You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York Media Boat’ category.

Since it’s THE maiden voyage arrival, let’s follow her all the way to “all fast.”  Here were parts 1 and 2, which followed her from several miles out in the Ambrose Channel to the Narrows and then from there to mid-KVK.

0aacr1

Eric works the starboard and Ellen, the port.

0aacr2

 

0aacr3

The turn at Bergen Point is way more than 90 degrees . . . more like 135, and

0aacr4

takes well-timed thrusting at bow and stern.  Notice Atlantic Concert just above Eric‘s stern?

0aacr5

Atlantic Concert is completing its clockwise spin here to line up its stern ramp, a maneuver

0aacr6

 

0aacr7

that Atlantic Star will replicate.

0aacr8

 

0aacr9

 

0aacr10

Here Eric McAllister is beginning the push on the stern to assist with that clockwise spin;  Ellen and Atlantic Star‘s own three thrusters are also likely engaged.

0aacr11

Spin complete, Eric moves over to the port side to nudge Atlantic Star gently against the dock.  I wrote about the reverse maneuver here some years ago.

0aacr12

Getting a profile of these two CONROs lined up . . . is not easy, since they represent nearly a half mile of ship.

0aacr13

Foreshortening helps a little.

0aacr14

 

I’ll be watching for the remainder of the G4 vessels–Atlantic Sail, Atlantic Sea, Atlantic Sky, and Atlantic Sun.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, with thanks  to NY Media Boat.

Also many thanks to JS, a retired harbor worker who made this connection for me between Atlantic Container Line, their generation 2 vessels, and John A. Noble.  The image below comes from pages 210 –11 of Erin Urban’s Hulls and Hulks in the Tide of Time, a must-read for all students of the sixth boro work boats.   Noble called the 1977 print “The Cinderella Passes the Occidental,” and then writes his sense of this new container ship passing the hulk of 1874 full-rigged ship called the Occidental.  He also alludes to having drawn the Atlantic Cinderella when she was brand new, but I have yet to locate copies of those drawings.  Oh well.  Many thanks to JS, whose previous contribution you might have seen here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

John A. Noble’s “The Cinderella Passes the Occidental”

Let’s pick up from yesterday and follow Atlantic Star from the Narrows to the part of the KVK called the “salt pile.”  To the right off the stern of Atlantic Star, that’s lower Manhattan.

0aag1

Ellen McAllister swoops in to deliver the docking pilot.  The signature “G” on the stack points to Grimaldi Group, of which ACL is an associate. Grimali’s West Africa service is a regular in the sixth boro with such vessels as Grande Morocco.

0aag2

 

0aag3

Seen from head-on, the bow is knife edged, but in profile it’s plumb. Yes, that’s the Statue of Liberty in the distance.

0aag4

That’s Robbin Reef Light and WTC1 just off its right.  Atlantic Star and the other G4 vessels are operated by a crew of 16, compared with 21 for the G3 vessels like Atlantic Concert.

0aag5

 

0aag6

 

0aag7

 

0aag8

The cranes in the distance are at the MOTBY terminal.

0aag9

We’re now in the KVK with the salt pile to port and

0aag10

the Bayonne Bridge ahead, and Atlantic Concert being assisted beneath.

0aag11

Eric McAllister joins, and we’ll pick it up there tomorrow.

0aag12

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the NY Media Boat for conveyance.

Here was Atlantic Star approaching the Narrows on Saturday, still a half hour outside the Narrows.  She was launched at the Hudong-Zhonghua Shipyard almost a year ago, and this maiden cargo voyage began in Hamburg on December 9, 2015.    Note the FDNY escort boat just forward of her bow.

0aas1

 

That’s the Verrazano Narrows Bridge off her bow and a fog-beshrouded WTC off her stern.

0aas3

The generation 4 (G4)  Atlantic Star followed a G3 Atlantic Concert into port.   Here and here are views from different perspectives of other G3 ACL vessels, all dating from the mid-1980s.

0aas4

 

0aas5

 

0aas6

More photos of the arrival tomorrow.

For a comparison of the G3 and G4 vessels by the numbers, click here and here.  For more detail on the vessel, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, protected under creative commons license.  Also, conveyance would not have been possible without the NY Media Boat;  thanks Bjoern.

 

No, I haven’t left the sixth boro.  Just yesterday I crossed paths with Allie B here at Atlantic Salt, purveyor of a safety product and patron of the arts.

0aamt1

It took a gray day for me to notice that the house colors along the KVK are reminiscent of those in coastal Canadian maritimes towns.  Allie B has been one of my favorite tugboats since I saw her depart on her epic tow here and here back in 2009.

0aamt2

Then I passed Evelyn Cutler, here with Noelle Cutler at Caddell Drydock.  Those are basic Wavertree masts in the background.  I first saw Evelyn

0aamt5

in red.

0aamt6

Here’s a first good photo of Dylan Cooper, the Reinauer tug that arrived in the sixth boro later last year.

0aamt7

 

0aamt9

I hope to get another of her here in a few years when that bridge is completed.

0aamt8

I believe Eric is the newest of McAllister tugs in the sixth boro.  And yes, here Eric is using her 5000+ hp to assist Atlantic Star, ACL‘s brand spanking new CONRO vessel into port yesterday on her maiden voyage.  I hope to have a post dedicated to Atlantic Star completed for tomorrow.

0aamt4

Eric is a product of the same Rhode Island shipyard that produced Dylan Cooper.  In the distance that’s one of ACL’s previous generation of CONRO vessels, Atlantic Concert.  Here’s an entire post dedicated to Atlantic Concert from 2009.

0aamt3

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to NY Media boat. 

And yes, I still have more of Barrel’s vintage USACE photos to share.

 

November, port month on tugster, ends here, making this GHP&W 30.  Here’s how the month began.  One thing I learned putting together this post is that Port Richmond and Mariner’s Harbor appear not to share a border, at least according to the wikipedia map.  Between the western edge of Port Richmond and the eastern edge of Mariner’s (the west side of the Bayonne Bridge) is a neighborhood called Elm Park.  I’d never heard of it.  Also, look at the northeast tip of Port Richmond . . . it’s in the water only and includes the Caddell yard.  Furthermore, Port Richmond never seems like much of a port if you see it by road only.  Click here for photos of the land portion of Port Richmond.  Click on the map to make it interactive.

0aappr

A google satellite view shows the northernmost margin of land is port-intensive.  Click here for many vintage photos of Port Richmond, pre-Bayonne Bridge, back when Port Richmond was a major ferry/rail link.

portrichaerial

Although the late fall midday sun backlit these shots, let’s cruise the waterside of Port Richmond, starting at its northeastern point, where the Wavertree (1885) project is ongoing.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Delaware River & Bay Authority’s Delaware is undergoing some major repowering work. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Frying Pan . . . light of the night vessel from up at Pier 66 is having some work done.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In the belly of Frying Pan, where the engine and machinery used to be, a night club sometimes comes to life.    Click here for some renderings of the vessel by the elusive bowsprite.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Miss Liberty, built 1954, is nearly finished with this dry-docking.  Notice here she is high and dry?  Well, just 45 minutes later, she had been

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

splashed and was being towed to a wharf by Caddell’s own L. W. Caddell (1990).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Continuing to the west, it’s the yards of Reinauer and Moran. From l to r, here, it seems to be Meredith C. Reinauer (2003), Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), Reinauer Twins (2011), and Dace Reinauer (1968 but JUST repowered). . . and Joan Turecamo with (?) Brendan Turecamo.  The McAllister tug between the Reinauer ATBs . . . I’ll guess is Bruce A. Marjorie B. McAllister.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This photo, taken a half hour earlier and before Joan Turecamo (1980) tied up, shows Kimberly Turecamo (1980), the very new and beamy  J. R. T. Moran (2015), and Brendan (1975).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On the west side of the Moran yard, it’s Cable Queen (1952).  Click here for photos of this cable-layer at work through the years.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And for the last shot of Port Richmond–although this may be straying westward into Elm Park waters, it’s Metropolitan Marine Transportation’s newest Normandy.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All the photos today by Will Van Dorp.

So as I said at the beginning of this post, so ends the “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves” series.  However, precedent on this blog makes it really easy to do a Port Richmond 2, 3, 4 . . . . etc. post.  also, if any of you feel like contributing a set of photos from a port of gunk hole, no matter how large or obscure, I welcome it.  Besides, there’s always then possibility of doing an “upland” version of any port, focusing on land-based businesses serving the work vessels.

And as for December, let me reprint this idea for a December theme:

How about  antique/classic workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  ‘The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.’  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.”

Many thanks to all of you who sent along photos, contributed ideas, and commented in November.

Sorry if I confused a few of you with the acronym GHP&W.  You see how it expands above.  I suppose this is a sixth boro gunkhole of an upscale sort, and I’ll let you guess where at first.  And given the date today, my misleading clue is “turkey sailboat.”

I’ll use relative cardinal directions:  looking north,

0aajc1

west,

0aajc2

east,

0aajc3

back west,

0aajc4

looking southwest,

0aajc5

And five minutes later . . . looking west,

0aajc6

 

0aajc7

 

0aajc8

west,

0aajc9

and east.  That’s Brooklyn over on the far side.

0aajc10

And  . . . while staying in the channels, you could get to a Manhattan dock in less than 20 minutes from our initial photo.

0aajc11

Here’s a chart view and here’s

caveptlib

more context.  See the two green diamonds at lower left of this image?  The lower of the two is Teal Bulker, which you saw above.   The blue diamond down there is a NYWaterways boat, just 17 minutes from Pier 11.  And just north of the complex is a beach that might hint at what sixth boro coastlines once were. 

cppl17

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Oh, and that clue intended to distract, here it is, and it has nothing to do with Thanksgiving.

0aatsb

On a personal note, I’d like to thank all of you for reading tugster and contributing in so many ways.  To everyone that I’ve crossed paths with in the past year and the foregone 2950+ posts, thank you.

Happy Thanksgiving today and every day.  Life is precious and unpredictable.

 

Here was the welcome for 343.

Yesterday, Feehan arrived in the sixth boro.  I miscalculated and missed the event, but New York Media Boat was there for the jubilation.

1

 

2

 

20151012_NYMB_FDNY_Feehan-7490_1200

 

Many thanks to Bjoern Kils of the Media Boat for use of these photos.

You can call this “Capt. Log gone;  Chandra B arrived.”  Log out or log off . . . might work also.  Anyone know if Capt. Log, launched 1979 and retired at 0000 hrs on 1/1/15,  has sold and if so to whom?  Click here for a Professional Mariner article  on the vessel.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

taken September 2013

But the real story here is that a new appropriate-sized double-hulled tanker has taken her place in the sixth boro. Welcome Chandra B.

0aacb1

Here she fuels up

0aacb2

Positive Carry, a Feadship,  on the Upper Bay.

0aacb3

Many thanks to Bjoern of New York Media Boat for these photos.

Here was the first of this sad series.

The photo below–taken by Bjoern Kils of New York Media Boat–shows what a half year under the water does.

0aasb

 

Again, thanks to Bjoern for sharing this photo.

There’ve been plenty of people I’ve wanted to chance re-encounter, but it doesn’t always happen.  I’ve been to Southwest Harbor long ago, but I’ve never seen a Good Idea before.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I saw this WLB come into the harbor the other day and just assumed it was Katherine Walker, WLM-552.  But I was wrong.  Voila Elm, WLB-204, 50 feet longer than Walker, and  out of Atlantic Beach, NC, where I saw it a few years back.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Alice Oldendorff . . . I heard her crew talking with the Sandy Hook pilots the other day . . . .  I wish I knew how many voyages she has made into the sixth boro in the past decade!!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Blue Peter . . . I saw it a month ago in Narragansett Bay, but got close enough for a good photo only after they’d dropped sail.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Liberty II . . . our paths haven’t crossed in quite a while.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sea Lion . . . is a busy boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

New York Media Boat . . .  another busy boat in duplicate.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

No Wake . . . our paths have never crossed that I recollect, but I wonder whose she has.  She seems to have some age.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos taken in the past week or so . . .

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 841 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

February 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 841 other followers