You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Ellen McAllister’ tag.

I’ve never “reblogged” before, but this is a good post and a good day to do it. Nine years on from this post, and 19 years on from the event that prompted this, I’d have thought we’d be more united.

tugster: a waterblog

Knowing what I knew, Maurania III headed up to the North River–where recently she raced– could only mean one thing, especially

given her accompaniment by Ellen and Elizabeth, also wearing the canvas frocks.  What it meant was that

USS New Yorkhad done its local doing and was

bound for sea.  We’re two days off the one decade anniversary of

quite the tragedy.

By the way, I’m with Bloomberg on this one: please stop calling it ground zero.  Let’s move on because time has moved on.

Also, for the record, we have a local election in my voting district, and I will hang up every time pollsters call and ask if I feel less or more secure now than before 9/11.  It’s a stupid question.  IMHO, be vigilant, but there NEVER is such a thing as complete security, although I’m grateful for those who endeavor to keep…

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2015 is the last year I saw the race;  in the following years I was working and away.  But 2015 Labor Day Sunday had beautiful weather.

Again, I’m not going to name each;  you can read the names either on the boats or in the tags . . .  and then match up. And in the photo above, the jetskis had no names, but I hope you noticed them.

I’ll make an exception for Sea Horse, the Linden-based Sea Scout boat.  Click here for more info on the boat.

 

 

See Harvey back at the end of the line?  It was 19 years ago that Harvey came out of retirement to assist when tragedy struck.

Both lead tugs here are nicely appointed with the colorful pennants.

Ellen certainly had the best matched “riding crew” that day.

Let’s hope the this race comes back in 2021.

All photos, WVD, whose fabulous ride was care of the NY Media Boat.  If you’re looking for something to do, click on the link and book a ride.

 

Let’s do 2013 and 2014, or redo them, same conditions as I stated yesterday. But first let’s look at the 2013 crowd, packing in like you wouldn’t with covid.  Here was the crowd at 1010 and

by 1035 they had grown significantly.

The compulsory muster takes place, irrigated by fireboat John J. Harvey.

Once the race begins, a front-runner like Decker

might soon get left in the wake.

The fire boat slices up from behind and

propels itself between two Miller boats.

Pushoffs happen next, sometimes quite equally matched like here, with 3900 hp countering 4200.

Let’s jump ahead to 2014, with the arrivals on the watery carpet,

the processing to the starting line,

and get straight to racing without all the preening and posturing.

Someone seems a bit oversize in that gray livery.

This is a fairly mis-matched pair:  Wayne at 5100 hp, and Ellen at 4000.  Maybe a re-match is in order Wayne v. Ava.

Thanks to Jeff Anzevino for this shot, the Media Boat has military background in common with Wayne.

After Wayne has strutted its stuff in the push-offs, some of the boats lined up for the roping the bollard.

Let’s hold it up here.  All photos, WVD.

 

Installment 1 was a long time ago.  But the hazy days of summer bring the inspiration back.  Any idea what this is?  Answers follow below.

Or this?  I took all the photos in this post a few days ago–Sunday–afternoon from near the VZ Bridge.

Here’s an easier one maybe.

This one is a bit weird.

This one’s truly unusual.

Below . . . in the foreground that’s the same vessel as seen directly above in profile.

I liked this shot in the camera, but when I put it on the computer, I noticed that bow and stern are bookended by recreational boats.  Have you identified the hazy profiles above?

Here’s the same Capt.Brian A. McAllister following a ship in and the deckhand on the bow prepares to capture the messenger line and tie it to the big line lead from the forward winch.

Answers:  1)  Ram VII     2)  USNS Supply (T-AOE-6) departing Naval Weapons Station Earle   3)  Ellen McAllister  bow first  4)  two large container ships passing in Ambrose Channel, a Maersk ULCV and a Hyundai one  5 and 6) USNS Mendonca (T-AKR-303) with dredger RN Weeks bound for sea in 6)

All photos, WVD, who’s making the best of hazy summer light and air conditions.  Snow-reduced visibility can be seen here, fog here and rain does the same here.

Happy 4th of July.  Here’s some sixth boro, some heartland, and some Pacific Northwest.  Here‘s the series.

But let’s start with Robert IV, a workhorse who last appeared in this blog here.

Hundreds of Cheyenne photos have appeared on this blog, showing her in a range of colors and trims; this photo was taken last week in Manitowoc by a Great Lakes mariner, who, by the way, at one time worked in the sixth boro.

Ellen McAllister has worked in the sixth boro longer than I’ve been taking photos here; as a result, hundreds of photos of her can be found here.

For a red-white-blue tug today, what could be better than a Nicholas Vinik photo.

 

An outa-towner has come through the sixth boro twice this week with an unusual bargeload;  bad decision-making means this is the best photo I got.  Sorry, Elizabeth Anne.  Did anyone get a better photo?  Any idea what the “marshmallow” load on that barge is?

Two of the tugs assisting in a Cosco Shipping ULCV, Brendan Turecamo and JRT Moran, seem small but bring adequate power to the task.

Another view of Cheyenne shows her location on the Manitowoc River, adjacent to Erich.

Thanks to Kyle Stubbs for sending along this photo of a raft of Boyer tugs.  L to r, it’s Sea, Billie H, Gretchen H, and Kirsten H.  You might have recognized Sea as the former Java Sea, a regular operating out of the sixth boro. Despite what’s on the bow, she’s now called Kinani H.  In the back row, that looks like Sonja H.

How about another red-white-blue boat for today?  This is from over 11 years ago. It’s the 1951 Dorothy Elizabeth, ex-Gotham, Christine Gellatly, Mobil 11, Socony 11.

To close out the set, Iron Salvor, a Vanuatu-flagged tug, is back in town. Anyone know her story . . . who she works for?

Many thanks to Great Lakes mariner, Kyle, and Tony A for some of these photos;  photos not otherwise attributed by WVD.

Grimaldi trademarked yellow appears fairly frequently in the sixth boro, but I’d never seen this CONRO until the other day.  Partly it catches my attention because I spent half a decade working in two of Gabon’s neighboring countries.

I’ve always enjoyed the dawn.  The cool air and rich light cannot be topped, and now, it is the best time to stay physically distant from folks.

Interesting names . . . these ships meeting in the almost-night;  Maersk Tukang (tukang is the Sundanese word for “doer” or craftsman”) meets Grande Gabon (Gabon is an appropriated name based on a Portuguese description of the Komo river estuary.)  The president’s name is Bongo,  but I really digress.

I know this is not a Pow Wow River morning with muskrats playing around the lily pads while I’m flicking minnows at pickerel or whatever else bites when the snapping turtles are away . . .  This is not another digression, just a way of highlighting the beauty in an industrial waterway.

Since i believe this CONRO is coming from West Africa, I’m wondering where these vehicles are coming from/going to.

I took this photo without seeing the crewman at the extreme left side of the frame.  Only after studying the photos on the big screen did I notice him.

Having the cars uncovered on the decks might not bode well for the cars, but they do provide a scale to show how large the exhaust ducting is.

Ava joins Ellen to ensure safe passage around Bergen Point, and  . . . sure enough . . . the crewman who was enjoying the cool morning with me is still standing at the rail.

All photos, WVD.

 

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

It’s hard to believe that this title has come up 286 times before today, but here they all are.  And yet, I’m starting out with a photo of Ellen McAllister, who herself has appeared here hundreds of times, but never quite like this, heading into the  dawn and about to pass an unidentifiable Vane tugboat.

Ditto Pegasus, passing between a Bouchard tug to the left and some Centerline boats to the right, and below that ONE container on the bridge and the Fedex plane in the sky.

Double Skin 57 and Long Island, previously Peter F. Gellatly,  moves a barge past IMTT, where some Reinauer boats–RTC 103 and Morgan— are taking on product.

Potomac gets an assist from Fort Schuyler.

Ava M. McAllister passes UACC Ibn Al Haitham, where Genesis Victory is lightering and Liz Vinik assisting.

On another morning, Fort Schuyler heads for the Upper Bay, and that looks like Kristin Poling in the distance to the left.

And where Meredith C. Reinauer is lightering Marvin Faith, Bouchard’s Linda Lee, Ellen S., and Evening Breeze look on.

All photos recently by WVD,who had to look up the namesake of the UACC crude carrier.   He turns out to be a Basra-born scientist from a millenium (!!) ago.  That link is worth a read.

 

All photos here were taken less than an hour after sunrise.  It’s commonly known that the golden hour is the best time for photos.

 

Mary Turecamo also headed out for morning work, not that this is anything but a 24/7 essential schedule.

HMS St Andrews arrives with sunrise on its back. Has the HMS been dropped from the name,

just as port of registry has been changed?

Eastern Dawn slings Port Chester into the dock.

Ellen heads out,

meeting a Vane tug on her way to a job.

Cape Henry comes off the anchorage, westbound on the KVK.

All photos, WVD.

 

Going through a backlog from “before” in late winter 2020  . . . a boat approached I didn’t recognize the profile of . . .

William Brewster . . . 65′ x 22′ and built by Blount in 1983.  And in spite of the livery, it seems she’s a fleetmate of Helen Parker and Ava Jude.

How’s this for unusual color?  Recognize the boat?  To see her in previous incarnations, click here and scroll.

Earlier in 2020 I caught Helen Laraway, and

on my way to somewhere else in the archives, I stumbled onto this photo, taken from the window of Amtrak in 2016.  I guess this was north of Hudson somewhere.

Charles D. comes and goes.  Recently I caught her solo doing an assist.

One of the true staples of my time in the sixth boro has been Ellen McAllister, but what I’d forgotten I noticed in this photo from a few years ago . . .  also tripped over while in the dark archives . . .

see the two circular plates on the afterdeck . . . my guess is that’s where the Z-drives were installed.

All photos  . . . WVD, who will be exiting the archives soon, I hope, after we win world war c.

 

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