You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Ellen McAllister’ tag.

Happy 4th of July.  Here’s some sixth boro, some heartland, and some Pacific Northwest.  Here‘s the series.

But let’s start with Robert IV, a workhorse who last appeared in this blog here.

Hundreds of Cheyenne photos have appeared on this blog, showing her in a range of colors and trims; this photo was taken last week in Manitowoc by a Great Lakes mariner, who, by the way, at one time worked in the sixth boro.

Ellen McAllister has worked in the sixth boro longer than I’ve been taking photos here; as a result, hundreds of photos of her can be found here.

For a red-white-blue tug today, what could be better than a Nicholas Vinik photo.

 

An outa-towner has come through the sixth boro twice this week with an unusual bargeload;  bad decision-making means this is the best photo I got.  Sorry, Elizabeth Anne.  Did anyone get a better photo?  Any idea what the “marshmallow” load on that barge is?

Two of the tugs assisting in a Cosco Shipping ULCV, Brendan Turecamo and JRT Moran, seem small but bring adequate power to the task.

Another view of Cheyenne shows her location on the Manitowoc River, adjacent to Erich.

Thanks to Kyle Stubbs for sending along this photo of a raft of Boyer tugs.  L to r, it’s Sea, Billie H, Gretchen H, and Kirsten H.  You might have recognized Sea as the former Java Sea, a regular operating out of the sixth boro. Despite what’s on the bow, she’s now called Kinani H.  In the back row, that looks like Sonja H.

How about another red-white-blue boat for today?  This is from over 11 years ago. It’s the 1951 Dorothy Elizabeth, ex-Gotham, Christine Gellatly, Mobil 11, Socony 11.

To close out the set, Iron Salvor, a Vanuatu-flagged tug, is back in town. Anyone know her story . . . who she works for?

Many thanks to Great Lakes mariner, Kyle, and Tony A for some of these photos;  photos not otherwise attributed by WVD.

Grimaldi trademarked yellow appears fairly frequently in the sixth boro, but I’d never seen this CONRO until the other day.  Partly it catches my attention because I spent half a decade working in two of Gabon’s neighboring countries.

I’ve always enjoyed the dawn.  The cool air and rich light cannot be topped, and now, it is the best time to stay physically distant from folks.

Interesting names . . . these ships meeting in the almost-night;  Maersk Tukang (tukang is the Sundanese word for “doer” or craftsman”) meets Grande Gabon (Gabon is an appropriated name based on a Portuguese description of the Komo river estuary.)  The president’s name is Bongo,  but I really digress.

I know this is not a Pow Wow River morning with muskrats playing around the lily pads while I’m flicking minnows at pickerel or whatever else bites when the snapping turtles are away . . .  This is not another digression, just a way of highlighting the beauty in an industrial waterway.

Since i believe this CONRO is coming from West Africa, I’m wondering where these vehicles are coming from/going to.

I took this photo without seeing the crewman at the extreme left side of the frame.  Only after studying the photos on the big screen did I notice him.

Having the cars uncovered on the decks might not bode well for the cars, but they do provide a scale to show how large the exhaust ducting is.

Ava joins Ellen to ensure safe passage around Bergen Point, and  . . . sure enough . . . the crewman who was enjoying the cool morning with me is still standing at the rail.

All photos, WVD.

 

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

It’s hard to believe that this title has come up 286 times before today, but here they all are.  And yet, I’m starting out with a photo of Ellen McAllister, who herself has appeared here hundreds of times, but never quite like this, heading into the  dawn and about to pass an unidentifiable Vane tugboat.

Ditto Pegasus, passing between a Bouchard tug to the left and some Centerline boats to the right, and below that ONE container on the bridge and the Fedex plane in the sky.

Double Skin 57 and Long Island, previously Peter F. Gellatly,  moves a barge past IMTT, where some Reinauer boats–RTC 103 and Morgan— are taking on product.

Potomac gets an assist from Fort Schuyler.

Ava M. McAllister passes UACC Ibn Al Haitham, where Genesis Victory is lightering and Liz Vinik assisting.

On another morning, Fort Schuyler heads for the Upper Bay, and that looks like Kristin Poling in the distance to the left.

And where Meredith C. Reinauer is lightering Marvin Faith, Bouchard’s Linda Lee, Ellen S., and Evening Breeze look on.

All photos recently by WVD,who had to look up the namesake of the UACC crude carrier.   He turns out to be a Basra-born scientist from a millenium (!!) ago.  That link is worth a read.

 

All photos here were taken less than an hour after sunrise.  It’s commonly known that the golden hour is the best time for photos.

 

Mary Turecamo also headed out for morning work, not that this is anything but a 24/7 essential schedule.

HMS St Andrews arrives with sunrise on its back. Has the HMS been dropped from the name,

just as port of registry has been changed?

Eastern Dawn slings Port Chester into the dock.

Ellen heads out,

meeting a Vane tug on her way to a job.

Cape Henry comes off the anchorage, westbound on the KVK.

All photos, WVD.

 

Going through a backlog from “before” in late winter 2020  . . . a boat approached I didn’t recognize the profile of . . .

William Brewster . . . 65′ x 22′ and built by Blount in 1983.  And in spite of the livery, it seems she’s a fleetmate of Helen Parker and Ava Jude.

How’s this for unusual color?  Recognize the boat?  To see her in previous incarnations, click here and scroll.

Earlier in 2020 I caught Helen Laraway, and

on my way to somewhere else in the archives, I stumbled onto this photo, taken from the window of Amtrak in 2016.  I guess this was north of Hudson somewhere.

Charles D. comes and goes.  Recently I caught her solo doing an assist.

One of the true staples of my time in the sixth boro has been Ellen McAllister, but what I’d forgotten I noticed in this photo from a few years ago . . .  also tripped over while in the dark archives . . .

see the two circular plates on the afterdeck . . . my guess is that’s where the Z-drives were installed.

All photos  . . . WVD, who will be exiting the archives soon, I hope, after we win world war c.

 

I hope this post elucidates what goes on in this photographer’s mind while taking photos, and later at home–in my own type of darkroom–while examining the “catch,” so to speak.

I’d seen these mergansers swim by while I was waiting for a ship.

Two minutes after that . . . in my zoom, I could make out these three tugs, clearly prepared and on their way to meet the same ship.  The mental connection, obviously, was the sets of three, patterns.

A single merganser and

a single tugboat, objectively, have no connection.  The connection is only in the photographer’s brain.

It would not surprise you either if I confessed to seeing the paint protector sheet on the tug fendering as mimicking the face masks that have become ubiquitous in my neighborhood.

 

Photos and tangential thoughts, WVD.

 

Tightrope?

 

This ULCV shows 17 containers across.

It’s a bit surprising to see a Moran 6000 on starboard bow, also on a “tight rope.”

YM Evolution . . . without counting the rows of containers, does it look less beamy?

It is  . . . 15 across.  By contrast, CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci, the other day here, carries 20 across.

All photos, WVD.

 

This series goes way back to 2007, when I erroneously thought a song existed called “Paris in springtime.”  My deciding it must be a faux memory did not prevent me from doing a bunch more posts, with variations like “pairs in winter,” like today’s posts.  It still is winter.  And there is a movie with a somewhat similar name;  a fun trailer can be seen here.

Let’s start with Sarah Ann and Thomas E. pairing up to get a crane off to Sims.

 

Ellen and Ava team up to see a small container vessel into the kills.

 

Meagan Ann and Emily Ann each bring a scow for the filling, likely with scrap?

 

And for a variation, a mixed triad of Margaret, Alex, and Ava return from assists.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you happy springish late winter and successful social separations.

 

 

March 2020 has arrived, and when I brushed the cobwebs away from the March 2010 archives, I discovered I took a lot of interesting photos that month, enough to do two posts from the 2010 March set.

Let’s start with the quirky Capt. Log, captained by the friendliest person I know in the sixth boro.  I rode along on the 63′ tanker for this story.

A fleetmate of Stena Perros , Stena Primorsk, is currently anchored off Long Beach NY.  Perros is off Santos Brasil today, 2020.  Ships are designed to travel the largest part of the planet.

Firefighter was still in service 10 years ago;  now it’s a museum in Greenport NY.  After the hauling out in this post, she was repainted in her original white/black colors.

MOL Innovation is escorted in by the indefatigable Ellen McAllister.  At 961′ loa, Innovation is more than 300′ shorter than the largest container ships calling in the sixth boro these days, and I suspect the 1996 build has been scrapped.

Back in 2010, I was not using AIS, but as I drove my car over the VZ Bridge on my way to work one morning, I noticed it entering the boro;  I was very happy that I was driving to work early that day;  I got the photos and still made it to work on time.  THAT is the logic of going to work earlier than necessary, and (almost) always carrying a camera.   Now I’m sorry to report the 1995 Jumbo Spirit is aground in a scrapping yard in Aliağa.

Maersk Wisconsin, a 2000 build, has also been scrapped.   Note the Humvees being transported.

McAllister Brothers is a 1958 Jakobson product;  I believe she’s laid up in the McAllister Staten Island yard.

Eagle Service is now Genesis EagleHorizon Discovery … in the distance, she’s also been scrapped in Texas. Note the different Manhattan skyline, only a decade ago.

More soon.  All photos in March 2010 by WVD, who now needs to wash the cobwebs off.  And since learning that Jumbo Spirit has been scrapped, I decided I need one more glance.

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