You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Miller’s Launch’ category.

Christy Anne is a small tug that I’ve not seen in 15 years!!  I posted it here, after seeing it in the Hackensack River, a place I see rarely.  Unrelated:  where are those buildings on the ridge in the distance?  Is there some Fata Morgana effect going on there?

With the placement of tire fendering fore and aft, I had the impression of an amphibious craft, the hull shaped around the tires almost like fenders on a flat-fender Jeep.  Here’s the late Fred “tug44“s post about the boat. 

When I saw this boat sailing in the other day, with its serious lines, I had to learn its story.  It’s Sparrow, an Open 50 racing sloop, preparing for the Global Solo Challenge. More on the boat here

 

Nicholas Miller, 33′ x 11′ crew boat, is picking up a pilot on the fly as

MSC Elodie, 980′ loa, comes into the harbor.  Nicholas matched the ship’s six-knot speed, sidled up, and stuck the rubber to the ship’s hull;  once the pilot was safely aboard, 

powered her way to overcome the physical forces and get away from the ship.

Ocean Venture is a purse seiner that comes through the boro periodically.. Some concern exists about the menhaden fishery.

She was possibly headed for her base on the Penobscot.

The seiner skiff helps deploy the purse  net.

What was curious, I thought, was that UConn’s 90′ loa Connecticut came in right behind Ocean Venture. 

 

As seems true a lot these days, I suspect there’s much more to the movements of these vessels

than I will ever know.  

All photos, WVD, who’s just being his customary curious.

Lightning is here and has been for at least four years, and Thunder is on its way.

From 2014 and therefore two years newer than Lightning, Adeline Marie, previously Denise A. Bouchard, was heading over to the Industry Day on Wednesday. I caught a few photos of her as Rubia in between her original and her latest livery. 

The 2006 Kristin Poling first came to the sixth boro as the 5000 hp 111′ x 36′ Chesapeake.   Here was my first good view of her as a Poling/Cutler tugboat.

Atlantic Enterprise has been keeping busy with runs with dredge spoils from the North River passenger terminal out to the dump site aka HARS.   For a day’s worth of reading, click here for a July 2022 report on HARS. 

The 1981 Susan Miller pushes a small deck barge through congested waters here. She’s been working in the boro for as long as I’ve been doing this blog. 

The 1968 Marie J. Turecamo has worked in the Moran livery for over 20 years. 

Scale is clear from this side-by-side photo of the 2007 Saint Emilion (105′ x 38′ and 4800 hp) and the 1982 McCormack Boys ( 74′ x 26′ and 1200 hp), both hauled out over at Bayonne Dry Dock. 

The 2007 Normandy (79′ x 27′ and 1900 hp) has been in the boro since 2015. 

The 1981 Navigator (64′ x 24′ and 1200 hp)  has to be one among the busiest boats in the harbor and the region.

The 1975 Mary Emma (100′ x 31′ and 3900 hp) has worked under this livery since 2021.  I caught her transformation here about a year ago. 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who thanks you for continuing to read this blog. 

Cormorant and I talk sometime; yes, the one on the piling and not the former DEP boat.  Anyhow, cormorant prompted me to get these three photos.

So, evidence here is that I did.  A red . . . Freightliner Summit Hauler was preparing to tow an odd bundle off M8001 barge held in place by Michael Miller.  Might those be bundled barricades?  Any idea where this post is going?

Then another Hauler backed onto the barge to tow off another oddly loaded trailer. This was Monday, I believe.

Then last night, I was messaging with some friends and learned about this . . .  to the right side of this photo . . . a building on Governors Island.  Know it?

It appears that this week, in addition to being UN Week, is New York’s leg of a global show jumper tour, and if not the horses, then certainly all the bleachers and everything else arrives on the island . . .  by barge.  I’m not knocking anything in this post, but the fact that Governors Island hosts such an event boggles my mind, although you’d think that after living in NYC for 20 years now, nothing would surprise me.  Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, it’s not, and Staten Island hosted those horses over 130 years ago!

Three top photos mine, WVD.  Previous Governors island posts can be seen here. Hat tip to cormorant.

Millers Launch pushes a lot of interesting cargo around the harbor, like this one (scroll) from July 2014, this one I missed in September 2018, and the five boros sometimes spill out onto the sixth boro with their show business pursuits.  And consumer side of show business, I think this 2020 concept was nixed because of Covid?

The previous 70 “something different” posts can be seen here.  Not included is the 2006 “floating island.”  Recall any other odd barges in the sixth boro?

Let’s start with a photo by John “Jed” Jedrlinic, one of Alp Forward, currently off the eastern Scottish coast. She’s a 213′ x 61′ anchor handling tug from 2007  with over 200 tons bollard pull.

From there, let’s go to the Connecticut in US coast and some local boats with 

some Seakite by PanGeo Subsea gear aboard. I’d love to see what this package projects onto a screen. 

Both Berto L. and Josephine K Miller were up at Lew’s port earlier this spring.

GO Pursuit, fleet mate of GO America, called in there also. “GO” expands to Guice Offshore. 

The reminder of photos here come in the past days from Tony A, starting here with Deborah Quinn

He caught her several times in the East River, and here  

with an unidentified covered barge.   In the photo above, the Taco Cina sign intrigues me. 

In roughly the same stretch he passed Brinn Courtney, whom I’ve yet to see.

And finally, he noticed Nicholas Vinik doing the do si do with Sea Monster, moving her over near the Sandy Hook Pilots station.  I’m not sure what that means about Sea Monster.  Anyone know?  

Many thanks to Jed, Lew, and Tony A for sending along these photos. 

Meanwhile, the robots are still doing their unmonitored best at tugster tower while WVD is in the lowland of alligators, shrimp, sugar, fleur de lis and beaucoup de plus for an unspecified time.

 

Here was the first post in this series, but Wednesday I caught the crane again, this time being handled by a regular in the boro as well as a newcomer named Brinn Courtney, who appeared here once before as Patricia Winslow

Thinking the better shot would be with Manhattan as background, we opted for the NY side,

but as we passed on our way to another job, we noticed the green stack on the starboard side of the tow.  I’d not seen that earlier and had not taken time to look at AIS.

At first I thought Charles James, but her red paint has been covered over a few years ago, so i finally looked at AIS and saw

it was Brinn Courtney, a new-to-Stasinos boat. 

I would have taken more of Brinn Courtney, but we were already late for a rendezvous.  

Welcome to the boro, Brinn Courtney.  She appeared here once about eight years ago as Patricia Winslow.

All photos on the fly, WVD. Thanks to the New York Media Boat for conveyance.

Note:  By this time tomorrow, I will be out of the boro and the robots in tugster tower will again have their virtual fingers and hands on the controls.  I’ve no idea how long I’ll be away on this gallivant, nor what the WiFi situation will be.  Go, robots!

 

Dana Alexa is another seldom seen tugboat in the sixth boro of NYC;

although painted DonJon blue, she’s now a Breakwater Marine boat, I believe.

It was good to see the 1958 54′ boat with a barge of what appears to be sheet piling.

William F. Fallon Jr. has appeared here several times recently.

Robert IV has worked in the boro for over 30 years.

 

Linda L. Miller originally was called Frog Belly.  I like that name.

And finally, you most likely by now have heard about the barge carrying scrap metals that caught fire on Delaware Bay and you may have wondered how scrap metals could burn.  What follows is a series of photo I took in mid-April of a similar load.

This load was towed by Mackenzie Rose;  the one that caught fire was towed by fleetmate Daisy Mae. Loads like this have been fairly common on the run from the sixth boro to the Delaware River.

Of course an investigation of the fire, which was confined to the barge, will take some time,

but scrapyard fires are fairly common.  Here‘s an unrelated though germane article from the BBC.

All photos, WVD.

 

Clearly, we robots messed up.  To make amends, here’s some info pasted in:

GENERAL RUDDER (IMO: 8835463) is a Training Ship that was built in 1984 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 4.5 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 68.28 meters and her width is 13.11 meters.
Here’s more on Texas A & M’s training ship. 

BERTO L MILLER (IMO: 8964850) is a Offshore Supply Ship that was built in 1999 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 3.1 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 49.71 meters and her width is 13.41 meters.
Here’s more the the Miller’s Launch OSV fleet. 

GO AMERICA (IMO: 8968181) is a Offshore Supply Ship that was built in 2001 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 3 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 44.35 meters and her width is 10.97 meters.

Here’s more on the Guice Offshore (GO) fleet. 

 

Many thanks for all photos to Pete Ludlow.  Tugster might pull our plugs and drain our batteries for our failing to fill in the info yesterday.

 

 

Bet you can guess where that line leads from the bow of Kirby Moran?

Here you go.

Jordan Rose has been tied up in Bayonne for a while, but

Gregg McAllister passes her on the way to an assist.

Michael Miller is one of the venerable tugs of the sixth boro,

having worked here since the mid-1960s.

Cape Fear has been here for a few years, although I’ve not yet seen

her two sisters, Cape May and Cape Henry. 

Ava M. is one of the workhorses, certainly. 

Does anyone know when and if Capt. Brian A. will return to service here?

Kimberly Turecamo has worked the harbor consistently for going-on 30 years.

Here she heads into an orange sherbet dawn.

All photos in the past week, WVD., who has more Canal Society archival photos coming but some contemporary posts demonstrate my temporary anchor.  Also coming up, a photographer high above Hell Gate has shared a new trove of photos from a perspective I’ve missed.  Many thanks for your continued interest.

Let’s go back a decade.  Then MSC Emma was on the west coast of Bayonne leaving town; now she’s on the west coast of Central America, leaving Lazaro Cardenas for Panama.

Above she was assisted by Gramma Lee T [now in Norfolk] and Margaret and setting up for the turn from Newark Bay into the KVK;  here we had almost gotten ahead of the trio of vessels.

A strange trio was in the sky

over the sixth boro. The piggyback rider is still in town, albeit likely to never fly again. More here.

Meanwhile, over in the Arthur Kill, a boring machine was placing charges in holes below the bottom of the waterway and connecting them to the stringy orange signal cord to blast when the time was right for them all to detonate at the same millisecond.  That day I touched some hefty but perfectly safe explosives, inert until the right signal is applied, which sounds like some folks I know.

More on “kraken” the bottom here.

Back then, I was spending a lot of early mornings near Howland Hook waiting for my work to begin, and I caught a Double Skin 37 moving bunkers

and maneuvered by Coral Coast.  Was that mechanical dredge Captain A. J. Fournier in the distance above?

The Joker was then a more sedate Taurus, before joining the hilariously-named over at Hays.

Put Tasman Sea into the picture too.  Is the Tasmanian still laid up in Louisiana?

And it was a great April 2012 day I caught the seldom-seen Patty Nolan

moving a houseboat into the sixth boro.  Patty seems to be preparing for a comeback.

And the 1972 2325 teu Horizon Navigator, here with Samantha Miller alongside,  was still working.  Is the 1972 container ship still intact?

And let’s wind this up with Ellen and Maurania III returning to base after a job.  Ellen is still in the sixth boro, and Maurania III is in the Delaware.

All photos, WVD, April 2012.

Entirely unrelated, check out these Smithsonian photo winners.

 

 

It’s hard to beat morning light for drama, as is the case here with QM2 getting assisted by James D. and

Doris Moran into her berth in Red Hook, as I shoot into that light.

Taken only a few minutes later, this photo of FV Eastern Welder dragging the bottom in front of the Weeks yard had me shooting with the rising sun behind me.

Bayonne dry dock is full of business.  Note the formerly Bouchard tug Jordan Rose and Cape Wraith off its bow.  I’m not sure which Miller’s Launch OSV that is.  To the left, that’s Soderman.

Hyundai Speed and Glovis Sirius shift cargo.

More shooting into the light here toward Bay Ridge, where lots is happening.

Torm Louise‘s color just looks cold.

Afrodite has been around the world several times each year since the hoopla of her moving Bakken crude from Albany has subsided.  Note the unidentified formerly Bouchard tugboat to the extreme left.

 

And with the drama of morning light, wild clouds form the backdrop to three tugboats seeing CMA CGM Pegasus out the door on a windy day.

All photos earlier this week, WVD, who feels fortunate to live in a place like this where my drama exists only in photos.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,563 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2022
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31