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This batch of photos is from 1958 from Steve, who has shared photos for at least 17 posts, and maybe more. I’m grateful Steve provides the captioning, because I was in second grade at the time.  Steve explains:  “I was just over 10 years old, and although being brought up on the water on my grandfather’s old 40’ cabin cruiser, I had never been on a tugboat—yet. When I came home from school at lunchtime, my mother told me to come home from school quickly at the end of the day so that I could get my homework done . . . because my aunt was picking me and my father up  to meet my uncle, Capt. Bob Munoz, on his tugboat to do a special job.”  More of that narrative follows at the end of this post.

Below, from that day, with Steve’s comments in quotes: “Diana L Moran alongside USS Franklin D. Roosevelt …”

I gather from records that the 1945-launched carrier had just completed a refit and overhaul at the time.   Diane L was Jakobson built and two years old at this time. If you’re not familiar with the sixth boro, that’s the Williamsburg Bridge and in the distance to the north, the Empire State Building.

Dalzellera pulling USS FDR-CV42-with assistance from Catherine Moran and Dalzellaird.”

This Catherine Moran, built in 1939, was mentioned in relation to Erie Canal work here, and may still be working as Sherry D in Napa CA.

Dalzellera pulling with assistance from Catherine Moran, Dalzellaird, and Fred B Dalzell.”

“Taken from the stern of Dalzellera alongside USS FDR.”

“USS Enterprise  (CV-6) at  Brooklyn Navy Yard.”

She participated in more major battles in WW2 than any other USN vessel.    Efforts by NYS to purchase and turn her into a memorial were unsuccessful.  Soon after Steve took these photos, she was sold for scrap, done subsequently at Kearny NJ.

“USS Independence (CV-62) at Brooklyn under construction.”

For this carrier as I saw her in 2010 in Bremerton WA, go to the end of this post.  In March 2017, she was towed out of Bremerton, 16000 miles around Cape Horn to be scrapped in Texas, which was completed in early 2019.  Anyone know who did this tow?

Barbara Moran in East River, heading east.”

This was the 1949, not the 1948, boat by that name.

Steve gave me a long version of his account of the day, but I’ve taken liberty to abridge it.  “Uncle Bob greeted us as we boarded the Dalzell Towing Company’s Dalzellera, flagship of the Dalzell fleet and converted from steam to diesel only 5 years earlier, was previously the Jersey Central RR steam tug Bethlehem. Dalzellera had a 1750hp diesel engine, a surplus WW II submarine engine coupled to a new unique drive system for NY harbor–a controllable pitch propeller.   When Dalzell was purchased by McAllister in 1965, she was renamed D. E. McAllister.

But that day our special job happened to be at the New York Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn Navy Yard, helping move the aircraft carrier USS FDR from its slip into the East River,  downriver,  and then  into the graving dock. It was a dead ship,  968’ long, 45,000 tons, in port for overhaul and repairs. The time for this move was selected to take advantage of the slack water in the early evening.  Dalzell had the contract with the US Navy to move the ship, but did not have enough of its own tugs available to do the job alone. Hence,  tugs from McAllister, Bronx Towing, Red Star, and Moran were also involved, for a total of 13 tugs.

Uncle Bob was the mate on the Dalzellera, but for this job he was one of several pilots assigned to control and monitor the movement of the ship and the tugs assisting the carrier. He was stationed up on the port bow on the flight deck.

Having the ship on a hawser allowed a unique vantage point as seen in the pictures.  And, it was uneventful. I was on the port side of the main deck with everyone else away from the after deck, just in case the line snapped. Then it happened. BANG!  I watched the line part and jump up toward the carrier’s bow. No one was on the after deck, so no one was hurt, no damage done.  Another line was lowered and the towing continued like nothing ever happened. As we got closer to the dock, Carol Moran got too close to one of FDR‘s overhangs on the port side and destroyed her mast, which fell onto her deck. Shortly afterwards the tug was relieved to allow it to head back to the yard before dark, since her mast lights were out.

Dalzellera was relieved of hawser duty just before the ship’s bow entered the graving dock and helped continue the push into the dock while the yard personnel started getting lines up to the ship to guide it into position. It was dusk when the task was finished. We picked up Bob at the end of the pier and headed back to our base.  After this day I was hooked on tugs.”

Thanks much, Steve.  As with the Enterprise, efforts by NYS to purchase USS FDR and turn her into a memorial were unsuccessful, and she was scrapped in Kearny NJ in 1978. Some photos of that last trip to the scrapyard can be found here.

For more tugboats of this decade, click here.

Finally, here’s USS Independence as I saw her in 2010 in Bremerton WA.

 

What’s prompted the reappearance of the past here is that I’ve been sorting my archives.

So let’s start in April 2008, and this vessel will reappear tomorrow.   I miss that orange in the harbor.

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This is November 2009.  Where is McAllister Brothers (built as Dalzelleagle) these days?

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This is what Eagle Service (now Genesis Eagle) looked like in March 2010.

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Here’s a closer up of the vintage Horizon ship.  Is she still in lay up?

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Ivory Coast, headed into the KVK here on a foggy morning, appeared almost to be floating on air above the water’s surface.

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And here, a mysterious swimmer, Edith Thornton (now in Trinidad as Chassidy?), and a Hanjin ship.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders who says things stay the same.

The race took place exactly 60 years ago today, and megathanks and superkudos to Harold Tartell for finding fotos of more than half of the boats involved in the race.

Top Class A (over 1250 hp) finisher was Reading Lines Shamokin.

Second was Barbara Moran.

No foto found yet of third place Socony 11, but fourth place was William J. Tracy of  Tracy Towing Line.

Again, no foto of Dauntless #14, but here’s sixth place finisher Russell #17.

Number seven finisher was this Turecamo Girls, painted in “wood.”

And rounding out Class A, here’s Dalzelleader.

In the Class B division (850 to 1250 hp), top boat was Pauline L. Moran.

Number two finisher was Red Star Towing & Transportation‘s Huntington.

In Class C (less than 850 hp), the top finisher was steam vessel Latin American, operating for the Texas Company.

Number two Class C boat was Providence, of the Red Star Towing & Transportation.

Third place Class C finisher was  Ticeline, of Tice Towing Line, Inc.

Unranked Class B boats include Fred B. Dalzell here and

here, as well as

Anne Carrol, a 1910 steamer of Carroll Towing Line also ran.

I’m reposting this image, made available by Paul Strubeck and posted yesterday.   1952 is especially significant for me because it was the year I was born.  It was also the year that

Queen Elizabeth was crowned, nuclear sub Nautilus keel was laid, a B-52 first flew, SS United States first crossed the Atlantic, Ike became President, the word “smog” was coined in reference to London weather, Albert Schweitzer won the Nobel Peace Prize, lots of UFOs buzzed  Washington DC airport, and Werner von Braun published Man Will Conquer Space Soon.

This last entry reminds me of the Mr Armstrong that died a few days ago.  I’ll never forget the July night in 1969 that I, age 17 then, stayed up all night even though it was haying season;  I’d worked in the hay all day July 20, and stayed up much of the night before working again all day on the 21st.  My father thought I was crazy but my mother came downstairs to watch with me a few times during the night.  “What will it change?” she asked in different ways, and I surely had no answer, as excited as I was.

A few days later a farmer nearby told me it was all a hoax.  “Nobody really walked on the moon,” Elmer said.  “It’s all just a movie they made in Hollywood.”

43 years and a month later . . . well, maybe it didn’t change anything related to our travel destinations, but the some of the technology we  live with on earth stems from those efforts.

A final thought:  I recently read a statement by Robert Ballard saying that the NASA budget (I’m not sure which year he was talking about.) for ONE year equals the NOAA budget for 18 years.  As much admiration as I have for Neil Armstrong, maybe the next heroic explorations should involve walking along the bottoms of the oceans.

Harold . . . I hope your family illness will subside so that you can attend the tugboat race this coming weekend.   Thanks again for these archival fotos.

Here was Pairs 3, a series I decided to revive when I saw this rough if felicitous pairing of hormone-intoxicated geese one springy morning last weekend.

A pair of eagles atop two Dalzell boats.  More Dalzell boats can be found in video #8 here, thanks to Bellboatbob.

A pair of Moran tugs  (James Turecamo and Jean Turecamo) help River Elegance do circles off the Statue of Liberty.

A pair of Weeks tugs (Robert and Kathleen) move Weeks Crane 533 eastbound out of the KVK.

Amy C and Charles D McAllister head back to the yard after a shift.

Susquehanna and Quantico Creek partner Doubleskin 59 into a dock.

Brendan J and Rhea I Bouchard do the same with B. No. 215.

Ah!  springtime seems to compel pairing.  Merry Mardi Gras!

All fotos except number 2 by Will Van Dorp.  Special thanks to Allen Baker and Bob McLaren for the Dalzell foto.

This is a post for Bonnie, in response to hers in which she reveals she’s crazy about buoys, very crazy . . . by her own admission a week ago.  Further, Bonnie’s post was in response to Tillerman.

I feel compelled to say I’m equally crazy about gulls, all kinds of gulls including eeeee

gulls . . . er, eagles.

But I don’t like dogs or

snakes.

The second foto comes thanks to Bob McLaren via Allen Baker.  Taken in the early 1960s, the fotos shows  the house of Dalzelleagle, now McAllister Brothers as seen here and here.  Previously, Allen has supplied this foto and others.    Please get in touch if you have ideas on how I can locate and  photograph any remaining Dalzell trademark eagles.   Other vessels with ornamental eagles are Huntington and Pacific.   (Use “find” to locate the ornamental eagle reference within those articles.  I’m curious about this tradition. )

The third foto shows McKinley Sea (1981,  ex-Annabelle V. Roehrig and El Oso Grande II).  And the boa, I took the foto on Coney Island after the mermaid parade in 2007.

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