You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Ava M. McAllister’ tag.

This Stella Polaris . . . a very common vessel name for obvious navigation reasons, is less than 400′ and about 20 years old.  The curious building off the bow is the Boldt Castle Power House and Clock Tower . . .  or BCPHCT.

Algoma Conveyor, SLSWmax, was still under construction a year ago in Jiangsu, China.

Narie is another recent Chinese built cargo ship

in the Great Lakes, I’ve read, for the first season, although other Polsteam boats have worked there for some years.

The oldest Great Lakes port in the US is Oswego, and it sees lakers like the Japan-built cement ship NACC Argonaut fairly frequently.

With the right vessel, one can travel from the Great Lakes directly to NYC, of course, and when we did, we ran into Disney Magic, Italian built, Bahamian flagged, and Spain overhauled.

Making this likely the most diverse “random ships” post ever, here’s P61, an Irish patrol vessel named for Samuel Beckett. Unless I’m mistaken, this “writers” class comprises the largest vessels in the Irish Naval Service. Here’s a photo of Beckett leaving town yesterday taken by frequent commenter Phil Gilson.

Cembay is another Japan built cement carrier, 1997, shuttling between the US and Port Daniel QC. 

And finally . . .  YM World is, as of this posting, steaming toward Savannah, after shifting boxes here in Bayonne.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp within the past 30 days.

Here’s the previous post of this focus.  I had others ready to go at one point, but  . ..  ships sail, horses leave barns, and ideas slip away.  Yesterday I spent one hour on the Upper Bay and concluded that it’s a diverse place, starting with this water rising up and obscuring whatever lay beyond it.  Of course, I knew what it was, but I recall the first time I saw such a misting–in the Gulf off Kuwait–and my brain could not process what my eyes were sending it.

Regular and irregular cargoes juxtaposed, boxes and rocks.

Framing a shot puts together what is actually quite far apart.

I’ve done a number of posts on winter fishing, but fall fishing must be super right now, with some fisherman torn between landing that next fish and

 

staying out of the path of YM World and all those tugs assisting it into Global terminal.

 

I know foreshortening plays a role in giving a sense of crowding, but there IS undeniably some crowding going on here.  The ship DID sound a warning at one point.

And that mist in the top photo . . . it came from Firefighter II.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who still has lots of photos from the trip from Montreal.

 

 

Over 11 years ago I did the first post called “tractors,” and back then I never imagined what the “2” in the series would consist of.  It’s summertime–click here for soundtrack–and let’s see those tractors!  By the way, most of the photos below I took in Canandaigua NY last week at the annual “steam pageant.”

This is mostly a photo post, but a little text.  How many “crew” do you think are operating the tractor below?  Answer at the end of this post.

Do you suppose someone had Mardi Gras in mind in parking these three?

Weights come in handy in pulling contests.

“Orchard” tractors must be inspired by Ferrari lines, or vice versa?  Here’s a short history of McCormick-Deering.

 

 

Here’s a history of Birdsall Engine.

Before GPS-guided tractors, controls had style.

 

 

Here’s some history of the Silver King and related Plymouth industry, now all gone.

 

 

This is a dedicated piece of equipment; it can plow and nothing else.  Rumely made this machine, which required a driver/engineer to operate and another person under the un-deployed sunshade to ensure the plowshares didn’t foul.  For a massive Rumely plow demonstration, click here.

When the steam traction engine moves at less than 5 mph, technology can be this basic . . .  re: steering for

this tractor.

 

And here’s the answer to the “crew” question posed before this top photo . . .  he’s the engineer, she’s the driver, and baby–wearing her mud boots–is apprenticing.

Oh . . . but this blog is tugster, not tractorster, so let’s return from the detour.  Here from a month ago are some more pics of the christening on the the sixth boro’s newest tractor tug,

an equally family event.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has left the boro and has scheduled a number of posts in a queue until it runs out . . .  or I have some new photos and wifi to post them.  If no posts appear for a few days, it just means I’m enjoying a wifi-free dimension, might even get trapped there.   And since wifi is needed for the manual process of moving a wordpress blogpost to FB, look for me at tugster.wordpress.com, not on FB.

 

 

I’ve seen lots of the L-class, but this was my first view of Ever Lotus.   I’m not sure what’s in the boxes, but she’s carrying a lot of boxes.

Ava escorted her out.

 

Bow watch was performed by this relaxed-appearing seaman, while

stern watch was controlled by this hitchhiking but discerning raven.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Eleven years ago I missed a christening because of work.  Then last year I missed one again for the same reason.  But last night, neither work nor weather could have  kept me away.

Ava (rhymes with “java”) M. McAllister has already been working in the harbor about a month, but time needed to be carved out of her busy schedule to welcome her to the harbor with ceremony.

Since her namesake is an accomplished skater, the tug demonstrated just a modicum of her skills . . . .

including some tug-modified twizzles and axels.  Notice the guests of honor including the namesake waving on the bow?

The pipers came, they played, and then they led the way

to the convivialities.

Welcome, Ava.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who several years back did a review of McAllister’s 150th anniversary book here.

For more of my photos including namesake breaking the bottle, go the McAllister Towing FB page.  

Sarah D makes for Global Terminal,

Helen Laraway passes an inbound container vessel,

Ava M. guides a ULCV in beside a cruise ship,

Rebecca Ann moves a light scrap barge,

Capt. Brian A. tails a box ship into her berth,

Genesis Glory passes GM 11105,

Eric McAllister assists a tanker into its berth,

Rhea I. Bouchard heads westbound light in the KVK,

and Frances pushes a scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loves that the sixth boro never sleeps.

And now one more, taken this morning in San Juan PR by Capt. Neftali Padilla, it’s the arrival of the cranes towed by Capt. Latham after not quite an 18-day run. See the tow departing NYC here.  Thx much, Tali.

Ava M McAllister has assisted at least three ships already, and she’d been in the sixth boro less than  36 hours when i took these photos.

No doubt her largest so far was YM Wind, which she’s assisting here with her twin Capt. Brian A. Barely less than a year ago I missed the dual christening of Capt. Brian A. and Rosemary . . .

For scale, notice the orange-clad ship’s crew both above and below.

 

Capt. Brian A., Rosemary, and Ava M. are all 100′ x 40′ and powered by two 16-cylinder Tier IV Cat 3616E engines.

How new is she?  Check out the white hand-lettered numbers on the fendering just below the word McAllister.

Long and safe may she sail.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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