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Let’s jump back to May 2012.  Over along the Manhattan side of the East River then, I caught this scene.  Since then, there’s been some movement:   Peking to Germany,  Marion M to the Chesapeake,  Helen McAllister to  . . . rebirth as new steel.

Cheyenne has migrated to the Lake Michigan for now.

Twin Tube is still around but sans the boom.

Ellen McAllister is also still hard at work in the sixth boro, but I don’t see her doing much indirect towing as here.

Mark Moran was just passing through from the shipyard to Charleston.

Swan, built in 1981 and showing as her last movement three and a half years ago in China, has likely gone to rebirth as new steel.

But a decade ago in May 2012, she was here to move some used tugboats over to West Africa. Here she’s already down and BFT No. 38 with a crew boat strapped on has already been loaded, while

McAllister Sisters and McAllister Girls wait with three Crowley tugs, 

Cavalier, Pioneer, and Mars

After they are floated aboard, the tide turns the anchored Swan.

Socrates and Heron also float aboard, and

overnight, Swan gets deballasted and raises the hull, so that we can see their five-bladed wheels.   More of the story here.

Also in the boro those days was Picton Castle, showing the flag and more, maybe recruiting some hands

before sailing away.  Does anyone have news about her?  Has she really stayed in Lunenburg since late 2020?

All photos, WVD, exactly 120 months ago.

Unrelated to any of this, read this May 2004 article by the late great Don Sutherland and reflect on how much change has occurred.

Other Evergreen F-class vessels have called in the sixth boro.  So can you be sure which one this is?

Justine McAllister had the port bow.  Again, name that ship?  I could just be pulling your leg with that title.

 

Yup, this is the now much-maligned Ever Forward.

I too have made the same jokes about ever backward, ever sideways . . . .

But here, as she rounds a sharp turn with assistance from Justine, Ellen, and Majorie B., I have to change my tune.  No report has yet determined what caused the incident in the Chesapeake, and when that report comes out, whatever error caused the incident will lead to avoidance for next time.  Who has not erred or operated a device that hasn’t erred?

Bravo, Ever Forward for rinsing off that mud and getting back to work. Fuel up and deliver those delayed boxes.

All photos and sentiments, WVD. 

They come, they go . . . and we never get to know more than the names, unless something unusual happens, as was the case with Ever Forward.  More on that at the end of this post.  Some names are intriguing, like CMA CGM Osiris, likely among the newest cargo ships calling in the sixth boro, part of the CMA CGM Zephyr class. 

 

Chipolbrok–the name– made no sense until I looked up its origins.  The agreement has been around longer than I have!!

Bulk carriers have the best names . . .  like Common Luck. 

Maersk Vilnius is a regular in the boro, last posted here in January. 

So is MSC Tomoko, although I’ve not posted any photos of her before. 

Fairchem Copper has never appeared here before, although sister Fairfield tankers have

Ortolon . . . that’s a word origin I never suspected!  Making sense of Ortolon Coco, that defeats me.  

Ice Fighter . . .  I saw this and immediately thought of Ice Babe Base of many years ago.

I started with a CMA CGM Zephyr, so it’s a good place to end . . .  and they crossed paths in the boro:  Osiris, meet Apollon.

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s the story I alluded to earlier:  a graphic novelist —Jordan Crane–had his latest book printed overseas and it–along with other new books–was traveling back to the US aboard Ever Forward.  Crane also had a book tour planned, where he would distribute copies of the new book.  Well, Ever Forward messed up those plans!  Long term though, this delay revealed this story, and that may just boost his sales, like a double-printed postage stamp or doubly-struck coin. Well, if I were Crane, I would play up this angle.  And Ever Forward, it appears she’s back in Baltimore.  I’ll bet the pilot and crew will be very nervous around the Craighill Channel. 

 

Let’s go back a decade.  Then MSC Emma was on the west coast of Bayonne leaving town; now she’s on the west coast of Central America, leaving Lazaro Cardenas for Panama.

Above she was assisted by Gramma Lee T [now in Norfolk] and Margaret and setting up for the turn from Newark Bay into the KVK;  here we had almost gotten ahead of the trio of vessels.

A strange trio was in the sky

over the sixth boro. The piggyback rider is still in town, albeit likely to never fly again. More here.

Meanwhile, over in the Arthur Kill, a boring machine was placing charges in holes below the bottom of the waterway and connecting them to the stringy orange signal cord to blast when the time was right for them all to detonate at the same millisecond.  That day I touched some hefty but perfectly safe explosives, inert until the right signal is applied, which sounds like some folks I know.

More on “kraken” the bottom here.

Back then, I was spending a lot of early mornings near Howland Hook waiting for my work to begin, and I caught a Double Skin 37 moving bunkers

and maneuvered by Coral Coast.  Was that mechanical dredge Captain A. J. Fournier in the distance above?

The Joker was then a more sedate Taurus, before joining the hilariously-named over at Hays.

Put Tasman Sea into the picture too.  Is the Tasmanian still laid up in Louisiana?

And it was a great April 2012 day I caught the seldom-seen Patty Nolan

moving a houseboat into the sixth boro.  Patty seems to be preparing for a comeback.

And the 1972 2325 teu Horizon Navigator, here with Samantha Miller alongside,  was still working.  Is the 1972 container ship still intact?

And let’s wind this up with Ellen and Maurania III returning to base after a job.  Ellen is still in the sixth boro, and Maurania III is in the Delaware.

All photos, WVD, April 2012.

Entirely unrelated, check out these Smithsonian photo winners.

 

 

Here was 1.  Dawn’s early light is my favorite time in the city that never sleeps.

Even Navig8 Gauntlet snoozes, except for the person on watch.

Captain Dann is moving about, spinning

around for an assist.  Radiant Ray is aptly named for this time.

Truth be told, the sixth boro never sleeps.

Ellen, along with

Charles D., was on its way to an assist over at Earle.

Like I said, this is my very favorite time of day.  Of course, you won’t find me awake very much after 2100.

All photos, WVD.

 

Five tugs are grouped in the photo below.

Let’s follow these two.

Ava and Ellen are off to assist a tanker into a berth at IMTT.

Shortly afterward, Kimberly Poling passed by with Noelle Cutler and 

Evelyn Cutler followed

with Edwin A. Poling.

 

Beyond Energy Centaur, that would be Kimberly heading upriver.

Meanwhile, Ellen and Ava muscle Lillesand into her berth.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  Ever Forward, the more distant vessel here, is currently aground in the Chesapeake, for some reason outside the channel since Sunday night.  She was headed from Baltimore to Norfolk and then would have come to the sixth boro of NYC.  Speaking of tugs, watch this story evolve, since large tugs may be necessary to get her off.  If you have 17 minutes to spare, here’s Dr. Sal. 

Tony A sent this along labeled as “m-o-a-t,” mother of all tugs, and Pacific Reliance is truly a large tugboat at 121′ x 42′

with 9280 hp turning two 12′ diameter propeller and pushing around a 560′ tank barge that carries 155k barrels of liquid product.  But there are larger tugboats.  Justine McAllister gets called in to assist the Crowley unit into the dock.

CMT Pike heads north about to be obscured by an incoming MSC ship.

 

Seeley pushes along a block of four scows.

 

JRT and Kirby prepare to sail a Minerva tanker.  Minerva, Roman goddess of war and other things, seems appropriate these days.

The indefatigable Ellen McAllister passes Barney Turecamo on her way to a job.

Catherine C. Miller moves Weeks crane 577 to a lift site.

Emily Ann returns from a job. 

Nicolas Vinik gallops off to a job,

following Liz Vinik, herself

follwing Gregg McAllister.

And the beat goes on . . . all photos, WVD, except of course the one from Tony A, to whom I am grateful.

Thanks for following me down memory lane the past few days, or should I say up recollections river.  My plan for the next bit is to alternate current sixth boro activity with photos from archives of the Canal Society of New York.

I love winter light, when it’s light, as it illuminates parts of NCC Reem and Captain Dann with the bunker barge.

The hot exhaust/cold air differential makes for more shimmering light this time of year.

Images are clear, but fata morgana distortions are more pronounced;  Ellen and Doris here are less than two miles away.

Here the Moran 6000 in MSC Vittoria’s shade is silhouetted, whereas the one following catches the light on its superstructure facets.

At 2 to 3 miles, it’s shimmered again, as two of the Moran 6000s sail Monaco Bridge.

Margaret returns from sailing Conti Cortesia.

And finally, with Coho in the background, it’s Eastern Dawn pushing an almost color matching fuel barge, in Balico colors.

All photos less than a week old, WVD.

Let’s have another look at photos in the sixth boro during the first month of 2012.  It was a snowy day that I caught Cheyenne

and Franklin Reinauer. Cheyenne is now in Wisconsin, for sale, and Franklin is still in this boro.

Thomas Dann had a crane barge over alongside New Century.  Thomas Dann had a serious fire off Florida and was scrapped in 2015.  New Century is now Lucky Century, NE  bound near Mauritius and Reunion.

Bohemia assisted Quantico Creek with a bunker barge. Bohemia is on the Delaware River, and Quantico Creek . . . in Tampa.

This scene was so busy I might come back to it in another post.  What I can identify here (l to r) is this:  Maersk Murotsu, Quantico Creek, of course Greenland Sea, Dubai Express, and a Reinauer barge. Dubai Express is currently on its way from the Med to the sixth boro.

Seaboats had already been scooped up by K-Sea in January 2012, which had itself been scooped up by Kirby.  Notice the stacks of the two boats:  the red/black initials have been painted over and a K-Sea oval placed but not painted with the K-Sea logo nor had the stack itself been painted K-Sea “yellow.”  Mediterranean Sea and

Weddell Sea still carried their mostly-green livery, and when painted, we clearly Kirby boats.  Mediterranean Sea has just recently changed hands again and is now Douglas J., a Donjon boat.  

Beaufort Sea was still fully K-Sea, as evidenced by the yellow stack and the K-Sea oval.   She was scrapped around 2016.

Left to right here, it’s Pearl River I and Morton S. Bouchard Jr.  The ship is now Zim Vancouver–just left Norfolk for Spain–and the tug is now Stasinos Boys. 

Ellen McAllister passed the 7 buoy. 

And finally, Penn Maritime began the year as its own company before been acquired by Kirby, and

Penn No. 6 carried that name forward until 2018 when she began what we now know as Vinik No. 6.

All January 2012 photos, WVD, who hopes you enjoy this photographic account of some of the changes in the sixth boro in the past decade.  I have lots of photos of that month, so I could do an installment “C” of that retrospective.   Besides, although there are things I want to see in the boro today, I might have to acclimate to the cold first.  Yesterday after it was 57 degrees here, and this morning . . .  a dramatic 31.

And unrelated, here‘s how the new year was feted in around the world . . .

Also unrelated, this 1953 “tugboat tug” (sic) is still for sale.

 

 

The juxtaposition of small craft with the larger vessels in the sixth boro can be dramatic, like when the small fishing boat barely rises above the boot stripe on the ship.

Here’s another, where the small craft is about 1.5 teu or less.

The guy on this Sea-Doo would be minced if his Sea-Doo engine or jet stopped doo-ing.  He’s tiny beside the tug, which itself

is not that big beside the ship.

This “small” NYPD boat might be over 50′ loa but still small beside the 1200’+ of the regular ULCVs.  By the way, I’d not read this story about 52′ ex-NYPD launch No. 5 until now.  I saw No. 5 on the Hudson back a few years, and you can see it here . . .  if you scroll.

I caught this blurry pic of a harbor small craft donning its invisibility cloak a few days ago. 

That, dear readers, is a pontoon boat running from somewhere east of Norton Point across Gravesend Bay and into the Upper Bay before a storm.  A pontoon boat!!

Thank the clean waters for the schools of fish in the harbor and all these small recreational boats out to snag them.

And finally, talking small, this appears to be the new color of the line boats here handling boom along Bayonne’s KVK Riviera.  I love that high-visibility chartreuse color.  Here‘s a job ad if you’re interested.

All photos, large and small, WVD.

And thanks to Phil Little, here’s a story about a harrowing voyage from Long Island to Bermuda in a Grover 26.

I regularly read the Brooklyn Eagle, and I’m happy to share this great photo

of a young child happily asleep as the family harvests reeds on Lake Titicaca, as credited.

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