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Blessings of summer heat, if you don’t have to work out in it, are best relished right after dawn, or from the shade.  I chose the first option here as Barney Turecamo, made up to Georgia,

gets an assist in rotating from Turecamo Girls.

Once pointed, a burst of power from its 5100hp EMDs commits the ATB to its course.

Foxy3, with its bright trim ribbons gleaming in the dawn, is off to the job.

Doubleskin 57 arrives from somewhere in the Kills and Elk River

waits to assist Wye River

 

in placing it alongside the dock gently.

Marjorie B is off to some work, followed by and Poling & Cutler and Vane units.

The P & C unit was Kristin Poling pushing Eva Leigh Cutler.

On another day, Mister T was arriving from outside the Narrows

just as the sun cleared Bay Ridge.

And yet another day and different place, Curtis Reinauer waited alongside RTC 82 during cargo transfer.

 

All photos, WVD.

Sorry, folks.  I hit the “post” rather than the “save” button once again.  Well, enjoy the photos.  I’m going to take some time off.

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All photos, WVD, who has thousands more.

Now that I’m at installment 291 of this series, I’m rethinking the adjective random.  Check out these meanings old and new here. But “random” it is until I come up with a better word.  I’d rejected the descriptor “miscellaneous” when I first started.  How about one from this list:  some, select, chance, serendipitous, entropic, stochastic . . ..

Enjoy this novel juxtaposition, Coney Island Light and Denise A., with her barge.  Denise A. is from 2014, a 4000hp tug with dimensions of 112′ x 35′ x 17′.

Marjorie B McAllister waits in the offing.  You might not guess that she’s worked since 1974 with her 4000hp and 112′ x 30′ hull.

Franklin Reinauer pirouettes her 81′ x 28′ hull right in front of me, the 1984 tug propelled by 2600 hp.

Capt. Brian A heads out for yet another job.

Meanwhile, Linda Lee Bouchard and two of her sisters, Ellen and Evening Star, bide their time at old Home Port. Linda Lee is from 2006, her 125′ x 38′ hull powered by 6140hp.  The sisters are 1982 104′ x 35′ and 3900hp and 2012 112′ x 35′ and 4000hp, respectively.

B. Franklin has been hard at work since 2012, measuring in at 112′ x 33′ and powered by 4000hp.

Robert IV came off the ways in 1975, and sometimes her  56′ x 22′ and  1050hp is just right.

More shots of Linda Lee

and Capt. Brian A.

and Evening Star.

And to conclude, hat tip to Stephen Reinauer, from 1970 and 101′ x 31′ and 3000 hp.

All photos, WVD, who thanks all who watched the Erie Canal presentation yesterday.  Here‘s more Erie Canal on Saturday.

 

 

Many thanks to Phil Little, who took these from his socially-distanced perch high atop the Weehawken cliff . . .  I had thought to go out, but I didn’t want to get swarmed by “social-approachers.”  An alternative title here could be “Comfort Departs.”  I like the blue/white sign on the building off the starboard side of the ship:  “Thank you essential and health-care workers . . . .”

If I see accurately,  it’s Ava, Capt. Brian, and Marjorie that see her out.  As Phil writes, “Conditions: slack tide, wind 10-15 ESE, temp 53 deg.F. Looked like they had to nudge her around a bit into the wind, before she got underway!”

And so she got underway, exactly a month after arriving.

The closest I could find to an accounting is here from Mike Schuler at gCaptain: “While in New York, medical personnel treated 182 patients of which 70% were COVID-19 positive. More than 110 surgical procedures, 540 x-rays and CT-scans, and 1,300 intravenous and oral medications were performed, according the U.S. Navy. ”

Many thanks, Phil. Many thanks to crew of USNS Comfort.

And tomorrow, we begin our virtual canal tour of the western portion the NYS Canal system.  And thanks to a friend who pointed this out on a NYS blog a short time ago, a fascinating and profusely illustrated article about the impact of the 1872 horse epidemic on the economy and the Erie Canal.

 

I did not forget in the beginning of April about the 2020 calendar enhancement;  there were just too any things going on! So today I both catch up, and get ahead.  And according to my accounting robot, today I post for the 4,500th time.  Champagne is spilling all over my editor’s floor, but he’s not sharing.

YM World came in last April as Anthem of the Seas was departing.  If one keeps records with the goal of tracking change, few industries have changed as profoundly as the cruise industry has in the past year, and all that in the past two months.

Truly YM World, an ULCV,is huge.  But earlier this week, MSC Anna sailed under the Golden Gate, over 100′ longer, almost 40′ wider, giving her a total teu capacity of over 19k, compared with around 14k here.  That 5000 teu difference equals the total capacity of an average container ship serving the sixth boro 10 years ago.

 

The May calendar page features James D Moran nosing up against a pink magenta wall.

Here she comes in to meet off the starboard side.

Then she matches speed

and comes alongside to drop off the docking pilot.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

J. George Betz and Morton Bouchard Jr. raft up on the floating dock.

Helen Laraway pushes toward the east.

JRT passes Weddell Sea on the way home after completion of another job.

Daisy Mae moves a deeply loaded scow westbound.  I’m not certain but believe the product is road salt.

Discovery Coast heads over toward the Kills.

A light Elk River makes for the next job.

Emily Ann tows  astern passing the collection of boxes in the Global Terminal.

And Majorie B. passes Pacific Sky while she steams back to the McAllister yard.

And one more, Ellen S, Pearl Coast, and Evening Light .  .  round out this installment.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose sense of this decade’s end is growing more palpable, offers this photo of Michigan Service and a whole lotta dredgin’ from the last two weeks of 2009.

A harbor, different parts of it, can be a crowded place.  Here are some previous posts called “congestion.”

Kyoto Express left first, after my arrival, passing some icons during her exit.

Ever Legion departed next, leaving the US-flagged Overseas Key West at the dock.

 

Seroja Enam, ex-APL Poland, was arriving but being followed.

Meeting them was Stolt Sea, escorted by Margaret Moran.

 

 

Grande New York followed closely behind.

Note all the docked vessels out beyond the Bayonne Bridge.

Grande New York, a relatively new vessel, was launched the same year as the ill-fated Golden Ray, now being scrapped down south.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Quick post today . . . with a followup tomorrow.  I became somewhat obsessed with the name of this ULCV;  I’d expected it to arrive a day earlier and it anchored a dozen leagues out, so you can understand my obsession when my brain told me I was waiting in vain for the “world.”  For now, this may be among the largest box boats to arrive in the harbor . . .  1200′  x 167′  x 47′  with an air draft of 177′, if my ears caught the numbers correctly.

Maybe you can participate in my tangent, though.  Here’s how.  Given the name of this vessel,  what comes to mind?   What song titles?  And,  if you worked for YM and needed to come up with a name for a sister vessel, what would you suggest?  I don’t believe there is a sister vessel.  And I believe this is YM World’s first visit to the sixth boro.  If there’s any humor in this post, I intend it to be on me and on the crazy places my brain goes when I consider the (YM) World to be arriving in NYC . . . because hasn’t it always….

Some of my thoughts, in no particular order, would be these:  stop the world I wanna get off, world on a string, I’m sitting on top of the world . . .  .  As to a sister ship, I come up with “other world” and then this one being worldly and the sister being otherworldly . . .

 

Anyhow, as I said earlier, more of this actual vessel tomorrow.  By the way, she’s currently at Global Terminal in Bayonne, arriving here Saturday (4/27) as its first port call after departing singapore on 4/1.

All photos and reactions by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a repository of song titles--most of which I don’y know–with “world” in the title.  And book titles . . . around the world in 80 days has [comic] possibilities.  This “world” song comes with its own NYC images in its music video. For many years I was a fan of what record stores (what are they??!) classified as “world music, stuff like this . . . or this.

And hat’s off to the fine machines and skilled crews who guide these behemoths into and out of ports as if the feats were just play.

It’s been a few months to do a sixth-boro look around here.  Of course it’s never the same.  Never. Not even from one day to the next.  Let’s start with Weeks tug Elizabeth.  If I’m not mistaken, this machine’s carried that name ever since it was launched in 1984.

James William has been a regular in the sixth boro the past five years or so, but she started  as a Moran tug in 2007.   Note the eerie fog around the base of the Staten Island-side bridge tower.

Choptank [which the pesky auto-correct insists should be spelled Shoptalk] passes in the foreground;  Mary H in the distance. Choptank is back from several years in the Caribbean.

Paula Atwell is almost 20 years old, having started out as Crosby Express.

Northstar Integrity . . . quite the mouthful of syllables . . . seemed an unknown to me, until I realized I knew her as Petrel . . .

Not long ago I caught Marjorie at work on the Hudson down bound.

Mary Gellatly emerges from the fog.

Evening Star rests B. No. 250 at anchor with Brooklyn in the background.

Mister T heads for the mooring . . .

All sixth boro photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a backlog of so many collaboration photos that I might be alternating much-appreciated “other peoples photos” posts for a while.

 

 

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