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There’s an expression about the excitement of watching paint dry.  Recording a large construction project is about as interesting unless you do a form of time lapse, which I’ve inadvertently done with the Bayonne Bridge. Change is happening all over the city, but here’s what I’ve watched since way before the raising began.

In August 2017, I rode over the new span for the first time.

 

I next got down to look what was happening at the Bridge in December,  the 16th.

Here’s January.  Notice above the old lower roadbed still spanned to the third arches inside Bayonne, and below, three arches (I’ll call them 4–6) remained without roadbed.

That’s Doris Moran, and notice that #6 arch has seen some erosive work.

In mid-February, #6 arch is gone, and work is happening

(here’s a closeup) on #5.

By 24 April, #4 is gone and #3 previously supporting a roadbed is now “freestanding”, as Joyce passes.

And on May 10, roadbed only linked the grid box with one of the arches, and the current inland most arch is only half its former size.

Here’s a closer up.

On June 20, this is what remained of arch #1.

Here’s a closeup.  I’m wondering if the workers in the lift basket held a camera so that the extension jack hammer could see what he was doing.

Then I noticed . . . about where arch #4 had been a new column was being erected in sections.

The tall crane does the lifting, and workers in two lift baskets–an orange and a green–guided the section into place, fitting the guide rods–it seems–into slots in the section being lowered.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any mis-reading of the process.

 

Cosco Prince Rupert came into town recently 27 days out of Pusan, Korea.

She was launched in South Korea in 2011, has dimensions of 1095′ x 141′, and has container capacity of 8208.  By current standards, she’s upper medium-sized calling in the sixth boro of NYC.

Prince Rupert’s namesake?  He was the first governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

JPO Capricornus, 2005, 865′ x 106,’ teu capacity of 4132 . . .  makes her a smaller size calling these days.  She was a week out of Cartagena upon her arrival in NYC.  She was built in South Korea.

 

Atlantic Sky, a CONRO vessel with capacity of 3800 tea and 1300 vehicles, was launched in 2017 in China.  The tape has her at 970′ x 121′.

 

 

 

Ever Leading launched in 2012 in South Korea.  She has 8452-teu capacity and has dimensions of 1099′ x 151′.

 

Zim Ukrayina  was launched in 2009 in the Philippines.  Her dimensions are 849′ x 105′ and her teu capacity is 4360.

She made the voyage from just north of  Hong Kong (Da Chang Bay) to NYC in 40 days.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

By the numbers today, Daisy Mae,  launched in late 2017 and generating 3200 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, built 2002 and 2600 hp.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969 and 2000.

James E. Brown, 2015 and 1000.

Dean Reinauer, 2013 and 4260.

Andrea, 1999 and 3000.

Elizabeth McAllister, 1967 and 4000.

Ellen McAllister, also 1967 and 4000.

Kimberley Turecamo, 1980 and 3000.

Joan Turecamo, 1980 and 4300.

Joan Moran, 1975 and 4300.

Miss Ila, 1962 and 2400.

All photos by Will Van Dorp; all numbers from tugboat information.

 

Who knew so many types of fog exist?  I believe this is advection fog, and it’s patchy, forming only in places where warm air lays over cold moist areas, like ocean water in May, a common occurrence in the Upper Bay in springtime.

0849 hours:  I watched this ship come through the Narrows.  Around that hour, traffic was intense.  At one point less than half an hour earlier, I feared two MSC container ships were going to collide, but it was only my eyes playing tricks on me, with limited visibility.

0852  That’s Oleander overtaking the bulk carrier.

0852.23   At this point, I decided to see what conditions existed on the other side of the island.

0949  And here we are, less than an hour later.

0952  Jumeirah Beach is a white sandy waterfront area in Dubai.  I chuckled when the VTS folks announced her a “jeremiah beach,”  recalling when Hammurabi was announced as “ham berry.”

0955  No hint of fog existed here, about five miles away.

1000

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has lots more foggy and not-so-foggy photos to post.

Click here for the Pacific Basin homepage.

 

CMA CGM T. Roosevelt is not the only 1200′ ship calling here these days.  CMA CGM J. Adams has recently visited the harbor, as has NYK Wren, ninth of the NYK “bird” series, which arrived and departed in the hours too dark for photos.   There are several 1200′ OOCL vessels, including recently OOCL Chongqing.

If you need an image to show why assist tugs look triangular from this angle, this might be it.

 

 

Ten years ago, it would take two ships to move this number of containers.

It’s hard to keep up with new ULCS entering service.  OOCL Chongqing is rated at 13,208 teus; the newest vessels are already up to 21,000!

 

 

She recently departed Charleston and is headed for Suez and back to Asia through the Indian Ocean.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

YM Express backs into the Rose Bowl after leaving Howland Hook, with some assistance seen at the starboard stern quarter.

Once rotated toward the east, she passes Eric McAllister.

Note that whereas English is a strictly left to right writing system, Chinese is not.

Ellen assists  . . .

 

 

This is my first time to notice the “beware of the propeller” sign in Chinese.  I take it the rightmost character means propeller, but I could be wrong about that.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose computer translates English to Chinese characters as below, speaks and writes/reads no Chinese, Mandarin or otherwise.

.

Here was a related post, Yano, watched by John Watson and me simultaeously and from different vantage points, each of us unbeknownst to the other.

Before the snow and cold hit this past week, actually Wednesday Jan 4, I was tipped off about an impending BDD dry dock exit in Bayonne.  And when James E. Brown grasps the door–think of it as a plug–that confirms something will be floating out.

To the extreme left,  see the plug, and Capt. Brian A. McAllister positions itself on the stern of USNS Soderman.

Ellen has the starboard stern quarter, and

Eric has a line on the bow.  For a point-by-point comparison of Eric and the Moran 6000s, click here.

 

Note how the ship dwarfs the lighthouse, and

the harbor dwarfs the ship,

almost entirely obscuring Alex standing by.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whom wonders if anyone’s going to get photos of Millville and 1964 in the anchorage today.  I’m tied up.

This is the time of year when boxes are moving every which way on land.  Delivery drivers for companies like FedEx and UPS work even longer hours on dark streets, especially here in the north.  Click here for a graph of global container ship capacity in seaborne trade since 1980.  How many containers exist worldwide?  Answer follows.

Box ships move containers around the world all year round.  Astrid Schulte departed the sixth boro a week ago and has moved through a handful of US ports since then, approaching Savannah now.  Assisting her around the bend at Bergen Point are (r to l) Ellen McAllister, Marjorie B. McAllister, and Charles D. McAllister.

 

I haven’t found the resource with info on air draft, so I don’t know if this vessel (ex-APL Illinois) would have fit beneath the old roadbed.

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  And the answer to the question in paragraph one is . . . . there is no answer.  See more here.

As tugster continues its CYPHER series,  this is the 3633nd post, and almost 2.1 million hits.  Thanks for staying with me.

On the other hand, if I were selling calendars, the number 12 would be significant.    So for the next few days, let me offer some diverse dozens chosen quite subjectively, although what the photos have in common–besides subject–is that I like them.

Here’s a November 2016 photo along the Gowanus under the BQE.  This tug looks good in blue, but I’ll never forget her in orange.

Here’s a November 2015 when the upper deck of Bayonne had yet to be assembled, and the lower disassembled.  Amy C last appeared here as she nudged Empire State into her Fort Schuyler dock.

Here’s 2014.  She’s recently worked in the Keys.

Here’s ’13.  Where is Houma today?

’12.  Ellen‘s a regular on this blog.

’11.  Tasman has been doing this work since 1976!

’10.  Is ex-Little Bear in Erie along with Bear?

’09.  She now makes her way around the lower Caribbean .  . . and currently anchored in Trinidad.

’08.  And I’m adding another photo right after Linda (launched in ’08) of

Scott Turecamo (below) launched in 1998 but radically retrofitted in 2005, originally quite similar to Greenland Sea, here see the photos by Robert J. Smith.  How many of these ATBs does Moran now operate?  .

’07.  This was the only time I ever saw Penobscot.  Anyone know where foreign she went?

’06.  Note the size of the yard workers around the wheels on Ralph E. Bouchard.

Again, some of these photos show what has changed in the sixth boro, spawning ground for this blog.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

And random perspectives, like this of James E. Brown approaching the W’burg Bridge, whose namesake was an engineer you’d never guess.

 

Yes, that’s Manhattan.

Marty C is a Weeks tug I’ve never heard of, here assisting Weeks 500 modify shoreline.

If you’re wondering, you’re looking into the Bronx.

 

And finally, with queens in the near background, it’s the workhorse Ellen McAllister.

 

 

And that reminds me, I saw Prentiss Brown this morning, although she was way down on the horizon, so far off I couldn’t even force my camera to focus.  You may recall Prentiss Brown as Michaela McAllister.  And Chicagoans know her barge as the “jinx ship,” back when she was still self propelled.  Now I’m keeping my eyes peeled for the former Katie G and Colleen McAllister.  Have they been renamed?

All photos, etc. by Will Van Dorp.

 

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