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This post covers a day and a half of travel, shown in pink and green.  You’ll understand why by the end of this post.

We departed Chandeleur Islands and headed for Mississippi’s Gulf Islands, part of a National Seashore.

In the distance off Pascagoula, we saw Crowley tug Achievement and her barge.

 

No Worries . . . that’s the small open fishing boat anchored near the rig.

 

F/V Apache Rose was at anchor showing off its “wing trawling” innovation.

Lois Ann L. Moran, with its very familiar livery, anchored off Mobile Bay, to the west of a dozen or so anchored vessels.

Sand Island Light marks the southernmost tip of the state of Alabama.

I’ll just point out here that we saw countless rigs off Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.  That fact contrasts with what will follow in an upcoming post.

Lots of placards indicated presence of Cox and Telos, but I saw none marked Hilcorp or other energy companies. 

We ended that day off Perdido Key Resort in Floribama, where some skullduggery appeared to warrant keeping our distance. 

The next morning we entered Pensacola

for some crew change and grub shopping. 

Fort Pickens, one of only four southern US forts to remain in Union hands during the Civil War, lay on a barrier beach.   Updates were made to the fort up through WW2.

USCGC Walnut (WLB-205) is homeported in Pensacola, but nearby were two other CGCs,

Reliance and

Diligence.  A WLB and a WMEC made up part of the fleet in the sixth boro back in May 2022.

And here is the reason I extended this installment all the way to Pensacola.  As we made for our landing, we passed Gulf Dawn, which itself was passing that large blue/white vessel in the background . . . .

It’s Jacklyn, Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin rocket landing ship-to-be.  Well, now it will never be, since Julie F towed it out of Pensacola just two days ago, destination ISL Brownsville TX.  The story in detail can be read/heard here.

All photos, any errors, WVD, who will reprise this trip on the blog soon with more vessels.

 

 

In part 1, Treasure Coast slowly made her way to mid KVK, and I thought it was to get fuel, but it was soon apparent that she was there for an assist, to help ATB Galveston and Petrochem Producer to get off the dock.

The scale of Galveston is apparent from the workboat;  the tug is 144′ x 46′.

She’s slightly larger than Lynne M. Rose, and works with a total of 12,000 hp.

My vantage point has not changed here, so the movement here derives from the ATB powering astern.

Notice just to the left to the mooring line spools . . .

Normandy is the second assist tug.

Once the ATB is pointed east, the assist tugs back off.

 

 

 

Treasure Coast follows the ATB toward the Upper Bay.

As of posting, ATB Galveston/Petrochem Producer are off Palm Beach on their way to western Louisiana.

All photos, WVD, who has just confirmed a return to the bayous of western LA myself next week.

Unrelated:  If you’ve always dreamed of owning a tugboat yacht, here‘s one that popped into my feed just before post time.  Below are two photos I took of the same tugboat, Shenandoah, in Waterford on September 13, 2009.

Tug44 was a friend of the Buffalo-based owners at that time, Baltimore registry notwithstanding.

 

Tugster is on an extended trip, so the robots have scheduled these posts.  Later in May, I will get back to Barge Canal-era photos from the Canal Society.  I’ve taken a break from that series to “catch up.” 

Next I’ll alternate in posts using photos thanks to Pete Ludlow, whose aerie high above the East River just “west” of Hell Gate places him in a unique location to get good photos of traffic through there, and he has certainly captured some winners, photos and evolutions I’ve not seen from my preferred places.

Here Jay Michael tows a dead ship Sea Hunter to be scrapped farther downeast.

 

Some years ago I caught Sea Hunter in port of Boston, when she looked bad but surely not this bad. 

Sea Hunter was once the platform for a treasure hunter, but as so often happens, certain treasure becomes just out of reach, if they ever existed at all. 

Another unusual tow, this one westbound, is Ivory Coast towing

GDM 264, a barge-mounted cement unloader.

 

Many thanks to Pete for sharing these scenes not previously seen on tugster.

Let’s go back a decade.  Then MSC Emma was on the west coast of Bayonne leaving town; now she’s on the west coast of Central America, leaving Lazaro Cardenas for Panama.

Above she was assisted by Gramma Lee T [now in Norfolk] and Margaret and setting up for the turn from Newark Bay into the KVK;  here we had almost gotten ahead of the trio of vessels.

A strange trio was in the sky

over the sixth boro. The piggyback rider is still in town, albeit likely to never fly again. More here.

Meanwhile, over in the Arthur Kill, a boring machine was placing charges in holes below the bottom of the waterway and connecting them to the stringy orange signal cord to blast when the time was right for them all to detonate at the same millisecond.  That day I touched some hefty but perfectly safe explosives, inert until the right signal is applied, which sounds like some folks I know.

More on “kraken” the bottom here.

Back then, I was spending a lot of early mornings near Howland Hook waiting for my work to begin, and I caught a Double Skin 37 moving bunkers

and maneuvered by Coral Coast.  Was that mechanical dredge Captain A. J. Fournier in the distance above?

The Joker was then a more sedate Taurus, before joining the hilariously-named over at Hays.

Put Tasman Sea into the picture too.  Is the Tasmanian still laid up in Louisiana?

And it was a great April 2012 day I caught the seldom-seen Patty Nolan

moving a houseboat into the sixth boro.  Patty seems to be preparing for a comeback.

And the 1972 2325 teu Horizon Navigator, here with Samantha Miller alongside,  was still working.  Is the 1972 container ship still intact?

And let’s wind this up with Ellen and Maurania III returning to base after a job.  Ellen is still in the sixth boro, and Maurania III is in the Delaware.

All photos, WVD, April 2012.

Entirely unrelated, check out these Smithsonian photo winners.

 

 

Just photos will appear here today, and I realize I’m contradicting that statement by writing this sentence and the others.  However,  inspiration was failing me, so I decided this post should be not photo-driven, but photo-dominated.  Names are provided in the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday started sunny, but then clouds moved in.

I’ve thought about using this title quite often, and I surely have a lot of candidates, my personal ones, to include here.

Know the tug(s) from the photo below?  Really the most seldom seen is the nearer one, the one with escape ropes mounted on either side of the wheelhouse egresses.

Pacific Dawn I last saw over six years ago here.  She tends to follow dredging projects, which might possibly have brought her in the other day. 

I’ve seen Delta a lot on AIS, but I believe I should consider her a “never seen” by me.  So voila!

Here she passes the seldom seen Ypapanti and the some to be no longer seen Pilot No. 1 New York.  I could be wrong about the last part of that statement.  

Delta also tends to follow dredging projects, it seems to me.

 

Have your own “seldom seen”?  Let me know.  All photos here in the past week, WVD.

 . .  but first, I know I missed lots of excitement in the sixth boro this morning.  If anyone got photos, I’d love to share them here for folks who don’t do FB.  Now let’s head a few years back and down on the Chesapeake in Baltimore. . . 

Sea Crescent . .  .  I believe she’s a 1981 Stevens Towing vessel, currently in Narragansett Bay.  I took this photo near Annapolis.

The 1970 Capt. Henry Knott operates for Vulcan Marine Services. She’s currently in norfolk. 

In the foreground, it’s the 1975 Indian Dawn, formerly Sea Star at Spentonbush-Red Star in the sixth boro. My notes fail me on the tug beyond the scow. 

Now inside Baltimore, it’s Bridget McAllister. The 2006 tug was built as Leo for Foss and worked at one time under that name for Constellation Maritime, as seen here

Also in Baltimore it’s the 1966 YTB now known as Timothy McAllister. Like Ellen and Steven McAllister, she brings 4000 horses to the job. 

 

Harriet Moran is a 1978 Jakobson tugboat that was heavily modified in the 1990s.

James R. Moran is a 2004 Washburn & Doughty tractor, rated at 5000 hp. John W. Brown is one of the last remaining Liberty ships, off the ways in Baltimore in 1942.  In that link, you see her in the sixth boro in 2016.

Rounding out the Moran fleet I saw in 2017, it’s April Moran and Z-One. They are from 2006 and 1996, respectively, and both rated at 5100 hp. I first ran into Z-One in San Juan, here

Now out of Baltimore and headed for the C & D Canal, I ran into the 1981 Skiffs Creek Towing vessel Justin, with a loaded barge. 

All photos, WVD. 

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