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I hope you all enjoy looking at these retro posts as much as I do putting them together.  I’m seeing that 2010 was the year I started to gallivant extensively, so the division for July 2010 retrospective is part a is for local, and part b will be for away.

Count the boats in the photo below!  Greenland Sea is prominent, but in the distance, find a Staten Island ferry, QM2, Susan (?) Miller, a dredge operation where I see Rae, and a Reinauer tug (Ruth?) beyond that!  Greenland Sea is now on the hard in Houma LA, the SI ferries run regularly but with fewer passengers due to the covid catastophes, QM2 is in Southampton, the Miller boats are still busy, Rae is kept in reserve for special projects designed for a 46′ tug, navigation dredging is over for now, and the Reinauer tugs have proliferated and keep busy.

Navigation dredging has created deeper channels, and the Bayonne Bridge has been raised.  Miss Gill is now in Jacksonville FL, and GL 55, the dumper scow, is wherever work may require her.

The formerly-yellow submarine is located at the entrance to Coney Island Creek, a place I’ve not been to in almost a decade.

I never did identify the wrecks at the mouth of said Creek, which seemed then to have an abundance of blue-clawed crabs.

Jane A. Bouchard languishes along with the rest of the fleet, and Cape Cod, with one of the intra-port SSS barges here,  has moved to Philly, last I knew.

Barbara McAllister pushes B. No. 262 with an assist from Ron G.  Barbara has not been in the sixth boro in quite a while, the 262 is laid up, and Ron G has been sold south.

Cape Race arrives here in Atlantic Basin, with a much-changed lower Manhattan skyline.  The former fishing trawler/now expedition yacht is currently on the Elbe, south of Hamburg.

Margot still “keeps on pushing,” although I’ve not seen her down in the sixth boro of late.

And here, Patty Nolan passes a wreck–I’ve not yet identified it . . .  maybe you have–inside Sommerville Basin in coastal Queens. Patty Nolan has been on the hard a few years.

And here’s a photo taken exactly a decade ago today . . .  an unnamed houseboat being towed from Peekskill to Queens, not a view you see every day.  It’s Patty Nolan towing with gatelines.  Here and here she tows other houseboats.

All photos, WVD, who wishes everyone health and patience in this difficult time.  Also, these “retro sixth boro” posts take us back only one decade.  It’d be great to locate more photos of identifiable locations going back 50 or so years, the fifth dimension of time photos.

 

Almost exactly a decade ago I did this post.  Today I decided to add to it and broaden the geographic scope.  Stick with me to see how broadened this gets.

From the Delaware Memorial Bridge to the entrance of Delaware Bay is about 100 miles.  Near the entrance you see big water and big traffic, like a light Ivory Coast above and a working OSG Vision below.  OSG Vision is mated to OSG 350, a huge barge used to lighter crude oil tankers 342,000 barrels at a time.

Forty miles upstream from the Delaware Memorial, there’s the Ben Franklin Bridge, here with Pilot towing La Princesa and assisted by Grace and Valentine Moran.

Some Delaware River boats are rarely seen in the sixth boro like Jack Holland.

Almost 150  miles upstream from the Philly-Camden area is  Hawk’s Nest Highway, the part of the river once paralleled on the nearer side by the D&H Canal.

Of course I paddled the whole way up there. In fact, this stretch of the Delaware has enough current that a 21st century paddler would not choose to go upstream very far, and a 19th century boat-mule canaler would want to keep navigation separate from the river.

Early summer had its share of young  birds,

deer, and trout visible under the canoe.

Some mysterious paddlers shared the waters.

That New York side of the river . . .

if you look close, you can see in places that these are not natural rock formations. Rather, they support the towpath side of the D & H Canal, way up above the river.

Part of Route 97 is also known as Hawk’s Nest Highway.

To digress, the eastern end of the Canal–about a hundred miles to the NE–is in Kingston NY, and a transshipping point was Island Dock, which

has now overgrown.  I wonder if there’s ever been a project to clear the trees and undergrowth and contemplate a recreation of this important site.  Oil is today’s fuel;  coal was definitely king in this other age.

But let’s back to the Delaware.  North of Barryville, there’s this bridge. At least, it’s now a bridge, but when

John Roebling built it, it was an aqueduct for D & H coal boats bringing anthracite out of the Coal Region to the sixth boro.

 

Here’s a preserved portion of the Canal between Hawley and Honesdale PA, just upstream (water has long long) from Lock 31.   Honesdale was once the transhipping point between railroad cars and canal boats and deserves another visit and maybe a whole post, which maybe I’ll getto when the museum there opens again.

Pennsylvania has place names like Oil City, Cokeburg, and Coal Port.  The coal transported on the D & H came from aptly-named Carbondale, another place that deserves more time.  The commodity legacy is seen in these two businesses

and maybe others.

All photos, WVD, at different points over the past 10 years.  If anyone has ideas about high points along the river you’d suggest I visit, please let me know.  Since my jobs for this summer have fallen through, this might be the year to canoe and hike.

Unrelated, if you haven’t yet read this story about an Argentine in Portugal unable to get home because of cancelled flights and choosing to sail across the Atlantic in a 29′ boat to see his father turn 90, here‘s the link.

 

 

 

Mary Turecamo has the distinction of having been built at Matton Shipyard near Waterford.  She’s a big boat:  106′ loa and 4300hp.

James William was originally Lisa Moran.  She’s 77′ and generates 2800hp propelled by three screws.

Barney Turecamo, built in 1995, was intended to push cement barges.  She’s 116′ and rated at 5100hp.

Brendan Turecamo was launched in 1975.  She’s 106′ and her twin EMDs generate 3900hp.

James D. Moran is one of the four 6000hp tugboats that have worked in the sixth boro for the past five years.  She’s 88′ loa.

Notice that all the above boats had some connection with Moran?  Anyhow. Ava M. is the newest escort tug in the boro.  She arrived here about a year ago, 100′ and 6770hp.

Alex McAllister has been in the harbor–I believe–about five years now.  Built in 1985, she is 87′ and 4300hp.

When I first saw Genesis Vigilant, he was a Hornbeck Offshore boat called Michigan Service.  Built in 1981, she’s 99′ and rated at 3000hp.

Josephine might be the newest T of an ATB in the boro.  She was launched in 2018, is 110′, and moves with 4560hp.

Here she was pushing the 347′ loa RTC 83 into a berth at the east end of IMTT, with assistance from Franklin ReinauerFranklin was launched in 1984, is 81′ and generates 2600hp.

All photos, WVD.  Again, sorry I posted prematurely sans any text. Sometimes I’m looking right at something, seeing a word or a number, and just calling it something else.  I believe my brain is becoming like my mother’s.

 

 

 

If you’re new on this blog, for the past 27 months I’ve been posting photos from exactly 10 years before.  These then are photos I took in June 2010.  What’s been interesting about this for me is that this shows how much harbor activities have changed in 10 years.

Tarpon, the 1974 tug that once worked for Morania and below carries the Penn Maritime livery,  is now a Kirby boat.     Tarpon, which may be “laid up”  or  inactive, pushes Potomac toward the Gate.

North River waits over by GMD shipyard with Sea Hawk, and now also a Kirby vessel.   Sea Hawk is a slightly younger twin, at least in externals and some internals, of Lincoln Sea.

Irish Sea, third in a row, was K-Sea but now is also a Kirby boat.

Huron Service went from Candies to Hornbeck to now Genesis Energy, and works as Genesis Victory.

Ocean King is the oldest in this post . . . built in 1950.  She’s in Boston, but I don’t know how active she is.

Petersburg dates from 1954, and currently serves as a live aboard.  Here’s she’s Block Island bound, passing what is now Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Kristin Poling was built in 1934 and worked the Great Lakes and the Eastern Seaboard via the Erie Canal.

To digress, William Lafferty took this photo on 15 May 1966 at Thorold, Ontario, in the Welland Canal, same boat 44 years later.

And finally, she who travels jobs up and down the East Coast, the 1970 Miss Gill.  She’s currently working in the Charleston area.

All photos, WVD, who never thought a decade ago while taking these photos that I’d revisit them while in the midst of a pandemic.  June 2010 was a great month for photos, so I’ll do a retro a and b.

Stephen Reinauer westbound as the sun heads in the same direction.

Mary Turecamo assists an MOL ship into port.

Ava M pushes toward the pilot’s door on the side of another container ship.

James D heads to the next job amid two container ships in the approaches.

Margaret throttles up alongside.

James William travels toward Howland Hook.

James E. heads, no doubt, for the car float with rail cars awaiting it.

Stephen Dann heads in to get some fuel.

Emily Ann travels light toward the Upper Bay.

All photos from a socially-distanced, physically-isolated, seasonally-adjusted, pent-up energized, freely-masked, and emotionally-stale  WVD.

 

Today’s post will have low verbal density, but I could not pass up noting the arrival of a vessel named Captain Haddock, especially since it’s a bulk carrier with a salt cargo, not a fishing boat.

This is just a hint; it is a container vessel but with many refrigerated plug ins, it might just be transporting some citrus.

 

No comment.

Put rail on water and you’ll see graffiti.

 

Let’s end this post with more context on Captain Haddock.

All photos, WVD.  Stay healthy.

How’s this as an unusual perspective, East Coast coming through the Narrows and under the VZ Bridge, barely visible at top of photo,  with a sugar barge, not sure which one. I believe that’s a Sandy Hook antenna and West Bank Romer Shoal Light off starboard.

Kimberly Poling heads into the Kills past Robbins Reef Light.

James William has been moving garbage containers these days.

The intriguingly named Iron Wolf passes the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Mary Alice moves Columbia New York.

A few hundred yards ahead of Iron Wolf is Sea Fox.

Andrea departs the Kills to pick up a fuel barge.

Mary H returns from a run with barge Patriot.

And finally, Fox3 heads southbound;  that’s the southern tip of Manhattan behind her.

All photos, WVD.

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

It’s been a while since I used this miscellaneous title; in fact, it appeared not at all in 2019.

Montreal awards the gold-headed cane, and the Welland Canal’s Port Colborne offers a beaver fur top hat, each a recognition of a maritime first at the start of the calendar year, but the sixth boro has no such ritual that I know of.

So here’s mine . . . I was not here for the first few days of 2020, but at daybreak on January 4 I was at the Narrows for daybreak, and this was the first vessel passing under the VZ Bridge that I recorded.  So Bravo to Paula Atwell,

NTC 1503, and crew.  You perform an invaluable role in the city.

Should there be some harbor recognition of the new year?  Besides Montreal and Port Colborne, are there others?

Also, when I had a good look at Barry Silverton the other day, it occurred to me that it used to look different.  As recently as January 2018, it looked different and seemed to have more flash.

Here’s a photo from over two years ago.  See the difference?  When did it change, and how did I miss it . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders now what else I’ve missed.

 

This post is front-loaded with photos, text heavy at the end . . .  .   Have you seen this boat before?

 

 

The name is new, as is the livery.

And in a previous lifetime it was  . .

Patapsco!  Below that’s a photo of Patapsco I took on September 2, 2007!!  After the tugboat race, she went nose-to-nose with Lucy Reinauer.

It’s the first Vane boat I saw in the sixth boro, and it was even the name of a class of 4200 hp boats that followed.  See a few more here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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