You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Margaret Moran’ tag.

The photo below is somewhat misleading;  MSC Beijing was assisted in–from outside the VZ Bridge by the two 6000s–Jonathan C and JRT–but Doris just happened to be in proximity as the ship passed.

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Earlier in that glorious 65-degree day with the strange cloud, here was JRT assisting another ship around Bergen Point . . ..

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Margaret was assisting on the bow.

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And in quite different light less than a half hour later, here Jonathan C escorts a related ship around the point,

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in tandem with James D. It should be noted that while Amber was inbound NYC from the UK, Georgia was arriving from Spain, converging–I suppose–at Ambrose. Now that’s logistics.

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Jennifer Turecamo followed around the Point.

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Half hour later, Margaret and JRT headed back to the barn.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous weather posts, and although today the sixth boro and surrounding land masses are experiencing the first serious snowfall this season, this post is not about that.  Rather, it’s about something I saw and felt yesterday, when it was 65 degrees F for a few midday hours.  65!!

So here was the weather phenomenon photo taken at 0834.  I take it that’s a squall line, but it seemed so isolated.

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Here was the scene at 0826.  CMA CGM Amber headed into Port Elizabeth with JRT on the stern quarter.  Tomorrow I’ll have more Moran photos.  Notice how clear and calm it was right at the bridge, although Elizabethport seems enveloped in some mist.

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0827 . . . shows HMS Justice in that mist.

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So here I repeat the 0834 photo of that line moving rapidly in my direction.

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Here’s 0840 and

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below,  0841, as Jonathan C escorted CMA CGM Georgia around Bergen Point to Port Eliz.  Notice the dull finish on the Bayonne Bridge, since that squall line has obscured the morning sun at my back.  The temperature also dropped noticeably.

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At 0846, besides Jonathan C, we can now see (l to r) Jennifer Turecamo with barge Portland, James D., and Miriam.

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By 0922 my back was nicely warmed by the sun again, with the temperatures heading to a blue sky 65 in February, although Elizabeth seemed still misted in.

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All photos taken on February 8 by Will Van Dorp.  Did anyone else see and feel this front move through?

 

Can you identify these boats?  This is a game I sometimes play . . . trying to guess before I can read by my eyes or some device . . .

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Do you know the unit headed away?

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Here’s that Moran vessel from the first photo of this post.

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OK.  Did you get Sea Fox?  I had guessed Sea Wolf. There is no Sea Coyote.  Yet.

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I didn’t get this one either.

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James D. here had just finished the salt ship job,

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along with Margaret .  .  . and headed back to base to await the next job.

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And finally, Turecamo Girls heads out for the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the whole series.  The different colors in the pile reflect trace minerals from different global sources.

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Anyhow, the latest salt ship came in yesterday at sunrise.  I’d come to my spot early in hopes there would be enough light when TTM Dragon arrived , but I was wrong.

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James D. Moran worked the bow as the line boat stood by.

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Pilot on the bridge wing calls the shots, and

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when the signal is given, mooring lines are ferried to

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shore and looped over the bollard.

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When it’s all fast, James D. and Margaret Moran  prepare for the next job.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are some snows days in the sixth boro from previous seasons.  Yesterday’s saw crews on duty doing what they always do.  Cielo di Milano was outbound, as was Peney, a practically new ship, emptied of her Mejillones safety product.

09:50  My thermometer registered 23 degrees F, and a squall was passing over Manhattan but not here.

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10:15  In less than a half hour, the snow squall has intensified on the KVK.

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10:15  Portside watch reports on distance already away from the salt dock, where product was trucking out the gate.

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10:18  That’s Jonathan C at starboard and Margaret on the bow.

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10:19

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10:20  JRT heads westbound after an assist in the harbor.

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11:42  See the juice carrier, Orange Blossom 2, Jonathan C, IMTT, and WTC1?

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11:42  Here’s what the unaltered version of the photo above looks like.  I enhanced color in the version above.

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11:45

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11:46  All were cautious but moving.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More tomorrow from the same Saturday morning snow squall.

 

I’ve written about summertime and about summertime blues–about beating them.  But since you can’t ever step into the same river twice, or gallivant in the same primordial first boro, here’s the 2016 version of trying to capture the sixth boro with a camera on a hot summer weekend afternoon, looking for shade–any shade will do– as much as looking for novel compositions.

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These days odd juxtapositions can be found on west Manhattan piers and

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beyond, like Eagle and the fast bird and Loveland Island with a pilot on board and some folks gathered on the starboard bridge wing .  For a post I did last year with close-ups of details of USCGC Eagle AND for a book I highly recommend reading about her appropriate by the US post-WW2, click here.  Speaking of piers, here’s an interesting article on the engineering and construction of Pier 57.

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Or come for a tour on Janet D Cruises . . .

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with four sails set.

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Long Beach comes to Bayonne along with a Celebrity ship and a PWC . . . pesky workless canoe?

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Flagship Ivy clings for a spell to the bottom over by the VZ Bridge.

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Margaret Moran heads for the next job–or the yard, with Queens’ current and future tallest buildings in the background,

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while YP 704 sails past Governors Island, which has sprouted some new hillocks frequented by lots of people.

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Joan Turecamo exits the Buttermilk west with a light (?) dry bulk barge Montville, which probably recently carried coal.

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All photos Sunday by Will Van Dorp.  for some contrast, see this winter set and this.   More of the summer selects, tomorrow.

 

“Backing down” is a term I’ve heard used to describe a ship assist in which the tugboats control the sternwise movement of a vessel away from a dock.  Most of the work here seems to be tide current driven, if I saw it right.

Let’s pick this up at 16:28 hrs.

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The evolution waits for incoming traffic, in this case Seoul Express, which I watched getting backed down half a decade ago here and here.  Margaret Moran was involved that time as well.

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At 16:49, Seoul Express, accompanied by Kirby Moran, is passing and Margaret throttles up, catching

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the attention of a crew member on the superstructure of Seoul Express.

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By 16:51, Heina is well away from the dock, and now

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James D.Moran needs to get the stern out, but I’m not well placed to capture that.

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Margaret moves around to the bulb.  I love how the load markings mimic the tug profile.

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By 16:58, Heina is at least two ship lengths east of the salt dock, and

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by 17:07, Heina has begun to rotate counterclockwise in preparation to head under the VZ Bridge out to sea.  By now, she’s south of the Bahamas.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, to whose untrained eyes this all seemed to evolve with masterful control.

As to the meaning of “heina,” try this.

If you have a lot of free time, you can trace this back to the first installment.

These photos are all from the past week, starting out with Bouchard Boys, 1975.

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Pelham, 1960.  Behind her is USNS Red Cloud.

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Barney Turecamo (1995) and

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Scott Turecamo (1998).

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Eric R. Thornton (1960)

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Jill Reinauer (1967) and Dace Reinauer (1968) with RTC 61.

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Add Stephen-Scott (1967) and Ruth M. Reinauer (2008) pushing RTC 102.

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Margaret Moran (1979) starting a backing-down of Heina with

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James D. Moran (2015).  More on this backing down later this week.

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Captain D (1974) with CVA-604.

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Meagan Ann (1975)

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Houma (1970).

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Frances (1957) and I think I know the crewman forward of the house.

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And finally, I put this photo here because of a boat in the background.  Is that Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962)?  I thought she was scrapped half a year ago already.  Hmm.

Other boats here are L. to r.) Realist, Kristy Ann, Hubert Bays, Long Splice, Samantha Miller, Stephen B, and Hunt Girls, which has been in the yard there for (?) two years now?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here and here are previous posts in this spirit, but first, the answer to yesterday’s bridge identification question . . . Joseph Chomicz nailed it . . . it’s Outerbridge Crossing, named for a person of commerce.

Today’s question is:  as you look through the photos in this post, can you think of a type of cargo that seems to be missing in the sixth boro in recent months?

In the photo of the self-unloader below, Outerbridge Crossing is seen from the south side, not from directly below.

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Although the light is not ideal in the photo below, this is the stern of the self-unloader Caroline Oldendorff, poised to auger salt off to a pile between the oil tanks.

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I like the effect of the flag in front of the spare wheel.  I last saw Caroline on the Mississippi here.

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Here’s an unusual tugster perspective . . . Eagle Madrid leaving the south end of the AK, passing Perth Amboy and

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snaking through the channel across Raritan Bay;  that’s Brooklyn in the background to the right.

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Here’s another unusual tugster perspective . . . Sea Halcyone (formerly Unique Sunshine) passing Shooters Island as seen from Faber Park.

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Note Margaret Moran assisting to port, and a (mothballed??) Liberty IV still on the hard to the left, and several raucous gull drones doing some pilotage.  Maybe?

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Here JPO Pisces gets overtaken by Tangier Island before

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passing MSC Katya R, who’s

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seen in by JRT Moran.

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Heina, although no self-unloader, is discharging the same cargo as Caroline Oldendorff had in her holds:  salt.

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So which cargo seems to be missing . . . in recent months?  My perception is orange juice, my favorite drink.  Have I just been missing the ships, or is there a change in the supply chain?

Again, congrats to Joseph for naming the bridge in yesterday’s post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

When I saw a parade of Moran tugs heading to meet a ship or some ships, I suspected something large was coming.

And when she appeared around the bend, she did look quite large,

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Cosco Napoli did, and much as I wanted to keep my hands in my pockets, I took the photos I could.

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Kirby Moran (6000 hp) assisted.  I’m not sure if Margaret Moran (3000 hp)–to starboard–was assisting also.

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and JRT Moran (6000 hp) was back there . . .

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That’s a total of 15,000 tugboat hp, i.e., 11,185 kW, I believe.  Cosco Napoli‘s engine is rated at 69,620 kW, which converts to 93,362 hp, if I used the correct horsepower conversion, and I know how complicated the “horsepower” is.

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So, for some more numbers:  Cosco Napoli, capacity of 8000+  teu.  1099′ loa x 137′ x 45′

Comparing this container vessel to the largest one recently arrived in Oakland and Long Beach, CMA CGM Ben Franklin is 63,910 kW, 18,000+ teu, and 1309′ x 177′ x 37.’

Here’s another comparison, CSCL Indian Ocean recently grounded on the Elbe . . . her numbers look like this:  69,720 kW, 19,000+ teu, and 1311′ x 192′ x  39.’

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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