You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Margaret Moran’ tag.

This is a photo emblematic of our time . . .  two seafarers.  I could even speculate comfortably about their nationality.  The older man to the left has no mask, and the other, with mask, is on his device.  This can only be 2020.

Ditto here . . . the masked seafarer standing watch, leaning back on the rail as the vessel heads out to sea.

This can only be NYC, in the 20 aughts or later.  I took it in September 2020.

Here’s a series of three.  See the two crew?

They were testing/arranging something with the jacob’s ladder.

Then, this crewman saw me taking photos and he posed!

Here both the captain of the tug and the two ship’s crew are watching the pilot step across onto Margaret.

The pilot here stands out on the port bridge wing.

And finally, a crewman on a local boat provides lookout on the barge.

All photos, WVD, who loves summertime  . . . as no doubt so do these crew.

As of writing, two pink ULCVs– ONE Minato and ONE Hawk–share the cranes at Global Terminals. That would be a great photo, but I’m tied up this morning.

Recently, I waited around for another one of the CMA CGM Explorer series ULCVs.   So far, I’ve seen Vespucci.  That leaves von Humbolt, Colomb, Laperouse, Verne, Magellan, Polo, and Zheng.

Foreshadowing:  JRT is cutting ahead of CMA CGM Corte Real to go to the next job.

The “explorer” in this case is obscure on this side of the world.  Gaspar Corte Real was a 15th-century explorer memorialized by a statue in St. John’s Newfoundland.

More foreshadowing:  Margaret has the honors here of retrieving the docking pilot.

This photo was taken a half hour after the previous ones. That’s JRT cutting across the Narrows to position for the next job . . .

an APL ULCV that Margaret is already alongside.

JRT closes in on the bow of APL Sentosa,named for an amusement resort in Singapore.

She’s the longest ULCV to call in the sixth boro, to date, I believe. Prove me wrong. She’s listed at 1207′ x 167′ whereas Corte Real has the same beam but is seven feet shorter.

Here the two ULCVs meet.  Between them, they have capacity of 27,238 containers.  both ULCVs loaded in Sri Lanka in early August.  I’m wondering if anyone there got a photo of the two together in the port of Colombo.

 

As to relative size of ULCV to tugboat, notice the two crew on the bow of tug (in blue green)  and stern of ship (in orange with white helmet)?

Here’s a closer up, where you can see the messenger line coming down . . . just about to hit the deck.  The deckhand will grab it, make the messenger to the tow line, and the ship’s crew will bring it back to the ship.

 

All photos, WVD.

On the 2020 calendar, the top right photo shows a shore fisherman, a small fishing boat, a tug, and a tanker.    The 2013 and 49,999 dwt tanker, Elandra Sea, as of this morning is in the Java Sea, likely almost as far from the sixth boro as you can get.  The tug escorting her in is Capt. Brian A. McAllister.   It turns out that was the only photo I took of that vessel, because of the fisherman, small boat, and industrial vessels and setting.

What I was really there for that morning was the mothership of Sandy Hook Pilots, New York No. 1, the current one as the new one is being created.  It seemed to be an event happening on the after deck. Surprisingly, I believe I’ve never posted this shot until now.

Upper left on the June 2020 page is Helen Laraway; seconds before I took the photo chosen for the calendar, she passed this this container ship E. R. Montecito, escorted in by  James D.

The 2004 and 7544teu container ship is currently in the Malacca Strait, heading for Durban SA, and carries a new name. . . GSL Grania.  I cherish info like this, reinforcing the fact that the sixth boro is but a tiny place on a planet of countless coastlines.

Assisting her in were James D, JRT, and Margaret.

The lower photo on the calendar was taken in the Mohawk Valley, lock E-13, easily accessed via the westbound lanes of the NYS Thruway.  Grande Caribe was Chicago bound.  For more info on E-13, click here.

As she departed the lock, she passed one of the newest tugboats on the Erie Canal, Port Jackson, named for the part of Amsterdam NY  on the south side of the river.    It turns out that the family of the namesake of Port Jackson moved west and distinguished himself.   The barge attached to Port Jackson no doubt has an identified; I wish I knew it and its history, given the riveted hull.

The next shot after the one on the calendar shows the 183′ x 40′ Grande Caribe shrinking as it juxtaposes with the ridge that makes up the Noses.   Grande Caribe is currently in Warren RI, as Blount Small Ships Adventures has decided that in the wake of COVID, it’s better to use 2020 to plan for 2021.   So, neither of the Grande vessels will be transiting the canal this year.  Given the virus, I’ve planed some gallivants, but as is true for everyone, much of that is on hold.  I’m free to gallivant now, but my sense of responsibility says I stay put and see this all as opportunity to craft a different path.

All photos, WVD, who is working his way through his library again.  Last week it was Pieces of the Frame and Uncommon Carriers.  I’m currently re-reading The Night Inspector, historical novel by Frederick Busch, on the exploits in post-Civil War New York featuring a mask-wearing disfigured wounded vet who worked as a sniper in the Civil War, and his friend M, who is none other than Herman Melville, the washed up writer who currently works in the harbor as a night inspector, aka a deputy inspector of Customs who would row out to any ships arriving inport in the dark hours and waiting until morning to clear customs. Here‘s another review.

I’ve also discovered the many videos of Tim B at Sea on youtube.  Interesting stuff . . .  answers to questions you’ve not even considered yet in some cases.

Stephen Reinauer westbound as the sun heads in the same direction.

Mary Turecamo assists an MOL ship into port.

Ava M pushes toward the pilot’s door on the side of another container ship.

James D heads to the next job amid two container ships in the approaches.

Margaret throttles up alongside.

James William travels toward Howland Hook.

James E. heads, no doubt, for the car float with rail cars awaiting it.

Stephen Dann heads in to get some fuel.

Emily Ann travels light toward the Upper Bay.

All photos from a socially-distanced, physically-isolated, seasonally-adjusted, pent-up energized, freely-masked, and emotionally-stale  WVD.

 

Last post I titled this way was almost 10 years ago here.

These photos from a few days ago show no sense of the unprecedentedly different harbor.

Since Margaret assisted fleet mate Lois Ann L with barge Philadelphia off crude tanker Ionic Artemis, they’ve separated, each headed out in different directions.

x

 

All photos, WVD, who wishes everyone health.

 

I won’t ask which tug that is, featureless though it is, given the title.  I’m actually astonished that after some 4450 posts I’ve not yet dedicated a post to this tugboat.

That’s Brendan Turecamo on starboard bow and Miriam Moran on port.  Brendan is four years older than Miriam, which was christened in November 1979 and has worked in the sixth boro ever since.

 

She’s named for the  . . . Miriam Moran, wife of the Moran President from 1964 until 1987, if I read the archives correctly.

 

She has appeared on this blog hundreds of times;  one of the earliest was in Random Tugs 001,  back in 2007 when I still located relevant text below photos, unlike above them, as I do now, since one reads from the top . . .

Hat tip to this hard working tug, and her sister Margaret, two of the five tugs of the Dorothy Moran class. Spot differences?

I see at least one, but no doubt there are more both inside and out but visible only to the connoisseur.

All photos, WVD.

This series goes way back to 2007, when I erroneously thought a song existed called “Paris in springtime.”  My deciding it must be a faux memory did not prevent me from doing a bunch more posts, with variations like “pairs in winter,” like today’s posts.  It still is winter.  And there is a movie with a somewhat similar name;  a fun trailer can be seen here.

Let’s start with Sarah Ann and Thomas E. pairing up to get a crane off to Sims.

 

Ellen and Ava team up to see a small container vessel into the kills.

 

Meagan Ann and Emily Ann each bring a scow for the filling, likely with scrap?

 

And for a variation, a mixed triad of Margaret, Alex, and Ava return from assists.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you happy springish late winter and successful social separations.

 

 

As coronavirus spasms across the globe, affecting all aspects of public activity, container ship runs has been blanked.  But you would not guess so from the string of CMA CGM vessels that came in one sunny day last week.  La Traviata rounded the bend just before 1100.

The teu capacity of this 2006-built ship is said to be 8488 containers.

She was so light that the prop wash splashed froth to the surface.

Ten minutes later CMA CGM Thames appeared.

Thames carries 9200 containers, and was built in 2015.  I’ve never seen either Thames or La Traviata in the sixth boro, which does not mean they’ve not called here before.

 

A few hours later, a third CMA CGM vessel arrived . . . Amerigo Vespucci, one I had previously seen.

The 2010 Vespucci has capacity of 13,344 containers.  She one of the 1200′ vessels that now regularly call here.

That totals to 31,032 teu container capacity represented by a single fleet transiting inbound in less than a quarter of a day!  And to do some math here, that’s about 117 miles of containers stacked end to end, ie., the distance from the Staten Island St. George Terminal to the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

For some perspective, a Korean company will begin operating the largest teu vessels to date . . . 24,000 teu.

So like I said, last week I did not sense that container ship sailings were slowing, which does not mean they are not.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  A new word for a wasteful and polluting practice is coming from pandemic  . . . they’re called ghost flights . . .  Here‘s more on why airlines choose to fly these almost empty planes.

But first, what can you tell me about the tree directly below?

Now to “hoops” and maybe I should say “Höegh hoops . . .”

Here’s the aft most one, and

the court extends forward from there to this one.

See it?  I wished I’d been on the Bayonne Bridge walkway to look down on it.

JRT assisted and maybe delivered a ref?

 

JRT, 88.7′, is only slightly less long than the court, if it’s a standard NBA 94′ x 50′.

Possibly much more basketball goes on shipboard unbeknownst to anyone photographing as I was, played by seafarers constantly on the move.  I took this photo of basketball in the hold of a bulk carrier from a FB group called Seaman Online, which I’ve been following for a while.

All photos but the last one by Will Van Dorp.

Previous “hoops” post can be found here.

And finally . . .  this would have fit better in yesterday’s post, but . . . a reader in New Zealand sent the top photo along as a NZ “christmas tree”.

He writes:  “The New Zealand Christmas icon is the pohutukawa tree which has scarlet blossoms in December. [Remember it’s the southern hemisphere’s summer.]   It is often called the New Zealand Christmas Tree. It is a coastal variety and is often seen on cliff edges and spreading shade over sandy beaches.  The crooks of the branches were also used for the framing and knees of wooden boats.”

Thx, Denis and Judy.  More on a Kiwi Christmas here.

Update on the calendar voting, i.e., “polling… 1 through 4”   you’ve now seen the options for each month, but voting remains open, and I’m still accepting candidates for the December page.  And I’m grateful for all the voting so far.

Less than a handful of years back, a buzz could be heard in all the boros about these new ships that were going to arrive.  Well, they did and now seem routine.

Antwerpen Express departed the other day.

She and all the other ULCVs are longer than the Chrysler Building, once the first building to exceed 1000′, is tall.  The Chrysler is now obscured by all the taller buildings in the distance.

The same morning, the next “flower ULCV” departed.   We’ve seen Jasmine, Peony, and Camellia . ..   welcome  . . .

Sakura!!  aka cherry blossom.

The Moran 6000s arelarge tugboats, but here Jonathan C barely extends upward of the bottom paint.

 

Yesterday I drove past a trucking company yard with lots of trailers.  Compared with the “trailer boxes” you see here, that trucking yard was tiny.

“O ship!!” indeed!

 

And the story does not end here;  later Sunday afternoon–the day I took these photos–another ULCV YM Warmth arrived, but I was tied up and couldn’t run out to get a photo.   O ship!!!

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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