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All these photos were taken in the second half of January 2013.  This 1973 livestock carrier Falconia was in the Brooklyn Navy Yard getting some work done.  I’d love to see a cargo layout for the vessel.  Also, just back from the foremast, those are large bales of either hay or straw for the livestock.   What would you guess her disposition in second half of January 2023?  Answer follows at the end of this post.

The tanker here is today in the Gulf of Guinea on a run between Gabon and Netherlands.  Kristy Ann Reinauer was scrapped in 2015. 

The green tug Mary Gellatly was transformed into the very busy CMT Mackenzie Rose. 

The behemoth Rebel has become Ken Vinik, awaiting a makeover in the Arthur Kill. 

The name of the hull–we’d spell it “Sovkomflot“–is one you will not see in the sixth boro these days, and it seems the icebreaking tanker is currently

anchored  where it has been for at least the past six months in Murmansk. 

The Penn Maritime Coho has become the Kirby Coho, currently in Savannah. 

Note the ice and snow on the boats above and below;  January a decade ago was frosty!  Barbara McAllister has become Patsy K, which I’ve never seen.  She’s in Panama City FL right now. 

It’s clamming time in the boro, and many of these clam/fish boats come out of this creek in NJ.  More Dutch Girl tomorrow. 

Grey Shark may be a dead ship or even a scrapped one by now, last recorded in the DR. 

And finally, Megan McAllister is alive and well, busy as Charles James.  

All photos from January 2013, WVD.  

And the answer to the question about the current disposition of Falconia:   she’s renamed Dragon and in Midia, Romania on the Black Sea, flying the Togolese flag, and still working, having just arrived in from Libya. For a tour of a much newer and sophisticated purpose-built livestock carrier, click here. More on this category of vessel here, and Dragon specifically on page 49.

For a disturbing report–if you choose to followup here–google Queen Hind livestock carrier, which capsized in Midia in 2019  and resulted in the “lost cargo,” i.e., death 14,000 sheep. 

 

 

 

Truth be told, I should have passed this 100 milestone long ago, but I forestalled a number of times by differentiating within the title:  for example, besides the August 2007 starting point of random ships 1 but also random ships *1 and really random ships 1 posted inAugust 2016 and March 2019.

Forestalled or not, we are here, and I still enjoy doing this.  These photos all date from this month and December . . .   like B. Franklin Reinauer here lightering Atlantic Blue

Atlantic Crown here has a deck barge alongside delivered by Susan Miller, while in the distance you see the Bayonne peninsula and beyond. 

The next two photos show Laura K Moran assisting MSC Greenwich as an outbound Seaspan New York

shares the KVK as it heads for sea. 

If I’ve learned anything from these years of documenting the traffic the watery boro, it’s the value of light to (duh!) photo graphy.  When you have the dawn light illuminating the orange hull of vessels like NCC Tabuk, with red and shadow image of Miriam Moran, and the cold black steel of the barge to the left,  what more need I say about the joy of spending time in the cold morning solitude watching and “recording.”

What’s not to enjoy about shivering while taking photos of a CMA CGM with the name of a huge tropical city.  

Before completing this post, any ideas about the reference in Tabuk or the age and population size of Surabaya?  Answers follow. 

One more dawn photo here . . .  the enigmatic name Eco Revolution on a tanker escorted into the KVK by a 6000 hp Moran tugboat.  

All photos, WVD. 

Tabuk, in Saudi Arabia, and Surabaya, on Indonesia’s Java Island, have both been settlements for over a millennium.

As for Surabaya, some of you might know the lyrics of the Kurt Weill song here by Marianne Faithfull, but I prefer this one from Javanese myth

Here was installment 1.  Right over beyond Race Rock Light, that’s the entrance to 

New London, where Rowan M. McAllister lighters a salt ship named Feng Ze Hai.

A Reinauer unit heads for the sixth boro, and not taking refraction into account, 

I figured I could just read the name here.  Can you make it out?  My guess is Ruth E. but there are others similar to her. 

Cape Canaveral passed Bridgeport  bathed in morning light. 

Later, Sapphire Coast 

with Cement Transporter 1802 

overtook William F. Fallon Jr. and her barge at

Orient Point Light. 

As the early winter’s night approached,  Reinauer Twins

and RTC 104 passed close enough to read her name, refraction notwithstanding. 

All photos, WVD, who has many more and closer up lighthouse photos from the Sound.

I made my way through all the weird car wrecks on the Belt Parkway this morning to get to my cliff just before sunrise.  A small bulk carrier headed to Gravesend Anchorage while a tanker was anchored farther out. About those wrecks . . .  three multiple-car collisions in same-direction lanes between Woodhaven and the VZ . . .  what is it about impairment and driving that people don’t yet know!!?

Motorboat Yankee headed out to the mothership. 

Miss Emma McCall was just off the USCG quarantine station. 

 

From a different perspective, this is bulk carrier/general cargo vessel Meloi anchored.

When the sun rose, it painted ABC-1 and pilot boat New Jersey in light. 

Philadelphia and 

Josephine waited to rejoin their barges. 

Sunlight began to hit the tops of the cranes on Castlegate, a bulker with Chilean salt. 

All photos, WVD.

Discovery Coast has been around for over a decade now.  One of my first times to see her was here

Lightning has only recently been joined by Thunder, here.  Might tugs named for other weather phenomena like hail and fog be coming?

Helen was only renamed that earlier this year;  before that, she was  Charles Burton

Thomas D. Witte appeared here only once as Kendall P. Brake, and that was a decade and a half ago with Powhatan, class-establisher for Apache

Defender last appeared on this blog a year and a half ago here . . .  She was

formerly Davis Sea, my favorite photo of which was here, struggling with solid water upriver.

Pearl Coast is a regular at the cement dock on the KVK, here with Cement Transporter 1802,  one of a fleet of barges dedicated to exactly that. 

And while I was at this location, I caught a convergence of tugboats,  Pegasus eastbound and Stephen Reinauer westbound.   Stephen has been in the sixth boro for nearly 30 years now.

All photos, WVD.

Jason has appeared here before, but it’s been a few years since I last saw her in the sixth boro. 

I was pleased, therefore, to catch the boat at work in the KVK.

 

Timothy L. Reinauer was headed in and needed an assist, 

 

Jason, 90′ x 28′, brings 3000 hp to the job; Timothy L. 119′ x 34′, brings 4200 hp to the task.  

All photos, any errors, WVD. 

Jason and Timothy are part of the same fleet as these other boats. 

 

Happy please-go-vote day.  If you know anyone at all who is eligible to vote but won’t, have a chat with that person.  As a New Yorker, I voted over a week ago . . . early voting on a Saturday afternoon.

Some photos . . .  and your part is to 1) rank these boats by highest to lowest horsepower, and 2) identify which if any were built north of central sixth boro.  I’ve provided dates of initial construction, but tugboats are required to be well-maintained, sometimes repowered and extensively rebuilt.

The 1979 Miriam Moran looked this way in her October markings.  Cancer is a scourge, and I know this remembrance each October means a lot to folks who’ve seen the disease from nearby.

HMS Liberty has worked in the boro for over a decade now.

Laura K. Moran came off the ways in 2008, spent some years here, some away, but now she’s back in the boro.

Mister T, 2001, has carried that moniker ever since. 

Andrea, 1999, has been in the boro a half dozen years.  Here‘s how she looked back in 2016. 

Shannon Dann was built in 1971.

Dace Reinauer dates from 1968 but has been considerably rebuilt from the first time she appeared on this blog here.  See pre-2010 photos of her here and here.

Brian Nicholas, 1966, has been in the boro about as long as I’ve been doing this blog.  I did post a photo of her with Banda Sea name clearly on her bow here 12 years ago.

Foxy 3 was built in 1974 and first appeared on this blog as Barker Boys, a name she carried until 2009, when she was renamed Buchanan 16.  I don’t believe I ever saw her in the Balico livery as BF Jersey although I did see her with BF Jersey nameboards here. Note the folded back upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD.

Answers? 

Laura K 5100 horsepower, Dace 3400, Andrea and Miriam at 3000, HMS Liberty and Mister T and Shannon D all at 2400, Brian Nicholas 1700, Foxy 3  1600.

Built north of the sixth boro:  Laura K in Maine and Mister T in Rhode Island;  all others were built in Louisiana.

 

I’ve seen lots of pairs in winter, some in spring, but never until now in fall, at least not acknowledged until this post.

Two sets of pairs appear below, one Centerline and another Moran, the latter escorting in CSCL South China Sea.

Ellen and Patrice here are going to different jobs.

Mary Turecamo and James D Moran here work on the CSCL box ship.

Lots are boats here;  clockwise from the farthest, Haggerty Girls (I think), James D, Margaret, Marjorie B, and James William.

Around 0900, a brace of migratory birds headed north . . .  F-18s maybe.

B. Franklin got an assist from Matthew Tibbetts.

Two old ferries ply their trade:  Barberi with the highest flagpoles and Marchi.

Two top of the line sixth boro McAllister tugs joins forces.

Two old style boats:  Manhattan II and Wanderer, the latter from the Sippican River.

And finally, this juxtaposition passed and allows a comparison of the lines of the 2015 6000 hp Kirby Moran with the 2008 5100 hp Laura K.

All photos in the past week, WVD.

Quick post today with sights around the boro . . . like Morgan Reinauer

and James William

and Alex McAllister

and Ava M.McAllister and 

Janet D and 

Fort Schuyler and 

Brinn Courtney and 

Ivory Coast.  Note these last two mark the October awareness

All photos, my hat tip, WVD.

 

The idea of recent posts in this series is to look at a single fleet.

As temperatures cool off, my perception is that demand for fuels rises, especially in the Northeast.  Let’s look at the Reinauer fleet, starting with a light Nicole.

Haggerty Girls exited the KVK into the Upper Bay a few days back.

 

Ruth M. does the same here, likely returning to rejoin her barge.

Dean made for the East River

after having left the KVK minutes earlier.

Janice Ann enters the KVK from the Upper Bay.

Matthew Tibbetts heads for the Sound . . .

 

followed by Dace . .  .

 

and then drops anchor beside Janice Ann.

who had been at the east end of IMTT a day or so earlier.

Christian waits with her barge before heading

somewhere in the Northeast.

All photos, any errors, WVD, who in the past has posted about these as bronze tugs.

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