You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Margaret Moran’ tag.

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

Here are the birds.  Now what’s the rest of the story?

Part of the story is told by these flags, US courtesy, German registry, and is that a pilot flag?

She was large for a 2008 container ship:  1098′ x 140′ with a capacity of 8606 teu.

 

I’d love to know more about accessing that lifeboat, given the cargo configuration.

And where are the birds?

 

Doubleclick on that last photo to see the closeup . . . you can almost hear the excitement!

All photos, WVD.

 

Here are previous installments.  What’s different here is that in this case I’m inside  the Narrows and shooting to the east and north.

Yankee passes in light before sunrise.

I rotate the lens 90 degrees to the right and Margaret stands by

along with James D to support Maersk Chicago, anchored in Stapleton.  As I write this,  24 hours later, the container ship is leaving port, although her destination shows NYC as both “from” and “to”….

Meanwhile Mary Turecamo comes out of its base in the KVK

just as the sun rises above the horizon and its cloudbank and gets reflected.

All photos, WVD, who thinks this set perfectly illustrates why I take photos at dawn whenever I can.  It’s worth getting up and out.

 

She looks bigger than the 981′ she is.  By today’s sixth boro standards, she’s not, and with a capacity for 9971 teu, she’s nowhere near the 15,072 of CMA CGM Panama, which I missed this week.

 

I’ve not noticed the wings to add lateral visibility near the stern, or

the starboard-offset stack.

As for the name, I’d thought the reference South American; in fact, it’s Asian, referring to high peaks shared by India and Pakistan, and a river that’s a tributary of the Indus.

All photos, WVD.

I saw the approaching tanker and immediately thought back to a morning before work back in April 2008, reported here.

The water had the same calm, maybe a similar state of tide, as the two tugs and Seamuse floated in. 

 

The homonymous sea mews would apply in this photo as well.

 

As of this writing, the crude tanker is discharging its contents in Sewaren.  To the right on the photo, that’s Seaways Yellowstone, discharging at Linden.

All photos, WVD.

 

A container ship rounds the bend.  It carries containerized cargo, obviously, but not all cargoes fit into a standard container. 

See the irregular aka custom boxes below?

They appear to be two crates for over-high cargo. and anchored on a flat rack.

Here’s a question:  since WEG is a Brazilian coastal city multinational specializing in electrical power and automation products and wind generation, might this be an offshore windfarm related oversize cargo?

MSC Vigo came in

assisted by Brendan Turecamo on the port side.

Here was a cargo that came in a few weeks before.

All photos, WVD.

 

Note the line boat off B. Franklin‘s starboard.  Also, faintly to her port and beyond the green buoy hull down is a Kirby tug, probably one of the Cape-class boats

Actually part of the same scene panning to the left–note the line boat on the extreme right side of the photo–it’s Joyce D. Brown with a crane barge off to do a salvage job.

Not long afterward, Caitlin Ann heads west past Treasure Coast on the blue-and-yellow cement carrier.

Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran bring a ship in.

Kirby Moran follows a ship in with a Reinauer barge right behind.

And again, a few minutes later, Paul Andrew follows the Reinauer unit and the ship westbound.

Resolute, back in the sixth boro, heads out to assist a USN vessel into Earle.

Genesis Victory passes Doris Moran alongside the Apex Oil barge,

Another day, l to r, it’s Barry Silverton, Saint Emilion, and the A87 barge again. Barry‘s sister vessel–Emery Zidell--was in the sixth boro recently, but I got just 

a very distant photo.

 I can’t put names on these vessels, but it’s the Wittich Brothers fleet, formerly (I think) known as Sea Wolf Marine.  And I see Sarah Ann in the extreme left. 

And let’s end on a puzzle . . .  William Brewster with a new paint job.  Last time I saw her, those dark green stripes were red. 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

At first light, Navigator passes a docked Saint Emilion

This 1981 build has called the sixth boro her home since 2015.  Saint Emilion (2007) has been here in two previous liveries and names.

Barney Turecamo was launched in 1995.  Note her cutaway forefoot.

Barney, married to Georgia, gets an assist from Doris Moran, 1982, as she departs the dock.

 

Meaghan Marie, 1968, follows a box ship into port but is not involved in the assist.

Meaghan Marie is a former fleetmate of Margaret Moran, 1979, doing the assist.

Emily Ann, 1964, moves a sanitation scow.

 

And finally, coming in from sea with a dump scow, it’s Captain Willie Landers, 2001.

When she first appeared on this blog in 2015, she had a prominent mast, not an upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

More Gowanus soon, but for now, this follows a post from a few years back called “boxes on ships,” but what begs for attention here is the number of less common containers, these by a company called Agmark

Maersk Vallvik actually has two centers of liquid bulk containers, Agmark toward the stern and Bertschi farther forward.

Bertschi is a Swiss company that transports, among many other things, cocoa butter, i.e., their self-described “heaven.”

All this brings me to what appears to be the biggest concentration of tanks . . . . Agmark’s.  According to their site, they transport the following:  “Dairy products, concentrated and single strength fruit juices, vegetable oils, spirits, wine, chocolate, alcohol, beverage preparations, essences, hot or cold bulk liquids, food products, chemicals, and fuels.”

So, this could have cold fruit juice, just like these, but in parcels rather than “shipfulls.”  Others carry “rock juice” either by the shipfull or in parcels.

But i digress.  I don’t know what Vallvik carried in those tanks;  my point here is simply that she carried a lot of those tanks.

Back in 2013 this same vessel called attention for another type of container as here.

All photos, WVD.   And that small craft in the photo above, maybe that’s in tomorrow’s post.

Another unusual container type, CATS, was featured here 10 years ago.

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