You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Miller’s Launch’ category.

This follows on yesterday’s post, using Lew’s photos taken on the Connecticut River.  Shawn Miller brought it up the North River for the airplane’s reunion with Intrepid

All that greenery forms the base of Stevens Institute of Technology

 

For more on the aircraft, click here

 

A truck-mounted crane was ready on the pier north of Intrepid, and preparations for the lift began immediately.

Less than 15 minutes after tying up, the crane swiveled around and lift crew began attaching the straps.

 

The tail lifted first, 

 

and then clearing the flag poles,

the crane did its work, almost giving the impression the Skyray was coming in for a landing . . .

 

Aircraft was on the pier before 1000, the announced lift time.

All photos this morning, WVD, who learned long ago the only way to be on time is to be way early.

Click here and here for aircraft on barges in the sixth boro.

Now to see it up close, get your Intrepid tickets here.  

 

 

Many thanks to my friend Lew who caught this even without a functioning AIS… on the Connecticut River, coming from Windsor Locks CT and heading for the Intrepid Museum . . .

it’s an Douglas F4D Skyray aircraft, not to be confused with an F-4 Phantom.  Here I quote from officials “The Skyray, named for the unique shape of its wing (which resembles a manta ray), went into operation with the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps in 1956. It was designed to be a high-altitude fleet protection interceptor, fast enough to catch and neutralize an approaching enemy bomber flying at 500 knots. Skyrays set many speed and time-to-climb records in their day as they were able to reach supersonic speeds. The specific Skyray acquired by the Intrepid Museum from the New England Air Museum … served in VF-162 and deployed on Intrepid between June 1961 and March 1962 with Carrier Air Wing Six.”  Ah!  So there’s a connection between this plane and the carrier.

Shawn Miller is doing the job with deck barge Weeks 47.

 

I’ll post this early so that folks might be able to catch it on either side of Manhattan Monday morning.  As of 0600 now, she is anchored just east and north of Throgs Neck Bridge.  Once she gets underway, she could be passing lower Manhattan in a half an hour.

Many thanks, Lew.

 

“Scarlet Begonias” has a line “the sky was yellow but the sun was blue…”  Well, you may have noticed the sun this morning here was pink and bluish;  the sky was a uniform gray, and 

that made the water gray as well.  Thank the Canadians . . . well, the smoke from wildfires in western Canada.

 

 

See the WTC1?

 

All photos this morning, WVD.

 

Miller Boys . . .

Seatow’s Ralph

the 598,

with a work crew on and under the dock, 

Christina

Bobby G. Miller in the thick of it, 

 

Nicholas

Gaines

Jessica Ann

and Emily sidling up to Aitolos.  There are a lot of small work boats in the area, and a  lot of them are operated by Miller’s Launch.

All photos, WVD. 

 

Grey Shark assisted out of the Kills by Catherine C.  MillerCatherine is still working, but Grey Shark has not moved from its berth in Las Caleras DR in almost three and a half years, so it’s safe to assume she won’t be calling in NYC’s sixth boro any more. By the way, July 2011 had some HAZY summer days.

The former Kristin Poling (1934 as Poughkeepsie Socony) had a few months to work, here alongside the almost new Crystal Cutler.

The mighty Viking was still working.  See the Celebrity ship in the haze.

along with even more powerful fleetmate Irish Sea, still intact and tied up at Vinik Marine.

Glen Cove was still working;  she was sold south.

Then the gallivanting started, here with a stop under the Route 213 bridge alongside the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal to watch the almost-new Mako go by. 

Down to Key West and USCGC Mohawk WPG-78, now a fish condo.  She was reefed almost exactly a year later.

Florida is unusual in that few Kirby tugboats, to my knowledge, work as assist boat.  She’s currently operated as a Seabulk tug.

C-Tractor 5 and its fleetmate

the slightly more powerful lucky 13 set the bar for unusual design and color scheme.

All photos, WVD, who’s making arrangements for more gallivanting soon, although it looks to be in the interior on the continent rather than along the edges.

If you’ve not seen a ULCV, CMA CGM A. Lincoln is coming in this afternoon/evening.

 

It should be no secret that I’m an early riser, have always been one to get up in the “o’dark” hours for the morning golden hour, the best time of day.  Here are two Miller’s Launch OSVs, possibly Rana and Rosemary.

 

A bit later on a different day, I caught Dylan Cooper westbound, with another Reinauer unit off in the distance.

 

Janet D headed into that  same morning, here eastbound.

Ditto . . .  Charles D McAllister and

Mary Turecamo.  In fact, in the photo below, you see all three.   Did you get the golden hour this morning?

All photos, WVD, who thinks this morning’s overcast skies here blocked any gold.

 

Spring, for a few more weeks, means it’s no longer winter.  Warmer temperatures bring mariners out, to clean glass,

to plan the docking procedure,

to flake out the lines,

to retireve the boom . . . although these boom guys have to be out all year round, as do all the crew above.

Spring temperatures just make it more pleasant to stay out,

on the way to work,

catching fresh air,

or just contemplating all the oceans this cargo vessel has already transited and will still transit in future months.

All photos recently, WVD.

 

It’s June, and I’m starting my 176th month doing tugster.  Wow!  how many hours might I have put into this now? 

June 2011 saw some interesting sailboats and boats.  This post mentions only a few and covers the first half of the month.

The Dyna-rigged Maltese Falcon was in town, sailing at 20 kts across the harbor and then dousing all sails almost instantly at the push of a button. She’s currently in Messina, IT.

Blue Marlin was in town and spent three weeks loading US tugs and barges sold to Nigerian interests.  Most of these names–Dean Reinauer, Curtis Reinauer, Janice Ann Reinauer, and John Reinauer–have been re-used on quite different tugboats.  “Three weeks to load a Float on-float off . . .?” you might be wondering.

Well, there were some setbacks with ill-fitting cradles.

Eventually, everything found its place and stayed there. 

I recall taking photos from Fort Wadsworth and overhearing some folks concerned “the big orange ship” was sinking.

Sixth boro haze that June made for some dull photos.  If you want to relive the ordeal of loading, click here for the tugster six-part “groundhog day” series.

Reefer Albemarle Island got assistance into the Red Hook terminals from Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran. Currently, the reefer is running between Martinique and Panama.

EPA Bold came into town;  the 1989 USNS Vigorous has changed hands several times and is now operated as Bold Explorer, an EGS survey vessel.

The 2007 Barbara C became Arabian Sea and is currently Saint Emilion.

The 5100 teu Cosco New York gets an assist from Miriam Moran.  Currently, she’s running south along the western Mexico coast.

We began with a luxury sailing vessel;  Black Seal made one run into the sixth boro with a cargo on cacao from Dominican Republic.  The three-masted schooner is currently at a mooring in Pocasset MA.

Let’s lleave it here for now, with all photos, WVD.

 

Because the name and focus of this blog is tugster, you’d expect to see a lot of tugboats, both within the confines of New York harbor, aka the REAL sixth boro, and I hope you are satisfied that you find a plethora of tugboats in installments of this blog.  So here’s Random Tugs #337, post 4877, and the tugboat is Foxy 3 moving an aggregate scow.

In the foreground, it’s Crystal Cutler;  off in the distance it’s Normandy.

Diane B here heads east with a cargo in John Blanche.  I did an article on this unit some years back.

Joyce D. Brown pushes an empty scow east.  Notice anything on the scow that identifies it?  See the end of this post.

James E. Brown passed sister Joyce D. that morning in the Kills.

Franklin Reinauer that morning may or may not have been under control of the author of a tugboat captain who shared his tales a few years back.  I will stay mum. Off to the left, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

HMS Liberty muscled a barge full of bunkers to deliver to a thirsty ship over in New Jersey.

Centerline operates both Liberty above and HMS Justice below.

Susan Miller moves some material and equipment over to the project just west of the St. George ferry terminal.

Brendan Turecamo heads over to the next and the next and the next job.

Bruce A. McAllister assists a container ship into port.

Bergen Point came off the ways at Blount Shipbuilding way back in 1958.

So that scow Joyce was pushing above is called Maria and

this logo says it was once in the Disch fleet, now sold off in many directions.

All photos, WVD.

With Eastern Dawn in the foreground, the massive scale of these box boats is apparent.

Foreshortening gives the illusion that MSC Lauren cannot possibly avoid a collision.

Although this may be her first arrival in the sixth boro, this 12400 teu vessel has sailed the seas for a decade already.

See the crewman near the port bow quarter?

Now you see him?

 

If I recall correctly, she arrived here from Jamaica;  from here she travels to Italy.

Again . . . Linda L. Miller and the 6000 hp tugs show scale.  MSC Lauren is one of 560 container vessels operated by MSC, the second largest shipping company in the world.  Know the largest?  The third largest?  Answers are here.

So here’s a merger of truckster! and ULCVs, a photo I took last week from a parking lot.  I know what was loaded into that 20′ MSC container.  I invite you to guess.  Answer will be posted tomorrow . . . .

All photos, WVD, who is always happy to collaborate.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,478 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

August 2021
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031