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Steve’s uncle Bob was a captain and pilot on the Dalzelleagle/McAllister Bros from 1968 to 1985.  That makes for a special connection and lots of vintage photos.  Enjoy these thanks to Steve.  I’ll use his captions.

Dalzelleagle assisting ship in East River in September 1968.

Dalzelleagle heading down Buttermilk Channel-from pier 12 Brooklyn in September 1970.  The tug is interesting, but so are the details in the background.

Cook Ralph Andreason waves from the stern on Dalzelleagle departing 69th St pier Brooklyn in September 1970.

McAllister Bros in North River off Hoboken pier on August 24, 1973.

The is the same time and place, roughly.  The Twin Towers had opened earlier that year.

Tug McAllister Bros leading Atlantic Champagne thru Newark Bay Draw on July 5, 1976. This picture brings to mind a story that my Uncle Bob Munoz told me. Bob was a captain and pilot on the Dalzelleagle/McAllister Bros from 1968 to 1985. One time he was piloting a ship in Newark Bay toward the Newark Bay Draw Bridge and a woman passenger came over to him on the bridge of the ship and asked him if the ship was going through that little opening in the bridge. Bob said that they were. She then asked how he did that. So he looked at her and said, “When we get real close I just close my eyes.”    Atlantic Champagne, an ACL vessel, was launched in 1969 with a teu capacity of a dazzling 882 teu.

McAllister Bros in Newark Bay from a ship on June 26, 1987.  That CRRNJ bridge was used starting in 1926;  I saw some remaining piers about a decade ago, but it is entirely gone now.  Given the raising of the Bayonne Bridge, keep in mind that vertical clearance here was 136′.  Maybe someone can tell me the width of the channel.

McAllister Bros galley on January 11, 2001,

and her engine room on the same date.

And finally, McAllister Brothers here along with Christine M. McAllister on November 6, 2006.

It’s hard to say good bye.  Many thanks to Steve for use of these photos.

And thanks to Birk Thomas for posting this on FB today, Dalzell Towing.

Following from yesterday, which covered 0900 to 0930, today we pick up from the mystery vessel and do 0930 to 1000.  Identify this blue ship?

Here’s a clue and a hint that traffic is busy, as another vessel comes around Bergen Point.

 

As MSC Bilbao clears the bridge, you get a sense of all the boats over on the NW side of Staten Island.  Anyone know the passenger vessel at the shipyard to the left?  I don’t.

As MSC Bilbao approaches from the west and Adams heads out to sea, a RORO arrives.

The random curves of waves and reflections seem just perfect as a vessel named Bilbao passes by.

 

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Kimberly has released the line to Bilbao and is about to rotate to starboard and head back west.

All photos, WVD.

 

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

Long Island, eastbound, gets overtaken by a small fishing boat.

B. Franklin, light, heads to the Reinauer yard.

Doris Moran, light, heads east.

Ellen McAllister assists a Maersk ship through the channels to her berth.

Helen Laraway heads east to pick up a scow.

HMS Justice pushes HMS 2605 through the KVK.

Charles A. and Matthew Tibbetts follow a ship so that they can assist as needed when called upon.

Ava and Kimberly head out to different assignments.

Brendan Turecamo provides port assist.

Mister Jim follows Seeley.

Gulf Coast has been a Dann Marine vessel since it was launched way back in 1982.

All photos, WVD.

Can you  place this pilot boat?  The name on the bow, almost visible, says Chelsea.

Tanker New England I’ve seen in the sixth boro at least once, although I don’t think I took a photo.

I’ve not seen the tug here though;

 

Harold A. Reinauer, a 1972 3000 hp boat,  looks quite a bit like Jason Reinauer, a 1968 3000 hp boat which spent time in New York waterways a few years back doing assist work.

 

Liberty I have seen  . . . in Quincy MA more than a decade ago.

The Irving tanker New England mostly shuttles between Boston and St. John NB.

All photos, WVD.

Here comes Jonathan C around the stern of an incoming ship . . .

 

This turn would have been fun to see from the air, from a stable platform like a helicopter or drone.

The container ship is called Athens Express.  And of course that is Kimberley Turecamo.

 

 

She was inbound yesterday from the ancient port of Damietta, 12 days and 19 hours behind her.

All photos, WVD.

 

This post covers the St. Clair River (in the wee hours) and down to Detroit.  If it seems that it’s just a chronological series of photos of the voyage, well . . . yes, that’s what it is, and what’s wrong with that.

Can you identify the vessel that we passed between 0415 and 0430?  I’ll give the answer at the end of the post.

We followed Kaye E. Barker into the sixth Great Lakes. . .

Partway across, we both passed Atlantic Huron.

 

Just south of Belle Isle, we saw Bristol Bay with her barge and

still farther, Cheyenne light.

Federal Seto was moored near the Boblo-marked building, and

The last two boats for this post are Iver Bright and

Patricia Hoey.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The mystery vessel was Paul R. Tregurtha.

 

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When Ellen intruded onto my shot of Jonathan C assisting Amstel Stork around Bergen Bend, I first thought she had blown my shots of the assist, but yesterday’s post gave me an idea . . . .  And now that I mention yesterday’s post, here’s another large ATB to throw into the comparison, one that carries 214,000 gallons of fuel.

Compare them.  So here goes:  Ellen entered service in 1967, came to NYC in 2001 and measures 102′ x 29 with fuel capacity of 20,000 gallons.  Currently she brings 4000 hp to her assists.

Jonathan C came off the ways and to the sixth boro in 2016 and the tape calls her at 89′ x 38.”  Her engines generate 6000 hp, drawing from 40,000 gal tanks.

I have earlier photos of Jonathan C, but here’s one from over two years ago.

And since Ellen pre-dates my time in the sixth boro, here’s one I took over 10 years ago.

The photo above by Will Van Dorp.

“The road goes on forever and the  . . . [journey] never ends . . ..”

Robert Keen’s lyrics are slightly adapted here . . .  The Straits of Mackinac is a tempestuous place with random seeming currents;  note all the shipwreck symbols on the chart below.

Along the way, we pass Federal Mackinac.  I’m not sure what those conical-tipped cylinders are.

Off the stern, White Shoal Light sinks

out of sight . . .

 

Traffic goes on and on.

Here Erie Trader gets

powered by Clyde S. VanEnkvort.

 

Here a 49-foot Buoy Utility Stern Loading vessel leaves the St Ignace port

and heads for the Straits.

Meanwhile, CSL Assiniboine heads for the Straits and

Lake Michigan.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Thanks to Jonathan Steinman, who once a week has a moment to look out his window at work, here’s an angle on Kimberly Poling showing a weight bench just behind the wheelhouse.   In pleasant weather, that must make a great gym.rt.jpg

Chandra B meets Morton Bouchard Jr with the Goethals Bridge–old and new–as backdrop.

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Ditto Ellen S. and Erin McAllister, with added details of the Linden refinery.

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A closeup of Erin, as she plows eastward.

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Ellen S.  and Evening Light meet near the salt pile.

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And to close out today’s post, it’s the too long absent Vulcan III passing Gracie M.

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How about a flashback to June 2009.  Cheyenne looks different today, but so does the shoreline of Manhattan, now that Pier 15 has institutionalized itself over on the far side of where Wavertree rests.

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The first photo by Jonathan Steinman;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

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