You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Wye River’ tag.

One of these is not like the others . . .  and I’ll tell you why later.

By the way, in case you can’t make out the names, it’s Wicomico, Fells Point, and Kings Point.

When I first started this blog, the dominant bunkering company in the sixth boro was K-Sea, and on a given routine day back then, I might have caught three K-Sea boats at work.  When the first Vane boat arrived in the boro–was that in 2008 or 2009?–I never expected this many white with blue trim and V on the stack to work here. 

 

 

Potomac has been in and out of the harbor for over 10 years.

 

Above and below, it’s Wye River

And circling back to a tugboat from earlier in the post, enjoy another shot of Fells Point.

All photos, WVD.

My cryptic statement that “one is not like the others” might have you wondering what I meant by that:  Wicomico, Potomac, and Wye River are 4200 hp models;  the others are 3000 hp.

Thanks for the well-wishes yesterday;  the blog marches on with post 5051.

In a real way, this post is about cargo also.  Look at this top photo . . .  any guesses what’s unique about the cargo?

This is the only the second time I post a photo of Double Skin 510A, here pushed by Wye River, but it’s the first time I call attention to it as an asphalt barge.  In other words, cold as it was outside, the cargo in the barge is

being transported at a scalding 300 degrees F.  Unless you knew, you might not have imagined that.  This hot product might finally cool off when it’s squirted with some crushed stone into a pothole somewhere.

You can tell the temperature out by the snow accumulated on the stern of Genesis Glory, here with GM 11105.

Soon afterward, she spun around and

left the barge at the dock.

I’ve seen this tug in several liveries as Sea Bull and Labrador Sea, as well as without  and then with an upper wheelhouse

DBL 25 appears here for the first time though.

In the years I’ve been doing this photography, I’ve learned a lot, and have paid attention to different things as I’ve learned new things.  Barges are the money makers.

All photos, WVD.

If you subscribe to Professional Mariner, you’ve seen the article I published there in the March issue.  If not, it’ll be available online in a few weeks.

 

Hell Gate has to be one of the most storied waterways in the sixth boro.  How could I have mostly ignored it so long?!!

The other day I caught Vinik No. 6 and Liz Vinik westbound  through that section of the East River.   In the background, that’s the Bronx.

An indicator of current is the fact that NYPD boat here is barely making headway.  Current in a tidal strait like the so-called East River is constantly and dramatically changing.  That’s Manhattan in the background.

Nicholas Vinik also passed through the other day, returning from a job.  That NYC DEP GUP headquarters in the background.  The Hell Gate RR Bridge seems in need of some paint.  Referencing this part of Hell Gate, captbbrucato describes it from a captain’s perspective here.

A recent development is the transit of NYC Ferry service through the Gate to the Bronx on the Soundview run.

Wye River heads eastbound to retrieve a barge, meeting

Cape Canaveral and DBL 101 on the way.

Along the shoreline here, that’s Astoria Queens to the left, and Manhattan along the entire distant background.  Most iconic is the spire of the Empire State Building.

State Trooper . . .  I’m assuming that’s a government boat.

That’s it for now.  I hope to return to Hell Gate soon.  All photos, WVD. 

Blessings of summer heat, if you don’t have to work out in it, are best relished right after dawn, or from the shade.  I chose the first option here as Barney Turecamo, made up to Georgia,

gets an assist in rotating from Turecamo Girls.

Once pointed, a burst of power from its 5100hp EMDs commits the ATB to its course.

Foxy3, with its bright trim ribbons gleaming in the dawn, is off to the job.

Doubleskin 57 arrives from somewhere in the Kills and Elk River

waits to assist Wye River

 

in placing it alongside the dock gently.

Marjorie B is off to some work, followed by and Poling & Cutler and Vane units.

The P & C unit was Kristin Poling pushing Eva Leigh Cutler.

On another day, Mister T was arriving from outside the Narrows

just as the sun cleared Bay Ridge.

And yet another day and different place, Curtis Reinauer waited alongside RTC 82 during cargo transfer.

 

All photos, WVD.

On a recent foggy rainy day, I caught Elk River bunkering (I believe) Maritime Kelly Anne.  That’s certainly an interesting name, although yesterday Endless Summer topped it, arriving from Brasil.  Might there be a string of ships with movie name references out on the oceans?

I love how fog narrows the depth of field in a natural way.

The same day Genesis Vigilant nosed into an IMTT dock.

Wye River was traveling light on the way to and likely from a barge,

as were Morgan Reinauer,

 Haggerty Girls, and

and Stephen Reinauer.

Brendan was following a ship to Port Elizabeth.

Stephanie Dann was headed for sea and south.

Ellen S. Bouchard was lying alongside B. No. 262, as her fleet and their crews languish.  And exfiltrate?

Catherine Miller moves a Caddell crane  . . . back to the KVK base.

All photos,WVD.

 

 

 

Here are posts one through five in this series.

 

 

 

 

 

Just a photo essay, Vane tugs and barges in the KVK through all the daylight hours today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

To continue on from yesterday’s list . . . I’ve done chugster, jetster, even a gangster . . . though you have to search for it here by scrolling a bit,  but the blog is called tugster, and I’m proud of that some chuckles notwithstanding . . . .

This is a cross section for the 250th time, a random sampling of what tugboats were working in the Upper Bay of NYC aka the sixth boro on a given morning earlier this week.   By the way, the 001 version of this title dates from October 2007.

Vane Brothers boats and barges abound.

Hunting Creek stands by a set of four of them, while

Wye River travels light past the ferry racks.

Franklin Reinauer travels light past the count-defying load of containers on a ULCV over in Global.

ATB Freeport and Chemical Transporter transfer cargo over at the east end of IMTT, at

the same time

Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire do.

CF Campbell stands by with Long Island.

 

And passing an unusual but new landmark along the sixth born margins,

Patrice McAllister makes her way west.  Quick . . . name a larger global garment retailer than H & M, and what the initials H & M expand to?  Answers here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose fingers froze and cold tears flowed while having the float-about, look-about.

 

I’m not shifting the focus of this blog to photography–although it’s always been photo driven–but it’s fun to shoot what the light allows, which in this case somewhat obscures the identification of the tug in the foreground and highlights in profile the construction over by the Goethals Bridge.  Also, I’ve not forgotten a realization of a few weeks back about there being nothing random;  context here is recent sixth boro.

Anyhow, name that tug?

Meanwhile, north of the GW, it’s Joan Moran (1975) with a coal barge, from what I could tell.

Farther downriver, it’s Atlantic Coast (2007) with a dredge scow.

On that same dredge project, Shannon Dann (1971) stands by with GL 602.

Wye River (2008) waits over by the Palisades,

Sea Wolf (1982) holds steady over by –is that?–Edgewater.

Barry Silverton counts down for an appointment with Fight ALS,

Brendan Turecamo (1975) hangs with Connecticut, and

that brings us back to the first photo, now benefitting from a different light and easily identifiable as

Doris Moran (1982).

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I considered calling this “random vessels,” since I haven’t used that title in a while, but here is a tighter focus for a few days:  tugboats.  Here I also randomize the backgrounds and seek out some vessels infrequently seen.  Like the rare and exotic  Shelby Rose and

rt4b

Jay Michael and Vicki M and

rt5

Patricia with her racing stripes up against the gantry arms.

rt6

Wye River and James E. Brown here cross the south end of Newark Bay, where

rt7

Sandmaster has been tied up for (?) nearly a year now.

rt99

Sassafras did a circle in Erie Basin recently, and

rt8

 

Thomas, the Weeks tug, strode into town, picked up a barge and headed straight for Texas!  The first time I saw Thomas was January 2009.  Remember what memorable event splashed into the Hudson around the middle of that month?

rt4

 

Buchanan 12 here is light and seen from almost her prop wash.  I hadn’t noticed the Boston registry before.

rt1

Quantico Creek stays local a lot, but Severn I don’t see much.

rt2

Here’s Tangier Island behind . .  yes, Gerardi’s Farmers Market. 

rt3

 

OK . . . that’s it for today.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More random tugs tomorrow.

 

Nanticoke

aaav1

Choptank . . .

aaaavx

Nanticoke again . . .

aaaav5

Wye River . . . though it looks the same as Nanticoke and Choptank.

aaaav6

Christiana . . . is in a different class, for Vane, although she looks a lot like a certain Reinauer.

aaaav4

Chesapeake . . . thought it could be –at least to my eye– either Wye River, Choptank, or Nanticoke.

aaaav7

Wye River . . . although it could be Chesapeake with nameboards switched?? [No, there’s a slight window difference in the wheelhouse.]

aaaav8

The nameboards say Wicomico.

aaaav10

Wicomico again.

aaaav12

Wicomico a third time, passing what  looks like Charles D. McAllister.

aaaav13wiccharles

Patapsco, according to the nameboards.

aaaav14

Brandywine is a twin of Christiana.  At 6000 hp, they’re a smidgeon less than 1/3 more hp than the Patapsco class.

aaaav15Back to the Patapsco class, it’s Bohemia.

aaaav15bOf that class, I’ve yet to see Patuxent, Anacostia, and Severn.

Has there ever been another company that had 15 identical (are there nuances I’ve missed??) tugboats?  And on the Patapsco class, why does the forward companionway lead starboard rather than port?

All fotos . . . Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,543 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary “Graves of Arthur Kill” is currently available only through tugster

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

June 2022
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930