You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Ellen McAllister’ tag.

April 1, 2011 … and this was not a joke.  More on this distressed vessel at the end of this post.

McCormack Boys and

Turecamo Girls with Barney Turecamo.  All three are still working in the same liveries, I believe.

Long Island-built Escort was phased out as a certain coal-fired power plant shut down.  She’s taken on new life as Northstar Innovator, based on NJ’s

Maurice River, although I’ve yet to see her. 

Stad Amsterdam is not currently in Amsterdam;  she’s not far away though in Scheveningen.  If you want to pronounce this shibboleth as a Dutch speaker would, have a listen. 

Spring sunrises . . .  Coming into port is the 2017-scrapped Atlantic Cartier

escorted by Ellen McAllister and

passing Bow Clipper and Maria J.  That tug is now Nicholas Vinik. Bow Clipper is now in Santos Brasil. 

The venerable Chemical Pioneer was ushered in by Ellen McAllister and McAllister Responder. I say “venerable” because she was built using the stern of Sea Witch, after a massive conflagration in the port, told here by the Fire Fighter site.   .

Two small USMMA boats made their way through the fog.   I’m not sure the name of the vessel to the left, but the one to the right was Growler and she’s back (though hidden away) in the sixth boro.

Of course, I post a photo of Kristin Poling, which had only a few months of service left at this point. She started service in 1934 as Poughkeepsie Socony.

Marion M . . . I’ve been told she was sold to parties in the Chesapeake who planned to restore her and put her up for sale in 2018.  Does anyone have an update on that?

And finally, we return to Le Papillon . . .  the 48′ steel schooner was dragged off the beach but I lost track of her after that.  I believe she was cut up.

It all seems like stuff from long ago . .    all photos, WVD.

Location 1?  Do you know this tug?

Location 2.  Tug Rachel is with this

unusual looking cargo ship, Lihue.

Viking pushes southbound past Castle Rock and

Comet northbound along the Hudson River.

Near the west end of the East River, it’s C. Angelo and

near the east end, it’s Navigator with GT Bulkmaster heading west and Ellen McAllister, east.

Working near the TZ Bridge some years back, it’s Tappan Zee II.

And finally, on the northern end of Lake Huron, it’s Avenger IV

heading for the Soo.

To answer the first question, that’s Coney Island with the Goethals Bridge and Linden refinery in the background, making this the Elizabeth River in Elizabethport NJ.

And the second question, it’s Seattle.  Photo thanks to Kyle Stubbs. Lihue, ex-President Hoover III, ex-Thomas E. Cuffe, 1971,  may be at the end of Rachel‘s towline along the coast of Oregon, heading for the Panama Canal and then . .  . Texas for scrap.  She’s probably the last of LASH (C8-S-81e) vessels built, along with President Tyler IV and President Grant V, scrapped more than 10 years ago.  She’s been a survivor.

Click on the photo below to learn more about a 1970 container ship still moving boxes, up to 482 teu at a time.  Explorador!

All other photos, WVD, at points in various places since 2017.

This Odfjell tanker has 47 tanks!

I took this recently along the KVK.   Today the 1998 tanker is in the Mississippi River heading for New Orleans.

Guess the age here?

She’s just two years old, launched in January 2019. 

Elandra Willow has departed for the next job, but this morning Elandra Oak arrived in the sixth boro. Here is the rest of the fleet. 

Phoenix Admiral is a regular here, this time arriving after five days from Point Tupper. 

Of the three tankers here, she’s by far the largest.  The other two are 600’x 32′, and Phoenix Admiral is 820′ x 144′.

 

All photos, WVD, who has several times prepared a “random tankers” post and several times left them in the “drafts” folder.

More “threes” here.

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

The Kill Van Kull is a relatively narrow strait, but skill and experience allows passing like this to occur routinely.   Zim Tarragona (856′ x 106′) and CMA CGM Tosca (1096′ x 140′) need to mind the physics in this passage.

MSC Toronto (1065′ x 140′) heads into Port Elizabeth with another container ship not far behind.

MOL Courage (1036′ x 150′) heads for sea.  She seems to have shed the false AIS signal that accompanied her last trip.

Chacabuco (905′ x 31′)  heads toward the container port.  Years ago, I met this vessel in Brazil.  The name comes from a region in Argentina.

 

Ever Lasting (1098′ x 160′)  heads for the next port.

YM Evolution (849′ x 122′) comes in.

The past few years, she’s been a regular here.

Ever Front, (1095′ x 157′) and the newest vessel in this post, heads for the next port.

 

Taipei Trader (485′ x 76′) does a regular shuttle run.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

AIS said an MSC vessel was arriving, but when I saw it, I was surprised.  I’d never seen an MSC RORO.  MSC is the world’s second largest container line, and besides a cruise line, which I saw in Havana  and which I believe does not call at US ports, container transport is all MSC does.  This is quite unlike the largest container line, Maersk, which has over 900 subsidiaries, including tugboats and offshore work vessels.

By the way, any guesses on the others in the top ten by teu moved and how they’re ranked?  Answer below.

It seems that MSC has been in the scheduled deepsea RORO trade for only a short time, and although it’s likely that MSC Cristiana has called here before, this is my first time to see her.  I think of ROROS, like this PCTC, as boxy, but this photo with MSC Chritiana juxtaposed with a real trash container barge shows what boxy looks like.

Guess how many cars she carries?

Ellen has a hold on that recessed shell bit.

 

The paint scheme reduces the boxy look of this vessel, but

   

I didn’t know when she was last painted.  I’d say this 2011 RORO is due for a repaint. 

All photos, WVD.

She carries 6,700 ceu [car equivalent units].

Top ten are:  1. Maersk, 2. MSC, 3. Cosco, 4. CMA CGM, 5. Hapag-Lloyd, 6. ONE, 7. Evergreen, 8. OOCL, 9.  HMM, 10. Yang Ming.  More on each of those here.  If you’re a regular here, you’ve seen at least one of all of these lines’ vessels.

It also means that you can be on a highway or at a rail crossing anywhere in the US–or other country–and you’ll see containers of these lines.

Name that tug?  She’s 91.5′ x 26.8′ and used to be called Traveller.  Answer follows.

Part of a defacto ghost fleet around the sixth boro, it’s J. George Betz, and mostly invisible beyond, Rhea I. Bouchard. J. George is longer, stronger, and newer.

Also in the dry dock a week or so back, it’s Emily Ann.  My favorite story of this tug dates from a time she was called Cabo Rojo.

Lincoln Sea  was featured in my second ever tugster post, back in November 2006.   In the background, that looks to be Mount St. Elias

I usually see Captain D alongside a DUP barge, but behold, in good light, she’s light.   That’s my acronym, DUP.

Ditto . . .  Robert Burton.

Ruth M. Reinauer was just a year old when it appeared here in 2009.  Ruth is 112.9′ x 35′.

Ellen McAllister . . . what more can I add to what I’ve written already about this former USN YTB.   I know three of her dozen or so siblings, ex-USN YTBs, include Robert E.Timothy, and Stacy.

Miriam and Doris Moran follow along a ship, ready to put their force where needed when needed.

More fleetmates to Captain D and Robert Burton above, it’s Paula Atwell and Pathfinder . . . all unusually light.

And finally . . . that tug in the top photo . .  it’s Marie J. Turecamo.

All photos, WVD.

Clifford Maersk is making her final approach into port of NYNJ, arriving here from King Abdul Aziz Seaport in Damman, KSA.   So what?  Check out the non-containerized cargo near the front center of the load.

See it?

As the container ship approached, I managed to get some closer up photos.    I have my theory, but I’ll leave it to you to state yours in the comments

 

Do you see the “squiggle” on the camouflage just right of the red panel, above the rightmost blue container marked “45”?  I call that shape “ithnayn,” Arabic for the number two.

Again, I’m not putting into words what I see here, but I will say it’s poorly wrapped, or formerly wrapped.

This isn’t the first time I’ve seen intriguing cargoes.  Remember these Oshkosh trucks with Hebrew writing on them?  And then there have been other military hardware . . .  military trucks and other vehicles atop the boxes previously here, here, here, and here.   Once I even spotted a cigarette boat way up there.

All photos, WVD.  After your guesses, I’ll show my hand.   And since I’m not trick or treating or dancing tonight, here’s your second post for today.

It’s the end of another month, and maybe because everything’s been so bleak of late, let’s just admire and enjoy the complexity of the sixth boro.

Diverse people work here on diverse missions.

Places like NY Harbor School and M.A. S. T. as well as SUNY Maritime College and King’s Point MMA are here.

On foggy days a narrow navigation channel gives the illusion of being as expansive as the ocean.

Keeping it as ideal a place as possible is the mission of many people and much infrastructure, seen and unseen.

Professionals pass through the sixth boro without ever technically entering the space, both a boon and a bane to all involved,

and their safe passage is ensured by the named and the nameless.

Work and recreation can happen in the same space because of

professionalism.  If you have a lot of time, you can binge watch these videos by a pro who works the sixth boro and beyond.  Now, when I hear his voice on VHF, it’s familiar.  There are books as well.

The universal language of gesture is powerdful.

The sixth boro has at least as much specialized equipment as the other five boros combined;  another way to put it, the specialized equipment of the sixth boro enable the other boros to perform.

And if the land boros have spirit, don’t imagine the sixth boro  lacks anything.

Photos and sentiments, WVD.

Long Island, eastbound, gets overtaken by a small fishing boat.

B. Franklin, light, heads to the Reinauer yard.

Doris Moran, light, heads east.

Ellen McAllister assists a Maersk ship through the channels to her berth.

Helen Laraway heads east to pick up a scow.

HMS Justice pushes HMS 2605 through the KVK.

Charles A. and Matthew Tibbetts follow a ship so that they can assist as needed when called upon.

Ava and Kimberly head out to different assignments.

Brendan Turecamo provides port assist.

Mister Jim follows Seeley.

Gulf Coast has been a Dann Marine vessel since it was launched way back in 1982.

All photos, WVD.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,461 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

April 2021
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930