You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Reinauer’ category.

The challenge here is to have clear photos and lights.  Evening Star with B. No. 250 starts us off,

Jean Turecamo is on assignment with a barge,

Reinauer Twins heads back for the Kills,

TRF Memphis waits in Stapleton anchorage,

Mount St. Elias departs her barge,

and Alice Austen, usually the wee hours ferry, runs early.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Wendell Sea . . . she started out as Scott C, in 2007, meaning she worked as a SeaBoats vessel for only around a third of its life.  I got these photos of her last week.

She’s larger than I imagined:  104′ x 37′ and powered by 4800 hp. That’s Dean Reinauer in the background.

 

 

Back in April 2010, she looked like this.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a stranger in the harbor . . . OSG Courageous.  Winter does seem like the time to see the larger units moving oil products. Crowley’s 16,000 hp Legend is in the AK as of this writing.  If anyone snaps a photo, I’d love to see it.   Back in winter 2012, I posted photos of Legend here still on the hard as a new build.

OSG Courageous, 8000 hp,  is married to this 200,000 barrel barge OSG-244.   Click here for my first view of an even larger OSG tug, Vision, 12,000 hp.

Lincoln Sea was the largest tug I’d ever seen back 10 years when we crossed paths near Mariner’s Harbor.

This was her arrival from somewhere in New England yesterday.

At the same moment, Dylan Cooper was lightering a tanker I’d seen before as

Navig8 Stealth II, now intriguingly renamed Aquadisiac.

Eric McAllister assisted Glorious Leader . . .,

which these days sounds like it refers to a dictator.

To close, the venerable Frances moves cold stone through cold water,

but it’s winter.  Crank up the heat and put on some extra layers.  Click here and scroll to see photos of Frances I took in 2010 when she still had the Turecamo wood grained colors.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Sea Power has been lurking in and around the sixth boro the past few days, and I will continue trying to get some good photos of her, but on 9-22-16 Jack Ronalds up at the Canso Canal caught these photos of her as she headed into Lake Erie to pick up her barge constructed in Erie PA.

Remember, if you need photos of a vessel traveling between the Great Lakes and the west Atlantic Coast from the Maritimes southward, Jack’s your guy.   See some of his work (2440 photos) here.

4-24-08  Dean Reinauer passes NYK Daedalus.  This Dean left NYC for Nigeria in June 2011. 

6-16-08  Juliet Reinauer pushed oil a decade ago.  She’s still in the harbor working as Big Jake.

6-23-08  Odin . . . no longer has an adjustable wheelhouse and may be laid up, and ITB Groton, single-hulled tanker, . . . was sold in later 2008 to Nigerian interests first to ship grain and then returned to petroleum trade.  It was sent to Alang and scrapped in late 2013.

9-13-08  Viking seen here out of the notch has made its way to Kirby and is currently very busy on the Hudson.

9-05-10  Here’s another showing Viking out of the notch and all gussied up, and (it seems) terrifying W. O. Decker.

And finally, another from 9-22-16, a shot of Sea Power heading north through the Canso Canal and ultimately to Lake Erie to pick up its mated barge.  In the background is the 60+ year-old quarry now operated by  Martin Marietta Materials in Aulds Cove, where vessels like and including Alice Oldendorff pick up the aggregates.  Last year, four million tons worth of rock was shipped from here.

Many thanks to Jack for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who has learned that as of this morning, Sea Power is sailing for Charleston SC.

 

For a 2015 coyote on ice, click here and scroll.    If a coyote came up behind these critters right now,

there’d be movements in the cycle of life.  Benjamin Moll took this amazing series of shots a few days back on the Hudson.

I was wondering whether these deer approach the open water to drink.  Anyone conjecture?

I’m wondering . .  . was there a whistle involved?

Many thanks for use of these photos to Benjamin Moll.

 

Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series, and here’s probably the most dramatic set of photos ever from Paul, taken January seven years ago.

Below, that’s the view of the mouth of the Rondout . . . . and the light at the end of the north breakwater, which looks so beautiful here.

Here’s a view along the deck of Cornell, when

Frances was about to pass, headed north on the Hudson,

which looks like the concrete parking lot of an abandoned shopping mall.

 

 

But commerce goes on, Katherine Walker on station

and Haggerty Girls moving heating oil.

Daisy Mae, however, is making her maiden voyage home, up to Coeymans.

Many thanks to Paul Strubeck, who sent me these photos as soon as he thawed out from the trip.

And completely unrelated, I just added a new blog to my blogroll, GirlsAtSea, started this month by a Romanian bridge officer named Diane.  Check it out here or from the blogroll.

 

You can read  Ice 5 or 3 or 2.  But freezing temperatures in salt water look different than in fresh water, salt ice not like lake ice, which is a topic for tomorrow. The sixth boro low temperature in the first two days of January was well above 0 F, Maine and Minnesota well into the double digits negative F, and Anchorage, a balmy 46 ABOVE, warmer than places in Florida!

But I digress, cold is cold and uncomfortable.  Polar bear plunge notwithstanding, a strong swimmer won’t last a minute in this water.

 

But work goes on . . .

with extra layers

and precautions.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who really postponed admitting the new year had arrived because–dangerously– it was more comfortable thinking otherwise.

 

Genesis Vision has just gone onto the wire from alongside, and

tightens it, moving the barge outbound for Florida.  Click here for a 2013 photo of Genesis Vision as Superior Service.

Stephen Reinauer steams out to the Lower Bay to stand by with a barge just

vacated by Timothy L.

McKinley Sea returns in the direction of its barge out in the Upper Bay.

Hunting Creek provides a needed boost as Pokomoke moves Double Skin 39 out of the dock at IMTT.

In the fog, there’s a negotiation going on between Evening Mist and Evening Star that took me a bit to figure out . . . Ah . . .

Star goes into the notch of B. No. 250, and then Mist assists in the 180 degree turn.  Note the pink ribbon on Mist’s stack?

My father would say, “Dean‘s lit up like a Christmas tree.”

Helen Laraway . . . assisting?

 

The truth about Helen is that she was waiting as Anthem was departing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Kudos to Ginger, who guessed what the anniversary alluded to yesterday was.  Today begins year 12 of this blog.  So in the midst of all the references to CYBER- this and that, I’ll be my default contrarian self and call the next series a CYPHER series, lots of posts beginning with the number 12.  In today’s I took a photo from the top “hit” month in each year since 2006.

So in 2006, December was the top month, and the photo below (or one like it)  appeared in KVK.

In 2007, September was the top month, and this was from Historic Tug.

In 2008, June, and this was from Transitioning.

September in 2009 and from Divers 2. 

In 2010, November, and this is from Pilot and the Princesa.

June 2011, and context is Like Groundhog Day 3. 

2012, May, and Blueing Beyond the Sixth Boro. 

2013, March, and Looking for a Ship.

2014, March, and Botruc Plum Isle. 

March again in 2015, and this has context in Highway 4. 

March yet again, 2016, and Backing Down Heina. 

And finally, the greatest number of hits in 2017 was in July, likely because of the posts related to Peking‘s move. 

A reason to glance backward periodically is to see what has changed.  The corollary then is that a reason to do a daily waterblog is to record what was present when. And doing that permits me to see changes in myself and my tools.   Blogging, as you might guess, takes a fair amount of my time and guides a bulk of my focus, but it rewards me enough to continue.  I can’t say for how long, nor do I have to.  I’ve always refused to sign my boss’s multimillion dollar contract, although that might cost me the cover story on some high-profile magazine . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And let’s hear some applause for Ginger.

 

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