the south side eastern tip of Motby.  From left, it’s Teresa, barge Acadia, Jane A. Bouchard, Evelyn Cutler, and Susan Rose.  Note that Teresa has a small US flag high in the rigging.  Might that be a courtesy flag in the wrong location, since she’s said to be flagged Liberian?  I was hoping to see her stern to confirm that. 

From Tony A and on a rainy day,

it’s Steven Wayne!  She first became a regular in the sixth boro as Patapsco.

Courtesy of a son of Neptune aka Neptuni filius himself, the vessel alluded to in a recent post and now here for all to see, it’s M. A. R. S. War Machine, ex-Paul T. Moran.   The photo was taken somewhere in the south.

And finally, from the mighty Ij River, it’s a 1907 or 1904 built Anna Sophia.  Photo by een zoon van Ij.

All photos, except of course those by Tony A and the sons above, WVD.

Rumor has it that tomorrow is an unusual day that in years past I have acknowledged.  I’m staying put.

I’m surprised I’ve not used this title in almost a year, since the thought often comes my way that some very busy waterways exist in the sixth boro.  Like below with the four Moran tugs and one tanker.  Since three are headed to the left, you might be wondering why.  Easy . . .  those three–JRT, Kimberly, Margaret— are assisting an incoming ship, the single tug, Jonathan C,  in the foreground heading to the right will soon assist another ship coming in.  Polar Cod–a great name–is transferring petroleum product.

Here’s that incoming ship, exciting the birds as the ship and maybe stirring up the menhaden and their predators below.  We’ll get back to this.

Here’s a closer up of that fish/bird stirring ship, a torrent called Torrente.   Portside the ship is Mary Turecamo, and starboard, it’s the Belford-based Osprey

And here’s the most dense photo, eight tugboats from four different companies, two loaded container ships, and one tanker, all in less than two miles of waterway.

Getting back to all those birds and fish in the Con Hook Range . . .  a lot of people in small boats are putting their baited hooks in the water there.

Unrelated:  An unconfirmed report with this photo below says the 1912 Argo sank in Long Island Sound off Wading River NY on November 1.  Can anyone confirm that this happened?  I looked for a report but couldn’t find one anywhere.  To see a photo I took of it underway in the sixth boro just over 10 years ago, click here. And here, taken in June 2011.

The photo below was posted by Steve Adkins and said to be taken by USCG responding to the distress.

All photos except the last two, WVD.

Happy 31st, aka Halloween, World Savings Day, Day of Seven Billion, National Candy Apple Day, Annual visit a cemetery or graveyard day . . . and more.  If you need suggestions for a graveyard, consider this one.  And just yesterday, I learned of this one and this one.  Who knew?!!?  Want to revisit a tugster ghost post?

For this post, there’s a quiz.  The first part is … name the oldest and newest boat here.  The second part … identify the only two boats here NOT built in Louisiana.  Of course, building is one thing, and designing is another.

All photos taken this October.  Susan Miller,

Miriam Moran and Pegasus,

Andrea,

Gregg McAllister,

Robert IV,

Buchanan 12,

Navigator,

Robert Burton,

Shawn Miller,

Pearl Coast,

Miss Ila,

Mary Turecamo,

and the always seasonal Kimberly Turecamo.

There you have it . . . And I’ll give the answers tomorrow.

And my question is . . .  who is Miss Ila‘s namesake and what do you call that shade of red?

The sixth boro offers many vistas.  Enjoy a few, starting with Sarah D towing a deeply loaded scow past Bay Ridge. 

At sunrise, Atlantic Salvor and Patrice McAllister head in the same direction for different tasks past Stapleton Heights.

Jonathan C works shipside on the ConHook range in the sixth boro

Julie Anne heads north or so inside the VZ Bridge.  I should know what buoys are there, but . . . I don’t.

Sarah D again and here shipside in the KVK.

Mary Turecamo assists alongside a rust-flecked box ship.

Seeley pushes Weeks 250 eastbound in the Kills.

Kirby Moran, Patrice McAllister, and Gregg McAllister assist another box ship, as Marie J Turecamo heads in their direction.

Sea Fox moves a barge past Global terminal in Bayonne.

Navigator rotates clockwise away from St George and heads north.

And finally, Charles James stands by with a scow off Sunset Park.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

Colonel came into town a week ago with the new ferry.

Caitlin Ann has been here as long as I’ve been paying attention . . . although she had several names since then.

James D and Ellen McAllister pin YM Width to the dock. 

Jill Reinauer . . .  she’s been here from before tugster . .  .  AT and BT should be part of my new time nomenclature.   BT runs backward from this post. 

Atlantic Salvor has been here over 20 years, and among my favorite photos of her was here from the 2010 Labor Day race.

This has to be my clearest photo of Carolina Coast.  Know that tugboat in the distance?

I believe Julie Anne just recently arrived in the sixth boro, and this is my first time seeing her. 

And from a distance, it’s Mary Emma, formerly Evening Light, but now all in tan and green. 

Let’s stop with Ellen again, here passing in front of what must be the busiest background:  Geoquip Saentis, Cape Edmont, and Oasis.  Ellen is one of about a dozen reutilized USN tugboats in the McAllister fleet.  See more here.

All photos this week, WVD.

I’m on a short gallivant, but I have no shortage of sixth boro photos, mostly of tugboats engaged in commerce.  Sometimes I look for meetings, and interesting (how ever that’s defined)  ones are best.   Like here…. Kristin and Kimberly,

B. Franklin and Dylan Cooper,

Mary H and Joyce,

Reinauer Twins and Pokomoke,

R/V Ocean Researcher (a multirole survey vessel [aka an exotic] for the offshore energy sector) and Emery Zidell,

 

and Fort McHenry and Philadelphia.

 Then sometimes there are more than two at a time that can be framed in a shot, like here, Elk River, Paula Atwell, Chem Bulldog, Kirby, and B. Franklin . . .

More Bulldog soon.  All photos yesterday, WVD.

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