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Winter solstice is one date I pay attention to, and yesterday demanded an undivided portion of it.  I was out on the sixth and primordial boro at sunrise, although when it rose, a gauzy film of stratus filtered the light.  I tinkered with the image a bit to enhance the cosmic eeriness.

Along the Brooklyn shore a classic barque and one of the latest of a classic line awaited.

Notice two tugboats and a lighthouse below?  One tug is shifting a fuel barge, and the other is shifting refuse boxes.

Start of winter or start of summer, the sixth boro is always a busy place.  Notice the fishing boat in this image, along with all the rest?

For some reason, these E-2C aircraft flew the North River up and then down and out over the Lower Bay.

Dutch Girl, a winter regular along with Eastern Welder, was hard at work.

Ava M. crossed the Bay from one job to the next.  Things are always happening on the water.

And all that’s glorious, but less than a quarter mile from the North River, not all seems to be happening well, and that needs to be acknowledged.

All photos, WVD.

 

One of these is not like the others . . .  and I’ll tell you why later.

By the way, in case you can’t make out the names, it’s Wicomico, Fells Point, and Kings Point.

When I first started this blog, the dominant bunkering company in the sixth boro was K-Sea, and on a given routine day back then, I might have caught three K-Sea boats at work.  When the first Vane boat arrived in the boro–was that in 2008 or 2009?–I never expected this many white with blue trim and V on the stack to work here. 

 

 

Potomac has been in and out of the harbor for over 10 years.

 

Above and below, it’s Wye River

And circling back to a tugboat from earlier in the post, enjoy another shot of Fells Point.

All photos, WVD.

My cryptic statement that “one is not like the others” might have you wondering what I meant by that:  Wicomico, Potomac, and Wye River are 4200 hp models;  the others are 3000 hp.

Thanks for the well-wishes yesterday;  the blog marches on with post 5051.

James William was slinging along a slew of barges.

Galveston (I think) was coming in the other morning with Chemical Transporter.  Usually Freeport pushes Chemical Transporter, so maybe I’m just misremembering.

With the slash of safety yellow across the barge bow, I was initially confused…

until the green with red trim told me it was definitely . . . Pinuccia

Two Vane 3000s separated by five years of work . . .  team up on getting the barge gently into her berth.

Paul Andrew Brian Nicholas gets watched very closely by the Lady of the sixth boro.

And, Matthew Tibbetts exits the east end of the Kills.

All photos, WVD, who is finally back in the sixth boro . . . for a bit.  I will be doing a lot of inland/coastal traveling the next few months.  All photos of workboats wherever you are are greatly appreciated.

 

Here’s what the Upper Bay looks like on an overcast but calm dawn . . . with panamax  Torm Elizabeth being lightened by Josephine and her barge.  The tanker is not quite a year old.  There’s a lot going on in that expanse of protected water:  ferries passing, lots of tug/barge units anchored, Nautical Janine anchored, and who knows how much movement sits beneath those buildings in the distance.

Seamagic is slightly larger and dates from 2006.  She’s taking on bunkers from Kings Point and her barge.

Hafnia Lise has half Seamagic‘s carrying capacity, dates from 2016.  Here she heads out for sea.

I just love some of these names, especially the next ones,  although my all-time favorite is still Surfer Rosa.  Maybe that’s because when I saw it I knew a Rosa who surfed.  Meet Solar Katherine at dawn. She’s also from 2020, like Torm Elizabeth.

Pacific Sarah dates from 2017.

Nautical Janine is two years old.

I wonder if these names– Janine, Sarah, Katherine, etc–have namesakes who know they’ve inspired a vessel name?  I know that can be true of tugboats . . . . because I’ve met actual namesakes.

One more before I hit the road . .   Silver Joan, taking on some fuel.

All photos, WVD.

Mackenzie Rose and Paul Andrew are eastbound, and Mary Turecamo, westbound.

 

A light Haggerty Girls westbound,

passing Laurie Ann Reinauer.

Kimberly Poling moves a barge out of the Kills.

 

A bulker in the anchorage gets bunkered by

Kings Point.  Katya Atk needs to repaint the name on the starboard bow.

And Helen Laraway makes her way east.

 

All photos, WVD.

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

When I saw this Onego cargo ship on AIS, I was hoping it still had the paint job it had when Henk Jungerious took the photo below.  click on the photo for more info.

But, no, the paint was more sedate as Onego Mississippi entered the sixth boro.

The design is unusual for this 2013 vessel, 380′ x 59′.

See the crewman standing watch above the name?

I’m curious about the angled back stalk holding the bridge and what that means for interior space.  See the two crewman at the bulwark below the rescue boat?

This vessel reminds me of Dutch-built CFL Prospect that I caught on the Hudson here back in 2008.

Click here for more Onego cargoes

Here’s another shot of that angled back stalk.

I’m not sure what cargo they’re either carrying of picking up, but it’s the second Onego vessel in as many days.  I missed Onego Rio.  Double click on the photo below to enlarge it.

All photos, WVD, who’s also reminded of Vikingbank I saw some years ago here.

Sea Fox as a cold front moves across the Upper Bay.

Mary Turecamo off to the next job.

Dorothy J returns from an assist.  I’ve lots more photos of the assist to post soon.

Joyce and James eastbound in the KVK to start the work day.

Dean Reinauer heads over to fuel up.

Kings Point going over to Gowanus Bay.

Brooklyn going to pick up her barge.

Fells Point returning from a job.

The very busy Patrice waiting for a ship as Dobrin heads over to her daily projects.

The always moving Brendan making money, as all these boats and crews are. 

And finally Sea Lion outbound in the Lower Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

I recall my first time seeing the KVK, astonished by the density of commercial traffic.  Of course, I’d just come from northern New England’s freshwater meandering rivers, surfable sandy coastlines, and marsh creeks. 

Patrice steamed westbound, light,

Kimberly eastbound,

Josephine,

Daisy Mae, moving a half acre of scows…

Helen Laraway,

Daisy Mae again a few seconds later.

But to put it all together, here are Pegasus, Josephine, and Cape Henry

Pegasus and Patrice,

Josephine, Kings Point, and Cape Henry….

It was a busy morning.  All photos, WVD.

 

Franklin crossed over the KVK to

assist Haggerty Girls and RTC 107 out of IMTT.

Patrice just finished assisting a box ship, and then turned around to help a government ship out of port.

Ernest Campbell with no lion yet on its stack.

Kings Points eases Double Skin 307 out of IMTT.

Marjorie B. is about to do a power turn and assist that box ship.

Meredith C. is heading offshore with RTC 135.

And let’s end with a throwback to yesterday’s “golden hour,”

Lincoln Sea and a stealthy Sarah D westbound light just after my first coffee hour.  I have more of these recent golden hour photos…

Here’s a better shot of Sarah D beside a stealthy USS Slater in Albany earlier this month.

All photos, WVD, who is now ready for the big 300.  If you want to assist with a photo of a tugboat, especially one never before seen on this blog –or never before seen in its current or previous iteration, send one along.  I’ll take a few days.

 

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