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Two bulk carriers are currently in the sixth boro having come directly from a very salty area in the north of Chile, more than a 1000 miles north of the coastal city of Valparaíso.

One of them is Albatross Island, an ultramax bulker from the huge Pacific Basin fleet.

She was launched in 2010 as Jin Ming.

 

She made an 18-day voyage from Chile, counting the time transiting the Panama Canal, when last these crew were close to land.

Port Osaka, part of the Port Dragon Bulk fleet within Portline Bulk,  is roughly the same size as Albatross Island but much newer, launched in 2019.  She made the voyage from Chile in 15 days.

Yes, I love that logo, which I can’t quite decipher.

If you want a hint of the desert from which our road salt comes, click here for Punta Patache.

All photos, WVD.

Where’s there’s a “1”, a “2” must follow, right?  Let’s start with Brendan Turecamo on the starboard side of APL Dublin.

Enter a Maersk ship with Bruce tendering the port side.

APL Dublin has Kirby on the stern.

Gerda has Capt. Brian A. on her stern, and

Patrice and

Ava.  That makes a total of four tugboats on Gerda Maersk.

Note the rust stains on Maersk Columbus, a US-flagged ship.

Yet, no tugboats work the port side of Columbus,

 

but on her starboard side, Margaret has been all along, and Kirby has left APL Dublin to assist Columbus as they head for the bridge and Bergen Point.

All photos and interpretation by WVD, who’ll never see this identical concatenation repeated.  Hat tip to all the crews who make this happen.

Can anyone explain the story of the rust stains on Maersk Columbus?

Looking back a year, here‘s where April 11, 2020 found us.

 

The erudite readers of tugster know Evergreen doesn’t have a single vessel, the one that caused some anxiety in Suez recently.  In fact, the fleet comprises about 200 ships, of different sizes or classes.  The L and F classes currently call in the sixth boro.  The teu capacity for the F class is just over 12000.  In other words, the vessel that departed the sixth boro this morning holds 8000 fewer containers than Ever Given, coming in over 20000 teu.    Another way of visualizing it is this:  add all the containers of this F class boat AND all from an L class vessel . . . and you’ll have one Ever G class.  And consider this, an Evergreen A class is on the drawing board . . .  coming in between 22k and 23k containers!

Enough alphabetizing . . . Ever Faith is currently on its way to Baltimore.

 

 

 

All photos, WVD, who had a hard time coming indoors today to download these photos and post.

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

Thirty years ago the pose below did not exist.  From a long way off, I recognized what he was doing, and given the location, he made sure WTC and other points of the skyline made the background.

Here too, the deckhand on Ava M. conveys clearly that he’s waiting for the messenger line to come down.  Beyond him on the next ship, the mariner in orange is likely talking with someone just inside. 

I can’t tell exactly what this crewman is doing.  I’m not sure what the device he holds is.

Relative size is clear here;  sure tugboats look tiny beside a ULCV, but a mariner looks miniscule on the afterdeck.

A mariner walks along the catwalk;  shelters are located at regular intervals, maybe 100′ one from the next. 

As the container ship heads for sea, crew attend to the lashing

Crew on the barge and the tug cooperate in getting a line on for the assist.

Things are about to get very busy, so crew stand down . . . or sit down or lean back . . . until things start happening.

I can’t blame him for taking the gangway.

These crew stand at the ready to send down the messenger line.

All photos, WVD, whose photo has no doubt been taken and published elsewhere….

 

Here’s an extraordinarily busy photo;  Nicole Leigh is about to ease right around Shooters.  Beyond that tug, a half dozen or so more tugboats, an antenna, a bridge, a refinery, steam . . .

Gulf Coast waits in front of a 12-pack of IMTT silos.

Navigator continues shuttling around, moving fuel.

Buchanan 5 is not a common visitor here, so I was happy to see her pass.

Brooklyn and Dorothy J  head west although with different goals.

St Andrews moves a barge eastbound.

Ava M. waits for a container ship at sunrise.

Sea Fox moves a loaded recycling scow toward the Arthur Kill, and

Caitlin Ann moves an empty one back.

And finally, C. F. Campbell, first photo here with her upper house, heads west.  Light. 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Taking photos in the sixth boro is a real luxury, providing a wealth of subjects.  Ava M. was escorting a Maersk ship in, and I’ll post about that later.  For now let’s focus on the CMA CGM box ship.

Colomb dates from 2009, but this was my first time to catch her in the boro.  She’s one of five Explorer-class 13,830 teu boats.  Previously, I’ve posted photos of Vespucci and Corte Real, leaving Lapérouse and Magellan.  But there’s some unusual about Colomb, first of the series.  I’ll let you ponder that.

Given her dimensions of 1199′ x 168′, profile photos of her aren’t that interesting, although

if you zoom out a bit to catch the west end of the VZ bridge and the waning snow moon . . .  it helps a bit, maybe.

Powering her, at that time to Norfolk, is a single Wärtsilä-Hyundai 14RT-flex96C generating107,390 hp!

And the unusual feature?

All photos, WVD, who was surprised that she carries passengers!  Read more here, although I’m not sure this info is up to date.

Talos.  Know the reference?  I didn’t but will share the response at the end of this post.  It’s entirely appropriate for the very automated  and largest in physical size class of container ships to call in the sixth boro, 1211′ loa.  In fact, another ship of the class is recognized as being (in 2019) as the largest vessel to pass through the new Panama Canal locks.  That ULCV, Triton, has been in the sixth boro several times, once just recently, and I’ve managed to miss it each time. The diminutive tug off the port quarter is Vane’s 95′ Susquehanna with a barge on the wire.

Entering the boro means passing the lighthouse on Norton’s Point, aka Seagate.

Another clue to the length of Talos comes by comparing it to the VZ Bridge tower, which rise up nearly 700′.

 

 

I’ve seen photos of Triton, and it has the same blotchy paint.  Anyone know why?

She headed west on the ConHook Range with four McAllister tugs, although none of a tether.

I chose not to follow her through the KVK, so maybe Capt. Brian A. got on the tether here.

Note the size of ferry JFK alongside Talos. JFK has a loa of 277′.

Talos here heads for Port Elizabeth;  over beynd her is Al Qibla, another ULCV.

All photos, WVD, who offers this link on the five Triton-class boats.

Engine here is the AN Diesel & Turbo B&W 11S90ME-C9&10.

Talos, a robot, . .  . has quite the legacy, which you can learn here.  He was finally defeated by the guiles of MedeaHere‘s the contemporary, non-marine Talos.

Also arriving in port before dawn this morning is the CMA CGM 15000 ULCV I’ve not yet seen, CMA CGM Panama.

 

Grimaldi  has a number of these ROROs, or technically, CONROs.  I’ve seen Grande Gabon, Senegal, Marocco, and Guinea. Ones I haven’t seen include Grande Togo, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, and I could go on . . . and those are not in the order they appear along the West African coastline.   For some reason there’s no Grande Liberia or Mauretania, coastal countries.  I’m not surprised there’s no Grande Mali or Niger

Ava M. McAllister is providing the assist.

What I consider unusual about these Grimaldi vessels is

 

their use of exterior space to transport automobiles. 

You’d think they’d get salt spray where you don’t want it. 

All photos, WVD, who wonders

Maybe if this box-and-car-carrying vessel were lighter, it might be carrying seals in this manner.  Thx, Harry.

 

Find a great diagram here, as well as this quote:  “container carrying capacity has increased 1200% since 1968.”  This increased size drives developments in escort tugs.

As of 2021, the sixth boro has accommodated vessels no larger than 15,000 teu, like CMA CGM Argentina.  These can be called mother ships, since they can call in only a limited number of ports in the US for reasons of draft, air draft, and crane size. Vying for position as the largest, Liebherr appears to have a 25-row crane design, while ZPMC has a 26-row product.

Count them, it looks like Argentina has 20 rows across.  Imagine each of these row, each of these containers, as towed by a truck on the highway lane beside you.

YM Wellhead, an odd name in my opinion, is one of 20 W-class 14,000 teu ships.   World was the first of this class that I caught. 

 

She departed the sixth boro yesterday, sans the container that crossed the VZ as she made her way out.

Back in spring 2017, Cosco Development was the largest container ship to transit the new locks in Panama.  Her capacity is just over 13,000 teu.

 

At least half dozen Hyundai vessels have called in the sixth boro of late, all around 13000 teu.

I was surprised when the docking pilot boarded up the companionway.

 

Cosco Shipping Camellia is one of more than half dozen Cosco Shipping “flower-class” vessels to call hewre, all around 13,500 teu.

 

Orchid is a sister vessel, and in the next day or so, Sakura will arrive.

The most powerful escort tugboats in the sixth boro shrink in size alongside these behemoths.

All photos and interpretation of info, WVD, who wonders what the next milestone of any sort the sixth boro will see.

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