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I didn’t hear any wind speeds for yesterday, but it was blowing . . . winds of November according to the date, but fortunately not a November witch.

Chem Wolverine scudded through the Bay,

Kings Point went on with her routine,

Gabby Miller returned to home base,

Joyce aimed for the Kills,

Mister T slung a scow, 

Crystal pushed Patricia E. Poling,

ONE Ibis had some containers shuffled after spending time off Long Beach,

Fort Schuyler dispatched Double Skin 30,

and Chem Wolverine, on her way to Albany, passed Dace Reinauer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes a safe day to all.

Previous excessively windy days posts can be found here.

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I know others witnessed dawn this morning as the big pink ship came in . . . .

By the way, if you were naming this ONE “bird” ULCV based on this morning’s color, which bird

would

you choose?  Nah . . . it wasn’t that.  More later.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

With momentum gaining for more offshore wind farms, a raft of seldom-seen type vessels make port calls in the sixth boro.  This photo from Tony Acabono is an excellent example:  Geosea is not new, but she’s surely exotic.

Another from Tony, Berto L. Miller is new in town, joining two other Miller OSVs sometimes here, Rana and Josephine K.

And yet another set from Tony . . .  recognize this vessel?

Look at the design on the stack . .. .

It’s the return of Bear, as I first knew her, although she’s also been Catherine M. Brown and Elizabeth Anna.

And finally . . . here’s a photo of a vessel--Lois Ann L. Moran and barge Philadelphia–as seen from the “vessel,” the whatever-it-is in Hudson Yards. Those are LIRR trains in the foreground.  Thanks to my sister for this photo.

Thanks to Tony and my sister for these photos.  No photos here by Will Van Dorp, who is again off across the border.

This will be a photo-rich post, starting with bridge workers currently at the Brooklyn side VZ tower, aka the former Fort Lafayette.

You might remember Michele Jean;  Christina is the replacement vessel.

Most small craft in the sixth boro work all year round, in either construction, hydrographic surveys,

boom handling, launch service,

law enforcement,

and more.  Some fishing takes place all year round although winter fishing employs different craft.

 

Fishing machines as below . . .  only from about April to October.

Annunziata is a fishing boat I see a lot on AIS, but this is my first time to confirm boat with name under way.

New York Media Boat has some of their vessels working all year round, but here’s a catch, a NY Media Boat RIB in front of the Hudson Yards endless staircase called the Vessel, parts of which appeared on this blog during construction.

Then, the red boat below with kayak on roof, that’s a summertime only boat for up here.

And let’s close with the boom handlers;  tankers and oil barges are boomed during some of their harbor operations, as a precaution in case of spillage.  All year round these small craft do their boom wrangling.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Just for ships and figgles . . . have a glance at 155 and at 55 in this series. While we’re reconnoitering the past, here’s 5.

And here’s springtime 2019.  Might this be the last view I get of tug Viking?  Scuttlebutt’s bumped into me saying so. Her first (I believe) appearance on this blog was over 11 years ago here. She had some near twins, but none evolved quite as she did.

FB has this group I really enjoy called Freighters in the Night;  I could submit this one. Jonathan C escorts an MSC box ship out.

Liz Vinik is a former fleet mate of Viking;  I caught her yesterday entering the kills with a Cashman barge carrying barges. Click here for some photos of previous iterations of this boat.

A dark, slow-to-wake morning like yesterday provides lots of points of light.  Here Joyce D. heads out, likely for her railroad work.

Enjoy these contrasts, Linda L. Miller and Hayward, two specialized boats.

Let’s end with a transient, sporadically seen in the sixth boro, a formerly Pacific Ocean Crowley tug . . .  Morgan,  out of New Bedford.

All photos e-watermarked with invisible metadata as taken by Will Van Dorp in the past month.

 

I walked along the Hudson and past the Vessel the other day because it was flat and scenic.   I also wanted to see what progress was happening at Pier 55, aka on Diller Island.

Beneath, from small boats  .  . . these workers attended to several of the 132 pots that make up the island.

Michael Miller stood by Weeks 526, as

at this moment did  Shawn Miller.

 

Meanwhile, coming upriver was another Weeks crane, the 533,  with Susan Miller on port bow and

Elizabeth supplying power.

 

 

At a certain moment, Shawn departed the 526 and headed over to the Weeks 533

to assist.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently saw Weeks and Miller tugs working on 533 here.

 

 

It’s the first full day of spring, which means that soon many more small craft will operate on the sixth boro, yet all winter long, many small boats never leave.

If this is a Class A 25′ SAFE Defender boat, it may have entered service in 2002.   I’ll be back with this.

Here are a team of the newer 29′ USCG vessels.

Line and boom boats, patrol boats . . . these small craft operate in the sixth boro all year round.

Ditto survey boats like this one.

Over alongside Rhea‘s stern, that’s certainly a launch from Miller’s.

I’m guessing these are 31′ SAFE boats operated by NYPD, but they’ve been running in threes of late.  They also have larger Vigor (ex-Kvichak)-built boats.

NJ State Police has a few small boats that patrol/train all year round.

NYPD has had a few of these for almost five years now.  When they first arrived, I was astonished by the speed they could make.

USACE Moritz first launched in 2001.

 

So let’s go back to that 25′ Defender in the first photo, but at closer inspection . . . see the logo on the door . . . it’s a DonJon RIB.

USCG checking me out with a long lens? . . . Nah, that’s Bjoern of New York Media Boat.  Check out their blog here, and book a tour here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s again reminded that you’ll see something new each time you go down to the water and look closely.  And in the next few months, in all waters recently ice-bound, be ready to see an influx of recreational boats coming north for the summer.

 

and to someone else who took these photos back in 1974.

From what I can see in these photos, taken in the shipyard over in Jersey City, the lines are simple and very pleasing.

Of course, I can’t see the frames, and even if I could, I’m not a naval architect in any way shape or form.

Here’s she’s had finish paint.  Joe Weber was the yard foreman.  Here’s a photo of Joe Weber at work in 1983, and here’s one of her at Miller Girls at work around 2006.

I took the next photo, below, in January 2007, thirty-three years after she was built.  And my question is . . . since I have not seen Miller Girls in a long time, is she still around?

It looks like some sponsons have been added.

Photos this old qualify this as a “fifth dimension” post.

Many thanks to Paul for passing these along.

 

 

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