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Believe it or not, I’m way inland and without a camera, and a preference for novelty prompts  a different almost-year-end post together.  Rules I made for myself follow:  go to my archives and select the first photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if the first photo in my archives for each month is a person or an inland structure, I don’t use it;  instead, I go forward in that month to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Susquehanna in a very familiar IMTT on the Bayonne side of the KVK.  She’s currently westbound along the Keys.

February was La Perla, an oyster barge on Peconic Bay.

March was Nathan G on the very southern tip of Manhattan, across from the Colgate clock.  She’s currently working in the sixth boro.

Jonathan C was assisting a box ship out in the wee hours near the start of April.  Right now, she’s in the sixth boro, doing or waiting to do a similar escort.

May began with a NYC oyster boat headed north through the Narrows.

Early June it was Tavropos, in the Stapleton anchorage.  The crude oil tanker is currently off the Tabasco coast of Mexico.  The tanker appeared here previously as Moonlight Venture.

July began with Fishing Creek headed out of the Narrows.  She’s currently near Philly.

In August it was Grande Mariner approaching lock E14.  She’s docked in Narragansett Bay.

In September, actually on September 1, it was Kaye E. Barker southbound across Lake St. Clair with the landmark Renaissance Center ahead.  She’s currently upbound on Lake Huron, possibly getting another load of ore for the season.

October began with me meeting Mrs. Chips bound for the Narrows and point south and ultimately Florida, where she currently is.

November it was Denak Voyager taking on scrap.  That’s the Newark Bay Bridge beyond the ship, and Rebecca Ann lost to the left margin.  Rebecca Ann is currently in the sixth boro, and Denak Voyager has exited the Straits of Gibraltar, heading back to the sixth boro.

And finally, December, it’s a mystery boat for now and an unidentified location. Guess if you like . . . I hope to get back to this photo in 2020.

Maybe tomorrow . . .  last day of the year . . . I’ll do the last photo of each month following the same rules.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s another calendar’s worth . . . starting with Josephine.  I have many more of this bot coming up soon.

Capt. Brian heads out through the Narrows to meet a tow.

Cape Lookout returns for her anchored barge.

Nathan G delivers a brace of scows.

Ava M heads out for a job.

The “new” Kristin Poling returns to her barge as well.

Ellen and Bruce A follow a job.

St Andrews heads east and

Ernest Campbell, west.

Challenger, some weeks ago, brings a Weeks crane up for a lift.

Stephen B has some additions to her paint job since last I saw her.

CMT Pike heads back across the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who can’t believe it’s already mid-November 2019!!

 

 

The 1963 Patricia is always a head-turner, and she was especially so the other morning.  The longer I look at the photo below, the more I imagine it framed.

Her throaty sound catches the ear as well.  Am I mistaken or has that color scheme changed a bit?

Carolina Coast makes the sugar run all year round, but that billowing spinnaker clearly states the season.

 

Nathan G has been spending a lot of time of late on runs outside the VZ Bridge.

 

Here, a busy distant Bayonne port as seen from Owls Head, is Genesis Victory with barge GM 6506 and a very busy background, as

she gets assisted into a lightening position by Pegasus.

James D. Moran escorts a quite empty Leo C.

toward Port Elizabeth.

Discovery Coast here takes on Edwin A. Poling.  It amazes me that the sylvan shoreline beyond the unit is actually in New York City and masks a dense residential area.

Moments before she was headed in from an anchorage area.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who favors another shot of Patricia.

 

Here are all the previous installments of this series.

Glenn Raymo caught this photo up the Hudson the other day, as Joker assisted a Weeks crane.  Hays tugs do come up here occasionally, but I’ve never seen them.

Back almost exactly six years ago, the same boat headed upriver as a dead ship.  And eight years ago, working for a different company and painted in a different livery, here she was . . .  2011, eastbound in the KVK.

Justin Zizes was coming down the Hudson recently and caught this spring-evoking photo of Nathan G, her gray livery and aggregate cargo set off by the hint of leaves on the tree-lined far shore.

Thanks to Justin also for this photo of Mister Jim in her homeport in Coeymans.

Jan van der Doe sent these photos along of a group of northern European tugs at work, taken in early April by Jan Oosterboer, not far from Rotterdam.

Mutratug 32 is a Carrousel Rave tug, which means she rotate her point of attachment to better brake the assisted vessel.  To see her in action, click here.

And finally, see the tugs in this photo I took on the East River the other day?  Two of them?

Thomas J. Brown is obvious and always a delight to see.  But then there’s Bosco on the barge.  I believe she was heading for a job on the Hutchinson River.

Thanks to Glenn, Justin, Jan, and Jan for photos here.

 

Here’s a first timer in this livery and in an unusual location . . . on the wall at Battery Park, with the Colgate clock in the background.

Nathan G (1977) no doubt has docked here before, back as part of the McAllister fleet from 1989 until about two years ago.

With WTC1 background above and the Cass Gilbert-designed former Custom House (upper left below) and

the shrine of St. Elizabeth Anne Bayley Seton and adjacent James Watson House below . . .  to

her passing the stern of the massive Monaco Bridge, I’m trying hard to make up for the fact that this is the first appearance of Nathan G in this blog.  By the way, at 73′ loa, Nathan G long is less than half the beam of Monaco Bridge at widest . . . 167′!!

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently posted about Nathan G‘s fleet mate Sarah D.

 

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