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The Canadas and I were attentive, but it was really just another ULCV.  This was was named for Columbus’ detractor.  Ironically, Maersk Columbus will be arriving in the sixth boro today.

It struck me as remarkable that in spite of the number of containers visible–and of course many more are invisible–Vespucci rode fairly high in the water.  My read on the forward draft markings show just over 25′ draft. Maybe you read it the same?

In this article from four years ago, Vespucci would be listed among the top 10 largest classes on container vessels in the world, by teu.

 

 

See the red “fenders” on the stern quarter?  I first noticed them here a few years ago . . . turns out they are anti-pirate gear.  There’s a link to the inventors in  that post, and here’s a link to the manufacturer.

If you’re new to this blog, container ship capacity is rated in a unit called t. e. u. (twenty-foot equivalents).  Most containers are either 20′ or 40′ long, standard dimensions for efficiency’s sake. Containers are used to ship just about anything, but let’s for this conversation’s sake say a container is full of shoe boxes, which themselves can be moved in a shopping cart.  A standard shopping cart is rated at 4.4 cubic feet of volume.  A standard container is 1172 cubic feet, given the dimensions above.  My math then comes up with 267 shopping carts per container.  That adds up to over 3.6 million shopping carts of stuff on Vespucci, rated at 13,830 teu.  End-to-end with no space between the carts . . . that line of carts would stretch farther than NYC to Albuquerque along the roads!!

 

This 2010 vessel carries 20 containers across, and compare that to

CMA CGM Marlin (photo taken in September 2009) with 13 containers across.  Here are some recent posts featuring CMA CGM boats.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who suggests you keep an eye on ONE Stork, currently in Bayonne.

By the way, I was traveling S/V America Vespucci when she was last here in 2017.  Anyone get pics?

 

See that lineup . . .   it can mean only one thing, and it’s not the invasion of 300 enemy warships. 

Here are some of those meeting the fleet . . .

And here the fleet, part of the vessels . . ..

Three Forty Three does the honors.

The lead gray ship has a unique appearance, seen on this blog here from about a year ago.

 

LCS-5 will be docked on Staten Island, a tour I might be interested in doing.  For the complete schedule, click here.

 

Ellen McAllister, following her to the dock, is another product of Wisconsin shipbuilding.

 

Following the LCS was DDG-109, USS Jason Dunham.  Please read the story of the namesake here.

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More tomorrow, but here, passing in front of USS Jason Dunham and USS Milwaukee, is the 98-year-old HMCS Oriole, with an interesting bi-national history you can read here.  HMCS Oriole has appeared on this blog twice before, once on the West Coast and once on the Great Lakes.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous fleet week photos can be seen here.

 

I hope you all are enjoying these glances back a decade as much as I enjoy putting them together.  If you weren’t paying attention back then, this hints at how much the traffic in the harbor has changed, just as it has on the roads.  If you were watching back in spring 2009, you might have this same appreciation at the changes;  In addition, you might be amazed how quickly time has passed.  Maybe you’ve forgotten about some of these boats.

Pegasus, quo vadis?  I’ve heard some ominous scuttlebutt, the kind you’d hear about any 112-year-old vessel. Your project site is still up.  Here she was in front of the Hoboken Terminal, which opened the same year–1907–as Peg was launched.

 

Starboard view and port .  . it’s the 1968 McAllister Girls . . . if she’s still around, I’ve not seen her in quite some time. In the background over near the Jersey City river’s edge, Clipper City and Pioneer sail toward each other.

Ditto the 1977 Sisters.

Ellen (1967) and Amy C (1976) are still active in the harbor, but it’s been years since APL Cyprine has called here.

The 1978 Mary Gellatly has been sold up down east, and last I knew, working as Alice Winslow for Winslow Marine Inc.  out of Southport Maine.

The K-Sea fleet in the sixth boro in 2009 was quite large.  Norwegian Sea was a workhorse on the Hudson;  now she’s Miss Rui operating for Smith Maritime. 

Houma (1970) has been scrapped.

Taurus (1979) recently reappeared here as Joker.

Onrust was launched into the Mohawk River in May 2009, and I believe she will again be sailing out of Essex CT.  Her splash up and over the riverbank trees was quite spectacular.

All photos a short 10 years ago by Will Van Dorp.

 

When Ellen intruded onto my shot of Jonathan C assisting Amstel Stork around Bergen Bend, I first thought she had blown my shots of the assist, but yesterday’s post gave me an idea . . . .  And now that I mention yesterday’s post, here’s another large ATB to throw into the comparison, one that carries 214,000 gallons of fuel.

Compare them.  So here goes:  Ellen entered service in 1967, came to NYC in 2001 and measures 102′ x 29 with fuel capacity of 20,000 gallons.  Currently she brings 4000 hp to her assists.

Jonathan C came off the ways and to the sixth boro in 2016 and the tape calls her at 89′ x 38.”  Her engines generate 6000 hp, drawing from 40,000 gal tanks.

I have earlier photos of Jonathan C, but here’s one from over two years ago.

And since Ellen pre-dates my time in the sixth boro, here’s one I took over 10 years ago.

The photo above by Will Van Dorp.

A confusing pic?

This is more clearly Capt. Brian A. and Eric, the two newest McAllisters in the boro, bringing up the stern of Gerd Maersk.

Much less similar, Ellen and Patrice here work the bow of an outbound tanker.

That top photo may be confusing as the ninth photo here is.  So let me conclude by showing the photos taken seconds before and seconds after it.

For all I know, the smaller Brown tug may have been doing some training.  I snapped that top photo when they were neck-and-neck from my vantage point.  Eventually Thomas J. overtook Joyce.  

The phots in between allow one to see how meticulous the paint scheme is on these boats.  I’d love to see the engine room and other interior spaces.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The blog is called tugster, and not tatter, taster, tagster or truckster, as much fun as those digressions may be, being able to be a bit obsessively focused, this is the 249th installment!   If you add in the non-random tug posts, it’s even more than 249.

W. O. Decker, the only wooden-hulled tug in this post. Built in Long Island City in 1930 and 52′ loa.

Christian Reinauer, built 2001 in Mobile AL and 118′.

Haggerty Girls 2013 built in North Kingston RI and 110′,   and I think,  Dean Reinauer 2013 in North Kingston RI and 112′

.

Ellen McAllister, … 1967 in Sturgeon Bay WI and 102′ and she’s been a staple in the sixth boro for as long as I’ve been paying attention.  A former YTB, she works–it seems– every day.

Paul Andrew, … 1968 in Loreauville LA and 63′.  She too has been working the harbor since I’ve been paying attention. 

Jill Reinauer, … 1967 in Houma LA, and 91′ loa.

And to round things out with a photo I took in September 2017–all others have been since mid-February–it’s Sarah D, built 1975 in Palatka FL [Mary Kay, 1973 in Palatka FL] and 90′.  She has appeared on this blog fairly recently. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you warmth today.

Now about tats and tasting . . . those might be franchise expansion ideas . . .

Take a camera and an hour and a half,

hang out at some point along the KVK,

if it’s cold then bring some hand and boot warmers and a thermos with hot tea,

monitor the scan function on your hand held,

and wait.  Soon there’ll be some traffic. Snap away.

Winter is a better time than summer for photos because of the clarity

of the air.

A wise man once told me that New Yorkers don’t really have to travel, because the world

travels past them.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Previous installments can be found here.

Thomas and Ellen,

Thomas and Meagan Ann,

Meagan Ann and DS 71

Meagan Ann solo

Emily Ann and SMM 157, and

Brian Nicholas.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Faber Park aka the swimming pool has become one of my favorite places to watch the behemoths pass.The next set of photos I took in about 10 minutes.

I’m in awe of the skills involved . . . navigation and communication.

This is a tight turn.

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Four tugboats–Ellen, Rowan, Capt. Brian, and Eric–keep it in the channel and the track such that two of these ships can negotiate the turn.

 

And they make it look routine.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Navigator looks great in the yellow trim.  For some quantifiable info, she dates from 1981 and reports 1200 hp.

Ellen always strikes me as a brawler, more so than identical YTBs.  Maybe it’s the ships’ hull paint she’s rubbed off with the bow rendering. For numbers and facts, she dates from 1967, built in Marinette WI, and currently has z-drives putting out 4000 hp. Click here for photos I took in Marinette this past summer.

Dory looks great, having added an upper wheelhouse.  Click here and scroll for photos of Dory over the years, pre-upper wheelhouse.  Who operates her now?

Amy Moran and Atlantic Salvor meet under the bridge.  As an indication of winds, notice the bridge “curtains” movement.   Numbers:  AM 1973 and 3000 hp.  AS 1976 and 6480.  For previous Atlantic Salvor posts, click here.

If Buchanan 5 looks like she has new paint, she does.  It used to work around here as Taft Beach.  Numbers:  1983 and 2600 hp.

Normandy benefits from a simple and classical paint scheme.    2007 and about 1900 but with triple screw.  As I understand it, she used to work in Colombia.  Anyone have info on her propulsion plant?

Kimberly Poling got a makeover almost 10 years ago and she is just a beauty.   1994 and 3000 hp.

I’ve long heard Thomas D. Witte once worked the Erie Canal as Valoil, but I’ve never seen photos of her superstructure from that time.  Anyone help?   1961 and 1500 hp.

And finally, Matthew Tibbetts once won the most attractive tug at a North River Tugboat Race, and she truly looks good.   1969 and 2000.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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