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I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

It’s been a while since I used this miscellaneous title; in fact, it appeared not at all in 2019.

Montreal awards the gold-headed cane, and the Welland Canal’s Port Colborne offers a beaver fur top hat, each a recognition of a maritime first at the start of the calendar year, but the sixth boro has no such ritual that I know of.

So here’s mine . . . I was not here for the first few days of 2020, but at daybreak on January 4 I was at the Narrows for daybreak, and this was the first vessel passing under the VZ Bridge that I recorded.  So Bravo to Paula Atwell,

NTC 1503, and crew.  You perform an invaluable role in the city.

Should there be some harbor recognition of the new year?  Besides Montreal and Port Colborne, are there others?

Also, when I had a good look at Barry Silverton the other day, it occurred to me that it used to look different.  As recently as January 2018, it looked different and seemed to have more flash.

Here’s a photo from over two years ago.  See the difference?  When did it change, and how did I miss it . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders now what else I’ve missed.

 

This post is front-loaded with photos, text heavy at the end . . .  .   Have you seen this boat before?

 

 

The name is new, as is the livery.

And in a previous lifetime it was  . .

Patapsco!  Below that’s a photo of Patapsco I took on September 2, 2007!!  After the tugboat race, she went nose-to-nose with Lucy Reinauer.

It’s the first Vane boat I saw in the sixth boro, and it was even the name of a class of 4200 hp boats that followed.  See a few more here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

Happy 2020, so let’s go a decade back, and see a selection of photos from January 2010.

Ross Sea escorts Rebel eastbound past Atlantic Leo in the KVK.

Lucy Reinauer, bathed in morning light, approaches Howland Hook in the AK.

Miss Gill and Lucky D head for the smaller Bayonne Bridge and Goethals Bridge, off to the west.

Athena is way out of Block Island Sound, here doing winter work in the sixth boro.  Little did I know back then that I’d soon be taking my first ride to Block Island aboard Athena.

North Sea is on the hard in Kingston NY.

My favorite winter harbor fishing vessel passes Robbins Reef, leaving

the rest of the fleet farther to the NE in the Upper Bay.  Note how different the skyline of lower Manhattan was then.

Doris escorts a tanker into the KVK.

Davis Sea crushes her way into the Rondout with a load of heat.

It was, as all these “retro sixth boro posts,” only a decade ago, but so much has changed.

All photos in January 2010 by Will Van Dorp.  Happy 2020.

 

I’m always on the look out for new tugboats in the harbor, and Camie mostly fits that bill.  A bit of research, though, finds she’s been on the blog a few times already, however.

Here, l to r, it’s Polar Bright, Ava, New York, and Stephen B.

Robert Burton here is tending a rock scow in front of the very busy Bayonne background.

James Brown moves some scrap barges . . . likely in the direction of the East River.

Weddell Sea stands by with Penn No. 90, demonstrating all the components of “push gear.”

Maybe someone can clarify here, but it appears No. 90 has cargo heating gear.

 

Helen Laraway moves a scow toward a morning.

And Fort Schuyler heads straight for us–I’m zoomed in–away from a marine/industrial Brooklyn background.

For the last day of November 2019, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally, click here for Paul Strubeck’s Vintage Diesel Design blog post on tugboat Luna in Boston.  It expands a post I did on Luna here almost four years ago.

 

Back in the sixth boro . . . it’s a head-on shot of Thomas J. Brown, with multiple icons of the harbor behind her.

Mister T pushes some loaded barges out east beneath the 59th Street Bridge in the photo below,

and tows twice as many empties westbound in the next photo.

Mary Turecamo shifts deck cargo barge New York from Red Hook over toward the other container ports of NYC/NJ, keeping a good number of trucks off the roads and bridges.

Meredith C. Reinauer moves RTC 150 out in the direction of the Sound.

Philadelphia pushes fuel barge Double Skin 503 into the Kills, over to where Ellen McAllister assists Genesis Liberty out of her IMTT berth.

Then Genesis Liberty moves GM 11105 around and outbound.

Robert Burton, usually pushing compacted garbage barges, the other day was doing

rock scow duty.

And rounding out this post, Ava M. McAllister, still in her first half year of working in the sixth boro, heads out to escort in a vessel just in from sea.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

I know others witnessed dawn this morning as the big pink ship came in . . . .

By the way, if you were naming this ONE “bird” ULCV based on this morning’s color, which bird

would

you choose?  Nah . . . it wasn’t that.  More later.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

CB is obviously “Chicago bound.”

Neither Thomas D. Witte nor Clearwater here off Mount Beacon is that, but we were.

Meagan Ann headed south with

used and abused cars on

SMM 157 for the start of their last trip.

James William pushed several loads of building materials southbound.

Rebecca Ann turned around for her next trip.

Lisa Ann worked on the bulk heading project in Troy.

Frances moved a scow south, and

Ancient Mariner too moved on.

All photos by will Van Dorp, and this was Newburgh to Troy.

 

All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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