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What’s visible for now is Pegasus and Maersk Seletar, but behind the container ship and soon to emerge

is Mukaddes Kalkavan.  A few hours later, I saw Seletar doing 22 kts heading south along the Jersey coast.  Seletar is an area in Singapore.

Ava escorts Mukaddes Kalkavan into the port from the starboard bow.

Scot Munchen is a relatively small tanker ( 383′ x 59′) with an unusual superstructure design. Here‘s the fleet of this Istanbul-based company, all incorporating the same stack design.

 

Here’s a photo from about 0500, Ava is assisting Hyundai Smart into Bayonne.  The name Hyundai Smart connotes automotive to me.

 

Ever Liberal heads out to sea.

with Jonathan Moran assisting past the Bouchard flock.

And finally, this is the Laura Maersk that back already a month ago was towed into the sixth boro as a fully loaded dead ship due to an engine explosion.

Light in the water, this container ship shows a different profile.

All photos, WVD.

Capt. Willie Landers last appeared here  several years ago;  she lost a substantial mast to gain an upper wheelhouse.

She came in during my favorite time of day.

She met Atlantic Sail off Stapleton.

Meredith left a barge alongside Orange Victoria and went on to other assignments.

Troy’s pride Sarah D moved a stone scow out past Jamaica Bay, as all her crew who could did work on deck.

 

 

Ava M waited for a ship as a sloop sailed past.

Daisy Mae headed out for Philly with CMT Y NOT 1 and a load

of non-ferrous scrap, maybe.

 

 

Sea Fox headed out to a job and met Bomar Caen coming into Brooklyn.  Bomar Caen was previously CMA CGM Jaguar.

All photos, WVD.

Mary Turecamo has the distinction of having been built at Matton Shipyard near Waterford.  She’s a big boat:  106′ loa and 4300hp.

James William was originally Lisa Moran.  She’s 77′ and generates 2800hp propelled by three screws.

Barney Turecamo, built in 1995, was intended to push cement barges.  She’s 116′ and rated at 5100hp.

Brendan Turecamo was launched in 1975.  She’s 106′ and her twin EMDs generate 3900hp.

James D. Moran is one of the four 6000hp tugboats that have worked in the sixth boro for the past five years.  She’s 88′ loa.

Notice that all the above boats had some connection with Moran?  Anyhow. Ava M. is the newest escort tug in the boro.  She arrived here about a year ago, 100′ and 6770hp.

Alex McAllister has been in the harbor–I believe–about five years now.  Built in 1985, she is 87′ and 4300hp.

When I first saw Genesis Vigilant, he was a Hornbeck Offshore boat called Michigan Service.  Built in 1981, she’s 99′ and rated at 3000hp.

Josephine might be the newest T of an ATB in the boro.  She was launched in 2018, is 110′, and moves with 4560hp.

Here she was pushing the 347′ loa RTC 83 into a berth at the east end of IMTT, with assistance from Franklin ReinauerFranklin was launched in 1984, is 81′ and generates 2600hp.

All photos, WVD.  Again, sorry I posted prematurely sans any text. Sometimes I’m looking right at something, seeing a word or a number, and just calling it something else.  I believe my brain is becoming like my mother’s.

 

 

 

Today is the 100th anniversary of the Jones Act.  I hope folks who believe the Jones Act should be repealed read this and inform themselves.  A good place to start is here, a well-written editorial from gCaptain from a few years ago.

Sunshine State, one of five tankers managed by Crowley, is an example of a Jones Act tanker.  That means it was built in the US, and crewed by US mariners.

Atlantic Sea, 2016 launched in Hudong Zhonghua Shipbuilding, is a non-Jones Act vessel.

Maersk Tukang was built in Korea in 2008, and registered in Singapore.

ONE Minato and Constellation arrive together via the Ambrose Channel.  The 2018 ONE vessel was both built and registered in Japan. Constellation, 2006, was built in China and registered in Marshall Islands.

Mandalay, 2019, carries Singapore registry.  I’ve been unable to find where she was built, but my guess is China.

Zim Vancouver, 2007 built in Dalian CN, and registered in Haifa.

Torm Sublime, registered in Copenhagen, was built in Nansha, CN 2019.

Maersk Kleven, built in Denmark in 1996,  registered in Liberia. Assisting are Ava and Capt. Brian, both Jones Act.

All photos, WVD, who is the first to admit that as important as the Jones Act is, the decisions of flagging are complex.

Grimaldi trademarked yellow appears fairly frequently in the sixth boro, but I’d never seen this CONRO until the other day.  Partly it catches my attention because I spent half a decade working in two of Gabon’s neighboring countries.

I’ve always enjoyed the dawn.  The cool air and rich light cannot be topped, and now, it is the best time to stay physically distant from folks.

Interesting names . . . these ships meeting in the almost-night;  Maersk Tukang (tukang is the Sundanese word for “doer” or craftsman”) meets Grande Gabon (Gabon is an appropriated name based on a Portuguese description of the Komo river estuary.)  The president’s name is Bongo,  but I really digress.

I know this is not a Pow Wow River morning with muskrats playing around the lily pads while I’m flicking minnows at pickerel or whatever else bites when the snapping turtles are away . . .  This is not another digression, just a way of highlighting the beauty in an industrial waterway.

Since i believe this CONRO is coming from West Africa, I’m wondering where these vehicles are coming from/going to.

I took this photo without seeing the crewman at the extreme left side of the frame.  Only after studying the photos on the big screen did I notice him.

Having the cars uncovered on the decks might not bode well for the cars, but they do provide a scale to show how large the exhaust ducting is.

Ava joins Ellen to ensure safe passage around Bergen Point, and  . . . sure enough . . . the crewman who was enjoying the cool morning with me is still standing at the rail.

All photos, WVD.

 

Stephen Reinauer westbound as the sun heads in the same direction.

Mary Turecamo assists an MOL ship into port.

Ava M pushes toward the pilot’s door on the side of another container ship.

James D heads to the next job amid two container ships in the approaches.

Margaret throttles up alongside.

James William travels toward Howland Hook.

James E. heads, no doubt, for the car float with rail cars awaiting it.

Stephen Dann heads in to get some fuel.

Emily Ann travels light toward the Upper Bay.

All photos from a socially-distanced, physically-isolated, seasonally-adjusted, pent-up energized, freely-masked, and emotionally-stale  WVD.

 

It’s hard to believe that this title has come up 286 times before today, but here they all are.  And yet, I’m starting out with a photo of Ellen McAllister, who herself has appeared here hundreds of times, but never quite like this, heading into the  dawn and about to pass an unidentifiable Vane tugboat.

Ditto Pegasus, passing between a Bouchard tug to the left and some Centerline boats to the right, and below that ONE container on the bridge and the Fedex plane in the sky.

Double Skin 57 and Long Island, previously Peter F. Gellatly,  moves a barge past IMTT, where some Reinauer boats–RTC 103 and Morgan— are taking on product.

Potomac gets an assist from Fort Schuyler.

Ava M. McAllister passes UACC Ibn Al Haitham, where Genesis Victory is lightering and Liz Vinik assisting.

On another morning, Fort Schuyler heads for the Upper Bay, and that looks like Kristin Poling in the distance to the left.

And where Meredith C. Reinauer is lightering Marvin Faith, Bouchard’s Linda Lee, Ellen S., and Evening Breeze look on.

All photos recently by WVD,who had to look up the namesake of the UACC crude carrier.   He turns out to be a Basra-born scientist from a millenium (!!) ago.  That link is worth a read.

 

PPE, the word, was not a commonly used term in my world just two months ago when I took this photo; crew on freighters in the sixth boro typically wear work overalls, hard hats, googles, and in winter, face coverings.  After all, early March can be cold here,

and a week and some earlier, these guys could have been in Panama or Egypt, along the waterways here.  But then it was not called PPE yet.

Ditto here, except this was last week and that is a Tyvek suit, which has other associations.

Local mariners  . . . two months ago would not have had this mouth covering, even if it’s slipped off.

Or this paint/pesticide respirator . .  . it could be related to the virus.

But it’s the deckhands on container ships that show the greatest amount of prep and response to my lens.

They all have masks, as likely does the pilot.  New situations call for new protocols.

 

And this complete Tyvek and mask and blue gloves . . . this is the most extreme I’ve seen.

But hey . .  who wants to get sick?

 

All photos, WVD.

 

Many thanks to Phil Little, who took these from his socially-distanced perch high atop the Weehawken cliff . . .  I had thought to go out, but I didn’t want to get swarmed by “social-approachers.”  An alternative title here could be “Comfort Departs.”  I like the blue/white sign on the building off the starboard side of the ship:  “Thank you essential and health-care workers . . . .”

If I see accurately,  it’s Ava, Capt. Brian, and Marjorie that see her out.  As Phil writes, “Conditions: slack tide, wind 10-15 ESE, temp 53 deg.F. Looked like they had to nudge her around a bit into the wind, before she got underway!”

And so she got underway, exactly a month after arriving.

The closest I could find to an accounting is here from Mike Schuler at gCaptain: “While in New York, medical personnel treated 182 patients of which 70% were COVID-19 positive. More than 110 surgical procedures, 540 x-rays and CT-scans, and 1,300 intravenous and oral medications were performed, according the U.S. Navy. ”

Many thanks, Phil. Many thanks to crew of USNS Comfort.

And tomorrow, we begin our virtual canal tour of the western portion the NYS Canal system.  And thanks to a friend who pointed this out on a NYS blog a short time ago, a fascinating and profusely illustrated article about the impact of the 1872 horse epidemic on the economy and the Erie Canal.

 

I hope this post elucidates what goes on in this photographer’s mind while taking photos, and later at home–in my own type of darkroom–while examining the “catch,” so to speak.

I’d seen these mergansers swim by while I was waiting for a ship.

Two minutes after that . . . in my zoom, I could make out these three tugs, clearly prepared and on their way to meet the same ship.  The mental connection, obviously, was the sets of three, patterns.

A single merganser and

a single tugboat, objectively, have no connection.  The connection is only in the photographer’s brain.

It would not surprise you either if I confessed to seeing the paint protector sheet on the tug fendering as mimicking the face masks that have become ubiquitous in my neighborhood.

 

Photos and tangential thoughts, WVD.

 

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