You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Cape Canaveral’ tag.

Bobbie Ann departs the sixth boro with some GLDD equipment. 

Little did I know at the time that Bobbie Ann had left the sixth boro a decade ago, then as Vera K.

Ernest Campbell wrestles along a double hull bunker barge. I wonder why the Centerline Logistics lion has not yet been added to her stack.

When tugs like Mary Turecamo assist a deeply laden tanker, the perspective from the upper wheelhouse is so much different than when assisting a ULCV, with their much higher freeboard.

Sometimes the 46′ x 15′ Rae is just the right size.  Recall Rae‘s role in getting Wavertree back into her berth after the big renovation?

One of the newest tugboats in the boro, Cape Canaveral, 105′ x 36′ and generating 5000 hp, has the most evocative name.

She has two siblings, Cape Henry and Cape Lookout.

Again, is it me?  I don’t believe I’ve seen Justine in a long while. She’s also 105′ x 35′ and 4000 hp.  She has an elevating wheelhouse, which you can see here, scroll.

This is crowded:  (l to r) Diane B, Saint Emilion, Meredith C. Reinauer, Lois Ann L.  Moran, and Pathfinder.

 

Escorting from a distance astern, it’s Kimberly.

And finally, a photo from some time back, Vane’s New York, now working on the Great Lakes, Vane’s only freshwater unit . . .  that I know of.

All photos, WVD.

Enjoy the photos.  Can you guess which of these tugboats is oldest?

Greetings Rae and hello to the crewman at the railing. It’s been awhile since I’ve seen Rae.  The first time I saw her I was with Bonnie and the tug was then called Miss Bonnie.

Several people have said Matthew Tibbetts is the best looking tug in the harbor.  Who am I to argue with them about that?

Pathfinder cuts a sharp image as it leans into its empty trash containers . . . . and the barge CVA-601.

Some mornings the dawn light enhances everything.  Because I was a NASA fan a long time ago, a tug named Cape Canaveral will always get my attention.  I’m guessing she may be the newest boat among these.

Above, along the left side of the photo, see the barge with GL 54 on it?  Ocean Tower was moving it along,as below.

This light perfectly complements Sarah D‘s lines and colors.

The sun is already rising well after 0600;  I took this photo of Ruby M before 0600.

A very light Frederick E. Bouchard passed me by the other day.

Normandy has the throatiest sound of the boats I know best.

And finally,  well before 0600, Emily Ann was moving a scrap (?) barge westbound.  I believe she was last on this blog back in June.

All photos, WVD.

Oh . . . the oldest?  That would be Rae, launched 1952, same as me.

I’m always excited to see something new, even if I almost miss it . . . like Wachapreague.  I chased it here, but interminable stop lights, slow drivers . . .  grr.  But enough of me.  Wachapreague was in the sixth boro the other day, of the newest class of Vane ATBs.  She’s 110′ x 38′ and powered by two QSK-60M generating 4400hp.

Follow up on John Joseph . .  . photo by Ben Moll, she’s almost completely made over.

These two photos of Paul Andrew and scow . . . demonstrate directionality of dawn light.  This one was west of me at 0538, and this

east . .  at 0541.  Being out in the morning is not just about comfortable temperatures.

Harry McNeal is a sixth boro fixture in marine construction, but at 53′ x 18′,

she’s easy to miss, as demonstrated here alongside Linda Moran (116′ x 36′) and Houston.

Cape Canaveral, with its evocative name for anyone who came of age in the brief US space era, is another fairly new vessel in the sixth boro.

She comes in at 105′ x 36′ and 5000′.

Two Bouchard units waited in Grabesend the other day . . .

Denali bunkered intriguingly-named Eco California.

Another shot of Wachapreague eluding me . . . is a good place to end.

Many thanks to Ben for the John Joseph photo.  All others by WVD.

 

 

She first came through bit over a month ago, but I missed her.  But two days ago, I had no work,  a coin or two in my pocket and nothing to interest me on shore,  I decided to do my Otis Redding thing, and look at the watery world  . . .

Seeing this new boat headed my way enhanced an already perfect day.

She’s the third of three Cape-class boats and carries a name that was magic for me when I was young, probably magical then all around the world.

Just over a year ago, I caught the first of them here.  A few months later, I not only caught the second Cape but,better yet,  also photo’d them passing each other. 

Her two twin Cats generate 5000 hp in this 102′ x 36′ boat.

And by the end of the day, I caught Cape Henry and Cape Canaveral in the anchorage side by side.

All photos, WVD, whose previous newest hulls can be found here.

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