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GWA stands “go[ing] west again,”  the next set of posts all attempting to catch myself and maybe you up, if you’re following along, with random and I hope interesting photos from the past almost three weeks.  I realize that catching up is impossible, and in this case while I had vacated the sixth boro, big stuff happened.

A word that comes to mind is protean– named for Proteus.  Type “define: protean” into google and you’ll appreciate why it’s difficult to catch up.  But here goes.

Within a half hour of departing Warren RI, we pass Naema and

Lionheart.  Do check the links.  Either would be worthy of a post in itself.

And still north of the Rte 138 bridge, we see NOAA R/V Henry B Bigelow.

On the cusp of Block Island Sound, we encounter inbound Atlantic Pioneer, where you’d expect her returning from a run. Here’s a post I did almost exactly two years ago when Atlantic Pioneer components still needed to be combined at the shipyard.

A bit further, it’s Carol Jean and Islander, both Block Island bound, although one will arrive much before the other.

By now, we’re into Long Island Sound and being overtaken by darkness.  That’s Atlantic Navigator II as a speck heading toward us.

This dawn photo found us within NYC and approaching the East river.  It’s Fort Totten, designed for the entire US by Robert E Lee.  Here could be a dilemma:  there’s no debate that I know of of striking his name from the credits for this fort.

We pass HuntsPoint Produce Market,

the floating pool,

Marty C–a Weeks tug I’ve never seen,

the “north end” of Roosevelt Island with the Blackwell Island Light,

Gabby L Miller pushing past Cornell Tech‘s yet-to-be used buildings,

the Brooklyn Navy yard with Asphalt Sailor and –I believe– the old Great Point,

swimmers in the water doing a Manhattan circumnatation,

and–let’s end it here for today–a yacht  named  Vava II.  Here’s info on her owner.

Protean  . . . day 1?  It’s not even over, and I think so.

Lots more to come.

 

or . . . the final installment from the west side of the Atlantic .  .  .  and I’ll use (what I imagine as) NASA times here, but I’ll modify it from “t-minus” to “U–as in underway” minus and plus.

So, at U minus 53 minutes, there’s a man-basket dangling off the portside.

U minus 48 . . .  a crew boat arrives with the pilot.

U minus 37 . . .

the pilot boards Combi-Dock III,

U minus 9, the crew boat, Nicholas Miller,  departs  . . ., likely off to deliver three technicians departing Combi-Dock III.

Judging from when I first detected “under way – making way” from my vantage point, 1616, the photo below is U plus 11 minutes.  Movement at first was barely perceptible, gauged by watching juxtaposition of Peking masts and background features.

U plus 13.

U plus 14.  The traffic in the background will welcome me when I leave my station . . .  A note on the flags here:   the red one (below) is Hamburg’s flag, and the one high in the mast of Peking (next photo below) is that of Stiftung Hamburg Maritim (SHM).

And finally–I shifted my station about a mile to Camp Gateway, Staten Island . . .U plus 21.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

As I went to one of my locations Thursday, I saw this tow headed up the Upper Bay toward Bayonne, and lamented being too late.  I knew it was one of the new DSNY garbage cranes recently being deployed to new marine transfer stations in Manhattan & SW Brooklyn…

Panning slightly to the right, a group on Miller’s Launch boats were attending Afrodite . . .

Panning more than 90 degrees over past the VZ Bridge, I noticed a crane and some tugs over in the direction of Coney Island . . .

Shortly thereafter, I realized the sanitation cranes were returning . . . outbound, moved by Catherine C. Miller.

The next day, from the same vantage point, I noticed two large tugs in Gravesend Bay, one less familiar than the Moran tug.

The unusual stacks identified it immediately . . . Lauren Foss, which I had not seen since 2014, three and a half years ago here….  By the way, notice the ferris wheel and roller coaster on the skyline of Coney Island?

If you’re new to reading this blog, the high point of summer in the sixth boro shoreside for me is the first day, because it brings the mermaids ashore, a whole series of posts about which you can find here . . .

But back to Lauren Foss, a large oceangoing tug used for large barges.  RORO barge American Trader , 400′ x 105′ qualifies as a large barge, although some of the Crowley container barges are larger as seen here and here.

Click here for the specs on the 8200 hp Lauren Foss.

CCA . . . here’s info on this busy but mostly invisible corporation that dates back to the Reagan era.

Here’s the scoop on McLaren Engineering.

 

The sixth boro is truly the part of NYC that never sleeps.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Not surprisingly, a lot of people were out on the boro the other morning:  speeding out to fish,

descending from Vukovar–a name slipped out of the news–into the crew boat Emily Miller,

sitting watch past BW Shinano,

ditto . . . aboard CMA CGM Tancredi,

and preparing the heaving line . . . .

 

Is that c-ship so long that the curvature of the earth can be seen along its waterline?  Actually that’s Brendan Turecamo moving SSS barge New Jersey over to Red Hook, I believe.

And a little earlier, although I place it last here, Shawn Miller pushed a trickster barge past ConHook Range.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve mentioned Heraclitus before here . . . he’s the guy credited with observing that you never step into the same river twice.  It’s certainly true about going to a the Kills with a camera.  Take Saddleback . . .  never seen it before I thought  . . . although on longer reflection, yes I had here, doing what it’s designed and built for back in 1992 and in the North River back in the winter.  Stern view just looks different than profile.

As my eye followed Saddleback to the east, I noticed this “neck,” and for some instants wondered what was afoot, or afloat at least.

I didn’t have long to wait . . . it was Weeks 526 pushed by Shelby, Norfolk bound as it turns out.

Mr Russell usually stays upriver, but shuffles are sometimes necessary  . . .

I suppose some of this equipment will end up in Boats and Harbors once the TZ project is complete.

Gelberman  . . . at first I thought she was headed here to fuel, and that would have surprised me because I’d never noticed that before, but when the fishing poles came out,

I realized they had a different objective, one

that boats like this benefit greatly from.

I’ll end this foot-in-the-water with Gabby, pushing a small barge with reinforcing forms.

 

More soon.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally . . . a research request:  a friend is looking for photos of McAllister workboat M. L. Edwards.  Birk writes about it here, and Bob Mattsson includes this photo

of it here.

 

Happy 4th of July!  Here’s the first post by this title with a story of what John Adams wrote Abigail around this time 241 years ago.

So why do we celebrate this day?  Uh . . . the British surrendered?  It marks the first battle for independence?

DDG-55 Stout  (photo taken May 20, 2015)

We got freedom to say what we want, pray to whomever we choose, buy as many guns as we want, refuse to be unreasonably searched, charged too much bail, have access to lawyers in court, and things like that?

The founders of the US signed the Declaration of Independence?

Nope!  Nope, nope.  None of those is correct.  The British didn’t surrender for another 6 years and didn’t vacate their occupation force from the sixth boro–the only boro then–until 1783.  The Constitution wasn’t written for another decade and some!!

Here’s a good quick “not fake” read for today called “9 Things You May Not Know About the  Declaration of Independence.”

I’ll get back to that . .  but what is that military gray ship over there trying to camouflage itself against Staten Island ferry orange?  I took the rest of these photos about 24 hours ago . . .   The flag at the stern is NOT US…

It’s French.  So maybe they’re here to help us  celebrate the contributions of Rochambeau, DeGrasse. and Lafayette?

Nope, they helped after 1776 . . ..  In fact the Alliance had not even existed yet for a few years .  . .

Well, maybe the crew of the French L 9032 is here to ride the NYWheel?

Nope.  That’s in some turmoil.

See the billboard there?  Maybe they’re here for “the lowest cost health plan?”

Maybe they’re here for Macy’s !!?  Rowland Hussey Macy WAS a sailor, after all;  the red Macy’s logo star was the tattoo he wore on his hand . . .

 

Actually  I have NO idea why FS Dumont D’Urville docked over at the old homeport yesterday . . .  maybe someone can illuminate us . . .?

But to get back to 4th July . . . here was the response of George III–the accused– to the Declaration:  I’d never read it until now and it’s short and precious and defensive!!

Here’s another 4 July tugster post from the archives . . .  And if you still have time to read, here are “Six things you (probably) didn’t know about the 4th July. . . .”  And the flag of that year?  Maybe here.  And the drink of choice to fete the day back then . . .?  Well, it was not beer or rum.  Rick Spilman has it here.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who offers another link to the big document of the day here, and wishes you a happy independence day.

 

First, thanks to Joseph Chomicz . . . it’s Rebel and Dolphin over by the Philadelphia Navy Yard   . . .

Quo vadis, Rebel?

And the second batch comes from Ingrid Staats with likely the most unusual backstory ever on this blog . . .  Ingrid took the photos from a room in New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where her healthy baby was born. She writes, “We had an amazing view of the East River and for four days as Mom & babe recuperated. I amused myself by capturing as many tugs as possible.”    Congratulations to all and here they are:

Sea Lion above moving recyclables and and Evelyn Cutler pushing petroleum product.

TJ and Catherine Miller . . . and is TJ really doing all the work here?

And finally . . . Navigator light and Gulf Enterprise pushing a petroleum barge westbound.

Many thanks to Joseph and Ingrid for these photos.  And I’m happy to hear that one of the next generation of tugboat watchers has been born.

 

Here are the posts I did each of the past two years.  I’ll call this the beginning of the processional.  How many government vessels do you count in the photo below?

Carefully screened support vessels--Rana Miller, Elizabeth McAllister, and Resolute— lead the procession, here past Ellis Island,

while small craft of the NYC Navy and Air Force and others patrol.

Other McAllister boats include Alex McAllister . . . and

Eric.

CG-56 USS San Jacinto leads the larger vessel contingent.  She was here as well in 2012.   Know the import of that location in April 1836?  

Tomorrow will feature close-ups of the rest of the fleet, but for now we’ll leave it here.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who counts eight government craft in the first photo.  Here’s a post-fleet week photo set from 2009.

 

Hats off to the small boats that work all year round . . . crew boats,

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patrol boats,

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fishing boats,

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line boats,

pilot boats,

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dive boats,

more fishing boats,

more crew boats,

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government boats,

more —soon to face major cuts--government boats

more line and boom boats,

and here’s a special . . . a historic life boat, long atop Binghamton, which is still intact as far as I know, and a bit longer ago had

guys in hazmat suits doing the last ever lifeboat drill aboard the 112-year-old condemned ferry.

And finally, of course there’s the New York Media Boat. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who gives a hat tip to all the crews in small boats on the big waters.

 

I saw this boat last week on the KVK and wondered.  Was it the same vessel captured here in 2006,  here in 2007, here in 2008, here in 2009 in orange, and many other times since . . .?

fkm1

Below is a re-edited view of the boat in August 2009 and

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here’s a shot from a half minute later.

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Below she is in November 2014 and

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here in October 2015.

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So there you have it, photo below taken last week, this hull has changed names again, although the ML on the stack is the same.  On that detail, though, it might NOT stand for the same company name.  Check

fkm2

this link for Mother’s Launch.   For other Equitable boats, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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