You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Reinauer’ category.

Dace lighters STI Excel.

 

Neptune comes into town again.

Buchanan 12 makes a rare appearance light, but everyone needs to refuel periodically.

Janet D follows Seeley into the Kills.

How a bout a four’fer . . .   counter:  Marjorie, Kristin Poling, Nicholas, and Jordan Rose.

Sea Lion heads eastbound.

B. Franklin travels west, and

Discovery Coast, east. .  .  both light.

Nathan G moves a deep scow into the Kills with Cape Wrath lurking in the background. 

Traffic never stops, and it’ll outlast me, the photographer, WVD.

 

Happy spring.  All photos in this post were taken in winter two days ago and over a six-hour period.  Before noon, the five boros and the next state were obscured out of existence. I really think they didn’t exist during those hours, just like the imaginary sun crossed (??) the imaginary equator at 11:33 NYC time.  Crossed .  . by boat or chariot or blimp or goat cart . . .  I don’t know.

Kimberly  passed by and Robbins Reef was barely there.  Mariner brought boxes in, and Kirby passed by, and they might as well have been at sea.

Neptune shuttled by, and hints of Bayonne showed themselves.

Justine came by and the sunshine was making progress burning off the moisture.

When Cape Canaveral crossed in front of me, Manhattan was there, albeit like a matte painting;  right, that’s just a movie set, right?

The large gray ship . . . Soderman, that too was a different painted background, this time for Captain D.

Before Mary Turecamo appeared over on the starboard side of New York‘s trans-harbor load  of containers, I had no idea what I was seeing.

It wasn’t until well into the afternoon and–in the near distance–Bert Reinauer passed overtaking the Vane unit that I saw a boat pass by without a hint of fog.  That, however, was mostly due to the proximity

All photos, Friday, WVD.

It’s hard to beat morning light for drama, as is the case here with QM2 getting assisted by James D. and

Doris Moran into her berth in Red Hook, as I shoot into that light.

Taken only a few minutes later, this photo of FV Eastern Welder dragging the bottom in front of the Weeks yard had me shooting with the rising sun behind me.

Bayonne dry dock is full of business.  Note the formerly Bouchard tug Jordan Rose and Cape Wraith off its bow.  I’m not sure which Miller’s Launch OSV that is.  To the left, that’s Soderman.

Hyundai Speed and Glovis Sirius shift cargo.

More shooting into the light here toward Bay Ridge, where lots is happening.

Torm Louise‘s color just looks cold.

Afrodite has been around the world several times each year since the hoopla of her moving Bakken crude from Albany has subsided.  Note the unidentified formerly Bouchard tugboat to the extreme left.

 

And with the drama of morning light, wild clouds form the backdrop to three tugboats seeing CMA CGM Pegasus out the door on a windy day.

All photos earlier this week, WVD, who feels fortunate to live in a place like this where my drama exists only in photos.

I’ve mentioned before that I’m always looking for novelty.  Here’s one, new to me at least,

the 4400 hp Chincoteague with Double Skin 802.  I’d love to get closer-up pics one of these days.

Nicole Leigh Reinauer, a 7200 hp beauty twenty years almost senior, passes Chincoteague on her way to

rejoin her barge, RTC 135.

Meanwhile Miriam Moran follows in a ship as one of the assists.

Moments earlier, the 1979 3000 hp Miriam had accompanied 1982 4610 hp  Doris Moran to meet the ship.

The 2021 4000 hp Jordan Rose, ex-Evening Star and now in Rose Cay colors, is high and dry alongside Sorenson (?) Miller on the hard at Bayonne Drydock.

The 2008 4200 hp Pocomoke passes the KV buoy, which made soothing noises as it rose and settled in the chop.

The 1999 4500 hp Patrice heads out to meet a ship.

 

And finally, 1999 3600 hp Stephen Dann looked particularly good as she headed out to her next job.

All photos, this week, WVD.

 

It’s time for a February installment of “retro sixth boro,” a glance back at some of the boats working in New York harbor exactly a decade ago.  Cheyenne was still here, pushing a scow out the east end of the KVK.

I’m not sure the 61′ x 22′  1970 Salvage Master is still in the harbor.  Even back a decade ago, I only saw it once or twice.

The 1962 Kristy Ann Reinauer was scrapped in 2015.  The 2000 Tokyo Express is still around;  in fact, I believe I saw it just recently. 

The 1980 Independence was pushing 1982 tank barge OSG 243Independence was scrapped in 2020, and the barge laid up.

The 1981 Huron Service is now Genesis Victory.  The 1976 Atlantic Salvor has carried that name since 1998.

Na’hoku (Na Hoku) is a 1981 tugboat that spent a short time in the boro a decade ago;  later in 2012, Na’hoku (meaning stars, as used for navigation in Hawaiian) was sold to a South Carolina company that kept the name.  As of this writing, she’s in Fernandina Beach FL.  As for DBL 85, a tank barge by that name was built in 2009 and is likely still in use.

The 1976 Barents Sea switched over to Kirby and then in 2016, re-emerged as Donjon’s Atlantic Enterprise.  Along the left side of the photo, Casablanca is a 1987 barge.

All photos, WVD, from February 2012.

Let’s have another look at photos in the sixth boro during the first month of 2012.  It was a snowy day that I caught Cheyenne

and Franklin Reinauer. Cheyenne is now in Wisconsin, for sale, and Franklin is still in this boro.

Thomas Dann had a crane barge over alongside New Century.  Thomas Dann had a serious fire off Florida and was scrapped in 2015.  New Century is now Lucky Century, NE  bound near Mauritius and Reunion.

Bohemia assisted Quantico Creek with a bunker barge. Bohemia is on the Delaware River, and Quantico Creek . . . in Tampa.

This scene was so busy I might come back to it in another post.  What I can identify here (l to r) is this:  Maersk Murotsu, Quantico Creek, of course Greenland Sea, Dubai Express, and a Reinauer barge. Dubai Express is currently on its way from the Med to the sixth boro.

Seaboats had already been scooped up by K-Sea in January 2012, which had itself been scooped up by Kirby.  Notice the stacks of the two boats:  the red/black initials have been painted over and a K-Sea oval placed but not painted with the K-Sea logo nor had the stack itself been painted K-Sea “yellow.”  Mediterranean Sea and

Weddell Sea still carried their mostly-green livery, and when painted, we clearly Kirby boats.  Mediterranean Sea has just recently changed hands again and is now Douglas J., a Donjon boat.  

Beaufort Sea was still fully K-Sea, as evidenced by the yellow stack and the K-Sea oval.   She was scrapped around 2016.

Left to right here, it’s Pearl River I and Morton S. Bouchard Jr.  The ship is now Zim Vancouver–just left Norfolk for Spain–and the tug is now Stasinos Boys. 

Ellen McAllister passed the 7 buoy. 

And finally, Penn Maritime began the year as its own company before been acquired by Kirby, and

Penn No. 6 carried that name forward until 2018 when she began what we now know as Vinik No. 6.

All January 2012 photos, WVD, who hopes you enjoy this photographic account of some of the changes in the sixth boro in the past decade.  I have lots of photos of that month, so I could do an installment “C” of that retrospective.   Besides, although there are things I want to see in the boro today, I might have to acclimate to the cold first.  Yesterday after it was 57 degrees here, and this morning . . .  a dramatic 31.

And unrelated, here‘s how the new year was feted in around the world . . .

Also unrelated, this 1953 “tugboat tug” (sic) is still for sale.

 

 

The year is in its last hours, and these vessels saw their last hours in this year as well.  Of course, this is a subjective list, made up of mostly photos I’ve taken over the years of sixth boro and Great Lakes vessels. This list is not definitive.  If you know of others, you might add them in the comments section.

Many photos of Helen McAllister have appeared here over the years, but time caught up with the 1900 Helen, who began and ended her life on Staten Island.  I caught her doing her last dance –a tango or a waltz– here.

More than 10 years of silence passed between the photo above at the McAllister NY yard and the one below in Tottenville.  Eagle-eyed Tony A. caught her stripped of her identification and ready for the scrapping jaws last month.

The 1907 Pegasus saw her end this year as well.  I spent many hours on Pegasus, and regretfully, sometimes the scrappers’ jaws are the most humane end for boats. 

The 1970 Joanne Reinauer III also saw its end.  I learned a lot about the modifications made to tugboat from her and from photos of her tranformations supplied by readers.  My photo below is from 2009.

The 1972 Viking also saw a series of modifications.  You might think a powerful machine like this . . . like these . . . would never wear out, but like you and me, they do.  I believe it was 2021 that she was scrapped, but it may have been earlier.  The photo below is from the September 5, 2010 tugboat race.

The Great Lakes shed some vessels also.  Mississagi began work in 1943.  I took the photo in Lake St. Clair in August 2016. She was towed to a Sault Ste. Marie scrapyard in October 2021.

Manistee dates from the same year and has the same dimensions–620′ x 60′– as Mississagi.  This photo I took in Toledo, where she had been laid up for some time.  More on Manistee here.

Ojibway, a 1952 bulker, is currently underway in the Saint Lawrence River, bound for Port Cartier with a load of grain.  After that, she’ll lay up awaiting an uncertain future.   For what it’s worth, she came off the ways the year I was born.

And on a sad note, the 1975 St. Clair was relatively new for a Great Lakes bulk carrier, but a devastating fire during winter layup  in February 2019 condemned her; she arrived at the scrapyard in Port Colborne just a few weeks ago. Photo here is credited to Corey Hammond.

Thanks to Tony and Corey for their photos;  all others, WVD, who wishes you all a healthy and happy 2022 and the fulfillment of all your goals.

And unrelated to this post but entirely germane to this day of reflection/new goal setting before a new year, check out Ellen Magellan’s expeditions.  That’s not her real name but it’s so clever I wish I’d come up with it. 

 

Photos from the sixth boro . . . although I’m a thousand miles away and in the eastern mountains…  1974 ex-Exxon Ocean State and

and slightly smaller 1975 ex-Exxon Granite State, now Marjorie B. McAllister and Brendan Turecamo.

The 1999 ex-Crosby Knight now Stephen Dann was pushing a Centerline barge. 

The 2009 ex-Allison Crosby is now Mount St. Elias, is one of the Kirby boats in the boro that I perceive as a winter boat.  Where was she all summer?

 

The 1975 Robert IV has been in the boro since 1989.  Where was she for her first decade?

And finally, the 2020 Janice Ann Reinauer is the newest,  largest, and most powerful tugboat in this post, here overtaking the 2010 6589-teu Maipo.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Winter solstice is one date I pay attention to, and yesterday demanded an undivided portion of it.  I was out on the sixth and primordial boro at sunrise, although when it rose, a gauzy film of stratus filtered the light.  I tinkered with the image a bit to enhance the cosmic eeriness.

Along the Brooklyn shore a classic barque and one of the latest of a classic line awaited.

Notice two tugboats and a lighthouse below?  One tug is shifting a fuel barge, and the other is shifting refuse boxes.

Start of winter or start of summer, the sixth boro is always a busy place.  Notice the fishing boat in this image, along with all the rest?

For some reason, these E-2C aircraft flew the North River up and then down and out over the Lower Bay.

Dutch Girl, a winter regular along with Eastern Welder, was hard at work.

Ava M. crossed the Bay from one job to the next.  Things are always happening on the water.

And all that’s glorious, but less than a quarter mile from the North River, not all seems to be happening well, and that needs to be acknowledged.

All photos, WVD.

 

Laurie Ann Reinauer is pushing RTC 85 for an appointment somewhere the Kills. 

Meagan Ann moves dredge spoils out of MOTBY.

 

Thomas D. Witte stems with another scow as Meagan Ann passes by.

J. Arnold takes the Back Channel over to Claremont.

James William heads for an assist.

 

A fact about Buchanan 12 . . .  it appears she’s had that name and worked for that same company since 1972.  That’s longevity.

All photos, WVD, who’s happy the days are getting longer, with fewer than 200 days until the summer solstice.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,540 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary “Graves of Arthur Kill” is currently available only through tugster

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

May 2022
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031