You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Miller’s Launch’ category.

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

Today it’s all light, technically.  Other than that, this set is all sizes, all ages, all powers, and all shapes.

Let’s start with  Gabby L., built in 2007 (?), 25.9′ x 13.7′, and rated as 660 hp.

Comparing that, check out Genesis Vigilant, which I first met as Michigan Service, (same order of numbers) 1981, 89′ x 28′, and 3000 hp.

Emily Ann, ex-Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon Roehrig and ex-Diane Roehrig, 1964, 89′ x 28′, and also 3000 hp.

Sea Fox, 2012, 69′ x 24′, and 1400 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002, 78′ x 26′, and 2600 hp.

Fleetmate Thomas J. Brown, 1962, 61′ x 19′, and 1000 hp.

As I said before, technically light but about to engage the Seaspan ship, Jonathan C, 2016, 89′ x 38′, and 6000 hp.

And since we started out with Gabby L, let’s end there also, but you may have to look carefully to the left of the VZ bridge towers . . . . to spot her.  As I said before . . . all shapes and sizes, but they all work a niche in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I had no idea what I was seeing until I zoomed in on it here and recognized it as one of the small Miller tugs with a deck barge.

Linda L Miller heading across the Upper Bay, where

QM2 was in port.

Later, I saw Linda L sans barge, passing two anchored Reinauer units.

x

A couple days earlier I saw this and initially failed to identify what I was looking at.

I took photos anyhow and then realized it was Miller Girls with the northeasterly wind splashing a mess of water over the bow.

Here from earlier this year are photos of Miller Girls in a previous lifetime, 1974.

Earlier this year I’d seen her with skimming outriggers on, working in Poughkeepsie.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I have represented these “retro” posts as a slice of the sixth boro exactly a decade ago, but it more like  . . . what in the boro caught my attention.  So welcome back to December 2009, as seen from today, December 2019, taking advantage of 20/20 hindsight.  And, to digress, I’ll bet the term 20/20 [2020?] hindsight will seen a bit strange in the next thirteen months.

Over at South Street Seaport, a group of vessels then is no longer there: Marion M, Peking, and Helen McAllister.  Of those, Peking, though not the oldest, has the longest and most convoluted saga.

Sea Raven is no more, but with those high pipes, she always caught my attention.

Cable Queen seemed to have a future back a decade ago, but naught seems to have come of it, since last time I looked, she was still docked in Port Richmond.  For context to this photo of the 1952 vessel, click here.

NY Central No. 13, scrapped in 2017 . . . also seemed to have a future back in 2009, although the owner was not in a rush to complete the job.

In 2009, the sixth boro was in the midst of a several-billion-dollar dredge project, as folks were talking about these ULCVs that would be arriving after the opening of the new Panama Canal locks. GLDD’s dredge New York was part of that effort.

I don’t know if Volunteer is still intact, but I’ve not seen her in years.   Here she lighters Prisco Ekatarina while Mark Miller stands by.  As of this writing, Prisco Ekatarina is in the Gulf of Finland.

Does anyone know if Horizon Challenger, built 1968 in Chester PA,  still floats?

Patriot Service currently works as Genesis Patriot.

I believe Escort is laid up.

And let’s close with these two.  Below it’s the now modest looking Ever Divine and Tasman Sea, and assembling photos for this post, for the first time I see the Taz’ devil sign on the stern of Tasman Sea . . .   Maybe I’d seen it before and just forgotten.   Ever Divine is currently crossing the Indian Ocean.

There it is . . .

All photos taken in December 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Weeks 533 has credibility: she lifted the USAir Flight 1549 Airbus A320 out of the Hudson back almost 11 years ago and more.  So the other day when I was on my way to “yon” and saw her “hither” and she was working with Susan Miller, I decided to linger and inquire.

That’s when I noticed the pier 11 Wall Street float was partially submerged, and a heavy lift crew was aboard securing cables.

Besides that crew, one tug and Susan Miller, even the Green Lady was craning her neck overtop the ferry and over in my direction, paying attention.

 

When I managed to board a conveyance and get to the middle of the East River . . .

I saw there were actually four tugs involved,  two Dann tugs and another Miller tug.

Once the landing barge was lifted over the spuds and large pumps installed–I think that’s what I saw–Susan Miller whisked the barge away to be repaired, rehabbed.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who calls this another feat for Weeks 533.

Lots more tugster cranes here.

I didn’t hear any wind speeds for yesterday, but it was blowing . . . winds of November according to the date, but fortunately not a November witch.

Chem Wolverine scudded through the Bay,

Kings Point went on with her routine,

Gabby Miller returned to home base,

Joyce aimed for the Kills,

Mister T slung a scow, 

Crystal pushed Patricia E. Poling,

ONE Ibis had some containers shuffled after spending time off Long Beach,

Fort Schuyler dispatched Double Skin 30,

and Chem Wolverine, on her way to Albany, passed Dace Reinauer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes a safe day to all.

Previous excessively windy days posts can be found here.

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I know others witnessed dawn this morning as the big pink ship came in . . . .

By the way, if you were naming this ONE “bird” ULCV based on this morning’s color, which bird

would

you choose?  Nah . . . it wasn’t that.  More later.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

With momentum gaining for more offshore wind farms, a raft of seldom-seen type vessels make port calls in the sixth boro.  This photo from Tony Acabono is an excellent example:  Geosea is not new, but she’s surely exotic.

Another from Tony, Berto L. Miller is new in town, joining two other Miller OSVs sometimes here, Rana and Josephine K.

And yet another set from Tony . . .  recognize this vessel?

Look at the design on the stack . .. .

It’s the return of Bear, as I first knew her, although she’s also been Catherine M. Brown and Elizabeth Anna.

And finally . . . here’s a photo of a vessel--Lois Ann L. Moran and barge Philadelphia–as seen from the “vessel,” the whatever-it-is in Hudson Yards. Those are LIRR trains in the foreground.  Thanks to my sister for this photo.

Thanks to Tony and my sister for these photos.  No photos here by Will Van Dorp, who is again off across the border.

This will be a photo-rich post, starting with bridge workers currently at the Brooklyn side VZ tower, aka the former Fort Lafayette.

You might remember Michele Jean;  Christina is the replacement vessel.

Most small craft in the sixth boro work all year round, in either construction, hydrographic surveys,

boom handling, launch service,

law enforcement,

and more.  Some fishing takes place all year round although winter fishing employs different craft.

 

Fishing machines as below . . .  only from about April to October.

Annunziata is a fishing boat I see a lot on AIS, but this is my first time to confirm boat with name under way.

New York Media Boat has some of their vessels working all year round, but here’s a catch, a NY Media Boat RIB in front of the Hudson Yards endless staircase called the Vessel, parts of which appeared on this blog during construction.

Then, the red boat below with kayak on roof, that’s a summertime only boat for up here.

And let’s close with the boom handlers;  tankers and oil barges are boomed during some of their harbor operations, as a precaution in case of spillage.  All year round these small craft do their boom wrangling.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,327 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2020
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031