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I’m surprised I’ve not used this title in almost a year, since the thought often comes my way that some very busy waterways exist in the sixth boro.  Like below with the four Moran tugs and one tanker.  Since three are headed to the left, you might be wondering why.  Easy . . .  those three–JRT, Kimberly, Margaret— are assisting an incoming ship, the single tug, Jonathan C,  in the foreground heading to the right will soon assist another ship coming in.  Polar Cod–a great name–is transferring petroleum product.

Here’s that incoming ship, exciting the birds as the ship and maybe stirring up the menhaden and their predators below.  We’ll get back to this.

Here’s a closer up of that fish/bird stirring ship, a torrent called Torrente.   Portside the ship is Mary Turecamo, and starboard, it’s the Belford-based Osprey

And here’s the most dense photo, eight tugboats from four different companies, two loaded container ships, and one tanker, all in less than two miles of waterway.

Getting back to all those birds and fish in the Con Hook Range . . .  a lot of people in small boats are putting their baited hooks in the water there.

Unrelated:  An unconfirmed report with this photo below says the 1912 Argo sank in Long Island Sound off Wading River NY on November 1.  Can anyone confirm that this happened?  I looked for a report but couldn’t find one anywhere.  To see a photo I took of it underway in the sixth boro just over 10 years ago, click here. And here, taken in June 2011.

The photo below was posted by Steve Adkins and said to be taken by USCG responding to the distress.

All photos except the last one, WVD.

Happy 31st, aka Halloween, World Savings Day, Day of Seven Billion, National Candy Apple Day, Annual visit a cemetery or graveyard day . . . and more.  If you need suggestions for a graveyard, consider this one.  And just yesterday, I learned of this one and this one.  Who knew?!!?  Want to revisit a tugster ghost post?

For this post, there’s a quiz.  The first part is … name the oldest and newest boat here.  The second part … identify the only two boats here NOT built in Louisiana.  Of course, building is one thing, and designing is another.

All photos taken this October.  Susan Miller,

Miriam Moran and Pegasus,

Andrea,

Gregg McAllister,

Robert IV,

Buchanan 12,

Navigator,

Robert Burton,

Shawn Miller,

Pearl Coast,

Miss Ila,

Mary Turecamo,

and the always seasonal Kimberly Turecamo.

There you have it . . . And I’ll give the answers tomorrow.

And my question is . . .  who is Miss Ila‘s namesake and what do you call that shade of red?

Name that tug?  She’s 91.5′ x 26.8′ and used to be called Traveller.  Answer follows.

Part of a defacto ghost fleet around the sixth boro, it’s J. George Betz, and mostly invisible beyond, Rhea I. Bouchard. J. George is longer, stronger, and newer.

Also in the dry dock a week or so back, it’s Emily Ann.  My favorite story of this tug dates from a time she was called Cabo Rojo.

Lincoln Sea  was featured in my second ever tugster post, back in November 2006.   In the background, that looks to be Mount St. Elias

I usually see Captain D alongside a DUP barge, but behold, in good light, she’s light.   That’s my acronym, DUP.

Ditto . . .  Robert Burton.

Ruth M. Reinauer was just a year old when it appeared here in 2009.  Ruth is 112.9′ x 35′.

Ellen McAllister . . . what more can I add to what I’ve written already about this former USN YTB.   I know three of her dozen or so siblings, ex-USN YTBs, include Robert E.Timothy, and Stacy.

Miriam and Doris Moran follow along a ship, ready to put their force where needed when needed.

More fleetmates to Captain D and Robert Burton above, it’s Paula Atwell and Pathfinder . . . all unusually light.

And finally . . . that tug in the top photo . .  it’s Marie J. Turecamo.

All photos, WVD.

Let’s do 2013 and 2014, or redo them, same conditions as I stated yesterday. But first let’s look at the 2013 crowd, packing in like you wouldn’t with covid.  Here was the crowd at 1010 and

by 1035 they had grown significantly.

The compulsory muster takes place, irrigated by fireboat John J. Harvey.

Once the race begins, a front-runner like Decker

might soon get left in the wake.

The fire boat slices up from behind and

propels itself between two Miller boats.

Pushoffs happen next, sometimes quite equally matched like here, with 3900 hp countering 4200.

Let’s jump ahead to 2014, with the arrivals on the watery carpet,

the processing to the starting line,

and get straight to racing without all the preening and posturing.

Someone seems a bit oversize in that gray livery.

This is a fairly mis-matched pair:  Wayne at 5100 hp, and Ellen at 4000.  Maybe a re-match is in order Wayne v. Ava.

Thanks to Jeff Anzevino for this shot, the Media Boat has military background in common with Wayne.

After Wayne has strutted its stuff in the push-offs, some of the boats lined up for the roping the bollard.

Let’s hold it up here.  All photos, WVD.

 

I’m always on the look out for new tugboats in the harbor, and Camie mostly fits that bill.  A bit of research, though, finds she’s been on the blog a few times already, however.

Here, l to r, it’s Polar Bright, Ava, New York, and Stephen B.

Robert Burton here is tending a rock scow in front of the very busy Bayonne background.

James Brown moves some scrap barges . . . likely in the direction of the East River.

Weddell Sea stands by with Penn No. 90, demonstrating all the components of “push gear.”

Maybe someone can clarify here, but it appears No. 90 has cargo heating gear.

 

Helen Laraway moves a scow toward a morning.

And Fort Schuyler heads straight for us–I’m zoomed in–away from a marine/industrial Brooklyn background.

For the last day of November 2019, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally, click here for Paul Strubeck’s Vintage Diesel Design blog post on tugboat Luna in Boston.  It expands a post I did on Luna here almost four years ago.

 

Back in the sixth boro . . . it’s a head-on shot of Thomas J. Brown, with multiple icons of the harbor behind her.

Mister T pushes some loaded barges out east beneath the 59th Street Bridge in the photo below,

and tows twice as many empties westbound in the next photo.

Mary Turecamo shifts deck cargo barge New York from Red Hook over toward the other container ports of NYC/NJ, keeping a good number of trucks off the roads and bridges.

Meredith C. Reinauer moves RTC 150 out in the direction of the Sound.

Philadelphia pushes fuel barge Double Skin 503 into the Kills, over to where Ellen McAllister assists Genesis Liberty out of her IMTT berth.

Then Genesis Liberty moves GM 11105 around and outbound.

Robert Burton, usually pushing compacted garbage barges, the other day was doing

rock scow duty.

And rounding out this post, Ava M. McAllister, still in her first half year of working in the sixth boro, heads out to escort in a vessel just in from sea.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

I love the morning, and I’ve never gotten a better photo of Tasman Sea.  She’s a product of Main Iron Works, class of 1976.

Kirby Moran heads out on a job.   There’s no angle from which these Washburn & Doughty 6000s look anything but stunning.

Ernest Campbell, from Southern Shipbuilding’s class of 1969, comes by to pick up a barge.

James E. Brown, a recent product of Rodriguez Shipbuilding, leaves the dock and heads to the railroad, rail float that is. Daisy Mae came out of the same yard two years later.

As Robert Burton makes her run with a less than loaded barge, I hope commuters appreciate that this stuff is not traveling by road.

Lucy Reinauer is a powerful local 1973 product;  she came out of Jakobson Shipyard in Oyster Bay.

I’m planning a post on nothing but Brown boats, but I put Thomas J. in here because she’s bathed in that same rich morning light.   She’s a 1962 product of Gladding Hearn and is rated at 1000 hp, same as James E.

Elizabeth McAllister has a dramatic and rich history, which you can read here.  To summarize, in May 1988 as Elizabeth Moran, she was t-boned in the fog in Lower New York Bay.

And finally, two of Brewster Marine‘s workhorses . . .  Helen Parker (2005) and Ava Jude (2013).  In the distance is Neptune, built 1992 and sailing for Dann Ocean since 1996.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

What?!@#!!  See the end of this post.

 

For the past few years now, NYC municipal trash has traveled by barge and train to landfills in several states.  Captain D here is pushing this barge with containerized trash from a transfer point in Queens to a rail loading facility in Staten Island. Click here for animated explanation of trash movement overseen by DSNY.

As I understand it, the green containers are covered by a Waste Management contract, whereas the black ones, the older slightly contract, by Covanta.

One constant in the harbor has long been the Staten Island ferry; the new “constant” is these trash containers.

 

 

As a resident of NYC now for almost two decades, I have to say that for all the population density and numbers, NYC’s five terrestrial boros are relatively “tidy.”

You just can’t do what we did in my youth . . . set up a burn barrel at the hedgerow end of the farthest field and stoke it once a week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got photos of the new DSNY container cranes moving to the SW Brooklyn transfer station here.

And the first photo was taken from the mouth of the Bronx River, where the trash barge lined up with the Arthur Ash Stadium with a LaGuardia runway in between. Captain D was coming out of Flushing Bay.

Here  are the two previous posts by this title, and more.

Juxtaposed boats invite comparison, allow perception of subtle difference, here between Marion and Doris.

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It also gives a sense of the random traffic patterns, here about to pass the impatient Peking are (l to r) Michael Miller, Charles Burton, and way in the distance Robert E. McAllister.

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Here , a few seconds later, Charles Burton‘s barge CVA-601 is about to obscure Chandra B–on a ship assist?– and Miriam Moran.

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Here, from l to r, it’s Sapphire Coast, Charles Burton, Evening Mist, Ellen S. Bouchard, Robert E. McAllister, Scott Turecamo, and Erin McAllister.   cg2

And a quarter hour later and from a different vantage point, it’s Stena Companion, Cielo di Milano, a Miller launch, Maersk Phoenix, and NCS Beijing.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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