You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Bruce A. McAllister’ tag.

The top photo here comes from Brian Thigpen.  Last Monday, the first 13000 teu container ship–OOCL Berlin— entered port, and I missed it.  Bravo to Brian for photographing it.  I suspect soon the 14000 teu and then subsequent records will be set. Escort visible here is Eric McAllister, I think.

With larger ships, escort procedures seem to be changing also, like tugs coming in sets of three and meeting the vessel outside the VZ Bridge.  Just a few years ago, nothing of the the size of Northern Justice–8400 teu–was calling here.

 

I really should get more photos of the ships passing through the sixth boro and heading anywhere from Yonkers to Albany.  Here’s Western Aida along the cliffs of the UWS, 

leaving the Palisades to port once under the GW.

Here’s Spottail westbound on the KVK, assisted by Ellen McAllister and  Bruce A. McAllister,  and soon to pass

Stolt Pride, 2016, showing a new look for Stolt.

Thanks again to Brian Thigpen for use of his photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Patricia was built in 1963 and works in the sixth boro here and here, and last I knew worked for C.H. Phoenix LLC of Green Cove Springs, Fl. . . .   I like the racing stripes.

Caitlin Ann was built in 1961 and has worked for DonJon since 2011.   Here, she and

Sarah Ann appear to be moving coal.  Sarah Ann is from 2003, working for DonJon since 2009.

Marion Moran has worked by that name since 1982.  I think that’s Katherine Weeks on the far side of the barge.

Bruce A. McAllister, 

Eric McAllister, and

Alex McAllister were all working from the Narrows the

other morning.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

aka Names 34

What??

Xena, Lady Tara, one of exactly three barges squired in by Foxy3,

Denise A. Bouchard, 

Silver Cindy,

Elbabe . . . El Babe? . .. with Bruce A. minding to port,

Turecamo Girls, and I’ll bet more than just one British Sailor or sailor of any of the seafaring nationalities . . .

along with a high voltage shore connection . . .?!@#!    That can mean only one thing…  there might be a Debbie around soon too . . .

See tomorrow’s post, for which the photos have not even been taken yet, but it’s June fishing time.  All photos taken in the past week by Will Van Dorp.  Here’s a previous Xena reference on tugster.

The 1931 bridge has been so prominent on this blog over the past decade plus that the past few years of construction and now deconstruction mesmerize me.  Just look at the header photo I’ve not changed since 2006.  I’ll never change it now.

I spent a few hours watching the work yesterday and share some of the photos here today and tomorrow.  Photo 1 was taken at 06:49 before work began, from what I could tell;  I’m the observer only and speculate sometimes because I’m not privy to the communications.  NY is to the left and NJ to the right.

06:54 … NJ side.  A safety and planning meeting?

07:01.  Workers use various means to venture out to the severed transverse beam (?) to begin its removal.

07:30.  Similar activity starts on the NY side.

07:52

08:25.  Almost imperceptibly slow, the movement of the transverse progresses.

08:28.  And then it speeds up.

08:36.  A flatbed trailer has backed into place to receive the beam.

08:38.  Meanwhile, over on the NJ side, a similar evolution has begun.

08:39.

Meanwhile, at 08:43, a container vessel is rounding Bergen bend  and headed for sea, after “threading the needle,”  …  well, not really, it made it in with those beams in place . . .

08:43, and we’ll pick up the evolution here tomorrow with MSC Kolkata   . . .  Note the crewmen on the bow?

I’d like to give a hat tip to all the Bayonne Bridge workers who work with such skill and safety in this enormous project, one of at least six bridge projects happening simultaneously in the greater sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Name that tugboat?

Or this one?

Or these two?  Answer follows.

Enjoy the rest of these for what they are . . .

Bruce A. McAllister above and Fort McHenry below.

Meredith C. Reinauer on a sunny but

cold morning.   Ready for the answers on the first three?

Well, the first was Kimberly Poling, then

Dace Reinauer, which I first saw looking like this.

And finally Emily Ann, which reminds me of an email I once receivedfrom a reader named R. Pena, who wanted to track down the boat to which he owed his life after his own had sunk between Cuba and Florida.  I embed the link to that post here because it’s a story that bears repetition.

And finally pushing New Hampshire around,

it’s Scott Turecamo.  As a former resident of that state, I thought no one ever pushed New Hampshire around!

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve not used this title in too long, so here it is, a general cargo ship . . . because not everything fits inside a container.

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Ellen McAllister escorts Wilson Newcastle outbound

Nor does everything require a huge ship.

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When I saw Wilson Newcastle the other day, I knew I’d seen a Wilson vessel once before.

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I just didn’t think I had to go back almost four years.  It’s not exactly identical;  Newcastle is more than a decade more recent and has 25% greater capacity.  .

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Bruce A. McAllister escorts Wilson Saga into the Navy Yard.

 

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

November, port month on tugster, ends here, making this GHP&W 30.  Here’s how the month began.  One thing I learned putting together this post is that Port Richmond and Mariner’s Harbor appear not to share a border, at least according to the wikipedia map.  Between the western edge of Port Richmond and the eastern edge of Mariner’s (the west side of the Bayonne Bridge) is a neighborhood called Elm Park.  I’d never heard of it.  Also, look at the northeast tip of Port Richmond . . . it’s in the water only and includes the Caddell yard.  Furthermore, Port Richmond never seems like much of a port if you see it by road only.  Click here for photos of the land portion of Port Richmond.  Click on the map to make it interactive.

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A google satellite view shows the northernmost margin of land is port-intensive.  Click here for many vintage photos of Port Richmond, pre-Bayonne Bridge, back when Port Richmond was a major ferry/rail link.

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Although the late fall midday sun backlit these shots, let’s cruise the waterside of Port Richmond, starting at its northeastern point, where the Wavertree (1885) project is ongoing.

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Delaware River & Bay Authority’s Delaware is undergoing some major repowering work. 

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Frying Pan . . . light of the night vessel from up at Pier 66 is having some work done.

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In the belly of Frying Pan, where the engine and machinery used to be, a night club sometimes comes to life.    Click here for some renderings of the vessel by the elusive bowsprite.

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Miss Liberty, built 1954, is nearly finished with this dry-docking.  Notice here she is high and dry?  Well, just 45 minutes later, she had been

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splashed and was being towed to a wharf by Caddell’s own L. W. Caddell (1990).

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Continuing to the west, it’s the yards of Reinauer and Moran. From l to r, here, it seems to be Meredith C. Reinauer (2003), Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), Reinauer Twins (2011), and Dace Reinauer (1968 but JUST repowered). . . and Joan Turecamo with (?) Brendan Turecamo.  The McAllister tug between the Reinauer ATBs . . . I’ll guess is Bruce A. Marjorie B. McAllister.

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This photo, taken a half hour earlier and before Joan Turecamo (1980) tied up, shows Kimberly Turecamo (1980), the very new and beamy  J. R. T. Moran (2015), and Brendan (1975).

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On the west side of the Moran yard, it’s Cable Queen (1952).  Click here for photos of this cable-layer at work through the years.

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And for the last shot of Port Richmond–although this may be straying westward into Elm Park waters, it’s Metropolitan Marine Transportation’s newest Normandy.

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All the photos today by Will Van Dorp.

So as I said at the beginning of this post, so ends the “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves” series.  However, precedent on this blog makes it really easy to do a Port Richmond 2, 3, 4 . . . . etc. post.  also, if any of you feel like contributing a set of photos from a port of gunk hole, no matter how large or obscure, I welcome it.  Besides, there’s always then possibility of doing an “upland” version of any port, focusing on land-based businesses serving the work vessels.

And as for December, let me reprint this idea for a December theme:

How about  antique/classic workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  ‘The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.’  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.”

Many thanks to all of you who sent along photos, contributed ideas, and commented in November.

USMMA Foundation vessel Tortuga needed hands for a transit from Kings Point to Newport RI, where it is serving as support for Warrior Sailing program races this weekend.  I didn’t wait for a second call. I just needed to get there by 0250.  No problem, since this IS my favorite time of “day.”

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tug Elizabeth Anne at 0236 h.

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sunrise from the bridge of Tortuga at 0502.

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Past Port Jeff ahead of ferry PT Barnum  0638

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Passing Bruce A. McAllister with Vane barge on the wire along North Fork 0937

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Meeting ferry  John H near Plum Gut at 1002

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Seeing a distant ferry Cape Henlopen (?) and  S/V Mystic Whaler off New London 1030

Many thanks to Chris.

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UNREP from M/V Otter for second breakfast at 1035

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Passing S & S yawl Black Watch off Fishers Island 1042

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F/V Skipper off Point Judith Light 1259

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Schooner Aurora near Newport  1352

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Tortuga at rest as Warrior Sailing crew moves in 1615

 

Many thanks to Jonathan Kabak for the invitation.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp, and I have many more.

Click here for numbers on Long Island Sound.   Actually this trip involved the Sounds of Long Island, Block, and Rhode Island.

 

McAllister Sisters is back there somewhere, on the windy side,

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not the sunny side where crew keep watch on

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Atlantic Trader.  If you’ve forgotten what Sisters looks like, click here on a post from over a year ago.

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Much more conspicuous is Bruce A.

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James Turecamo assists in Vega.

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And finishing this post out, it’s Pelham.

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Of course, the rooted talent in this post is of course Robbins Reef Light.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Curtis Bay Fells Point built 1956.  Taken 1987.  Click here for Fells Point with more of the fleet.   Scuttled in 2008 at Redbird Reef near the mouth of Delaware Bay.

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James Turecamo built 1969 . . . in my first 2015 photo of her.  In the dry dock directly between James and the WTC, it’s MSC Harry L. Martin.

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It’s the classic 1965 built Bushey-built Cheyenne. Here she was in Oswego in June 2014 about to head into the Great Lakes, making her a truly anadromous vessel.

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Miriam Moran built 1979.

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Bruce A. McAllister . . . built in 1974.

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Ruby M . . . built in Oyster Bay in 1967.

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Robbins Reef . . . 1953

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with entourage that may have salvaged the white fiberglass boat on the barge.

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And the current Fells Point, Maryland built in 2014.

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Photos of both vessels Fell Point come thanks to Allen Baker.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

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My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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