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I’ve been meaning to ask about this lumber on the piers at Red Hook container terminal.  Not quite a year ago an unusual looking vessel called Mozu Arrow deposited these bundles of lumberHere‘s another shot showing all the bundles.  All through the stories of lumber being outrageously expensive,  this lumber stayed here.  In some places, the coverings have ripped off leaving the wood exposed to the weather, wasting away.  Can anyone tell me the story of this lumber and why it hasn’t moved in 11 months.  As of this writing, the lumber carrier is traveling between South Korea and British Columbia, light maybe, having deposited lumber on piers in Busan perhaps?  On second thought, would this vessel travel sans cargo across the Pacific?  What cargo might it be carrying to Canada?

Brendan Turecamo is a regular on this blog;  behold about nine feet of the boat you never see when she’s working.

Here’s a limitation of gantry cranes;  if you have a container ship loaded higher than the cranes can accommodate, getting a last box in place means lifting to the height and then sliding it in aft to fore.  Understand what’s happening here?  The box was lifted farther “back” than the empty slot, and now the crane operator is sliding it in laterally, toward the right in this photo.  Is this a common occurrence on these “tall ships,” to give a new meaning to the phrase?

Do you remember “you go girl” graffiti on a ferry just west of the Bayonne Bridge?  Well, clearly it has shifted over toward the Bayonne, New Jersey, side and is showing a different and more corroded side.  I wonder where she goes next.

From this angle, there appears to be quite a few Reinauer tugs in their yard.  While we’re playing an Andy Rooney and asking questions about everything, has anyone learned more about the WindServe Marine toehold within the Reinauer real estate here?  Isn’t it hard to believe that Andy Rooney has been gone for almost a decade now?

Getting back to the warehouse sheds in Red Hook, is it possible this very experienced tow truck is there to prosecute any violators who choose to trespass and/or dock?  I saw a more intimidating sign and sight in Belfast ME some years ago in the second photo here.

To show location of these signs and the antique tow truck, note it in the wider view photo below.

Shall we leave it here?    I suppose.  All photos, WVD, with conveyance from the New York Media Boat.

 

Barry Silverton first came to the sixth boro five and a half years ago.  Her twin Emery Zidell appeared here earlier this year, and i believe this is the first time to catch the ATB light and head on.

Roughly the same size, Haggerty Girls waits alongside as RTC 80 loads.

Mary Turecamo heads out  to meet a ship.  Mary Turecamo, Haggerty Girls, and Emery Zidell are all over 105′ and 4000 or more horsepower.

Margaret Moran here hangs close to a bulk carrier she’s escorting in.

Like Margaret above, Buchanan 12 is rated at 3000 hp and each has worked under the same name for the same company since coming from the shipyard. Buchanan 12 is a regular shuttling stone scows between the quarries up the Hudson and the sixth boro.

Franklin Reinauer has operated under that name since coming from the shipyard nearly 40 years ago.

I first saw Fort Point in Gloucester here over five years ago.

Joker seems to have become a regular in the sixth boro since this summer.  She used to be a regular here as Taurus.

Known as Brendan Turecamo for the past 30 years, this 1975 3900 hp tug is getting some TLC up on the floating drydock.

All photos here where we leave it today, WVD.

The red upper wheelhouse is no more, although I’m not certain what new paint scheme will evolve, or when Evening Star will become Jordan Rose, as Evening Breeze became Susan Rose.  Follow this transformation we will.

Ellen transformed from Navy gray to McAllister colors 20 years ago.

Atlantic Salvor has worn Donjon blue–almost the same as warehouse blue–for over 20 years.

In a different way, Marjorie B profile varies from a lower to higher wheelhouse depending on the job.

Jill Reinauer has worn Reinauer colors for over 20 years also, although she has seen some modifications of profile more recently.

Brendan is currently in dry dock, but when I took this photo, she was standing by with a large barge. I’ll post a photo of her high and dry soon.

This post began with a Bouchard tug in transition.  It’s fitting to end with one that already looks quite different . . .  Evening Light is now Mary Emma. currently on Narragansett Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

The bridge photo at the end of part A was of Kristin Poling, right after she’d been taken out of service.  In her long life from 1934 until 2011, she carried the nameplates of Poughkeepsie Socony, Mobil New York, and Captain Sam, before taking on her last name. 

Here’s a shot from the bow, and

here from near the stern looking forward along the catwalk.

This is one of my all-time favorite photos.  I wonder where this Coastie is today.

A decade ago, Maurania III worked in the harbor, here alongside the venerable Chemical Pioneer and

here muscling Suez Canal Bridge around Bergen Point.

APL Coral was scrapped in 2017, I believe.  Anyone know what those bolts of green fabric are?  By their location, I’d guess an anti-piracy measure.  Nicole Leigh continues to work.

DEP’s Newtown Creek was in her last days;  currently she’s a dive destination in Pompano Beach, FL known as Lady Luck.

Lygra (1979) went to Alang in 2018, after carrying that name as well as Centro America, Nornews Service, and Transfjord. 

Does anyone know where Captain Zeke has gone to?  I don’t.   If I ever did, I’ve forgotten.

Catherine Turecamo assists SN Azzurra away from a dock. The tanker seems still to be working as Augusta;  she’s also carried the names Blue Dolphin and Stena Commander.  In 2014, Catherine T. went to fresh water and, the last I knew,  became a Chicago area based John Marshall.

If you click on no links in this post except this one, you will be pleased;  it’s the legendary 1937 commuter yacht AphroditeHERE is the link.  Those all-caps are intentional.

Note the raked forward portion of Maersk Murotsu, getting an assist from Kimberly Turecamo. The tanker is currently known as Ardmore Seafarer, which I have seen but not photographed in the boro.  It’s impossible to keep up . . .  hang on to that thought until the end of the post.

And let’s close out  with some busy photos, here Barbara McAllister moves a barge, East Coast follows light, and Gramma Lee T Moran assists a tanker.  Barbara is now Patsy K.

And finally, the waters here are churned up by James Turecamo, Resolute, and Laura K Moran, as well as a few tankers off to the left.

All photos, WVD, who’s astonished how much changes if not daily or monthly but surely by decade.

And about that thought I asked you hang onto:  I’m considering taking a break, a sabbatical, or as Chapter 17 of Moby Dick explains . . .  a ramadan, a term used with respect. I say this as a solicitation of advice.

 

It’s October 1, and travel on we do, in this case, back in time exactly a decade.  Waterford was still recovering from Hurricane Irene, and farther upriver, that recovery would go on for at least half a decade.

Reinauer Twins was recently completed, and WTC1 had a long ways to go.

This 1929 trawler was patrolling the waters over by the Statue.  This has to be one of the best government boat-to-yacht conversions I’ve seen.  Fred tug44 profiled it here.

Beware the arm monster that lurks below.  Who knows . . . it could have been a very hungry mermaid or her sister Sedna approaching the unsuspecting kayaker . . .

This beautiful bar, which did need some cleaning up, disappeared

when Binghamton met its crusher fate. The process also was hastened by Irene.

Pride of Baltimore II passed the Statue, as did

this unnamed yawl keeping some water

on its starboard rail.  I never did figure out what yawl this was.

There’ll be a part B.  Guess which vessel had this helm.

All photos, a decade ago, by WVD.

Unrelated, have you seen this footage taken by a sailing drone inside Hurricane Sam?

 

1997.  Taken from QE2 as it overtakes a Moran tug  . . .

 

 

taken some days later as the QE2 returns, passing the Towers at dawn…

while possibly the same Moran tug meets it again.

May 1998.  Bounty arrives.

May 2000.  Morgan Reinauer passes lower Manhattan in the fog.

January 11, 2001.  Peggy Sheridan, now Apex’s  Brooklyn, passes on a cold winter day.

Places, as with people, you never know when you’ll see them the last time.  Steve wrote me once that he passed the Towers on September 2, 2001 on the way to the tugboat race starting line.  He looked at the Towers, but didn’t take out his camera …   because he’d taken so many photos of the Towers before.  I fully understand.  

I can’t say I remember my breakfast that morning or getting onto my LIRR at 05:17 that morning in Seaford, as I always did, with folks I always saw then  . . .

but I’d never see them again, because they worked in that building.

I know it’s the same for folks who’d come on watch a few hours earlier that morning with one set of orders, and then before 0900 were faced with this.

Hat tip to Joel Milton for this account of his day just about 20 years ago.  Workboat has republished in November 2001 account.   From ProfessionalMariner, here are some links.

RIP.

All photos supplied by Steve Munoz.

 

Some of these photos are from late August 2021, and others are from August 2011, and many of you can tell the difference.

Above that’s Meredith C. Reinauer,  and below . . . Tasman Sea.

 

 

 

And this is Teresa with her hot oil barge Acadia.

 

 

Following Tasman Sea, that’s Jane A. Bouchard.

 

 

And that’s it.  All photos, WVD.

The photos with Tasman Sea and Jane A. Bouchard are from a decade ago.  The last I knew, Tasman is tied up at a dock in Houma, LA.   Jane A. is part of the Bouchard fleet tied up in Staten Island, awaiting sale.  Seeing the skyline of lower Manhattan might have been a clue.  More on that in posts in the next week  or so . . .

Teresa has been one of my unicorns . . . and this is the first time this 1999 tug and barge have appeared on this blog, to the best of my memory.   And Meredith C. is, IMHO, a beautiful tugboat.

 

Colonel came into town a week ago with the new ferry.

Caitlin Ann has been here as long as I’ve been paying attention . . . although she had several names since then.

James D and Ellen McAllister pin YM Width to the dock. 

Jill Reinauer . . .  she’s been here from before tugster . .  .  AT and BT should be part of my new time nomenclature.   BT runs backward from this post. 

Atlantic Salvor has been here over 20 years, and among my favorite photos of her was here from the 2010 Labor Day race.

This has to be my clearest photo of Carolina Coast.  Know that tugboat in the distance?

I believe Julie Anne just recently arrived in the sixth boro, and this is my first time seeing her. 

And from a distance, it’s Mary Emma, formerly Evening Light, but now all in tan and green. 

Let’s stop with Ellen again, here passing in front of what must be the busiest background:  Geoquip Saentis, Cape Edmont, and Oasis.  Ellen is one of about a dozen reutilized USN tugboats in the McAllister fleet.  See more here.

All photos this week, WVD.

Timothy (1979 and rebuilt 2009) and Janice Ann (2020),

Marjorie B. McAllister (1974),

Jonathan C. (2016) and Doris Moran (1982),

Colonel (1978),

 

Cape Canaveral (2019),

 

Philadelphia (2017),

Capt. Brian A. (2017),

 

All photos of a busy place, WVD.

 

I’m on a short gallivant, but I have no shortage of sixth boro photos, mostly of tugboats engaged in commerce.  Sometimes I look for meetings, and interesting (how ever that’s defined)  ones are best.   Like here…. Kristin and Kimberly,

B. Franklin and Dylan Cooper,

Mary H and Joyce,

Reinauer Twins and Pokomoke,

R/V Ocean Researcher (a multirole survey vessel [aka an exotic] for the offshore energy sector) and Emery Zidell,

 

and Fort McHenry and Philadelphia.

 Then sometimes there are more than two at a time that can be framed in a shot, like here, Elk River, Paula Atwell, Chem Bulldog, Kirby, and B. Franklin . . .

More Bulldog soon.  All photos yesterday, WVD.

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