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At first light, Navigator passes a docked Saint Emilion

This 1981 build has called the sixth boro her home since 2015.  Saint Emilion (2007) has been here in two previous liveries and names.

Barney Turecamo was launched in 1995.  Note her cutaway forefoot.

Barney, married to Georgia, gets an assist from Doris Moran, 1982, as she departs the dock.

 

Meaghan Marie, 1968, follows a box ship into port but is not involved in the assist.

Meaghan Marie is a former fleetmate of Margaret Moran, 1979, doing the assist.

Emily Ann, 1964, moves a sanitation scow.

 

And finally, coming in from sea with a dump scow, it’s Captain Willie Landers, 2001.

When she first appeared on this blog in 2015, she had a prominent mast, not an upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

More Gowanus soon, but for now, this follows a post from a few years back called “boxes on ships,” but what begs for attention here is the number of less common containers, these by a company called Agmark

Maersk Vallvik actually has two centers of liquid bulk containers, Agmark toward the stern and Bertschi farther forward.

Bertschi is a Swiss company that transports, among many other things, cocoa butter, i.e., their self-described “heaven.”

All this brings me to what appears to be the biggest concentration of tanks . . . . Agmark’s.  According to their site, they transport the following:  “Dairy products, concentrated and single strength fruit juices, vegetable oils, spirits, wine, chocolate, alcohol, beverage preparations, essences, hot or cold bulk liquids, food products, chemicals, and fuels.”

So, this could have cold fruit juice, just like these, but in parcels rather than “shipfulls.”  Others carry “rock juice” either by the shipfull or in parcels.

But i digress.  I don’t know what Vallvik carried in those tanks;  my point here is simply that she carried a lot of those tanks.

Back in 2013 this same vessel called attention for another type of container as here.

All photos, WVD.   And that small craft in the photo above, maybe that’s in tomorrow’s post.

Another unusual container type, CATS, was featured here 10 years ago.

2011 began in Charleston, a great place to welcome a new year.  Strolling around, I encounter the 1962 75′ buoy tender Anvil, 75301, here made up to CGB68013.  In the background, that’s cutter Cormorant or Chinook.

Heading farther north a day or two later, it’s Hoss, sister of Patricia, and now habitat for fish and other sea life.  Click here to see her sink if you do FB.

Still farther north, I see this T-boat, a 1952 Higgins named for a high point in Ireland.

Lucinda Smith, then based in Maine, is currently based on Cape Cod.

Bering Sea, like a lot of K-Sea boat, has become a Kirby boat;  it is currently in Philadelphia.  According to Birk’s invaluable site, this boat was Stacy Moran for a short time.  I never saw it in Moran red.

Thanks to my friend Paul Strubeck, this Kristin Poling needed an assist from Cornell to get through an ice jam.  This is one of my all-time favorite photos.  It looks to me like a submarine in the very deeps.

McCormack Boys was active in the sixth boro back in 2011, and although she’s still working, I’ve not seen her in years.

I glimpsed Stephen Scott in Boston a few months back, but since this photo was taken, she’s lost the upper wheelhouse.

There’s classic winter light beyond Torm Carina, provisioned here by Twin Tube.  Torm Carina is currently in the Taiwan Strait. 

Later Margaret and Joan Moran assist the tanker westbound in the KVK while Taurus passes.  Taurus has become Joker, wears Hays purple, and I’ve not even seen her yet.  I guess it’s high time I hang out in Philadelphia again.

A wintry photo shows McKinley Sea in the KVK eastbound.  In the distance,

notice the now foreign-based Scotty Patrick Sky.  If you want to see her, gallivant to St. Lucia.  McKinley Sea is currently laid up in Louisiana.

Erie Service, now Genesis Valiant, pushes her barge 6507 westbound. 

And on a personal note, it was in January 2011 that I stumbled into a locality that had been attracting me.  I suppose if ever I created a retreat, I’d have to call it Galivants Hideaway.   Here‘s another Galivants Ferry set of photos.

Thanks to Paul for use of his photo.  All other photos, a decade back, WVD.

 

Not quite half a year ago, I caught Rose from the sunny side.  

This undifferentiated mass in the Ambrose Channel yesterday was quite impressive as well.

As a reference, the towers of the VZ Bridge towers in 693′.  The length of the tugboat in the foreground is just under 90′.

I’ve not pointed out Robbins Reef Light in a while, and that’s part of the Manhattan skyline beyond, also an undifferentiated mass in the morning fog.

The 13,500 teu vessel came off the ways at a Hudong-Zhanghua shipyard about two years ago.

She was assisted in by four tugboats.

 

Margaret, Jonathan C, Kirby, and Kimberly.

 

The three-mile strait called KVK, or the very Dutch name Kill van Kull, is hardly straight.

 

As she rounded Bergen Point, a trailer crossed over from Bayonne to Staten Island, harbinger of what will happen to whatever number of containers leave the ship in the next two days in Port Elizabeth.

All photos, WVD.

Given yesterday’s post, I’ll subtitle this “tugster:  the return.”  From a weather perspective, it wasn’t ideal weather.  From a traffic perspective, I also thought it was not ideal, because I’d hoped a certain ULCV would enter  the boro in daylight, but it had moved in three hours before the sun rose behind thick cloud strata.  

However, it was a busy morning.  And seen through one filter, a certain set of colors dominated. 

Get the picture?

It’s time to meet the incoming ships, 

 

There’s work around that bend.

Just count them:  all four Moran 6000s as well as Margaret and Kimberly . . . farther away and along the right side of the photo.

I don’t believe I’ve seen all four 6000s in the same frame before, as above.

The morning had brightened a bit as they escorted in the box ships.

 

 

 

 

It’s always good to get away, but it’s even better to get back.  All photos, WVD.

This is a photo emblematic of our time . . .  two seafarers.  I could even speculate comfortably about their nationality.  The older man to the left has no mask, and the other, with mask, is on his device.  This can only be 2020.

Ditto here . . . the masked seafarer standing watch, leaning back on the rail as the vessel heads out to sea.

This can only be NYC, in the 20 aughts or later.  I took it in September 2020.

Here’s a series of three.  See the two crew?

They were testing/arranging something with the jacob’s ladder.

Then, this crewman saw me taking photos and he posed!

Here both the captain of the tug and the two ship’s crew are watching the pilot step across onto Margaret.

The pilot here stands out on the port bridge wing.

And finally, a crewman on a local boat provides lookout on the barge.

All photos, WVD, who loves summertime  . . . as no doubt so do these crew.

As of writing, two pink ULCVs– ONE Minato and ONE Hawk–share the cranes at Global Terminals. That would be a great photo, but I’m tied up this morning.

Recently, I waited around for another one of the CMA CGM Explorer series ULCVs.   So far, I’ve seen Vespucci.  That leaves von Humbolt, Colomb, Laperouse, Verne, Magellan, Polo, and Zheng.

Foreshadowing:  JRT is cutting ahead of CMA CGM Corte Real to go to the next job.

The “explorer” in this case is obscure on this side of the world.  Gaspar Corte Real was a 15th-century explorer memorialized by a statue in St. John’s Newfoundland.

More foreshadowing:  Margaret has the honors here of retrieving the docking pilot.

This photo was taken a half hour after the previous ones. That’s JRT cutting across the Narrows to position for the next job . . .

an APL ULCV that Margaret is already alongside.

JRT closes in on the bow of APL Sentosa,named for an amusement resort in Singapore.

She’s the longest ULCV to call in the sixth boro, to date, I believe. Prove me wrong. She’s listed at 1207′ x 167′ whereas Corte Real has the same beam but is seven feet shorter.

Here the two ULCVs meet.  Between them, they have capacity of 27,238 containers.  both ULCVs loaded in Sri Lanka in early August.  I’m wondering if anyone there got a photo of the two together in the port of Colombo.

 

As to relative size of ULCV to tugboat, notice the two crew on the bow of tug (in blue green)  and stern of ship (in orange with white helmet)?

Here’s a closer up, where you can see the messenger line coming down . . . just about to hit the deck.  The deckhand will grab it, make the messenger to the tow line, and the ship’s crew will bring it back to the ship.

 

All photos, WVD.

On the 2020 calendar, the top right photo shows a shore fisherman, a small fishing boat, a tug, and a tanker.    The 2013 and 49,999 dwt tanker, Elandra Sea, as of this morning is in the Java Sea, likely almost as far from the sixth boro as you can get.  The tug escorting her in is Capt. Brian A. McAllister.   It turns out that was the only photo I took of that vessel, because of the fisherman, small boat, and industrial vessels and setting.

What I was really there for that morning was the mothership of Sandy Hook Pilots, New York No. 1, the current one as the new one is being created.  It seemed to be an event happening on the after deck. Surprisingly, I believe I’ve never posted this shot until now.

Upper left on the June 2020 page is Helen Laraway; seconds before I took the photo chosen for the calendar, she passed this this container ship E. R. Montecito, escorted in by  James D.

The 2004 and 7544teu container ship is currently in the Malacca Strait, heading for Durban SA, and carries a new name. . . GSL Grania.  I cherish info like this, reinforcing the fact that the sixth boro is but a tiny place on a planet of countless coastlines.

Assisting her in were James D, JRT, and Margaret.

The lower photo on the calendar was taken in the Mohawk Valley, lock E-13, easily accessed via the westbound lanes of the NYS Thruway.  Grande Caribe was Chicago bound.  For more info on E-13, click here.

As she departed the lock, she passed one of the newest tugboats on the Erie Canal, Port Jackson, named for the part of Amsterdam NY  on the south side of the river.    It turns out that the family of the namesake of Port Jackson moved west and distinguished himself.   The barge attached to Port Jackson no doubt has an identified; I wish I knew it and its history, given the riveted hull.

The next shot after the one on the calendar shows the 183′ x 40′ Grande Caribe shrinking as it juxtaposes with the ridge that makes up the Noses.   Grande Caribe is currently in Warren RI, as Blount Small Ships Adventures has decided that in the wake of COVID, it’s better to use 2020 to plan for 2021.   So, neither of the Grande vessels will be transiting the canal this year.  Given the virus, I’ve planed some gallivants, but as is true for everyone, much of that is on hold.  I’m free to gallivant now, but my sense of responsibility says I stay put and see this all as opportunity to craft a different path.

All photos, WVD, who is working his way through his library again.  Last week it was Pieces of the Frame and Uncommon Carriers.  I’m currently re-reading The Night Inspector, historical novel by Frederick Busch, on the exploits in post-Civil War New York featuring a mask-wearing disfigured wounded vet who worked as a sniper in the Civil War, and his friend M, who is none other than Herman Melville, the washed up writer who currently works in the harbor as a night inspector, aka a deputy inspector of Customs who would row out to any ships arriving inport in the dark hours and waiting until morning to clear customs. Here‘s another review.

I’ve also discovered the many videos of Tim B at Sea on youtube.  Interesting stuff . . .  answers to questions you’ve not even considered yet in some cases.

Stephen Reinauer westbound as the sun heads in the same direction.

Mary Turecamo assists an MOL ship into port.

Ava M pushes toward the pilot’s door on the side of another container ship.

James D heads to the next job amid two container ships in the approaches.

Margaret throttles up alongside.

James William travels toward Howland Hook.

James E. heads, no doubt, for the car float with rail cars awaiting it.

Stephen Dann heads in to get some fuel.

Emily Ann travels light toward the Upper Bay.

All photos from a socially-distanced, physically-isolated, seasonally-adjusted, pent-up energized, freely-masked, and emotionally-stale  WVD.

 

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