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Katanni and

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Sawyer I, these photos I took in September along the Saint Lawrence.

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I took the next photos in October.  Evans McKeil was built in Panama in 1936!   The cement barge she’s paired with–Metis— was built as a ship in 1956 and converted to a barge in 1991.

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Wilf Seymour was built in 1961 in Port Arthur TX.  I’ve always only seen her paired with Alouette Spirit.  Here she’s heading upbound into the Beauharnois Lock.   The digital readout (-0.5) indicates she’s using the Cavotec automated mooring system instead of lines and line handlers.

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Moving forward to Troy NY, I don’t think the name of this tug is D. A. Collins,   

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but I know these are Benjamin Elliot, Lucy H, and 8th Sea.

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Miss Gill waited alongside some scows at the booming port of Coeymans.

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And the big sibling Vane 5000 hp Chesapeake heads upriver with Doubleskin 509A.

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And one more autumnal shot with yellows, browns, grays, and various shades of red, and a busy Doris Moran and Adelaide.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos.

 

Know this New York NY boat?

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How about this one?

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Know this background?

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The one above is Taft Beach in lower Newark Bay and that’s the Union County (NJ) Courthouse prominent in the distance.  Below that’s Captain D on garbage detail.

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I’ve no idea what’s making that brilliant flash behind Joyce D. Brown . . . unless it’s another one of those supertall buildings springing up in Manhattan.   I guess “supertall towers” supersedes “skyscraper.”

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It’s Pegasus and

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Charles A and

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Genesis Vision.  Know her former name?  It’s here . . . the top of the Great Lakes.

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OK, so the “B” in the first photo is a vestige of Banda Sea.  See the complete name in raised letters in this post (scroll) from 2009.

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And Capt. Jason looks like this.  Know it?

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Yup, Mister Jim with the paint still drying.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Well well well . . . the paint confused me here, until

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I gt the name board . . . Mister Jim working while transforming.  Click here for a winter photo of Mister Jim.

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Weddell Sea I’ve not seen in a while. And her barge looks to be undergoing a paint change as well.

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Here’s my first glance close up of the stack of

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Barry Silverton.

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Silverton appears to belong to a different fleet than the Harley tugs that’ve been here for almost 10 years, like HMS St. Andrews.

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Brendan Turecamo here is rushing past CMA CGM Corneille to assist from starboard.  Here’s a Brendan Turecamo photo from almost 10 years ago.   Here’s more on CMA CGM Corneille, and if you want a refresher on who Pierre Corneille was, click here.  Recently the sixth bork has seen other c-ships named for writers like Herman Hesse and Ernest Hemingway.

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Closing this post out . . .it’s Jonathan C Moran, moving a tanker out.  More on this tanker soon.  But

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my photo below shows Jonathan C Moran on her christening day, less than two months ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Time to recapitulate the “go west” journey and post the many photos of tugboats I’ve omitted . . . .

Passing Senesco, we saw Buckley McAllister approaching us;  I photographed the boat as someone there photographed us.  I’m not sure which Reinauer tug that is in the background.

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In the East river the next morning, we passed Cornell at the Brooklyn Barge, a food and drink venue I need to make time to visit.

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Over by the Circle Line pier, it’s–well–Miss Circle Line, a reinvention of a Matton tug launched in 1955 and previously called Betsy.  Thanks to Paul Strubeck for reading the name board lettering here before it’s applied . . .  That was a joke, but thanks, Paul.

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James William moves stone Mississippi River style down the sixth boro into the gargantuan building site encompassing the other five boros.

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Near 79th Street, this unidentified tug was supporting a pier project.

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Along the Palisades north of the GW Bridge, Comet pushed Eva Leigh Cutler.

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And Miss Yvette moved a scow not far from where

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Carolina Coast waited for her sugar barge to be emptied into the maw of the Domino plant in Yonkers.

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All photos by will Van Dorp, who hopes to see you at the screening of Graves of Arthur Kill at the the Staten Island ferry terminal on August 13.

Land mass area can be quantified in square miles, but I’d love to work with a mathematician to measure the area within NYC limits which is navigable, i.e., the sixth boro.  Of course, “navigable” would need defining too. Immeasurable, of course, is the number of photos  taken daily of vessels with the sixth boro.

Like this one of Crystal Cutler pushing

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Patricia E. Poling westbound at the Brooklyn Bridge.

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Taft Beach pushes BMLP 703 and 305 in the opposite direction.   Also working recently have been

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Paul Andrew with scrap,

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Sarah Ann with more scrap,

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Thomas D. Witte with crane barge Columbia,

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James E. Brown with a spud barge,

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and Fort Schuyler in various locations.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated, here’s an interesting video on the salvage of  Modern Express . . . passed along by JM.

Also, as we near the mermaid parade, here are details on a performance to get you in the mood, an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s the “Fisherman and his Soul.”

 

This is a repost of the 4th photo in the post from two days ago, showing General Humphreys.

bt5CORPS OF ENGINEERS 85ft INSPECTION BOAT GENERAL HUMPHREYS 3- 19- 1928

I repost because Dan Owen responded as follows:   “General Humphreys was rebuilt into a conventional tug in 1950, 76 x 18.2 x 6.6, reportedly had two GM 6-71 diesels, 330 hp., which would have made it away under-powered. Data is very sketchy but I have a photo taken at Levingston Shipbuilding Co., Orange, Tex., which is undated but may be where it was rebuilt. I am sending this photo as it is the only one I have showing the SARAH R. II as an operating tug. This is a contact photo made from an original negative and is starting to turn yellow with age, hence the fading, but if the photo was made in 1950 at the time of rebuilding.

fb1Sarah R II (Boat Photo Museum)

Louisiana Marine Repair and Service Co., Inc., Baton Rouge, owned it in 1950.  They sold it in March 1966 to John C. Jackson, Jr., dba River & Canal Enterprises, Inc., Baton Rouge.
In Nov. 1976, still owned by Jackson, but removed from documentation as dismantled.  For many years the SARAH R. II was lying along the bank of the Port Allen-Morgan City Route of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway at Plaquemine, La. It may still be there.   I am also attaching two photos of the SARAH R II in this derelict condition.”   Anyone know what remains at that location?
fb2Sarah R II #2 (Boat Photo Museum)

 

fb3Sarah R II #3 (Boat Photo Museum)

Many thanks to Dan Owens for his quick follow up and permission to post these photos.  Hats off to all of you out there working today, like Taft Beach.

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Let’s go farther south–i.e., up the Elizabeth. Covered barge . . .

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pushed by Gram-Me.  Coal?

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Capt. Woody and Alexis of w3marine have the best logo.  See it better here. Fleetmate Ocean Endeavor was in yesterday’s post.

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Lorette is one of two Norfolk tugs that used to be Moran boats.

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As you can see by the livery, Ellie J is also a Norfolk tug, but although

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similar, Stevens Towing’s Island Express is not.

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Here’s a small portion of McAllister Virginia‘s fleet:  Nancy and Eileen.  The last time I saw Eileen she was returning a Staten Island ferry post rehab.

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Vulcan construction has its logo on a number of tugs here, including Arapaho,

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Aries,

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Capt. Ron L, and

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VMC Chattanooga.

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Alexander Duff is a Vane tug.

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Kodiak, here I think leaving the soybean depot– used to be Vane’s Capt. Russi.

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Kodiak has been in the sixth boro on a few occasions.  Here’s more of her current fleet:  Maverick, ?Southern Star?, and Challenger.

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Hoss, like the boats immediately above is also an Intracoastal Marine boat. Hoss is a close relative via Wiley Manufacturing of the sixth boro’s Patricia.   Sun Merchant, which I saw here in Savannah, is a Vane boat.

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Corman Marine’s Captain Mac is yet another tugboat in the Elizabeth owned by a construction company.

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Camie and Cajun look alike but may be owned by Robbins Maritime and Bay Transportation, respectively.

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Three Sisters seems to be owned by a family-oriented company called Smith Brothers.

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Elizabeth Ann, operated by Atlantic Gulf Towing, used to be known as El Hippo Grande, a truly satisfactory name for a workboat.

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And finally, we seem to have two Skanska-owned boats, Ranger and

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Cap’n Ed.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who imagined there’d be only about 10 photos in this post about a short section of the waterway in the Norfolk/Portsmouth VA area.  For the entirely delightful travel through the area, I am very grateful to the USMMA Sailing Foundation.

A request, though.   Over by the Norfolk Dredging yard, I saw their small tug Palmyra through the trees and could not get a good shot.  Has anyone taken one over the years?  If so, could you share it on this blog?  Send me an email, please.

Finally, some of you got an earlier version of this last night when I pushed the wrong button.  Sorry about that.  I could give other reasons for that error, but it was a slip and I had not intended you to think I had started using placeholder gibberish as captions.

Cheers.

 

This is day 8 of the GHP&W series, so let me break pattern a bit.  If you missed the beginning, GHP&W is not a law firm; it’s abbrev for “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves.”  I haven’t dusted off any wharves yet, but two-thirds of the months still lie ahead.

The story here is that TS Kings Pointer was out serving as a training platform and not at Kings Point, although there was a potential meeting somewhere south along our track to Portsmouth, VA.

Mile 1, 0738 Wednesday, heading for the Throg’s Neck Bridge.

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0756.  Passing SUNY Maritime and TS Empire State. Click here for photos from her summer sea term 2015.

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0804, Robert Burton, a Norfolk boat.

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0907, Mary Gellatly with a sand scow at the southern tip of Governors Island.

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1010, passing the northern tip of Sandy Hook but looking back at Naval Weapons Station Earle, with USNS Medgar Evers at the wharf.

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1017, Romer Shoal Light and Coney Island.

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1517, Capt. Willie Landers northbound off Beach Haven, I think.

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1612, FV Jonathan Ryan and tug Pops in the distance.

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1618, entering a grid marked “numerous scientific buoys.”

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1657 off Atlantic City, with unidentified tug and barge

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1740 and about to switch watch.

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Thursday, 0852, looking north into the Chesapeake after going wide around Fisherman Island.

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0910 . . . it’s the current  TS Kings Pointer, ex-Liberty Star. . .

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. . . heading along Virginia Beach

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before turning northward toward Long Island Sound.  Her former sister ship–Freedom Star–was in the area but we did not see her.

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Meanwhile, we head north into the Thimble Shoal Channel Tunnel and into port, which you can follow tomorrow.  And that tug and crane barge in the distance . . . survey work for new infrastructure or maintenance dredging?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.  It was a smooth trip.

Bravo to the organizers and participants of the 2015 NYC race.  It starts with a muster…

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L to r:  Catherine Miller, Robert E. McAllister, Eric R. Thornton, Mister T, Buchanan 1, and Buchanan 12

which looks  different as you shift perspective.

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Add Red Hook and Sarah Ann, with a jet ski for scale.

 

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Add Thomas Witte.

 

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Take a close up on Mister T with John J. Harvey in the distance.

It’s great to see race newcomers like Sea Scout Ship 243 out of Rahway NJ, and

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Patricia.

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By this point, some boats like Robert E. McAllister start to get impatient.

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Muster then turns into a procession,  filing straight toward the starting line and

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showing the colors

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as some newcomers catch up.

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James William used to be a Moran boat.

Next stage . . . it’s the tension on the starting line, feet digging into the starting blocks and muscles tensing, sort of.

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There are 11 boats here, including Margot pushing a set of rock barges and not racing.

They’re off!

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and water starts to cascade away from the bows…

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froth by the ton.

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But when the quick minutes of the race have elapsed, the first boat down the course is the impatient Robert E. McAllister.

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And almost as in a triathlon, the dash down the course changes and the pushing starts.

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All manner of paired struggle ensues.

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And we need to leave.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to Bjoern and crew for my ride.

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See that tug over there?   This photo comes from Asher Peltz, and I’m very grateful . . .

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because I was seeing the tow from this angle, quite backlit, but

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fascinated nonetheless, given the load

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on Marmac 300 . . . parts of the turbine bases for units 3, 4, and 5 of 5.   See the base for unit 1 here.  At the pace the tow is moving, it’s barely to Montauk as of this posting.  By the way, for scale, the tug is 97.7 ‘ loa.

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Here’s Stephen B in a logical though unlikely location.

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nestled between Manhattan Elite and Celestial.

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Dean Reinauer sidled over to my part of the Kills, and I got a good look.  Thanks.

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This Dean has been at work for just over two years.  Click here to see–along with some other departed vessels– the previous Dean Reinauer, currently in Nigeria under different ownership.

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Bluefin appears to have just been painted, as the lettered Kirby logo has not  been applied.

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The last time–I think–Bluefin was on this blog she was still gray.

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Here’s Robert Burton in yesterday’s strange pre-rain light and here

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at dawn yesterday interestingly backlit though not quite.  A couple of years ago, I caught her down in Morehead City.

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All photos taken yesterday.  Thanks to Asher for the lead photo here.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

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My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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