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That’s what I’m doing, preferably feeling the water but inside the ship today.  Below, W. O. Decker handles the whitewater created by boats in a recent race with at least 10 times Decker‘s horsepower.

As seen from the Bayonne Bridge walkway, Quenames displaces a fair amount of water, surrounding itself with froth.

Fireboat water in the sky and spray over the bow of these boats racing to the finish line. 

 

 

But today, I hope to be propelled by the wind, maybe with the rail not buried, but heeled over enough that water will be flowing into and then out of the scuppers.

 

Happy Labor Day.  All photos, WVD.

I’m outa range of Coney Island today, but it is a worthwhile to think of mermaids past . . . Go if you can!

tugster: a waterblog

I’m going to miss the mermaid parade this year.  And, yes,  I AM going to miss it.

But you don’t have to.  Click here for info to get started on your way.   It’s free, although you can choose to pay for access to the staging area where I took some of these photos.

This’ll be the second time I miss since I first went in 2004.   I go because of the mermaids, of course.  Mermaids tell me they often linger below the surface in boat photos I take.

Seriously, while making my way around the five boros and beyond, I see scenes that would make powerful images, but it might be creepy to intrude into strangers’ lives to get those shots.  In fact, I’m not really a people-photographer, yet the mermaid parade is all about posing.  Paraders want their photos taken.  Once a mermaid even asked to…

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Quick, name that boat.

It’s appeared on this blog before. 

She appeared here before as Charles Burton, but now . . .  meet Helen!

Cape Hatteras (1967) and Eugenie Moran (1966) have recently appeared over by Prall’s Island, regular spot for tugboats being prepared for reefing.   I caught Eugenie in Portsmouth NH over a decade ago here

Now over to the coast 3000 miles away, it’s C-tractor 22.  Thanks to JED, I rode out to sea with a previous generation C-tractor here over a decade ago. 

Many thanks to Tony A for all but the last photo, which was sent along by George Schneider.  Thanks to you both. 

And I’ll keep the lights on in tugster tower to keep juicing up the robots.

 

Quick . . .  what do you know about this white lionine tugboat?  Answer follows.

We’re still being quick here?  What can you tell me about this model of Dianne E. in a display case on the lower level of a barge of Pier 66?  I know nothing about the model, but I stopped by at Pier 66 Wednesday for the first time in way too long.  Any interest in meeting gathering there one of these warm days?

And speaking of piers, I made my first stop at Pier 76 ever Wednesday as well.  It seems I’ve not been out here in a really long time. 

Harvey looked resplendent alongside the seating  . . ..

The NYS Canal system opens officially today, and that means Sparky might be a looper headed up there traveling north and then west to get back to Florida.  I’m just speculating. 

Anne Moore is busy.  Hey, NPS, I’d like to talk with you about this vessel.

Media Boat 5 is always out, always doing and seeing interesting sights.

RCC Africa is a RORO I’ve not seen before.   Here are Autoliner routes. 

Pacific Basin‘s Sharp Island left town light. 

Rolf Williams was returning to base after delivering lube solutions. 

And that brings us back to this tugboat . . .  the former J. George Betz.

All photos, WVD, who suggests you too gallivant around the original boro, the sixth boro, some warm day soon. 

They come, they go . . . and we never get to know more than the names, unless something unusual happens, as was the case with Ever Forward.  More on that at the end of this post.  Some names are intriguing, like CMA CGM Osiris, likely among the newest cargo ships calling in the sixth boro, part of the CMA CGM Zephyr class. 

 

Chipolbrok–the name– made no sense until I looked up its origins.  The agreement has been around longer than I have!!

Bulk carriers have the best names . . .  like Common Luck. 

Maersk Vilnius is a regular in the boro, last posted here in January. 

So is MSC Tomoko, although I’ve not posted any photos of her before. 

Fairchem Copper has never appeared here before, although sister Fairfield tankers have

Ortolon . . . that’s a word origin I never suspected!  Making sense of Ortolon Coco, that defeats me.  

Ice Fighter . . .  I saw this and immediately thought of Ice Babe Base of many years ago.

I started with a CMA CGM Zephyr, so it’s a good place to end . . .  and they crossed paths in the boro:  Osiris, meet Apollon.

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s the story I alluded to earlier:  a graphic novelist —Jordan Crane–had his latest book printed overseas and it–along with other new books–was traveling back to the US aboard Ever Forward.  Crane also had a book tour planned, where he would distribute copies of the new book.  Well, Ever Forward messed up those plans!  Long term though, this delay revealed this story, and that may just boost his sales, like a double-printed postage stamp or doubly-struck coin. Well, if I were Crane, I would play up this angle.  And Ever Forward, it appears she’s back in Baltimore.  I’ll bet the pilot and crew will be very nervous around the Craighill Channel. 

 

Call this a case of the common and the obscure.  See the name on that tanker?

Of course, and we know the name well for his fables despite his and their antiquity.  The crude tanker was launched in 2012.

But how about this one?  I had to look it up.

But if you know sci-fi movies or Swedish epic poetry, you might have recognized it.  If not, I looked it up for you here.  How appropriate . . . a 2008 RORO ship named for a space ship from a poem adapted for film!

All photos, WVD.

Deck the hulls . . .

the bell sound signal device and railings too.

And I’ll leave that song right there. 

 

Kimberly Turecamo has a wreath around the bell also, but

consistent with the Kimberly crew, there’s more.

Merry Christmas all . . .

All photos, WVD.

Here was last year’s M is for Merry.

If they fly the flag, maybe they do the deeds, 

or maybe they had been too busy shrimping to notice what the deckhand ran up the mast.

Maybe they were just both at Journey’s End.

Lizzy B. Moran returned from an assist.

This unnamed trawler–I forgot to look at the transom because I was so distracted by the next traffic–might be doing a local run or could be ending the Great Loop just around the bend.  I just don’t know.

 

It is that season . .  and Silver Fox is festive.

 

 

Ships with memorable names head upstream.

Angus R. Cooper

and Mardi Gras are two of the local assist fleet too. 

All photos, WVD, who’s thinking to find a room down here, but I can’t gallivant back down until I sell the three more calendars I have left.

One of these is not like the others . . .  and I’ll tell you why later.

By the way, in case you can’t make out the names, it’s Wicomico, Fells Point, and Kings Point.

When I first started this blog, the dominant bunkering company in the sixth boro was K-Sea, and on a given routine day back then, I might have caught three K-Sea boats at work.  When the first Vane boat arrived in the boro–was that in 2008 or 2009?–I never expected this many white with blue trim and V on the stack to work here. 

 

 

Potomac has been in and out of the harbor for over 10 years.

 

Above and below, it’s Wye River

And circling back to a tugboat from earlier in the post, enjoy another shot of Fells Point.

All photos, WVD.

My cryptic statement that “one is not like the others” might have you wondering what I meant by that:  Wicomico, Potomac, and Wye River are 4200 hp models;  the others are 3000 hp.

Thanks for the well-wishes yesterday;  the blog marches on with post 5051.

Road Fotos never tell the whole story, but enjoy these fleeting sights from the Mississippi Valley . . . like an excursion boat called Tom Sawyer

or one called Mark Twain . . ..

Some towns have statues of obscure favored and maybe local folks . . .

but no such unknowns are raised onto a pedestal in Hannibal. Is there anywhere in the US a writer as universally known and recognized as Mr. Clemens?

I’m sorry never to have met him.

Let me be uncharacteristic, and add a bit about my visit here.  After some trouble I’ll not elaborate on in Saint Louis, I was driving north along the Mississippi.  After some debate with myself, I pulled into Hannibal, found a room, took a shower, and walked around town looking for some food.  The BBQ place had moved out to the highway (Highway 61 !), so I walked on and found a Turkish place, right next to the farmer’s market where I bought some pears.  This Turkish place…  I sat outside, where a cat of the feline sort joined me.  The waitress had no voice but was very charming and wondered why anyone would visit Hannibal.  I’ll get back to that.  After a delightful and delicious meal, I paid up and walked out onto the deserted street, or I thought it was a deserted street.  Two deer, who seemed to be out exploring, met me.  We chatted and then went our separate ways.

Why would anyone visit Hannibal?!!  

Are you kidding me?  

I’d go back.  I highly recommend a visit to Hannibal, although I can’t guarantee you’ll meet the deer, the cat named Isabel, or the waitress with no voice.

All photos, WVD, who is now out of my personal WiFi desert.

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