You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Miller’s Launch’ category.

So in a recent post, you had a glimpse of this small craft, which I initially thought was a fishing boat.   I know how addictive fishing can be, since I used to ice fish and canoe fish.

But it turned out to be Lynn, a Ken‘s boat, used for line and boom handling. I’d not before noticed that some of these small boats have names.

Another boom and line handling company, ACV Enviro, also has names on their boat.  Meet Miss Urvi, an interesting name in several ways.

Here’s Miss Urvi showing my bow on a foggy day.

An intriguing small craft departed the Narrows yesterday.  Where is it headed I wonder.  It looked to be no more than 35′ and the name might be Sirius.

I’m not sure who operates Grace D, but she’s been in the harbor for the better part of a decade doing launch service.

 

Head on . . . who is this survey boat?  Notice the up fold-down transponder on the bow between the hulls.

It’s USACE.  I believe it’s a Silver Ship boat.

At first, I didn’t know what I was looking at when I saw six knees.  Sure, Gabby I knew and I saw a small boat to starboard,

but

there were two alongside, one on each side.  And on the far side, it’s Mister “B”...   a new one for me.

So it is.  All photos, WVD.

It’s been a while since Lilac appeared here, but this illusion of the steamer under way on her own power was thrilling.  I’m not adept enough at photo manipulation to add the right measure of smoke from her stack.  

And yes, the prime mover here is Michael Miller, with Susan nearby as well.  .

Like a vessel steaming in from another era,

 

it was great to see Lilac under way. 

All photos, WVD, who is unaware of the length of her duration at Caddells.

Photos of her engine can be seen here.

These foggy days offer an enhancement to a photographer with a telephoto;  the background nearly disappears, causing the subject to pop out.  In this case, it’s two tugboats of different sizes. 

Linda L. Miller length is just a bit over half Cape Henry‘s beam. 

Linda L. Miller (ex-Frog Belly, a name for the ages) is 25.3′ x 14;  Cape Henry is 109’x 36′.

 

 

Each has its role.

All photos, WVD, who recalls a lecture I once heard called “Is this a tugboat?” given the late great Don Sutherland.  It made the same point as these photos.

Another post showing scale and involving W. O. Decker I did here.

Stolt Tenacity came in the other cloudy day . . .

she appears on this blog for the first time, but what caught my attention was the small craft

that you can see more clearly here.

This is called “landing a pilot on the fly,”

a 30′ launch landing a pilot on a 600’+ vessel while under way…

All photos, WVD.

 

Geoquip Saentis is currently over in Bayonne.  Previously known as Toisa Vigilant, the 2005 build is 269′ x 59′ and Nassau registered.  I supose this means the US has no vessel that can do the work Geoquip Saentis is performing, called offshore geotechnical site investigation, i.e., figuring out more about specific locations at the “bottom of the ocean” than anyone has every before known.

The former Toisa fleet has been scattered to the seven seas, quite literally.  This is one of the first jobs this vessel is undertaking for Geoquip Marine.  Dina Polaris, which called in the sixth boro last year, is another one of the Geoquip vessels.

Berto L. Miller certainly looks exotic, although she is based in Staten Island, now.

Samantha Miller is a versatile vessel, self-spudding crane and offshore supply vessel, and is also equipped for fires.   I believe she was built in 1981.  Here‘s another post showing Samantha at work.

Berto L., 161′ x 49′,  was launched in 1999 as Justin Callais.  Miller purchased her less than 10 years ago and operated her in southern California.  Demands for a vessel like this shift, first out of the Gulf, then out of southern California, bringing her to the sixth boro.

 

All photos, recently, WVD.

 

Let’s do 2013 and 2014, or redo them, same conditions as I stated yesterday. But first let’s look at the 2013 crowd, packing in like you wouldn’t with covid.  Here was the crowd at 1010 and

by 1035 they had grown significantly.

The compulsory muster takes place, irrigated by fireboat John J. Harvey.

Once the race begins, a front-runner like Decker

might soon get left in the wake.

The fire boat slices up from behind and

propels itself between two Miller boats.

Pushoffs happen next, sometimes quite equally matched like here, with 3900 hp countering 4200.

Let’s jump ahead to 2014, with the arrivals on the watery carpet,

the processing to the starting line,

and get straight to racing without all the preening and posturing.

Someone seems a bit oversize in that gray livery.

This is a fairly mis-matched pair:  Wayne at 5100 hp, and Ellen at 4000.  Maybe a re-match is in order Wayne v. Ava.

Thanks to Jeff Anzevino for this shot, the Media Boat has military background in common with Wayne.

After Wayne has strutted its stuff in the push-offs, some of the boats lined up for the roping the bollard.

Let’s hold it up here.  All photos, WVD.

 

I’ll devote a whole post once again to the 2012 races, since I have a  lot of photos.  What I did was look for the most dramatic or interesting photos and, in some cases, re-edited them.  What I didn’t do is go back through the 2012 posts, but you can here if you want.

Again, you can identify these, or I’ll help you if you can’t.  I call this the pre-race cluster, with some even pointing upstream, as if Yonkers would be the finish line.

The cluster continues as more boats arrive.

And then there’s the burn-out, or in this case . . .  froth-out as two Cat D-399s crank out over 2200 hp.

The pack spreads out quickly.  This was almost 60 seconds into the race.  If this were a terrestrial drag race, the contest would already be over and the smoke clearer.

I’m not sure I’d want to be in a kayak, particularly a double, as all this wake translates into wave motion.

A full five minutes into the race, Quantico Creek‘s two Cat 3512 3000 hp power plants take her past the finish line with sturm und drang . . .

Seven minutes into the race . . . they’re still coming.

At the 19-minute mark, the race is over, but the bulls appear to have scores to settle . . .

and next thing you know . . . it’s tugboat rugby!

Tomorrow . . .  how about returning to 2013.

All photos, WVD.

 

Like lots of things, the Great North River Tugboat Race is, as ws said in a comment yesterday, “alas  . . .  cancelled this year.”  So here’s some consolation, ws. . .  If you need a dose of racing, you can click here and get all the way back to tugster post 2006, or for a sampling from 2006 until 2011, follow along.  In 2006, I followed from W. O. Decker and had this view.  I’ll let you try to identify these;  if the group-source gets stuck, I’ll help out.

In 2007 . . .   of these, only Lucy Reinauer is still around here.

HMS Liberty is still around.

In 2008 . . .  throttling up releases some smoke . . .

 

In 2009, two of these are still running around the sixth boro staying busy.  The third was involved in a scandalous grouding and has been scrapped.

Meagan Ann has unique safety headgear, inspired by an ancient design.

In 2010 . . .  this was a motley armada, ranging from Atlantic Salvor to The Bronx.

Catherine C. Miller and Mary H were hurrying to the starting line here.

That year saw lots of pushing match-ups.

Vulcan III could be matched up with Viking later.

In 2011, THIS could be called the heat . . .  actually, it was a misting from one of the fire boats.

Pushing around happened all over the field for spectators on deck and photographers up high.

As always, getting a line on a bollard . . . just another event in the sixth boro games.

USMMA’s Growler is closing on the bollard as a crewman demonstrates a rodeo-influenced style.

More to come . . . all photos, WVD.  And if the last four photos above suggest a muddy Hudson, remember that 2011 had just seen Hurricane Irene flood the valley creeks feeding into the Hudson.

 

 

This title goes back more than 10 years.  But I got some congested photos recently, so I dredge up an old title.  Count the boats of all sizes here.  Of course, foreshortening makes them seem much closer to each other than they really are.  I count at least 12 vessels on the photo below, including some I had not noticed when I took it.

There are five here, and maybe two miles of separation between the two container ships.

Three operations were happening simultaneously in this stretch of the channel, and all were either stemming or moving very slowly.

Again, there’s lots of foreshortening here.

It may be exhilarating to get this close to a large ship, but if your engine stalls . . .  stuff’ll happen really fast.

Here’s a different sort of “traffic” photo from august 31, 2008 . . . exactly 12 years ago.  And it gives me an idea for a post.  By the way, left to right, can you name at least half of the 12 boats at least partly visible here?

All photos, WVD.

x

First off, I missed CMA CGM La Perouse, which left before daylight this morning. I had to look up La Perouse, since it was a French word I didn’t know.  It turns out that it’s a person, an accomplished 18th century French explorer of the Pacific.  Click here for a map of his explorations, along with French spellings of places you know;  Mauwee is my favorite.  Given this identity for this ship, this ULCV then fits into the “explorer” class of CMA CGM, the other vessels shown here.  Sp far, I’ve posted only CMA CGM Amerigo VespucciMagellan has been in the sixth boro, but I missed it.

Al Quibla is one of the middle-sized UASC vessels, at 13, 296 teu.

The largest UASC box boat right now is over 18,000 teu.  Back in April, I saw Al Qibla‘s sister vessel Unayzah, but not posted it until today below.  Unayzah at that time still had the Hapag-Lloyd livery.

 

Al quibla is the Arabic word for “direction.”

Hyundai Speed was launched in 2012, and has carrying capacity of 13, 100 teu.  Here Ava sidles up to escort it into the Global Terminal.

 

Recently I caught CMA CGM T. Jefferson departing.  She’s of the same class as T. Roosevelt and J. Adams.

 

Cosco Shipping has its “flower” class, with Peony and all the others. 

Capacious as these vessels are, much larger ones sail the seas.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but no vessel over 15,000 teu has yet called in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,440 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2021
M T W T F S S
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031