You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Reinauer’ category.

The last leg for now goes from Newport to Warren RI, but given the favorable wind before the torrent, let’s watch those contemporaries who play in this N-Bay city with such a long colonial and post-colonial history.

I’m quite unschooled about these speedsters, like the one showing her red belly.  A 12-meter, I suppose?

Northbound past Beavertail Light?

 

Madeleine heads out to play.

This racer is sponsored by the Danish wind energy company, quite appropriately, as I would hardly expect an ExxonMobil sponsored wind boat, although petroleum energy companies have started investing heavily in renewables . . . so someday soon there might be an Exxon sail racer.   Here’s BP’s portfolio.

 

Aurora has been featured here almost two year ago.

Marilee (1926)  is a classic, as is Pam (1921), once a whiskey runner.

Just as the wind boats use moving air currents to speed, this red tail benefitted from it to hover over a snake, which he eventually dropped, caught, and hauled off behind the tree line . . .

This is not a great photo, but Wallace Foss (1897!!) can be yours for a mere $165,000.  Those winds eventually brought lots of rain, which we

saw as we did the last short step . . . Newport to Warren.

I’d love to have seen NOAA’s Gunter and Bigelow closer up . . .

Gracie M. Reinauer (2016) waited for more favorable offshore weather before heading to the sixth boro.

And finally, after over a 1000 miles on our itinerary, we return to home base, where Niagara Prince welcomes us back.  So does anyone have photos to share of Niagara Prince in the Champlain Canal, the western Erie, Chicago Sanitary Canal, or any other inland waterway where scale make her look immense?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For a similar focus on sailing vessels associated with a specific water mass, click here for photos from the Great ! Chesapeake Schooner race.

And if you’ve not caught the connection of this journey to Albert Gallatin (a US founding father), click here.

First, thanks to Peter Eagleton, Philip T Feeney in the 1970s.  I haven’t the heart to go see her in her current condition.

Next, Miss Ila, resplendent as a springtime cardinal!

Haggerty Girls nudging RTC 107 out of the Kills,

 

Helen Laraway passing TS Kennedy over by ConHook,

James William leaving Mister Jim over by the scows,

James E. Brown taking some rail cars past a wall of containers . . .

and finally . . . is that Durham setting up Willy Wall?  Is that what it’s still called?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except that first one supplied by Peter, whom I thank.

Sometimes I like to start new categories so that the numbers don’t get so high, boats no longer extant or frequent get a second look, and we realize that time is passing pretty fast.  So all the photos here I took more than seven years ago.  Some have been on the blog before, but not together and not edited exactly as they are now.

Like Norwegian Sea, she used to be a wintertime staple running up the River, easily recognizable by her upper wheelhouse.

Juliet is still around but not very busy under her new name . . . it seems.

This boat, like her namesake, is gone too soon. Pegasus is still around but no longer looks this way.

Zeus was on the Great Lakes after working in the sixth boro, but I’ve lost track of her.

Volunteer, another unmistakable profile, now long time gone from here.

Zachery  . . . still around and still working. High Peace is now registered Vietnamese and goes by Pvt Dolphin.

Just to break the pattern here, here’s a photo I took of Zachery a few days ago.

Take my word for this last photo . . . the distant unit I can’t identify although I’m guessing a Reinauer boat, but the closer vessel is outrageous.  Actually I mean Outrageous.  That’s the name.  Click here (and scroll) for a previous photo of Outrageous, which I believe used to be based in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Kirby Moran here seems to have some symbiosis going on with the gulls,

and Jonathan C comes in for a closer look.

Zachery Reinauer repositions light under the parking lot forming on the lower deck of the Bayonne Bridge.

Diana B moves another load of product, likely to the creeks.

 

Thomas D. Witte is on the paper recycling run, I think.

Does anyone have a photo of her working up in the canals?

I’ve not yet seen Sapphire Coast light.

And finally, the unique paint scheme on Balisco 100 

moved into the Kills by Navigator.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

With apologies all around . ..  I am tardy in posting some of the photos I enjoy getting from you all readers. Tardiness . . . my only argument is that I am very busy with projects that will come out at some point.

Like this one that Ted M sent in response to my Turmoil post some weeks ago.  Jason Reinauer is towing Turmoil–an older iteration– astern.  I believe I saw Acadian Freedom in Chelsea last year, but don’t have a photo to prove it.  Here’s what I did put up from that reconnoitre.

And thanks to Jed, here’s Pearl Coast, taken recently, and

photo 4 MARCH 2017

Pati R Moran, taken not so recently.

photo date 16 OCT 2008

I once had photos of the green boat below and below, but I think I deleted them out of frustration of NOT being able to determine its history.  It stood here in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for a while, but scuttlebutt is that it has been scrapped. These next four photos come thanks to Paul Strubeck, busy with projects of his own.

Can anyone fill in any of the blanks as related to this green boat?

Paul also made a trip around part of Lake Michigan recently and took these photos in Green Bay–GL Texas and North Dakota

and below the bow of Stewart J. Cort, my guess is Minnesota and Oklahoma.  The GL tugs are really amazing, with combined thousands of years of work.  As to Cort, she’s back at work, bow that the Great Lakes has reawakened.

 

The Maraki crew is underway again also, in the Bahamas, but before leaving panther land, which generated these and these unusual photos, they got these photos of Rikki S and

Jane.

 

Thanks again to Ted, Jed, Paul, and the Maraki crew for these photos.  how does the French saying . . . (mien vast hard due jambs.   eh?)   Wow, that’s what autocorrect did with my foreign language.  I’ll try again:  Mieux vaut tard que jamais.

Name that tugboat?

Or this one?

Or these two?  Answer follows.

Enjoy the rest of these for what they are . . .

Bruce A. McAllister above and Fort McHenry below.

Meredith C. Reinauer on a sunny but

cold morning.   Ready for the answers on the first three?

Well, the first was Kimberly Poling, then

Dace Reinauer, which I first saw looking like this.

And finally Emily Ann, which reminds me of an email I once receivedfrom a reader named R. Pena, who wanted to track down the boat to which he owed his life after his own had sunk between Cuba and Florida.  I embed the link to that post here because it’s a story that bears repetition.

And finally pushing New Hampshire around,

it’s Scott Turecamo.  As a former resident of that state, I thought no one ever pushed New Hampshire around!

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Lucy Reinauer, according to Birk’s site–has an interesting history, acquired by one of her owners from lottery winnings.

She came off the ways in 1973, from Jakobson, source of many older boats in the sixth boro.

Franklin is a few years older, built in Louisiana, and formerly called Ocean Tower and Matthew Tibbett‘s, both names now used on other boats.

Meredith C. Reinauer is a 7200 hp behemoth, here pushing

RTC 150.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp

Gracie M. is the newest and fourth of this class of Reinauer boats.  Can you name the other three?

I believe this is my first time to get photos of her light.

 

 

So the other three?

There’s Twins from 2011, Dean from 2013, and Dylan Cooper from 2015.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I love the clear air of winter days, better to see details, like the horizontally mounted ladder and all the trucks in the background moving containers at the Global Terminal.  See how many trucks, i.e., tractors,  you count in this post.

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And more trucks, as Erin McAllister stands by.

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Again, see the trucks, as Scott Turecamo passes.  And you wonder why I don’t do even more truckster posts.

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I happened to be down by South Street Seaport’s row of ships the other day and noticed W. O. Decker there alongside Wavertree.

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And then lots more traffic passed on the East River, like Ruth and

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Helen and 

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James.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  I counted around 18–20.

 

If you squint, you can almost imagine Ellen McAllister is out at sea, with a big blue sky beyond her.  But that blue is

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also Maersk blue;  to know how to create that blue, read through this thread and you’ll get the mix.  And this name . . . I couldn’t get the echo “sheer maerskness” out of my brain.  There’s also this port town by that name.

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It’s fishing season in the sixth boro again, and here Eastern Welder is at work as Kimberly (oops!) JenniferTurecamo tows Portland out toward the Lower Bay.  It looks like Timothy Reinauer farther off.

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Also, in the anchorage at that moment, were Weddell Sea with DBL 83,

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launch Grace D, Mediterranean Sea with DBL 84,

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Dylan Cooper, Joanne III, and Matthews Tibbetts.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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