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All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Quick  . ..  name the ship name the ONE vessel  . . .

The first three photos were taken Sunday by Bjoern of the New York Media Boat.

And if you know the tugs in the sixth boro you have a 75% chance of naming all tugs here too . . .   three of the four 6000 hp tugs by Moran.  I’m not first in pointing out how small the tugs look relative to the 1200′ ONE Stork.  I hope you guessed that right.  The tugs are JRT, James D, Jonathan, and then Margaret farther back.

While we’re on names . . .  Glenn Raymo caught this photo  upriver.

Dodo . . . First ONE Stork and then Dodo.

Over by Shooters Island the other day, I caught Amstel Stork, coming from Port Newark and headed upriver herself.

Jonathan and Miriam assist her around Bergen Point, but here’s my point:  two vessels named “stork” in the harbor the same week!!?  What going on?  And with Dutch as my first language, I read this as Ooievaar van Amsted . . . that big bird name being ooievaar in Dutch.

Recently, vessels with the following names have visited the sixth boro:   NYK Blue Jay    Southern Owl   Stena Penguin  …   See what I mean about a trend that has emerged?  A few years back I saw the Eagle fleet, eg in yesterday’s post, and separate from that . . . Asphalt Eagle.  A few years back I saw a Peacock.

Here are some I suppose I’ll never see:  Subsea Seven has some bird vessels, esp  in diving support.

Millennium Falcon….  oh wait, that might not have launched yet . . .   Magic Victoria was here recently, although my photo was too blurry to use here.  Surfer Rosa . . . that name of the many I’ve posted here will stick with me.   As of this morning, Surfer Rosa is westbound in the Med just outside Algerian waters.

Many thanks to Bjoern and Glenn for use of their photos.

 

April 2009 . . . a decade ago but it’s still palpable and present.

How could I not remember the morning before work I stood on the Elizabethport dock wishing the punch-in clock mechanism would slow to a pace slower than McAllister Responder and McAllister Sisters helping Eagle Boston ooze toward her Linden berth . . .   Some who don’t take many photos might not be able to fathom how those moments stick to the memory.

Or the unmistakeable Norwegian Sea light and going for fuel near IMTT .  . at dawn;  it’s unforgettable.   I was hoping there’d no delays on the rest of my way to work that morning.

Another day, I took lunch break in Elizabethport, thrilled that Laura K and Margaret were escorting Seoul Express away from Howland Hook . . ..  backing her down.

And here’s one . . . I recall my pain this morning as I walked north along HRP, conflicted between the hurt of betrayal and the chill of being under-dressed, since I’d crept out early on a Saturday morning thinking that sun in April translated into warmth ..  . and the throaty sound of Melvin E. Lemmerhirt distracted me from all those things.

Also from that dock in Elizabethport, I watched Rosemary McAllister and Responder ease Hyundai Voyager boat toward the dock in Howland Hook . . .

The scene here is harder to recall, but from l to r, it’s Nathan E. Stewart, New River, and –the uniquely named– Gramma Lee T Moran . . .!

In April 2009, I commuted into work early a lot,so that I could catch the likes of this . . . John Reinauer moving a barge southbound on the Arthur Kill… not knowing that a few years later, that equipment would travel across to the South Atlantic.

Scott Turecamo . . .  this is the only photo in this “oldies” set that could have been taken in 2019 as easily as in 2009, except I’d have to photoshop in the current Manhattan skyline in the distance . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes he’s still fit to add to the archives in 2029 . . .

Let’s try a variation:  I’ve random tugs and random ships, in which I’ve confined most pics to a single general location and a a single photographer . . . me.  “Really random tugs” combines locations, eras, and photographers.  So why not do the same with ships, although in this case I’ve taken almost all the photos but in a variety of locations and times.

But this first one launches the concept.  What can you surmise or identify about the photo below, not taken by me?  Answer at the end of this post.

Spring brings the Great Lakes back to life. Here is a March 11 AIS capture of traffic on the Lakes.  The “arrows” are US and Canadian CG doing ice ops.  The rivers system around Chicago has some traffic.

The NOAA satellite image below provides the explanation . . .  what looks ice covered IS.  With the Soo scheduled to open on Monday, March 25, icebreaking carries high priority.   Note Green Bay as well.

March 22 marked the opening of the Welland Canal.  The first upbound ship this year was Thunder Bay;  this photo I took in Quebec in October 2017.  The first down bounder through the Welland was Algoma Spirit, but I’ve never gotten a photo of her.

Kaye E. Barker was the first springtime vessel out of Duluth;  I took this photo in the last week of navigation before the Soo closed on January 15.  The Soo is scheduled to open on Monday, March 25.

The KVK is a busy place all year round, although it’s not uniformly busy.  On this day last month, Alpine Maya followed Port Richmond, which  followed Atlantic Sun.

Stolt Integrity here stemmed while waiting to replace the tanker in the distance to leave the berth.

Tankers come in a variety of sizes;  Selasse is a particular small one.

By now, have you figured out that first photo?  I’ll give you a clue:  vessel name is Nggapulu and as of last night she was in BauBau.

Traffic moves at all hours;  night photos turn out quite unsatisfying, but golden hour ones I enjoy.  Can you guess the hull color on this one?

Foreshortening belies the amount of distance actually between the stern of the Evergreen ship and Diane B/John Blanche.

The colorful Stena tankers, bears and all,  seem to appear mostly in winter.

So here you have the answer, sort of.  Indonesia, being a far-flung archipelago supports a ferry system called Pelni, an acronym.  As an example of distances here, find Jakarta lower left.  From there to Makassar roughly in the center is 1000 miles!  Pelni operates about two dozen ferries of various designs.  Ngga Pulu has classic lines and was launched in 2002.

Here’s an English language site about traveling the archipelago.   Restless?  Aye peri!

Many thanks to Hannah Miller for sharing the photo of Ngga Pulu.  I’m not sure how that’s pronounced, but it’s named for a mountain.  Learning about Pelni and seeing this map gives me a whole new appreciation of Dewaruci.

Pushing and shoving  . . . are they different in this context with 3000 hp concentrated in the right location?

New steel and recycled name . . . Torm Hilde, the 114,000 dwt tanker in port recently, got spun around in the KVK by Kimberly and JRT.

Torm Hilde is one of the largest tankers operated by the company, now in its 130th year!

And while two Moran tugs are assisting the Torm tanker out, two more are assisting crude tanker Compassion into her berth.

And then two more are assisting an Evergreen L ship through as well.

Congestion? . . . it’s just another day in the Kills….

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Clio came into the sixth boro carrying “mineral fuel” cargo and a thick coating of sea ice.  I’m not sure where she arrived from, but six months ago, she was in some unambiguously hot places, sans ice.

JRT had a band of icelets,

Choptank carried souvenirs of her time upriver where more fresh water flowed,

but Margaret takes the prize with the jagged hang-downs.

C. F. Campbell had ice stalactites yet not nearly enough given her port of registry.  She has been in the sixth boro for a bit over a half year now.

Cold winters . . . they’re good for a lot of reasons . . .even for plants.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You’ll see the entire vessel as you scroll through here, but for starters, any idea of the namesake for this vessel?  At what point in these photos can you tell if you’re looking at a Panamax or postPanamax vessel or whether this is a ULCV?

Kirby has the stern and Margaret is portside.

At this point, you can answer most of the questions above.  I have to confess I thought she looked small.

JRT has the starboard.

 

To compare Tucapel with a standard container vessel from 10 years ago, check out this January 2009 post here.  And look at Sun Right, now scrapped.  Sun Right was launched in 1993.  Tucapel was launched in 2012.

 

Sun Right carried 4299 teu, and Tucapel . . . 8000.  The biggest ULCVs in the sixth boro these days are around 14,000.

And the vessel namesake?   Here’s the answer.

All photos and info by Will Van Dorp.

 

Birk certainly got this one better than I did, which you can see here.

Kirby has a new tug out, Cape Henry, and this is my first time to see it.  Is it pushing its first load out?  What barge is it pushing?

I calculated the two shots above wrong, but I love these next two of Kirby Moran and

Margaret Moran.

All photos since daybreak today by Will Van Dorp, who missed his deadline.  Please keep this secret out of the Tower, or understand this is an early post on Central Time.

 

Margaret shines “brightly” over by Fort Wadsworth.

Scott Turecamo transfers commodity over at the east end of Bayonne.

I think it is Miss Julia, but I still know nothing about her.

Of the Seaboats fleet absorbed into Kirby, Weddell Sea is the only one I see these days, and here she

gets assistance to the dock from Normandy.

Gracie M. was the newest Reinauer boat at least three boats ago.

With the ongoing renewal in the Reinauer fleet, Morgan must be among the oldest boats they operate.

And I’ll never forget an tempestuous morning when first I heard Evelyn‘s sound, when she was working as Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

And that returns us to Margaret.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m rushing December, but I’m eager to get through winter and back to spring.  All photos here date from December 2008.

Bowsprite took this from one of her cliff niches:  June K (2003) here is moving the Floating Hospital  (1974, Blount) up to the Rondout, where she remains. Is she really now called Industria at Sea.

The geography is unchanged, but McAllister Responder (1967) is no longer in the sixth boro, and Sea Venture (1972) is dead and likely scrapped . . . .

Maryland (1962) has become Liz Vinik, after operating with Maryland in the name for more than a handful of companies.

Choptank (2006) is back in the sixth boro and environs.  My autocorrect always wants to call this tug Shoptalk.  Puzzling.  NYK Daedalus (2007) is still at work, just not here.  TEN Andromeda is still on the oceans as well, still transporting crude.

Now called Charly and working the Gulf of Guinea, Janice Ann Reinauer (1967) used to be a personal icon in the sixth boro. Note that 1 World Trade does not appear in this photo, as it would today.

Closing this out . . .  Margaret Moran (1979 and the 4th boat by that name) passes APL Jade (1995 and likely scrapped by now) in the KVK.

I’m hoping you’re enjoying this glances back a decade as much as I am.

With the exception of the first photo, all these by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for research errors.

Unrelated:  Win a trip on a Great Lakes freighter/laker here.

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