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Sorry about the washout colors below;  what happened was the dawn light was intermittently too bright or dull, as winds washed clouds across the sky.

Nevertheless, I headed out because I saw a Spliethoff vessel in the offing, heading into the sixth boro. Painted a unique copper brown, Spliethoff vessels all have names ending in -gracht, or “canal” in Dutch. Saimaa is a lake in Finland. since they carry unique cargoes, I wondered what Saimaagracht would be carrying.  I’ll direct your eyes, but won’t tell you until the end of this post.  Some of you maybe have guessed from the photo below.

Vertical beams connected to high-up horizontal one, cabins, and wheels.

Closeup of cabins on 182 and 170.  Ladders and landing.

Some of them are differently loaded, cabins positioned on the starboard side of the vessel.

Side view of Saimaagracht, showing escort Moran 6000 and all the machines.  Who knows what’s in tweendecks–if anything–and holds.

Slightly different angle of cabins, and

cabins in their full context.

Just guessing here, these machines are 25′ to 30′ high, with a spread of just under 9′ or 10′.  That actually a clue.

See the scudding clouds.  I’m now curious about something else . . . the structure on the starboard side of the superstructure and connected by horizontal ducting.  I didn’t zoom in on that in the moment.

 

My verdict is . . . they are a set of new Boxrunner straddle carriers, aka straddlers, by Kone Crane.  The ship was arriving from Finland, so the manufacturing may have been done there.  A next generation will be automated, just like self-driving cars, trucks, tractors, and ships.

And my conjecture is that starboard side stern structure is part of a sulphur oxide  (Sox) scrubber plant.

All photos yesterday by Will Van Dorp.  For previous photos of –gracht vessels, click here.  I was unable to find a photo of  Spliethoff vessel from the 1920s, when they began, but here I learned  BigLift–with their Happy vessels– is one of their subsidiaries.  Spliethoff was involved in a pilot container project between Europe and Cleveland a few years ago.

Unrelated:  read this and listen to the audio . . . NY Media Boat takes journalists to the islands off the VZ Bridge.

More Great Race tomorrow.

Let’s finish up  Whatzit 38, which started here with a plain white canvas.  Below is a photo I took during the tugboat race in September 2015 of John J. Harvey, an FDNY fireboat in commission between 1931 and 1995.

And here’s one I took in April 2010, making an up-to 18,000 gpm water display to welcome the 343 into the sixth boro. Pumping water, which makes these designs in the sky,  is the whole point of a fireboat.   So . . .

check out her summer 2018 look.

This is a thorough

 

thorough dazzle paint job, white spray all over the boat, including the decks.

 

 

From this angle below, she  really looks like a WW1 Norman Wilkinson production.

I can’t wait to see her in glass calm water . . .  to enjoy the reflections.

I believe this is the current John J. Harvey website.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Remember tug Hackensack about ten years ago?  I’ve read some negative opining about the paint job on FB . . . here’s the concept.

 

After 66 days at sea, Zhen Hua 20 dropped anchor in Gravesend Bay yesterday after a few hours after I departed.  But thanks to Bjoern of New York Media Boat, this phase of the visit has been documented.

Given the ubiquity of containers, there’s a worldwide demand for the cranes;  according to their website, 70% of this style crane worldwide is produced by ZPMC.   As the container ships get larger, a need for cranes with greater boom reach is created.  ZPMC Netherlands has a fleet currently of 22 ships to idle these seemingly impossible loads.   Since 2012, ZPMC has successfully completed “1070 voyages to 180 ports in 80 countries.”

Note the Miller’s Launch crew boat off starboard bow.

Booms must be lowered before the delivery will fit under the Bayonne Bridge on the transit to Port Elizabeth . . .  alter this week.

 

Many thanks to Bjoern for use of these photos.  For more info on New York Media Boat–actually there are several vessels–check them out online or see and “like” them on FB.

Here was a Zhen Hua vessel in port back in 2007–the first I ever saw–from 2008 here, and from 2014 . .  herehere, and here.

Marginally related:  One would not need these cranes at one point in the Comoros;  this practice I’ve read has ended.

 

The little-used adjective fleet is appropriate here.   And when something goes amiss in the diverse workplaces of the sixth boro, it’s great to have the fleetest responders there are. The amusement park on the beach in the background identifies the location as Coney Island.  In fact, the responders towed the vessel out to deeper water while dewatering.  No passengers were on board at the time of the emergency, water ingress portside engine room.  All’s well that end’s well.

MV Zelinsky worked in San Francisco waters from at least 2007 until last summer. I’m guessing it arrived in the harbor aboard a ship . . .

Many thanks to New York Media Boat for photo and information. And hat’s off to the responders from USCG, FDNY, and NYPD.

Here are previous fleetest posts.

 

What happens if you build a pilot boat in Massachusetts to be used on the Great Lakes?  It needs to get to its place of use.

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Thanks to the NY Media Boat, I got these photos this week as the Huron Spirit hurried through

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the sixth boro.   North of the watery boro, I was invited to ride through the Erie Canal  before it closes on November 20.

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Above is the wall above lock 16 and below, it’s the approach to lock 19, where you have to first duck under the triple-track rail bridge.

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The photo below, taken at lock 21, was Wednesday afternoon.  By now, the newest Gladding Hearn pilot boat has exited the Canal and is making its way up the Great Lakes chain.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wrote this story on the Lakes Pilots.

See the two big shoes on the Nadro Marine barge pushed by Margot?  You might also call them “pedestals” for the New York Wheel.  Those are size 110-ton shoes.  A little over a month ago, NY Media Boat caught the legs arriving, the legs which will wear these shoes.

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Here’s a close up with two crew getting prepared to offload these shoes.

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Chesapeake 1000–which you’ve seen working here and here–did the lift.  In the photo below taken just prior to the shoes’ arrival, Chesapeake 1000 is offloading the “multi-axle” furnished likely by Supor.  Sarah Ann assists with the swiveling of the large crane.

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Here’s a closeup of the multi-axle (there’s likely another name for that, but I don’t know it)

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and the drone that someone is using to document the transfer of cargoes.

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Here Margot finesses the Nadro/McKeil SV/M 86 with the shoes to the lift point.

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Here’s another view of the same, looking east.

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At this point, the barge is 110 tons lighter as the shoe is lifted and moved carefully onto the dock.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More shoes to come, although my Canadian cousins call them “boots.”

Click here for some details from SIlive.com.  And since it’s always good to see more Margot, click here.

I have many more Gmelin photos, but as an indication that I still inhabit the present-day sixth boro, I’ll show some sign of life for a few days.

For outatowners, Gowanus Creek (now Canal) is one of the most polluted waterways in the US, which is no secret to locals.  By the way, Gowanus rhymes with “you want us” with a silent “t.”

I took this photo this week just upstream of the 9th Street Bridge.  In fact, when a man swam down the Canal last year, he wore some serious hazmat protection, as the Media Boat shows here.

What I was not aware of is how much effort is going into addressing the accumulated pollution of more than a century.

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This barge holds several excavators at work in the Fourth Street Turning Basin, one of the dead ends in the Canal.

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As needed, the barge is moved by this small tug/pushboat that might be called 1337E.

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Besides black goop that I might photograph next time, wood and other detritus is being plucked from the bottom.

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Gowanus, there’s hope.  I’ll be back.

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Click here and here for some posts I did when I last visited the Canal . . . in 2011 and 2013.

As to connections between the Gowanus area of Brooklyn and the Erie Canal, click here.  For a photo of the Gowanus Bay New York State Canal Freight Terminal, click here and scroll to p. 22.

Palabora . . . she’s got LEGS!!!  Italian legs.  … Lei ha le gambe!   gambe that will stand astride that harbor and be noticed, cartwheeling on the shore as traffic goes in and out of the Kills, and

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the legs of Bartholdi’s lady will be forever modestly covered.  So why are they made in Pescara on the Adriatic, and not in an American steel mill?  When you break it down, some parts are from Canada, Holland, Germany . . . .  I have no problem with this fact, but I think it should be noted as such.

Thanks to New York Media Boat for the photo.

Here are previous iterations of this title.

 

 

Let’s start with Bjoern’s photos from a month ago just about already.  The New York Media Boat runs almost all year round and provides wet and cold weather gear.

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Actually I took this photo, intending it as a baseline photo for the process of preparing the barque to travel the Atlantic next spring, on the deck of a heavy lift ship. I took this photo near Caddell Dry Dock almost two weeks ago.

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A really gallivanting Larry Seney took the next few photos in Hawaii:  Namahoe,

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Mahi, and

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Hoku Loa.  More info on Hoku Loa can be located here.

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Thanks to Alex Weiss for this photo of Independence.

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Ted M sent this papa smurf aka Pleon photo taken in early August in New Bedford.  Now it’s over in the Arthur Kill.

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And the last photo comes from an East River jogger, Art Feinglass, who took this photo of Navigator passing the old Domino Sugar refinery, an architect’s playground.

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Thanks to Bjoern, Larry, Alex, Ted, and Art for these photos.

 

July 13 saw my first sighting of this intrepid anachronism, here juxtaposed with a 21st century realm of Logi.

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She was then probing the inland seas, seeing how far she could voyage, possibly looking for a passage to the Mississippi and the Gulf via Lake Michigan.  OK, indulge me on that speculation.

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Our paths next crossed on September 1, as she made her way through the Erie Canal,

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with all the modifications that entailed and the use of sunstones to

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avoid getting lost in the meandering rivers.

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And late last week, Bjoern Kils of the New York Media Boat got this fabulous shot of her scoping out the sixth boro before

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she slipped into a Manhattan cove for a spell.

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I missed the display in the Winter Garden and hope I can get there again before the boat moves on.

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Many thanks to Bjoern for use of that photo. For more of Bjoern’s photos, click here.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  And following up on some info from Conrad Milster, here’s a video on a Viking ship that traveled to Chicago in 1893.  Yes, 1893!!   And the crossing from Bergen NO to New Haven CT with Captain Magnus Andersen and 11 crew took 30 days.  Then the vessel, dubbed Viking, traveled up the Hudson and through the pre-Barge Canal on its way to Chicago with stops in Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, and Cleveland.  The vessel is still there in Geneva IL.  Here’s another video on the ship.

To pick up on the NY canals’ connection, as we approach the bicentennial of the start of the Erie Canal, it would be great to seek out and archive any photos–still languishing in local photo troves–of the 1893 passage there of Viking, as well as of any other outstanding vessels that have traversed the Canal throughout its history.

And since my focus these days is on chrononauts, there is this fleet that comes through the sixth boro every few years.  I caught up with them in Newburgh in 2012 and Oswego in 2014.

 

 

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