You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York Media Boat’ category.

What happens if you build a pilot boat in Massachusetts to be used on the Great Lakes?  It needs to get to its place of use.

1

Thanks to the NY Media Boat, I got these photos this week as the Huron Spirit hurried through

2

the sixth boro.   North of the watery boro, I was invited to ride through the Erie Canal  before it closes on November 20.

3

Above is the wall above lock 16 and below, it’s the approach to lock 19, where you have to first duck under the triple-track rail bridge.

4

The photo below, taken at lock 21, was Wednesday afternoon.  By now, the newest Gladding Hearn pilot boat has exited the Canal and is making its way up the Great Lakes chain.

5

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wrote this story on the Lakes Pilots.

See the two big shoes on the Nadro Marine barge pushed by Margot?  You might also call them “pedestals” for the New York Wheel.  Those are size 110-ton shoes.  A little over a month ago, NY Media Boat caught the legs arriving, the legs which will wear these shoes.

nyw1

Here’s a close up with two crew getting prepared to offload these shoes.

nyw2

Chesapeake 1000–which you’ve seen working here and here–did the lift.  In the photo below taken just prior to the shoes’ arrival, Chesapeake 1000 is offloading the “multi-axle” furnished likely by Supor.  Sarah Ann assists with the swiveling of the large crane.

nyw3

Here’s a closeup of the multi-axle (there’s likely another name for that, but I don’t know it)

multiaxe

and the drone that someone is using to document the transfer of cargoes.

dronemultiax

 

Here Margot finesses the Nadro/McKeil SV/M 86 with the shoes to the lift point.

nyw4

Here’s another view of the same, looking east.

nyw5

 

nyw6

At this point, the barge is 110 tons lighter as the shoe is lifted and moved carefully onto the dock.

nyw8

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More shoes to come, although my Canadian cousins call them “boots.”

Click here for some details from SIlive.com.  And since it’s always good to see more Margot, click here.

I have many more Gmelin photos, but as an indication that I still inhabit the present-day sixth boro, I’ll show some sign of life for a few days.

For outatowners, Gowanus Creek (now Canal) is one of the most polluted waterways in the US, which is no secret to locals.  By the way, Gowanus rhymes with “you want us” with a silent “t.”

I took this photo this week just upstream of the 9th Street Bridge.  In fact, when a man swam down the Canal last year, he wore some serious hazmat protection, as the Media Boat shows here.

What I was not aware of is how much effort is going into addressing the accumulated pollution of more than a century.

gg1

This barge holds several excavators at work in the Fourth Street Turning Basin, one of the dead ends in the Canal.

gg2

As needed, the barge is moved by this small tug/pushboat that might be called 1337E.

gg3

Besides black goop that I might photograph next time, wood and other detritus is being plucked from the bottom.

gg4

Gowanus, there’s hope.  I’ll be back.

gg5

Click here and here for some posts I did when I last visited the Canal . . . in 2011 and 2013.

As to connections between the Gowanus area of Brooklyn and the Erie Canal, click here.  For a photo of the Gowanus Bay New York State Canal Freight Terminal, click here and scroll to p. 22.

Palabora . . . she’s got LEGS!!!  Italian legs.  … Lei ha le gambe!   gambe that will stand astride that harbor and be noticed, cartwheeling on the shore as traffic goes in and out of the Kills, and

bjoerns-pic

the legs of Bartholdi’s lady will be forever modestly covered.  So why are they made in Pescara on the Adriatic, and not in an American steel mill?  When you break it down, some parts are from Canada, Holland, Germany . . . .  I have no problem with this fact, but I think it should be noted as such.

Thanks to New York Media Boat for the photo.

Here are previous iterations of this title.

 

 

Let’s start with Bjoern’s photos from a month ago just about already.  The New York Media Boat runs almost all year round and provides wet and cold weather gear.

op4

 

op5

Actually I took this photo, intending it as a baseline photo for the process of preparing the barque to travel the Atlantic next spring, on the deck of a heavy lift ship. I took this photo near Caddell Dry Dock almost two weeks ago.

op6

A really gallivanting Larry Seney took the next few photos in Hawaii:  Namahoe,

op1

Mahi, and

op2

Hoku Loa.  More info on Hoku Loa can be located here.

op3

Thanks to Alex Weiss for this photo of Independence.

op99

Ted M sent this papa smurf aka Pleon photo taken in early August in New Bedford.  Now it’s over in the Arthur Kill.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And the last photo comes from an East River jogger, Art Feinglass, who took this photo of Navigator passing the old Domino Sugar refinery, an architect’s playground.

op8

 

Thanks to Bjoern, Larry, Alex, Ted, and Art for these photos.

 

July 13 saw my first sighting of this intrepid anachronism, here juxtaposed with a 21st century realm of Logi.

drk1

She was then probing the inland seas, seeing how far she could voyage, possibly looking for a passage to the Mississippi and the Gulf via Lake Michigan.  OK, indulge me on that speculation.

drk2

 

drk3

Our paths next crossed on September 1, as she made her way through the Erie Canal,

drk91a

with all the modifications that entailed and the use of sunstones to

drk91b

avoid getting lost in the meandering rivers.

drk91c

And late last week, Bjoern Kils of the New York Media Boat got this fabulous shot of her scoping out the sixth boro before

mb

she slipped into a Manhattan cove for a spell.

drk918a

 

I missed the display in the Winter Garden and hope I can get there again before the boat moves on.

draken

Many thanks to Bjoern for use of that photo. For more of Bjoern’s photos, click here.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  And following up on some info from Conrad Milster, here’s a video on a Viking ship that traveled to Chicago in 1893.  Yes, 1893!!   And the crossing from Bergen NO to New Haven CT with Captain Magnus Andersen and 11 crew took 30 days.  Then the vessel, dubbed Viking, traveled up the Hudson and through the pre-Barge Canal on its way to Chicago with stops in Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, and Cleveland.  The vessel is still there in Geneva IL.  Here’s another video on the ship.

To pick up on the NY canals’ connection, as we approach the bicentennial of the start of the Erie Canal, it would be great to seek out and archive any photos–still languishing in local photo troves–of the 1893 passage there of Viking, as well as of any other outstanding vessels that have traversed the Canal throughout its history.

And since my focus these days is on chrononauts, there is this fleet that comes through the sixth boro every few years.  I caught up with them in Newburgh in 2012 and Oswego in 2014.

 

 

Here were previous snapshots of sample small craft on the sixth boro, a city of water all summer and all other seasons as well.  Here one of the four-season RIBs of NY Media Boat passes along the western margins of Brooklyn, where a lot of folks congregate in the evening.

sc

Manhattan is one of Classic Harbor Line‘s vessel.

sc1

Crew launch Christian works all summer and all other seasons too.

sc2

Tara heads under the Brooklyn Bridge as light fades.

sc3

Fish appear to be active over where Kate used to chum with food scraps.

sc4

And this skipper seemed to enjoy pushing his craft against the currents in Hell Gate.

sc5

 

sc11

 

sc10

 

sc9

 

sc8

And there are so many other small craft in all parts of the sixth boro.   All these photos taken recently by Will Van Dorp.

For context, let’s look back here. And last year among some of the great photos shared by Harry Thompson, here (scroll) was a crowded harbor photo I really liked.

Last Saturday saw threatening weather; even so, lots of small boats and crowds braved the possibility of rain to see the races.

pb

Vigilance prevailed and I heard of no incidents.

pb1

And yes, I paid a lot of attention to the Bath Maine-built 1906 Mary E, but that’s because I haven’t seen her in 9 years . . . obviously I was looking in the wrong places.  Click here and scroll for a photo of Mary E in Greenport almost 9 years ago.

pb1b

Harvey was there.  Scroll here for one of my favorite photos of the 1931 Harvey, cutting through the pack at the 2013 tugboat race.

pb1c

The 1885 Pioneer was there. Click here for a sail I did on Pioneer a few years back.

pb1d

A raft of small boats clustered yet kept orderly.

pb2

The 1935 Enticer  . . . well, enticed, spectators as a platform.

pb3

as did a range of people movers. 

pb4

including the 1983 Arabella.

pb5

The captain of the heavyweight out there, the 2014 Eric McAllister, treaded lightly through the crowd.

pb6

Of course, out in the mist along the Jersey side there are more heavyweights, a Moran tug and its huge NCL gem.

hww

And as for my ride, Monday morning it was earning money going for a load of scrap.

mmm

Another tall old ship that might have been present–the 1928 Bivalve NJ-based A. J. Meerwald had other missions to perform.

All photos by will Van Dorp.  And for photos of some of the people on the boro who were working during the race, check out NYMediaBoat’s blog post.

 

 

Since it’s THE maiden voyage arrival, let’s follow her all the way to “all fast.”  Here were parts 1 and 2, which followed her from several miles out in the Ambrose Channel to the Narrows and then from there to mid-KVK.

0aacr1

Eric works the starboard and Ellen, the port.

0aacr2

 

0aacr3

The turn at Bergen Point is way more than 90 degrees . . . more like 135, and

0aacr4

takes well-timed thrusting at bow and stern.  Notice Atlantic Concert just above Eric‘s stern?

0aacr5

Atlantic Concert is completing its clockwise spin here to line up its stern ramp, a maneuver

0aacr6

 

0aacr7

that Atlantic Star will replicate.

0aacr8

 

0aacr9

 

0aacr10

Here Eric McAllister is beginning the push on the stern to assist with that clockwise spin;  Ellen and Atlantic Star‘s own three thrusters are also likely engaged.

0aacr11

Spin complete, Eric moves over to the port side to nudge Atlantic Star gently against the dock.  I wrote about the reverse maneuver here some years ago.

0aacr12

Getting a profile of these two CONROs lined up . . . is not easy, since they represent nearly a half mile of ship.

0aacr13

Foreshortening helps a little.

0aacr14

 

I’ll be watching for the remainder of the G4 vessels–Atlantic Sail, Atlantic Sea, Atlantic Sky, and Atlantic Sun.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, with thanks  to NY Media Boat.

Also many thanks to JS, a retired harbor worker who made this connection for me between Atlantic Container Line, their generation 2 vessels, and John A. Noble.  The image below comes from pages 210 –11 of Erin Urban’s Hulls and Hulks in the Tide of Time, a must-read for all students of the sixth boro work boats.   Noble called the 1977 print “The Cinderella Passes the Occidental,” and then writes his sense of this new container ship passing the hulk of 1874 full-rigged ship called the Occidental.  He also alludes to having drawn the Atlantic Cinderella when she was brand new, but I have yet to locate copies of those drawings.  Oh well.  Many thanks to JS, whose previous contribution you might have seen here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

John A. Noble’s “The Cinderella Passes the Occidental”

Let’s pick up from yesterday and follow Atlantic Star from the Narrows to the part of the KVK called the “salt pile.”  To the right off the stern of Atlantic Star, that’s lower Manhattan.

0aag1

Ellen McAllister swoops in to deliver the docking pilot.  The signature “G” on the stack points to Grimaldi Group, of which ACL is an associate. Grimali’s West Africa service is a regular in the sixth boro with such vessels as Grande Morocco.

0aag2

 

0aag3

Seen from head-on, the bow is knife edged, but in profile it’s plumb. Yes, that’s the Statue of Liberty in the distance.

0aag4

That’s Robbin Reef Light and WTC1 just off its right.  Atlantic Star and the other G4 vessels are operated by a crew of 16, compared with 21 for the G3 vessels like Atlantic Concert.

0aag5

 

0aag6

 

0aag7

 

0aag8

The cranes in the distance are at the MOTBY terminal.

0aag9

We’re now in the KVK with the salt pile to port and

0aag10

the Bayonne Bridge ahead, and Atlantic Concert being assisted beneath.

0aag11

Eric McAllister joins, and we’ll pick it up there tomorrow.

0aag12

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the NY Media Boat for conveyance.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,064 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

December 2016
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031