You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Reynolds Shipyard’ category.

Let’s start with Alice Oldendorff, inbound with a hold full of Nova Scotia stone and about to turn to starboard on her (almost) final approach to Brooklyn.   Alice and I have a long history.

YM Wind makes the final approach her into Global Terminals, her first call at sixth boro docks.  In contrast above, Alice has already made hundreds of calls here, always transporting aggregates. Visible assisting Wind are Alex McAllister and Ava M. McAllister.

E. R. Montecito is a large ship, but containers are stacked 17 across, versus 20 across for Wind above.

Undine here takes on bunkers and other supplies.  The small black/red/white vessel long her stern is Twin Tube, the venerable 1951 harbor supply vessel. In dry dock in the distance it’s USNS Sisler.

MOL Emissary travels the last few miles before Port Elizabeth.

Uniquely named tanker Forties waits in the Stapleton anchorage.

COSCO Vietnam enters the Kills and passes Houston at the dock.

Since Kriti Amber is Greek-flagged, I’m guessing that’s a variation on “Crete,” but that only conjecture.

QM2 takes on fuel while transferring passengers on the port side.

And let’s call it a day with Unique Explorer.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who considers himself fortunate to live in this large port.

 

like route 66, this gets me kicks . . . although I see no ” St. Louis, Joplin, Missouri, Oklahoma City looks oh-mighty pretty.  You’ll see Amarillo, a-Gallup, New Mexico, Flagstaff, Arizona, don’t forget Winona, Kingman, Barstow, San Bernardino….”

But I digress.  In the distance it’s Glorious Leader and closer up–not much–it’s Bitu Express getting a delivery from Twin Tube.  What is the purpose of that large rectangular structure over the stern of Bitu Express?  My guess would be a heating system of some sort . . .

One a dark, rainy, too-late morning of March 10, it’s good to go back a day and see ONE Minato in morning sunlight, in

homeport registered in Kobe,

Where would Lian Gui Hu be registered do you suppose?

 

Monaco Bridge . . .  yes there are bridges in Monaco, but this ULCV is registered in Panama.

 

You’d maybe expect Maersk Callao to be Peru-flagged, but  . . . hey, maybe Singapore has a Calle Callao or Avenida Callao.   That’s Potomac with a barge lightening alongside.

And Evergreen Ever Loading . . .  London?

Torm Hilde . . .  you’d think Copenhagen or even Aalborg…

Stolt Integrity  . . .  Georgetown!??  Practically every state in the US has a town by that name, and Indiana–in fact–has FOUR!!  An’ dis aint nun a dems!

All the color in this post remind me of a CV I’ve not seen in a while . . . Buffalo Hunter.

All photos and humor–attempted–by Will Van Dorp, who thinks there should be a route 66-parallel song for shipping in the sixth boro.   Enya has one that starts to get at it . . .

Happy short day . . .

 

There’s nothing new that I know about Twin Tube, but she cuts a unique image as she works year round.  She came off the ways in 1951, and just moves along doing essential and almost invisible work.  Here’s a post I did on her four years ago telling about her previous incarnations.  Here are many others with photos, with or without (as here) her boom.

 

What’s interesting to me is that the port of Philadelphia has (I’m not sure it’s still there.)  a similar Blount-built vessel called Sailor, launched in 1977.  It appears to have the same basic plan but with the orientation reversed, as you can see here.

Here’s something to research:  Sailor had previously been El Paso Sailor.  Where did it work in that iteration?   Surely, it didn’t work here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Kirby Moran and James D Moran wait, like a team of horses, actually a team of 12,000 horses.

Here’s a different perspective on Kirby as she returns from a job.

CMT Otter and a salt barge lies alongside Nord Summit while along the other side, the venerable Twin Tube reprovisions from stern starboard.

Atlantic Salvor (or Enterprise??)  . . . I’ll never catch up as she heads for one of the many skylines of Brooklyn.  By the way, has anyone caught a photo of Hunter D in the sixth boro?

With Shooters Island and beyond that the cranes of Howland Hook in the background, it’s Discovery Coast, these days somewhat rare in the sixth boro.

Mister Jim is looking sharp these days, much better than her earlier livery.

Kodi is quite far away here, but she is a mere 42.6 footer.

Bering Dawn . . . she’s been on the East Coast some time now,

but all told, she’s spent more time on the West Coast.

The elusive Thomas stopped by the salt pile the other morning to retrieve a crane.

Margaret Moran . . . as always assisting ships into and out of the sixth boro.  More Margaret soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series.

There is some self-disclosure here:  since last winter and thanks to my movie-buff son, I’ve gotten hooked on movies based on comics.  So, recently, to my surprise, while watching Gotham, I saw Marie J. Turecamo and one of the 6000s in a CGI-noir of an East River scene.  She’s unmistakeable.  Season 1, episode 11 has all these, along with some FDNY vessels, a NYCDEP tanker, and recognizable barges.

And with apologies to the actor, that is one of the Harley boats, St. Andrews (my guess) or Liberty.

And this . . . ABC-1, with a very odd mast.

I realize some of these are not tugs, but categories are made to be challenged.  In the next two photos, I’d heard that Lilac was used for a Daredevil scene, so I watched the series–not liking it at first–until I got to the scene.  By the time I got there, I was a fan.

Clearly filmed in the Navy yard, I have to say I’m impressed by the magic of cinema, and that’s why it’s the economic powerhouse it is.

All “screen-grabs” by Will Van Dorp.

Somewhat related:  Come celebrate the launch of film maker Thomas Halaczinsky‘s “Archipelago New York”: June 18th, 6PM at Rizzoli Bookstore at 1133 Broadway Manhattan.

I stopped by around midday today.  Trevor had been alongside all morning.  I presume this was loading cargo support materials. Here’s the last post I did where Trevor appeared.   These first two photos are taken from Brooklyn looking across at Staten Island.

Time is of the essence here, but I’ll bet working in the 90 degree F temperatures was draining.

Here’s the prep as seen from Fort Wadsworth.

Reynolds Twin Tube appears to be standing by with supplies for crew and possibly spares.

 

Let’s hope tomorrow proves an eventful day. . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Tugster feels so very blessed this year that I’m recognizing the top gift boat in the sixth boro.  If NYC ever decided to have a water-borne symbol of gift-giving season, the most appropriate boat for the elf to ride would HAVE to be this one.  See all the packages, wrapped sensibly, on the deck?  While you try to name that boat, let me digress a little to use the print to push the next image farther down the page.

tt99

Digression #1:  Here are my Christmas posts from 2015    2014    one about a Rockefeller Center tree that arrived by ferry    one that arrived here by barge towed by a tug called Spuyten Duyvil and finally my post from 2013.

Digression #2:  If you’re not from NYC or a large city, you might wonder where city folks go to cut their trees.  Here’s a feature from the NYTimes about a Christmas tree vendor who’s come to the same neighborhood NYC with trees for the past 19 years.

Digression #3:  Nope, I don’t get my tree from this vendor.  In fact, I haven’t had a tree for  . . . decades.   Not interested.  So here was the post I put up in 2006, about my first ever Christmas present.  Here’s the story about our first Christmas tree.  My father, who drove a school bus in addition to running a dairy farm, brought home our first tree back when I was 5 or 6.  I think it was his and my mother’s first also, because “christmas trees” did not exist for them in pre-WW2 Netherlands.  Where did he get the tree and what prompted him to bring it home, you might wonder . . .  Well, as he was leaving the school with his last bus run before the Christmas break, he noticed the custodian throwing a tree into the snowbank next to the dumpster.  It must have been set up somewhere in the school–the office?  We LOVED that tree, and it still had some tinsel on it.  My parents were willing to spring for a string of lights, which could be used again year after year, but tinsel?  In my imagination, that tree was the best.

When my kids were small, I did get a Christmas tree, and we decorated it with more than a string of lights.

So have you figured out this vessel that does nothing all year round except deliver packages like these?

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Of course, it’s Twin Tube, featured many times on this blog.

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She is the sixth boros quintessential package boat that delivers no

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matter the weather.

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Merry Christmas to the operators of Twin Tube.

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And merry merry Christmas spirit to all of you who read this blog today and any day.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s received so many gifts every day and doesn’t need anything more on December 25.

 

Here’s the index on previous second lives posts.  I use “second lives” for what land folk call “adaptive reuse.”  It strikes me that there may be more instances of repurposing re-design and -engineering on water than on land, but that’s may just be my opinion.

But first, I thought to call this “pre-boomed” to follow up on yesterday’s post and the wonderful backstory I got in email yesterday from William Lafferty, frequent contributor here.  Here also sent along the photo below, which shows Twin Tube in 1951, i.e., before I was born and I’m 63.

Twintube 1

Here’s part of what William wrote:  “It shows the Twintube just after it entered service in fall 1951.  Twintube was launched 28 August 1951, Captain Blount’s mother doing the honors, and built on Blount’s account.  He used it as a travelling “demonstrator” for his shipyard’s products (it was Blount’s hull number 6) but also used it to haul oysters.  Power plant originally was a rather rare 4-cylinder Harnischfeger 138-hp Diesel.  (Click here for a 1950 news article including a photo of a 6-cylinder marine diesel.)  Harnischfeger (the H in the mining equipment manufacturer P & H) had been set up in 1945 at Port Washington, Wisconsin, by P & H to exploit the workboat and yacht market.  P & H closed the division, then at Crystal Lake, Illinois, in 1963.  In spring 1952 Blount sold the vessel to the Staten Island Oil Company, who converted it to a tanker with a 40,000 gallon capacity in eight 5,000 gallon compartments within its “tubes.”  The rest is, as they say, history.”

By the way, reference to “Staten Island Oil Company” brings me back to one of my favorite articles by the late great Don Sutherland here.

Here’s the index for all my previous Blount posts.

All this repurposing leads me to the second half of this post.  A friend named Matt–former all-oceans sailor–is looking to write a serious history about Cross Sound Ferry vessel Cape Henlopen, ex- USS LST-510.  Note the 510 still carried on its starboard bow.  She was built in the great shipbuilding state of Indiana.

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Cape Henlopen preparing to depart Orient Point March 2014

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Here she passes Orient Point Lighthouse at the start of its 80-minute ride over to New London.

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Matt is interested in interviewing past and present crew and seeing old photos of the vessel in any of its previous lives:   Cape Henlopen, MV Virginia Beach, USS Buncombe County, or LST-510.  If you send your interest in participating directly to my email, I’ll pass it along to Matt.

Many thanks again to William Lafferty for the Twintube story and photo.  I took the photos of Cape Henlopen in March 2014.  Here’s a version of the vessel by bowsprite.

 

 

Here’s the index for previous Twin Tube posts.  This freight vessel is 64′ x 19′ x 8.5, and I’m sure I’ve mentioned before that it is one of the first Blount built vessels ever, launched in 1951.  Here’s the index to all my previous  Blount posts.

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Twin Tube January 2013

This is how I imagine her, but recently . . .

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the boom has been missing.  I don’t know the story, but I’d like to.

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Twin Tube April 2015

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and the brants are discussing it . . .

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Dec 2013 approaching the gauntlet of Balder‘s docklines

Most larger cargo vessels provisioned by Twin Tube have their own on-board cranes, so maybe the boom was removed to avoid having to negotiate the dock lines as she had to here in a blinding snowstorm back a year and a half ago.

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dipping under the the boom under the lines

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and then raising it again

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but important:  If you are local, free and have the slightest inclination to make merry, there’s a soiree on Lehigh Valley 79 THIS Friday night, as a means to consolidate doubloons to keep the barge afloat.  Details here.  See you there, if my best approximation of pirate hood.  Here’s a post I did nearly five years ago.  And one more.

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Here’s an index of previous posts with this title.

And a lot of photos of small craft.  Given recent temperatures, it’s notable that all these vessels would NOT be able these days to navigate waters much north of the sixth boro or on the Great Lakes, because of ice conditions.  Given the significant clues, can you identify the vessel and location below?  Answers follow.

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Here’s Julia, a sturdy all weather boat out with McKinley Sea.

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Here’s Julia a few weeks ago–when the whelp of Hudson River ice still went out into the Lower Bay–

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retrieving personnel from NS Lotus.

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Taking the stern of Kimberly Poling . . . a small USACE I don’t recognize.

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See the small unidentified boat beyond Mako‘s stern.  I believe it’s the Vane crew boat, not

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to be confused with Grace D.

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ABC-1 was out with supplies a few weeks ago, no matter the single-digit temperatures.

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These temperatures could kill, but small fish boats like Pannaway are out there.

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And if I’m reading that right, Pannaway is registered in a New Hampshire, my home state as you can read on the “about tugster” page.

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Harbor Charlie is out with the small NYPD boat.

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Now, let’s mix things up a bit.  Seth Tane took this photo in the sixth boro back in the late 70s or early 80s.  Can anyone identify this boat, Karen L?  I ran a lot of photos from that era by Seth in a series here almost two years ago.  In this case, Karen L seems to have just returned four jolly tars back to their ship in the anchorage as another crewman watches from the rail.

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Rich Taylor took this photo recently off St. Lucia, four different very balanced tars in a long narrow boat.

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This photo comes via Fred Trooster in Rotterdam showing line handlers there. Here’s a post I did over three years ago of line handlers in the Kills.

0aaaasc19. K.R.E.V. 42, Amazonehavben-0461

And this somehow returns us to the mystery vessel at the top of the post:  Knight Rider following the FDR just north of the United Nations, the blue flag in the top photo being the clue.

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Thanks to Rich, Seth, and Fred for the photos already attributed.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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