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Thanks to Bjoern of New York Media Boat, it’s  . . .  LCU 1657.  This was last week, March 2022

At first glance I thought it was a landing craft with a large add-on wheelhouse.  Later I noticed the landing craft was being pushed by a small tugboat named Pierson.  I’m not familiar with this unit.  LCU 1657 was built by Defoe Shipbuilding in Bay City MI in the early 1970s.

George Schneider sent me these photos from July 2021 in San Diego of a very similar if not identical vessel.  He writes “LCU 1648 was built in 1955 by Marinette Marine in Wisconsin.  She is not a commissioned warship, and is considered a ‘boat’ in the Navy hierarchy.”

From August 2021, here’s something unusual.  George writes “the remote-controlled prototype Sea Hawk passed us to the South.  I was still on the bow [of my vessel], and although she was up-sun, I still got some good, clear shots of her.  Then, just to be a nuisance, I called our bridge and asked if they could get the Sea Hawk to turn around and pass down our starboard side for better lighting.  The Captain didn’t dignify my call with an answer, but the Navy must have heard me, because that’s exactly what she did.  So I got excellent underway shots of her, plus

 

I got a shot of her boat number, which is slightly different than we thought.” 

Since the sixth boro is not usual Navy waters except during Fleet Week, we don’t get such exotic vessels here. 

We do see a lot of Vane Brothers vessels in the sixth boro and throughout the East Coast, but in August 2021, Delaware was in  . . . LA!  She’s currently working in Oakland CA.

Many thanks to Bjoern and George for use of these photos.

It’s back, and with reconstruction complete, training can begin.  To see how the new pilot boat got to this point, see updates here from May and August 2020.  For a glimpse of the 1972 vessel this one replaces, click here.   The 1972 pilot boat measures 155′ x 28′;  this rebuilt 1993 OSRV measures 210′ x 46,’ so this is a massively larger boat.

For today’s post, enjoy these spectacular shots Bjoern of New York Media Boat got as she transited a rainy sixth boro yesterday evening.

Many thanks to Bjoern for permission to share these photos.

Meanwhile, keep your eyes turned toward the harbor and you may catch the new No. 1 with the old.

 

Ambrose Channel late morning yesterday

saw the arrival of this vessel, 321′ x 41′ and with that pennant flying from the masthead at 157′.

Launched in 1914 in Bremerhaven, and having changed national registry many times,

Statsraad Lehmkuhl is on its One Ocean Expedition, having left Norway in August.

New York is one of 36 stops it will make on a 55,000 nm circumnavigation worldwide.  Hop aboard via their FB page here.

 

By noon yesterday

she had anchored, basking in sunshine

just off the Statue.

All photos, WVD, with conveyance thanks to New York Media Boat.

The three-masted barque visited the sixth boro back in 1964, and maybe since then as well.

More photos and inside information can be found here.

More info about its multiple changes in ownership since 1914, here.

For other posts about visiting tall ships, click here.

 

ACV Enviro provides boom service at IMTT;  this means they use a small boat to deploy and retrieve oil containment precautionary booms around vessels  transferring petroleum products there.  Here and here are examples appearing here previously. I don’t know how long booming has been required– years, I suppose;  it’s not new.

Miss Beth, however, is a new boat.  At least, this is my first time to see her.  My question is . . . what was her previous life?  She looks military.

 

The photo quality below is not the best, but I hope you find it as interesting as I do:  Left to right, most prominently that’s Martin Explorer and Douglas J., whose livery says Donjon and whose lines are unmistakably those of the former Mediterranean Sea.  Before that, she was Donald CInterestingly, I believe I see the stack of Lilac there too, just forward and above the stack of Douglas J.

Also, this is not a great photo of Annie Moore, a relatively new hull in the boro, given that this Bristol Harbor Group-designed (Or was it designed by TAI Engineers??) workboat was delivered at most a half year ago to work the Statue of Liberty for the National Park Service.   This is my first sighting for this boat. Her namesake is a 17-year-old Irish immigrant, the first person to pass through Ellis Island in early 1892 from steamer Nevada. Click here for more of the Annie Moore immigrant story.

Many thanks to Tony A for catching the Douglas J photo;  all others, WVD.

 

I’ve been meaning to ask about this lumber on the piers at Red Hook container terminal.  Not quite a year ago an unusual looking vessel called Mozu Arrow deposited these bundles of lumberHere‘s another shot showing all the bundles.  All through the stories of lumber being outrageously expensive,  this lumber stayed here.  In some places, the coverings have ripped off leaving the wood exposed to the weather, wasting away.  Can anyone tell me the story of this lumber and why it hasn’t moved in 11 months.  As of this writing, the lumber carrier is traveling between South Korea and British Columbia, light maybe, having deposited lumber on piers in Busan perhaps?  On second thought, would this vessel travel sans cargo across the Pacific?  What cargo might it be carrying to Canada?

Brendan Turecamo is a regular on this blog;  behold about nine feet of the boat you never see when she’s working.

Here’s a limitation of gantry cranes;  if you have a container ship loaded higher than the cranes can accommodate, getting a last box in place means lifting to the height and then sliding it in aft to fore.  Understand what’s happening here?  The box was lifted farther “back” than the empty slot, and now the crane operator is sliding it in laterally, toward the right in this photo.  Is this a common occurrence on these “tall ships,” to give a new meaning to the phrase?

Do you remember “you go girl” graffiti on a ferry just west of the Bayonne Bridge?  Well, clearly it has shifted over toward the Bayonne, New Jersey, side and is showing a different and more corroded side.  I wonder where she goes next.

From this angle, there appears to be quite a few Reinauer tugs in their yard.  While we’re playing an Andy Rooney and asking questions about everything, has anyone learned more about the WindServe Marine toehold within the Reinauer real estate here?  Isn’t it hard to believe that Andy Rooney has been gone for almost a decade now?

Getting back to the warehouse sheds in Red Hook, is it possible this very experienced tow truck is there to prosecute any violators who choose to trespass and/or dock?  I saw a more intimidating sign and sight in Belfast ME some years ago in the second photo here.

To show location of these signs and the antique tow truck, note it in the wider view photo below.

Shall we leave it here?    I suppose.  All photos, WVD, with conveyance from the New York Media Boat.

 

Enjoy this set of photos, taken on a random path across the harbor with the NY Media Boat.  More Gene Chaser soon. 

Ruby M above is the oldster of the set, launched in 1967.  She’s 95′ loa and turns out just under 2000 hp.  Below, Colonel dates from 1978, turns out 3000 hp and is the longest in the set . . . at just about 107′.

 

Sea Lion was launched in 1980, is 65′ loa and powered by 1400 horses.  Below, Margaret Moran (I believe) has been in the sixth boro long before I called it that;  she arrived in 1979 bringing 3000 hp and a loa of just a foot under 100′.

Julie Ann has arrived in the harbor the most recently of this set, just a couple months ago.  She was launched in 2006 and brings 4200 hp packed into 75′.

And finally, Ava M. McAllister is likely the first boat to carry that name.  She was christened in 2018.  She’s a 100′ boat with 6770 hp.

Thanks for Bjoern at NY Media Boat for a tour of the boro.  All photos, WVD.

It’s hard to believe, but I’ve not been to the Great North River Tugboat Race since 2014, but in normal times, September 5 would see the next race.  But we’ve dispensed with the “normal times” concept for the time being.

In selecting the batch for this post, I wanted splash, froth, bubbles, and the effervescence the river can react with when tons of steel and thousands of horsepower push through the ever changing water.   The next two photos are from that 2014 race. 

It was overcast during the race, but an hour or so later, when pushing contests were happening and

the wakes flattened out and we sized up USAV MGen. Anthony Wayne, patches of blue appeared.  I should leave you in suspense about how this push went.  Let me put it this way;  they left town not long after the push-off.

2013 was an equally overcast day, and again, not to identify every tugboat in that lineup, it appears that W. O. Decker has either jumped the gun or activated its jet drive and will soon rise up out of the Hudson on her hydrofoil assists. I’d guess the latter.

See what I told you . . . Decker has gone so far ahead that it’s already over the horizon.

Second lap maybe for Decker?

It’s starting to appear that in 2012, as in ’13 and ’14, it was overcast.

It was great to see Buchanan 12, usually burdened with a half dozen stone barges, disencumbered and frothing up the river.  That’s the 1907 Pegasus back there too.

In 2011, I was able to get a photo of the racing craft along with sky spray by one of the fireboats present, likely 343.  What’s remarkable comparing the photo above with the one below is the color of the water;  hurricane Irene had dropped a lot of rain upstate and all the tributaries sent that into the Hudson with tribute in the form of silt.

Quantico Creek and Maurania III did an excellent job of stirring up the water.

But again, it was overcast and hazy over silty water.

However, in 2010, we had blue skies that really accentuated the DonJon boats like Cheyenne and

the harbor colossus, Atlantic Salvor.

In 2009, there were wispy clouds, allowing the “queen of the day” to be Ellen McAllister. But look who else showed up!!!!

Urger.   Urger would EASILY have won the race, but she was doing what she does best . . .  urging all the other boats and crews to be fleeter than she, holding herself back, allowed herself to be that day.

All photos and commentary, WVD. See you at the races in 2022.

 

 

I’d planned something else for today, but then I saw the tree!  See it on the bow of Pilot No 2 New Jersey?  And that reminded me it was Three Kings day, Epiphany.

 

The colors are always best when wind chills are biting.   Pilot No 2 and the smaller boat, America, went out as it were in a procession.

America stayed out over the horizon, but New Jersey returned, tree intact.

This reminded me also of photos I’d taken from New York Media Boat and had intended to use for my Christmas post.  From its station out at the sea end  of Ambrose Channel, the VZ Bridge is clearly seen.

 

Coming from sea, this is first glimpse of the port, two states and all six boros.

Safe year to all.

All photos, WVD.  Thanks to New York Media Boat.

Six years ago, I posted this for Three Kings.  And the tree makes this a great complementary bookend for this season.

With the end of the year coming, it’s strangely difficult to put these posts together.  I’ve chased down several ideas the past few days, and abandoned them.   All these photos were taken in recent days, except one about a month ago.  They strike me as showing the different skies and waters of the unacknowledged boro. 

So, photos . . . like this of Christine M. McAllister, 125.5′ x 38′ and 6000 hp.  She’s returning to town after a rough encounter on Christmas day . . . .  Maybe someone else can tell the story of SS Denebola (T-AKR 289) first hand.  It’s been a while that Christine M. has appeared on this blog.

Soon to be ex-Eastern Dawn, 52′ x 22 and 1200 hp,  crosses the Upper Bay looking all resplendent in the new paint job.

Two Bouchard tugs are stacked up on the far side of Cape Henry, 109′ x 36′ and 5000 hp,  and her DBL 103, 102,000 barrel capacity barge. 

Dylan Cooper, 112′ x 35′ and 4720 hp, waits in the anchorage with RTC 108, around 108,000 barrels.

Genesis Vigilant, 98.5 x 34 and 3000 hp, also at anchor with GM 6508,  80,000 barrels capacity.

And finally . . .  misclassified on purpose, notice several things this windy morning  on the starboard side of OceanXplorer:  a tender, a helicopter, and areas marked ROV and CTD.  ROV I knew, but CTD I had to look up.  Check out this blog post by New York Media Boat.

All photos and any errors of fact or interpretation, WVD, who wishes you all a happy new year, or as my parents would say . . . gelukkig nieuwjaar.

Behold OceanXplorer.  I missed them in a search because I was looking for an Ocean Explorer.  Of the many exotics that have called in the sixth boro in recent years, this one stands out.

She started life as Volstad Surveyor in 2010, a much more spartan-looking workboat, launched at Construcciones Navales Paulino Freire, Spain.  Since then she’s seen major modification inside and out by OceanX, in partnership with BBC’s Blue Planet and James Cameron, who “sailed” to the bottom of the Mariana Trench in 2012.

OceanX is the project of a Queens native named Ray Dalio, in town for a few days. 

Media was invited but somehow tugster was omitted from the guest list . . . at least so far.

Look at this and then see

this labeled diagram from here.  If you do FB, here‘s a story from Good Morning America of the previous boat in operation in mid-2019.

A comparison with Jacques Cousteau has been made;  Calypso was also a made-over workboat, and big money was involved there too.  In the photo below, note the person on the dock off the stern line of the vessel?

All photos, WVD.  Calypso is currently still in rebuild in Turkey, SE of Istanbul.

Several other projects come to mind:  Lone Ranger and Ocearch. If I’ve never posted my Ocearch story, here it is.

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