You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Kirby Moran’ tag.

Let’s start with Alice Oldendorff, inbound with a hold full of Nova Scotia stone and about to turn to starboard on her (almost) final approach to Brooklyn.   Alice and I have a long history.

YM Wind makes the final approach her into Global Terminals, her first call at sixth boro docks.  In contrast above, Alice has already made hundreds of calls here, always transporting aggregates. Visible assisting Wind are Alex McAllister and Ava M. McAllister.

E. R. Montecito is a large ship, but containers are stacked 17 across, versus 20 across for Wind above.

Undine here takes on bunkers and other supplies.  The small black/red/white vessel long her stern is Twin Tube, the venerable 1951 harbor supply vessel. In dry dock in the distance it’s USNS Sisler.

MOL Emissary travels the last few miles before Port Elizabeth.

Uniquely named tanker Forties waits in the Stapleton anchorage.

COSCO Vietnam enters the Kills and passes Houston at the dock.

Since Kriti Amber is Greek-flagged, I’m guessing that’s a variation on “Crete,” but that only conjecture.

QM2 takes on fuel while transferring passengers on the port side.

And let’s call it a day with Unique Explorer.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who considers himself fortunate to live in this large port.

 

While waiting for Triton, I had a surprise, a big pink surprise.  I hope someone gets photos of Triton when she departs.

But here, 24 days and 13 hours out of Singapore,

it’s

ONE Apus, which rhymes with “tape us.”  Since she’s a duplicate, I think, of ONE Stork, I assumed an apus referred to a bird in some language.  Any guesses?

Here are my first photos of ONE Stork.

 

See that messenger line coming down to send up

the big  line?

It turns out that “apus” is the Latin word for the common swift, a fantastic name for a ULCV.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s minutes late for the noontime posting.

Ten years ago I did a series called “meditations” as I was pitching about to structure my days.  The series was keyed to the alphabet, A to Z.  The L meditation focused on “line.”    Picking this back up has been prompted by the photo below.

Notice anything unusual about the line seen here?  By the way, CS Peony was underway when I took the photo.

Contrast the line in the images above and below.  Notice how taut the one from the OOCL ship is.

See the somewhat diagonal line between the port side of the green vessel and the Moran tug?  It’s tightly stretched.

Below . . .  both lines are tight.

Ditto . . . below.

And along the other side of CS Peony . . .  bar tight.

In a different context, a tightrope walker like Philippe Petit could navigate that non-sagging line.

But here . . . I find this unusual.

Any ideas?

Photos and observations by Will Van Dorp.

 

Spring and fog coexist a lot, and from there, the gradation from fog to summer haze is somewhat blurred.  Blue-hulled Oyster Catcher, in the foreground, gives clearest indication that this in not a black/white/gray photo.  I’ve searched online fruitlessly to confirm that Oyster Catcher is an NYC DEP vessel.  When

A panoply of vessels converge in the Narrows as the great gray ULCV approaches from many days at sea.

 

I’ve not been paying attention to how many of these ULCVs have multiple bow thrusters.  Anyone know the horsepower on each?

 

 

 

Three 6000s, one 3900, and two brants . . . all converging along with Cosco Faith.

For scale, notice the 25′-to 30′ outboard passing just to the right of the letter O in COSCO.  More to scale, note the size of engineering crew next to this crankshaft.

I waited for a messenger line for the deckhand to send up the towline, but  . . . it happened after they were out of range for me.

x

x

Way back when, I had some fun abridging “__ Express” names, generating Glex and Sex.   While out at the KVK, then, I thought I’d seen Dublin Express aka Dex before, so I’d take some photos, of the box ship and

the two escort tugs.

And I wondered about the unusual pyramidal arrangement of containers on the stern.

I hadn’t known that Gary Haszko, credited for the next two photos,  was taking photos almost simultaneously from Elizabethport, and aware of something else.

Here the two tugs assist in pinning Dex to the pierced in Howland Hook.  He also knew something else I was unaware of, ie, containers tumbling overboard during a rough ocean transit may have damaged the hull and led to oil spilling into the Kills.  For more on this spill, click here.

After a concerted investigation and clean up effort, USCG cleared the ship to depart. 

Many thanks to Gary for use of the last two photos above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s that day, and although I’d planned something different, there are a lot of these green containers coming through the sixth boro.  Guess which ship?  Unrelated but something else to guess?  What is the emerald isle of the Great Lakes USA?  Answer follows.

Kimberly Turecamo was on port bow the other day, as

 

James D. and

 

Kirby assist along starboard side.

I believe 30 of the L- series have been built.  Click here (and look on the left nav bar) for their green features.

Go to any world shipping lane and you’ll see them.  The photo below was in Gatun Lake.

Their profile is unmistakeable.

I certainly haven’t even taken a photo of everyone I’ve seen in the sixth boro.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s ingesting green things like basil and oregano today.

Here is the first in this series.  Here’s another.  And from 12 years ago here’s an earlier class of Evergreen C-ships.

Emerald Isle of the Great Lakes . . .  it’s in Lake Michigan . . .  Beaver Island!!

 

When the almost 20,000 hp team is assembled this way, it means one thing.

Sometimes it’s a big bright bird in flamingo, but other times it might be a dark bird.

Kirby went in first,

followed by Miriam. This one’s a crane, dark like NYK Blue Jay is.

Click here (and scroll) for the anticipated seven other bird names in this series of 14,000 teu ULCVs.

James D. and Joan stayed on this side  .  . .

 

 

I’d love to see NYK Crane side by side with NYK Daedalus, as shown here in 2008.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who forgot about time today.

By my interpretation, this ULCV is propelled by about a 38,000 hp engine. But NYK Eagle has a different and more powerful engine.  I’m not sure my interpretation here is correct.

 

 

 

Turning or spinning . . . and there may be a technical term for “sailing” as vessel by rotating it away from the dock, into the current and making a 180 degree turn.  It’s an evolution I enjoy photographing.

Seriana was launched in Japan in 2015, but it’s not as big as it seems, given the current scale of vessels I know:  it’s 770′ by almost 138′ but from the deck to the water . . . over 50′ I’d wager.  That’s a lot of tank.

Imagine climbing the companionway from Julia Miller.  Next on the scene were (l to r) Kirby Moran and Jonathan C Moran.

Water began to sluice through the hawse.

After lots of traffic had cleared,

the rotation began.  Seemingly she had enough headway on so that she didn’t drift astern and into the dock there Petali Lady lay on the far side.

 

This is my favorite in the series .  .  . a foreshortened tanker.

 

I like this a lot also: a plumb bow and just enough detail to ID the tugboat company.

Jonathan C heads back to the barn–or the next job–and

Kirby stands by as it anchors in Stapleton, were she remains as of this morning.  Can anyone ID the red tug on the far side of the tanker?  Delta maybe?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

You’ll see the entire vessel as you scroll through here, but for starters, any idea of the namesake for this vessel?  At what point in these photos can you tell if you’re looking at a Panamax or postPanamax vessel or whether this is a ULCV?

Kirby has the stern and Margaret is portside.

At this point, you can answer most of the questions above.  I have to confess I thought she looked small.

JRT has the starboard.

 

To compare Tucapel with a standard container vessel from 10 years ago, check out this January 2009 post here.  And look at Sun Right, now scrapped.  Sun Right was launched in 1993.  Tucapel was launched in 2012.

 

Sun Right carried 4299 teu, and Tucapel . . . 8000.  The biggest ULCVs in the sixth boro these days are around 14,000.

And the vessel namesake?   Here’s the answer.

All photos and info by Will Van Dorp.

 

Birk certainly got this one better than I did, which you can see here.

Kirby has a new tug out, Cape Henry, and this is my first time to see it.  Is it pushing its first load out?  What barge is it pushing?

I calculated the two shots above wrong, but I love these next two of Kirby Moran and

Margaret Moran.

All photos since daybreak today by Will Van Dorp, who missed his deadline.  Please keep this secret out of the Tower, or understand this is an early post on Central Time.

 

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