You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York Media Boat’ category.

This will be a photo-rich post, starting with bridge workers currently at the Brooklyn side VZ tower, aka the former Fort Lafayette.

You might remember Michele Jean;  Christina is the replacement vessel.

Most small craft in the sixth boro work all year round, in either construction, hydrographic surveys,

boom handling, launch service,

law enforcement,

and more.  Some fishing takes place all year round although winter fishing employs different craft.

 

Fishing machines as below . . .  only from about April to October.

Annunziata is a fishing boat I see a lot on AIS, but this is my first time to confirm boat with name under way.

New York Media Boat has some of their vessels working all year round, but here’s a catch, a NY Media Boat RIB in front of the Hudson Yards endless staircase called the Vessel, parts of which appeared on this blog during construction.

Then, the red boat below with kayak on roof, that’s a summertime only boat for up here.

And let’s close with the boom handlers;  tankers and oil barges are boomed during some of their harbor operations, as a precaution in case of spillage.  All year round these small craft do their boom wrangling.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Many thanks to Steve Munoz for these photos.  These were all taken on July 14, 1964, the first OpSail held in conjunction with the NY World’s Fair.  The “rendezvous of  11 ships from 9 nations” appeared on the front page of the NYTimes the next day.

What I attempt in this post is to match up the skyline in these vintage photos with today’s skyline.  With my limited resource of time, I found it not an easy undertaking.

Esmeralda, a 4-masted barkentine launched in 1954, sails north here, roughly between the Statue and the SW corner of the Battery.  Notice Pier A just below its bowsprit.  Excuse any misuse of sailing vessel rig terminology.   Prominent on the skyline to the left is the Woolworth Building, 792′, and slight to its right is the still standing Singer Building, 674′ and demolished in 1968.

Christian Radich, a Norwegian-built full-rigged ship launched in 1937 is in roughly the same location.  Woolworth appears just to the right of her foremast, and 40 Wall and 70 Pine are prominent near the right side of the photo.  Directly below 70 Pine are the Standard Oil Building (topped with black “oil pot”) and the green-roofed Hamilton Custom House.  Below and slightly to the left of 40 Wall is the Whitehall Building. I don’t know the prominent building near the left edge of the photo.

Below, the arrow to the left points to the Woolworth this week, and the one to the right point to 40 Wall and 70 Pine.

Ditto, with an additional arrow here pointing to the Custom House.

A few miles farther north, this is 3-masted barque Gorch Fock II sailing past the Empire State Building.  The barque was launched in 1958.   Correct me if I’m wrong here, but all those car floats just forward of the ship makes me think we’re looking at the West 27th Street Freight Yard (Pier 67).

This is roughly the same area today, as here we see from Pier 57 up to Hudson Yards, all south of what would be Pier 74.

A bit farther north, Indonesian barquentine Dewarutji, which also called here in Opsail 2012.

Except for the Empire State Building and the very tip of Chrysler, not much looks now as it did.

For these vintage photos, many thanks to Steve Munoz, who writes:  “all these photos were taken as slides by my father.”

Many more to come. All others in this post by Will Van Dorp, who has currently again gone on the road after having scheduled the next few posts.

Here’s more on the Opsail 1964/Worlds Fair event.

Unrelated but interesting from NYMedia boat . . . a vessel in the sixth boro whose specialty is retrieving and recycling obsolete undersea cables.

 

Quick  . ..  name the ship name the ONE vessel  . . .

The first three photos were taken Sunday by Bjoern of the New York Media Boat.

And if you know the tugs in the sixth boro you have a 75% chance of naming all tugs here too . . .   three of the four 6000 hp tugs by Moran.  I’m not first in pointing out how small the tugs look relative to the 1200′ ONE Stork.  I hope you guessed that right.  The tugs are JRT, James D, Jonathan, and then Margaret farther back.

While we’re on names . . .  Glenn Raymo caught this photo  upriver.

Dodo . . . First ONE Stork and then Dodo.

Over by Shooters Island the other day, I caught Amstel Stork, coming from Port Newark and headed upriver herself.

Jonathan and Miriam assist her around Bergen Point, but here’s my point:  two vessels named “stork” in the harbor the same week!!?  What going on?  And with Dutch as my first language, I read this as Ooievaar van Amsted . . . that big bird name being ooievaar in Dutch.

Recently, vessels with the following names have visited the sixth boro:   NYK Blue Jay    Southern Owl   Stena Penguin  …   See what I mean about a trend that has emerged?  A few years back I saw the Eagle fleet, eg in yesterday’s post, and separate from that . . . Asphalt Eagle.  A few years back I saw a Peacock.

Here are some I suppose I’ll never see:  Subsea Seven has some bird vessels, esp  in diving support.

Millennium Falcon….  oh wait, that might not have launched yet . . .   Magic Victoria was here recently, although my photo was too blurry to use here.  Surfer Rosa . . . that name of the many I’ve posted here will stick with me.   As of this morning, Surfer Rosa is westbound in the Med just outside Algerian waters.

Many thanks to Bjoern and Glenn for use of their photos.

 

It’s the first full day of spring, which means that soon many more small craft will operate on the sixth boro, yet all winter long, many small boats never leave.

If this is a Class A 25′ SAFE Defender boat, it may have entered service in 2002.   I’ll be back with this.

Here are a team of the newer 29′ USCG vessels.

Line and boom boats, patrol boats . . . these small craft operate in the sixth boro all year round.

Ditto survey boats like this one.

Over alongside Rhea‘s stern, that’s certainly a launch from Miller’s.

I’m guessing these are 31′ SAFE boats operated by NYPD, but they’ve been running in threes of late.  They also have larger Vigor (ex-Kvichak)-built boats.

NJ State Police has a few small boats that patrol/train all year round.

NYPD has had a few of these for almost five years now.  When they first arrived, I was astonished by the speed they could make.

USACE Moritz first launched in 2001.

 

So let’s go back to that 25′ Defender in the first photo, but at closer inspection . . . see the logo on the door . . . it’s a DonJon RIB.

USCG checking me out with a long lens? . . . Nah, that’s Bjoern of New York Media Boat.  Check out their blog here, and book a tour here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s again reminded that you’ll see something new each time you go down to the water and look closely.  And in the next few months, in all waters recently ice-bound, be ready to see an influx of recreational boats coming north for the summer.

 

Sorry about the washout colors below;  what happened was the dawn light was intermittently too bright or dull, as winds washed clouds across the sky.

Nevertheless, I headed out because I saw a Spliethoff vessel in the offing, heading into the sixth boro. Painted a unique copper brown, Spliethoff vessels all have names ending in -gracht, or “canal” in Dutch. Saimaa is a lake in Finland. since they carry unique cargoes, I wondered what Saimaagracht would be carrying.  I’ll direct your eyes, but won’t tell you until the end of this post.  Some of you maybe have guessed from the photo below.

Vertical beams connected to high-up horizontal one, cabins, and wheels.

Closeup of cabins on 182 and 170.  Ladders and landing.

Some of them are differently loaded, cabins positioned on the starboard side of the vessel.

Side view of Saimaagracht, showing escort Moran 6000 and all the machines.  Who knows what’s in tweendecks–if anything–and holds.

Slightly different angle of cabins, and

cabins in their full context.

Just guessing here, these machines are 25′ to 30′ high, with a spread of just under 9′ or 10′.  That actually a clue.

See the scudding clouds.  I’m now curious about something else . . . the structure on the starboard side of the superstructure and connected by horizontal ducting.  I didn’t zoom in on that in the moment.

 

My verdict is . . . they are a set of new Boxrunner straddle carriers, aka straddlers, by Kone Crane.  The ship was arriving from Finland, so the manufacturing may have been done there.  A next generation will be automated, just like self-driving cars, trucks, tractors, and ships.

And my conjecture is that starboard side stern structure is part of a sulphur oxide  (Sox) scrubber plant.

All photos yesterday by Will Van Dorp.  For previous photos of –gracht vessels, click here.  I was unable to find a photo of  Spliethoff vessel from the 1920s, when they began, but here I learned  BigLift–with their Happy vessels– is one of their subsidiaries.  Spliethoff was involved in a pilot container project between Europe and Cleveland a few years ago.

Unrelated:  read this and listen to the audio . . . NY Media Boat takes journalists to the islands off the VZ Bridge.

More Great Race tomorrow.

Let’s finish up  Whatzit 38, which started here with a plain white canvas.  Below is a photo I took during the tugboat race in September 2015 of John J. Harvey, an FDNY fireboat in commission between 1931 and 1995.

And here’s one I took in April 2010, making an up-to 18,000 gpm water display to welcome the 343 into the sixth boro. Pumping water, which makes these designs in the sky,  is the whole point of a fireboat.   So . . .

check out her summer 2018 look.

This is a thorough

 

thorough dazzle paint job, white spray all over the boat, including the decks.

 

 

From this angle below, she  really looks like a WW1 Norman Wilkinson production.

I can’t wait to see her in glass calm water . . .  to enjoy the reflections.

I believe this is the current John J. Harvey website.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Remember tug Hackensack about ten years ago?  I’ve read some negative opining about the paint job on FB . . . here’s the concept.

 

After 66 days at sea, Zhen Hua 20 dropped anchor in Gravesend Bay yesterday after a few hours after I departed.  But thanks to Bjoern of New York Media Boat, this phase of the visit has been documented.

Given the ubiquity of containers, there’s a worldwide demand for the cranes;  according to their website, 70% of this style crane worldwide is produced by ZPMC.   As the container ships get larger, a need for cranes with greater boom reach is created.  ZPMC Netherlands has a fleet currently of 22 ships to idle these seemingly impossible loads.   Since 2012, ZPMC has successfully completed “1070 voyages to 180 ports in 80 countries.”

Note the Miller’s Launch crew boat off starboard bow.

Booms must be lowered before the delivery will fit under the Bayonne Bridge on the transit to Port Elizabeth . . .  alter this week.

 

Many thanks to Bjoern for use of these photos.  For more info on New York Media Boat–actually there are several vessels–check them out online or see and “like” them on FB.

Here was a Zhen Hua vessel in port back in 2007–the first I ever saw–from 2008 here, and from 2014 . .  herehere, and here.

Marginally related:  One would not need these cranes at one point in the Comoros;  this practice I’ve read has ended.

 

The little-used adjective fleet is appropriate here.   And when something goes amiss in the diverse workplaces of the sixth boro, it’s great to have the fleetest responders there are. The amusement park on the beach in the background identifies the location as Coney Island.  In fact, the responders towed the vessel out to deeper water while dewatering.  No passengers were on board at the time of the emergency, water ingress portside engine room.  All’s well that end’s well.

MV Zelinsky worked in San Francisco waters from at least 2007 until last summer. I’m guessing it arrived in the harbor aboard a ship . . .

Many thanks to New York Media Boat for photo and information. And hat’s off to the responders from USCG, FDNY, and NYPD.

Here are previous fleetest posts.

 

What happens if you build a pilot boat in Massachusetts to be used on the Great Lakes?  It needs to get to its place of use.

1

Thanks to the NY Media Boat, I got these photos this week as the Huron Spirit hurried through

2

the sixth boro.   North of the watery boro, I was invited to ride through the Erie Canal  before it closes on November 20.

3

Above is the wall above lock 16 and below, it’s the approach to lock 19, where you have to first duck under the triple-track rail bridge.

4

The photo below, taken at lock 21, was Wednesday afternoon.  By now, the newest Gladding Hearn pilot boat has exited the Canal and is making its way up the Great Lakes chain.

5

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wrote this story on the Lakes Pilots.

See the two big shoes on the Nadro Marine barge pushed by Margot?  You might also call them “pedestals” for the New York Wheel.  Those are size 110-ton shoes.  A little over a month ago, NY Media Boat caught the legs arriving, the legs which will wear these shoes.

nyw1

Here’s a close up with two crew getting prepared to offload these shoes.

nyw2

Chesapeake 1000–which you’ve seen working here and here–did the lift.  In the photo below taken just prior to the shoes’ arrival, Chesapeake 1000 is offloading the “multi-axle” furnished likely by Supor.  Sarah Ann assists with the swiveling of the large crane.

nyw3

Here’s a closeup of the multi-axle (there’s likely another name for that, but I don’t know it)

multiaxe

and the drone that someone is using to document the transfer of cargoes.

dronemultiax

 

Here Margot finesses the Nadro/McKeil SV/M 86 with the shoes to the lift point.

nyw4

Here’s another view of the same, looking east.

nyw5

 

nyw6

At this point, the barge is 110 tons lighter as the shoe is lifted and moved carefully onto the dock.

nyw8

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More shoes to come, although my Canadian cousins call them “boots.”

Click here for some details from SIlive.com.  And since it’s always good to see more Margot, click here.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,305 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

September 2019
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30