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Only 13 months ago, Cosco Glory could not have entered Port Elizabeth.  Now the +14,000-teu boats –more accurately called NYC’s 1200-footers, have become routine like T. Roosevelt, J. Adams, and Chongqing.

The geese are not even spooked.

Jonathan takes the starboard, and Kirby . . . port

while JRT and Margaret leverage the stern.

 

 

 

 

As of this writing, this crewman has most recently been treated to views of the Savannah waterfront.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

. . . in this case, Moran ship-assist tugs in the sixth boro.

Jonathan C leaves the waving lady to port,

James D waits with Brooklyn to port,

Margaret waits over closer to Red Hook,

Miriam treads water over along Bay Ridge,

JRT prepares to head dockside,

Kirby goes to the next job

Jonathan C and Kirby heading out to meet a ship,

Jonathan C prepared to exert counterforce,

And we’ll end with Margaret and James D following a box boat into the Kills.  All this you can see repeatedly every day of the year in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you all a happy, safe, healthy, and thriving 2018.

 

OK . . . I prematurely published it, so here it is.

Recognize this tanker . . . once a regular in the Hudson River but out in other waters the past few years . ..

I was thinking this post could be called

Afrodite . . . shares the waterways. A sport fish boat, a USCG patrol boat, and migrating(?) swans . . .

escorted past the Bayonne Bridge, where

Margaret Moran escorts her in as other traffic passes …

and Brendan Turecamo helps out . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

The photo below is somewhat misleading;  MSC Beijing was assisted in–from outside the VZ Bridge by the two 6000s–Jonathan C and JRT–but Doris just happened to be in proximity as the ship passed.

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Earlier in that glorious 65-degree day with the strange cloud, here was JRT assisting another ship around Bergen Point . . ..

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Margaret was assisting on the bow.

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And in quite different light less than a half hour later, here Jonathan C escorts a related ship around the point,

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in tandem with James D. It should be noted that while Amber was inbound NYC from the UK, Georgia was arriving from Spain, converging–I suppose–at Ambrose. Now that’s logistics.

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Jennifer Turecamo followed around the Point.

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Half hour later, Margaret and JRT headed back to the barn.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous weather posts, and although today the sixth boro and surrounding land masses are experiencing the first serious snowfall this season, this post is not about that.  Rather, it’s about something I saw and felt yesterday, when it was 65 degrees F for a few midday hours.  65!!

So here was the weather phenomenon photo taken at 0834.  I take it that’s a squall line, but it seemed so isolated.

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Here was the scene at 0826.  CMA CGM Amber headed into Port Elizabeth with JRT on the stern quarter.  Tomorrow I’ll have more Moran photos.  Notice how clear and calm it was right at the bridge, although Elizabethport seems enveloped in some mist.

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0827 . . . shows HMS Justice in that mist.

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So here I repeat the 0834 photo of that line moving rapidly in my direction.

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Here’s 0840 and

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below,  0841, as Jonathan C escorted CMA CGM Georgia around Bergen Point to Port Eliz.  Notice the dull finish on the Bayonne Bridge, since that squall line has obscured the morning sun at my back.  The temperature also dropped noticeably.

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At 0846, besides Jonathan C, we can now see (l to r) Jennifer Turecamo with barge Portland, James D., and Miriam.

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By 0922 my back was nicely warmed by the sun again, with the temperatures heading to a blue sky 65 in February, although Elizabeth seemed still misted in.

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All photos taken on February 8 by Will Van Dorp.  Did anyone else see and feel this front move through?

 

Can you identify these boats?  This is a game I sometimes play . . . trying to guess before I can read by my eyes or some device . . .

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Do you know the unit headed away?

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Here’s that Moran vessel from the first photo of this post.

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OK.  Did you get Sea Fox?  I had guessed Sea Wolf. There is no Sea Coyote.  Yet.

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I didn’t get this one either.

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James D. here had just finished the salt ship job,

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along with Margaret .  .  . and headed back to base to await the next job.

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And finally, Turecamo Girls heads out for the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the whole series.  The different colors in the pile reflect trace minerals from different global sources.

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Anyhow, the latest salt ship came in yesterday at sunrise.  I’d come to my spot early in hopes there would be enough light when TTM Dragon arrived , but I was wrong.

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James D. Moran worked the bow as the line boat stood by.

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Pilot on the bridge wing calls the shots, and

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when the signal is given, mooring lines are ferried to

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shore and looped over the bollard.

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When it’s all fast, James D. and Margaret Moran  prepare for the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are some snows days in the sixth boro from previous seasons.  Yesterday’s saw crews on duty doing what they always do.  Cielo di Milano was outbound, as was Peney, a practically new ship, emptied of her Mejillones safety product.

09:50  My thermometer registered 23 degrees F, and a squall was passing over Manhattan but not here.

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10:15  In less than a half hour, the snow squall has intensified on the KVK.

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10:15  Portside watch reports on distance already away from the salt dock, where product was trucking out the gate.

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10:18  That’s Jonathan C at starboard and Margaret on the bow.

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10:19

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10:20  JRT heads westbound after an assist in the harbor.

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11:42  See the juice carrier, Orange Blossom 2, Jonathan C, IMTT, and WTC1?

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11:42  Here’s what the unaltered version of the photo above looks like.  I enhanced color in the version above.

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11:45

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11:46  All were cautious but moving.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More tomorrow from the same Saturday morning snow squall.

 

I’ve written about summertime and about summertime blues–about beating them.  But since you can’t ever step into the same river twice, or gallivant in the same primordial first boro, here’s the 2016 version of trying to capture the sixth boro with a camera on a hot summer weekend afternoon, looking for shade–any shade will do– as much as looking for novel compositions.

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These days odd juxtapositions can be found on west Manhattan piers and

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beyond, like Eagle and the fast bird and Loveland Island with a pilot on board and some folks gathered on the starboard bridge wing .  For a post I did last year with close-ups of details of USCGC Eagle AND for a book I highly recommend reading about her appropriate by the US post-WW2, click here.  Speaking of piers, here’s an interesting article on the engineering and construction of Pier 57.

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Or come for a tour on Janet D Cruises . . .

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with four sails set.

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Long Beach comes to Bayonne along with a Celebrity ship and a PWC . . . pesky workless canoe?

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Flagship Ivy clings for a spell to the bottom over by the VZ Bridge.

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Margaret Moran heads for the next job–or the yard, with Queens’ current and future tallest buildings in the background,

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while YP 704 sails past Governors Island, which has sprouted some new hillocks frequented by lots of people.

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Joan Turecamo exits the Buttermilk west with a light (?) dry bulk barge Montville, which probably recently carried coal.

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All photos Sunday by Will Van Dorp.  for some contrast, see this winter set and this.   More of the summer selects, tomorrow.

 

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