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I happened onto a very busy sunrise this morning, five ships of which two were ULCVs and a half dozen of so tugboats can be seen.

The first ULCV was CMA CGM Chile,

and the light, as last night’s Hunter’s Moon settled in the west, was perfect.

Marie J Turecamo and Margaret Moran assisted,

Here were Mexico and Brazil.

The sixth boro terminals are doing something right, because no backups as in southern California and Savannah are happening here.

All photos, WVD.

Barry Silverton first came to the sixth boro five and a half years ago.  Her twin Emery Zidell appeared here earlier this year, and i believe this is the first time to catch the ATB light and head on.

Roughly the same size, Haggerty Girls waits alongside as RTC 80 loads.

Mary Turecamo heads out  to meet a ship.  Mary Turecamo, Haggerty Girls, and Emery Zidell are all over 105′ and 4000 or more horsepower.

Margaret Moran here hangs close to a bulk carrier she’s escorting in.

Like Margaret above, Buchanan 12 is rated at 3000 hp and each has worked under the same name for the same company since coming from the shipyard. Buchanan 12 is a regular shuttling stone scows between the quarries up the Hudson and the sixth boro.

Franklin Reinauer has operated under that name since coming from the shipyard nearly 40 years ago.

I first saw Fort Point in Gloucester here over five years ago.

Joker seems to have become a regular in the sixth boro since this summer.  She used to be a regular here as Taurus.

Known as Brendan Turecamo for the past 30 years, this 1975 3900 hp tug is getting some TLC up on the floating drydock.

All photos here where we leave it today, WVD.

Enjoy this set of photos, taken on a random path across the harbor with the NY Media Boat.  More Gene Chaser soon. 

Ruby M above is the oldster of the set, launched in 1967.  She’s 95′ loa and turns out just under 2000 hp.  Below, Colonel dates from 1978, turns out 3000 hp and is the longest in the set . . . at just about 107′.

 

Sea Lion was launched in 1980, is 65′ loa and powered by 1400 horses.  Below, Margaret Moran (I believe) has been in the sixth boro long before I called it that;  she arrived in 1979 bringing 3000 hp and a loa of just a foot under 100′.

Julie Ann has arrived in the harbor the most recently of this set, just a couple months ago.  She was launched in 2006 and brings 4200 hp packed into 75′.

And finally, Ava M. McAllister is likely the first boat to carry that name.  She was christened in 2018.  She’s a 100′ boat with 6770 hp.

Thanks for Bjoern at NY Media Boat for a tour of the boro.  All photos, WVD.

Someday I’ll have to quantify the tanker traffic in the sixth boro. For now,  just photos of three that moved all within a few hours.  And I have to say again . . . the other five boros and greater geography depend on this watery boro activity. 

Kimberly and Jonathan C assist this tanker from Ust-Luga, Russia.  Check out this port on the Gulf of Finland and what closely neighbors are there. 

 

Lines go on for the docking right across from the east end of Caddell’s.

A bit later, an interestingly named Chem Bulldog heads out. 

 

She’s was heading for the SC port of Charleston.

 

Mr. Leo came in from Portugal, a voyage of just over 11 days.

 

 

She passed SCF Ussuri on her way into the Kills.

All photos, WVD.

 

This is flamboyance personified . . . well, at least shipified.

This 6724 teu vessel began life in 2010 at Mol Magnificence, with a much less flashy color.

This 8468 teu vessel, taking on fuel in Gravesend Bay carries an unlikely name, 

America, registered in Limassol.  Previous names include CSCL America and MSC Baltic.

This 10000 teu box ship was previously called Hanjin China.

I’d not want to be in the small boat right ahead of the ship as James D, Jonathan, Brendan, and Margaret assist the ship in.

Gravesend Bay being used as a location for bunkering suggests to me that more bunkering is going on in the sixth boro than previously.  Bigger fuel capacity and more vessels mean bunkering in new places.  Here Philadelphia stands by Double Skin 57 bunkering Albert Maersk.

MSC Texas is a 8204 teu vessel with lots of previous names:  E. R. Texas, MSC Bengal, CMA CGM Faust, Faust.. and launched in 2006.

Zim Yokohama dates from 2007 and carries up to 4250 teu.

It appears that some rust busting might be in order.

One of my favorite times to catch some traffic is dawn.  Here Ava M waits for Maersk Algol to approach.  

I love the lighted area as the 9000 teu vessel comes in.

And finally, Margaret Moran escorts the 8000 teu Ever Lively into port.

Ever Lively is one of over a dozen Evergreen L-class vessels serving the sixth boro and region. There should be 30 globally, and I’ve missed a few. 

They come, they go . . .  and they never stay very long.  All photos, WVD, who has time to do not much more than sample.

Here are the birds.  Now what’s the rest of the story?

Part of the story is told by these flags, US courtesy, German registry, and is that a pilot flag?

She was large for a 2008 container ship:  1098′ x 140′ with a capacity of 8606 teu.

 

I’d love to know more about accessing that lifeboat, given the cargo configuration.

And where are the birds?

 

Doubleclick on that last photo to see the closeup . . . you can almost hear the excitement!

All photos, WVD.

 

Here are previous installments.  What’s different here is that in this case I’m inside  the Narrows and shooting to the east and north.

Yankee passes in light before sunrise.

I rotate the lens 90 degrees to the right and Margaret stands by

along with James D to support Maersk Chicago, anchored in Stapleton.  As I write this,  24 hours later, the container ship is leaving port, although her destination shows NYC as both “from” and “to”….

Meanwhile Mary Turecamo comes out of its base in the KVK

just as the sun rises above the horizon and its cloudbank and gets reflected.

All photos, WVD, who thinks this set perfectly illustrates why I take photos at dawn whenever I can.  It’s worth getting up and out.

 

She looks bigger than the 981′ she is.  By today’s sixth boro standards, she’s not, and with a capacity for 9971 teu, she’s nowhere near the 15,072 of CMA CGM Panama, which I missed this week.

 

I’ve not noticed the wings to add lateral visibility near the stern, or

the starboard-offset stack.

As for the name, I’d thought the reference South American; in fact, it’s Asian, referring to high peaks shared by India and Pakistan, and a river that’s a tributary of the Indus.

All photos, WVD.

I saw the approaching tanker and immediately thought back to a morning before work back in April 2008, reported here.

The water had the same calm, maybe a similar state of tide, as the two tugs and Seamuse floated in. 

 

The homonymous sea mews would apply in this photo as well.

 

As of this writing, the crude tanker is discharging its contents in Sewaren.  To the right on the photo, that’s Seaways Yellowstone, discharging at Linden.

All photos, WVD.

 

A container ship rounds the bend.  It carries containerized cargo, obviously, but not all cargoes fit into a standard container. 

See the irregular aka custom boxes below?

They appear to be two crates for over-high cargo. and anchored on a flat rack.

Here’s a question:  since WEG is a Brazilian coastal city multinational specializing in electrical power and automation products and wind generation, might this be an offshore windfarm related oversize cargo?

MSC Vigo came in

assisted by Brendan Turecamo on the port side.

Here was a cargo that came in a few weeks before.

All photos, WVD.

 

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