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Marjorie B. McAllister is one of those tugs that confused me when I first started paying attention.  Below the house is down, and

and here the hydraulics have raised it up to look over Bulkmaster.

Ava M. McAllister‘s elegant lines are shown off as she assists a tanker to the Arthur Kill.

Cohoes on the Hudson River was the launch site of Mary Turecamo, the last tugboat to be built there.

Thomas D. Witte originally had a telescoping wheelhouse to fit under bridges on the Erie Canal and elsewhere, but I’ve never seen photos of that superstructure.

Ever sharp-looking 2006 Pegasus goes to a job.

The veteran Ellen McAllister escorts in a tanker.  I’ll do a tanker post here one of these days soon, maybe later this week.

Capt. Brian heads eastbound on the KVK to a job.

Pathfinder is rarely seen light, but here she heads over to pick up the TUP at the trash transfer station.

Twins . . .  at the 10-year mark . . . looks to need some TLC.

Here was Twins a minute earlier, coming out of a busy but typical traffic pattern on the KVK.  I count five tugboats besides Twins.

The mighty Patrice powers her way east to pick up a job.  Note the crew aboard Chem Singapore.

And to end this post, which of course could go on and on, the 4610 hp Doris powers along a container barge from one NY/NJ container port to another, a local example of short sea shipping.

All photos, WVD.

 

James William was slinging along a slew of barges.

Galveston (I think) was coming in the other morning with Chemical Transporter.  Usually Freeport pushes Chemical Transporter, so maybe I’m just misremembering.

With the slash of safety yellow across the barge bow, I was initially confused…

until the green with red trim told me it was definitely . . . Pinuccia

Two Vane 3000s separated by five years of work . . .  team up on getting the barge gently into her berth.

Paul Andrew Brian Nicholas gets watched very closely by the Lady of the sixth boro.

And, Matthew Tibbetts exits the east end of the Kills.

All photos, WVD, who is finally back in the sixth boro . . . for a bit.  I will be doing a lot of inland/coastal traveling the next few months.  All photos of workboats wherever you are are greatly appreciated.

 

In case you’re new to this blog,”retro” means I’m looking back to my photo archives exactly 10 years to June 2011.  The “38” here means this is the thirty-eighth month I’ve done this.  It’s a fresh look at June 2011 photos, in some cases informed by whatever the past 10 years has wrought.

Bridge Builder 26 doing what it is named for. 

F. Dawson, 1969, 66′ x 22′ and 1000 hp, in 2011 was working on a bridge project in the Harlem River. I’ve no idea where either of these boats is today.

Patapsco, 2004 and 96′ x  34′ and now known as Steven Wayne, was one of the first Vane boats into the sixth boro.  

Susquehanna is a Patapsco-class tugboat, meaning mostly a clone and three years younger, and still in the Vane fleet.

Marlin (1974, 96′ x 35′, and 4200) and Penn No. 6Marlin‘s now registered in Panama, and the No. 6 is now Vinik No. 6.

Kathleen Turecamo is now buff and green, a Stasinos boat, seen here as Meaghan Marie.

Matthew Tibbetts is still in the sixth boro and at work.

This was the only time I saw Hercules, ex-YTB-766.  In June 2011, it was towed here and then loaded aboard a semi-sub for Nigeria. 

Barents Sea came back to life as Atlantic Enterprise, and is currently working on a salvage/recovery down south.

All photos and memories, WVD.

There will be a mermaid parade later this summerin 2011, it took place on the Saturday closest to the solstice, which would be today.

It should be no secret that I’m an early riser, have always been one to get up in the “o’dark” hours for the morning golden hour, the best time of day.  Here are two Miller’s Launch OSVs, possibly Rana and Rosemary.

 

A bit later on a different day, I caught Dylan Cooper westbound, with another Reinauer unit off in the distance.

 

Janet D headed into that  same morning, here eastbound.

Ditto . . .  Charles D McAllister and

Mary Turecamo.  In fact, in the photo below, you see all three.   Did you get the golden hour this morning?

All photos, WVD, who thinks this morning’s overcast skies here blocked any gold.

 

Random Tugs 001” I posted in October 2007, 14 years ago.  The motivation for such a post then, as now, comes from the observation that what passes you by, either on the water, the roadway, or even the sidewalk or hallway, is often just random.  It’s foolish to look for meaning or significance where there is none. So here’s installment 339.

Genesis Glory, 1979, 3900 and 120′ x 34′

Janet D, 2015, 1320, and 67′ x 26′

Sarah D, 1975, 2000, and 90′ x 29′

HMS Justice, 2013, 2000, and 75′ x 30′

Sarah Ann, 2003, 2700, and 78′ x 26′

Charles D. McAllister, 1967, 1800, and 94′ x 29′

Durham . . . I’ve seen her a long time, I believe she’s operated by Ken’s Marine, but I don’t know anything more.

Kodi with Hayward back by the bridge.  Kodi dates back to 1974, under 500, and 43′ x 15′, I think.

L. M. Caddell works near the floating dry docks. The upper wheelhouses at the Reinauer yard in the background, I’d guess Dace, Stephen, and JoAnne III.  I’m sure I’ll be corrected.  I don’t believe the shorter “upper house” to the right is installed on a tugboat.  Now I’m really sure I’ll be corrected.  As for simple specs on the Caddell yard tug . . . sorry.

Coho, 2008, 4000, and 111′ x 36′

All photos, WVD, and happy “fly the official flag day.

To highlight the variety, this post will focus on size, horsepower, and age.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969, 92′ x 27′, 2000 hp.  All numbers rounded up if  .5 or more.

Brendan Turecamo, 1975, 107′ x 32′, 3900.

Crystal Cutler, 2010, 67′ x 26′, 1500.

Bruce A. McAllister, 1974, 112′ x 30′, 4000.

C.F. Campbell, 1975, 100′ x 31′, 3400.

Ava M. McAllister, 2018, 100′ x 40′, 6770.

Saint Emilion, 2007, 105′ x 38′, 4800.

Christian Reinauer, 2001, 119′ x 40′, 7200.

Magothy, 2008, 100′ x 34′, 4200.

All photos, WVD.

Two blog-related issues:  Sarah Dann and the big blue crane are now below Quebec City.  And, bidding has begun on Grouper and Chancellor.

 

It’s June, and I’m starting my 176th month doing tugster.  Wow!  how many hours might I have put into this now? 

June 2011 saw some interesting sailboats and boats.  This post mentions only a few and covers the first half of the month.

The Dyna-rigged Maltese Falcon was in town, sailing at 20 kts across the harbor and then dousing all sails almost instantly at the push of a button. She’s currently in Messina, IT.

Blue Marlin was in town and spent three weeks loading US tugs and barges sold to Nigerian interests.  Most of these names–Dean Reinauer, Curtis Reinauer, Janice Ann Reinauer, and John Reinauer–have been re-used on quite different tugboats.  “Three weeks to load a Float on-float off . . .?” you might be wondering.

Well, there were some setbacks with ill-fitting cradles.

Eventually, everything found its place and stayed there. 

I recall taking photos from Fort Wadsworth and overhearing some folks concerned “the big orange ship” was sinking.

Sixth boro haze that June made for some dull photos.  If you want to relive the ordeal of loading, click here for the tugster six-part “groundhog day” series.

Reefer Albemarle Island got assistance into the Red Hook terminals from Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran. Currently, the reefer is running between Martinique and Panama.

EPA Bold came into town;  the 1989 USNS Vigorous has changed hands several times and is now operated as Bold Explorer, an EGS survey vessel.

The 2007 Barbara C became Arabian Sea and is currently Saint Emilion.

The 5100 teu Cosco New York gets an assist from Miriam Moran.  Currently, she’s running south along the western Mexico coast.

We began with a luxury sailing vessel;  Black Seal made one run into the sixth boro with a cargo on cacao from Dominican Republic.  The three-masted schooner is currently at a mooring in Pocasset MA.

Let’s lleave it here for now, with all photos, WVD.

 

Because the name and focus of this blog is tugster, you’d expect to see a lot of tugboats, both within the confines of New York harbor, aka the REAL sixth boro, and I hope you are satisfied that you find a plethora of tugboats in installments of this blog.  So here’s Random Tugs #337, post 4877, and the tugboat is Foxy 3 moving an aggregate scow.

In the foreground, it’s Crystal Cutler;  off in the distance it’s Normandy.

Diane B here heads east with a cargo in John Blanche.  I did an article on this unit some years back.

Joyce D. Brown pushes an empty scow east.  Notice anything on the scow that identifies it?  See the end of this post.

James E. Brown passed sister Joyce D. that morning in the Kills.

Franklin Reinauer that morning may or may not have been under control of the author of a tugboat captain who shared his tales a few years back.  I will stay mum. Off to the left, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

HMS Liberty muscled a barge full of bunkers to deliver to a thirsty ship over in New Jersey.

Centerline operates both Liberty above and HMS Justice below.

Susan Miller moves some material and equipment over to the project just west of the St. George ferry terminal.

Brendan Turecamo heads over to the next and the next and the next job.

Bruce A. McAllister assists a container ship into port.

Bergen Point came off the ways at Blount Shipbuilding way back in 1958.

So that scow Joyce was pushing above is called Maria and

this logo says it was once in the Disch fleet, now sold off in many directions.

All photos, WVD.

Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

Way back in 2007 I started this series, and I now think I should never have called it “bronze” since it’s more like a golden brown, but no matter, this post is all the same fleet.  Name the fleet and the tug?

Talking fleet renewal . . ., Reinauer has a young fleet.  Janice Ann is not even a year old . . .

Laurie Ann, here with Grace D alongside, is just over a decade old.

Dean is not quite a decade at work.

Curtis came out the same year as Dean.  By the way, I didn’t identify the photo in the top photo yet.  Figured it out?

Morgan is the oldie but goldie . . .

Haggerty Girls is about the same age as Dean and Curtis . . . i.e., a young fleet.

All photos, recently, WVD.

And the tugboat in the first photo is . . . Dylan Cooper.

 

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