You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Sea Lion’ tag.

Enjoy this set of photos, taken on a random path across the harbor with the NY Media Boat.  More Gene Chaser soon. 

Ruby M above is the oldster of the set, launched in 1967.  She’s 95′ loa and turns out just under 2000 hp.  Below, Colonel dates from 1978, turns out 3000 hp and is the longest in the set . . . at just about 107′.

 

Sea Lion was launched in 1980, is 65′ loa and powered by 1400 horses.  Below, Margaret Moran (I believe) has been in the sixth boro long before I called it that;  she arrived in 1979 bringing 3000 hp and a loa of just a foot under 100′.

Julie Ann has arrived in the harbor the most recently of this set, just a couple months ago.  She was launched in 2006 and brings 4200 hp packed into 75′.

And finally, Ava M. McAllister is likely the first boat to carry that name.  She was christened in 2018.  She’s a 100′ boat with 6770 hp.

Thanks for Bjoern at NY Media Boat for a tour of the boro.  All photos, WVD.

Sea Fox as a cold front moves across the Upper Bay.

Mary Turecamo off to the next job.

Dorothy J returns from an assist.  I’ve lots more photos of the assist to post soon.

Joyce and James eastbound in the KVK to start the work day.

Dean Reinauer heads over to fuel up.

Kings Point going over to Gowanus Bay.

Brooklyn going to pick up her barge.

Fells Point returning from a job.

The very busy Patrice waiting for a ship as Dobrin heads over to her daily projects.

The always moving Brendan making money, as all these boats and crews are. 

And finally Sea Lion outbound in the Lower Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

If you follow this blog, you know I look for novelty:  new vessels, new roles, new perspectives I don’t always even initially or ever understand.  Here’s for me a new boat, Cape Fear, 2018, another Sassafras class tug.

 

Brendan Turecamo, 1975,  has appeared here many times, but in the past week, I’ve seen her in two configurations, doing ship assist below and

slinging barge Connecticut below.  Yes, it’s the same tug, house down or house up.

With the bronze monument, aka Teardrop Memorial, in the background, Marjorie B. McAllister delivers nearly a dozen rail cars on NYNJ100

to cross over the harbor from NJ to NY. The run is usually performed by Brown tugs.

Chemical Pioneer, a sixth boro icon, here is assisted into the anchorage by  . . . Franklin Reinauer.

Matthew Tibbetts stands by as Dylan Cooper (correct me if I’m wrong) with RTC 108 lighters Gulf Coral. 

Taking a break from the dredge project over by Sandy Hook, Neptune travels west in the KVK.

Sea Lion pushes a barge westbound on the East River, past the old banana pier and Vladick Houses of the Lower East Side in the background.

Ivory Coast stands by with an Express Marine (former owner?) barge over in the Wallabout section of the East River. 

Christian Reinauer and barge RTC 145 stand by over in the anchorage below Fort Wadsworth.

And finally . . .  over in Red Hook, Eastern Dawn hangs alongside Meaghan Marie. Stand by for a new paint job of Eastern Dawn.

All photos, any errors, solely mine, WVD.

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

All photos in this post come from Paul Strubeck, who has started a blog here called vintagedieseldesign.

Mary H is the right size to serve the fuel storage in Newtown Creek, a renowned location in the sixth boro. Here are previous posts I’ve done there.

The first oil refinery in the US was sited here, and that industry fouled it, given attitudes at that time toward the environment and disposal of chemical waste.

Today a lot of commerce happens there from oil storage to scrap metal processing.

 

 

 

 

The creek has its advocates, these folks and others. At its headwaters lies Bushwick, not for everyone but vibrant in its own way.  Here’s a post I did last fall after a tour on land and on the water of Bushwick.

Again, thanks to Paul for these photos.

 

Memorial Day weekend 2019 . . .  and we should all remember the meaning, whether we’re working or vacating from work.

You can read the names on the vessels or on the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d included no links in this post except the one that follows and which I hope you read in its entirety here.

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Call it a sea change.  The air warms up although the water is still very cold.

Sea Lion does what it has all winter, but what’s different is the reappearance of non-workboats.  Sea Lion has some history on this blog.

Evening Light moves north in anticipation of summer.

Pleasure boats move into an environment that has been consistently about work throughout the winter.

Mischief passes New Champion and Stephen Dann, which brought in highway ramp sections.  Would these sections be for the Bayonne, the Tappan Zee, or another?

Small party boats

head out to catch what spring fish migrate in. Should there be a Really Never Snuff Express?

Bigger party boats appear as well.

Fast open boats and

slower enclosed cruisers, of all sorts

pass Atlantic Salvor as it returns from another dredge spoils run.

Norwegian Escape has smaller boats

accompany it on its way into the Narrows and the harbor.  If my numbers are correct, Escape has capacity for 5999 souls, including crew, which is more than the population of Taos, Marfa, and well more than the town where I grew up.

I’ve not seen many of these smaller boats since early last fall, and on a warm Sunday, they start to reappear.  Drive safe; work safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose other posts about small craft can be read here.

 

First, thanks to Joseph Chomicz . . . it’s Rebel and Dolphin over by the Philadelphia Navy Yard   . . .

Quo vadis, Rebel?

And the second batch comes from Ingrid Staats with likely the most unusual backstory ever on this blog . . .  Ingrid took the photos from a room in New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where her healthy baby was born. She writes, “We had an amazing view of the East River and for four days as Mom & babe recuperated. I amused myself by capturing as many tugs as possible.”    Congratulations to all and here they are:

Sea Lion above moving recyclables and and Evelyn Cutler pushing petroleum product.

TJ and Catherine Miller . . . and is TJ really doing all the work here?

And finally . . . Navigator light and Gulf Enterprise pushing a petroleum barge westbound.

Many thanks to Joseph and Ingrid for these photos.  And I’m happy to hear that one of the next generation of tugboat watchers has been born.

 

I’ve done posts about the East River, like these, and I’ve done a post at least about canyons, but it’s never struck me as vividly as right now how much this part of the East River is like a canyon.  These too are images of the varied sixth boro.

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HMS Liberty pushes east past the cliffs before entering the terrifyingly-named Hell Gate.  Click here for the youtube video that periodically surfaces about a barge grounding in Hell Gate and then skillfully extricated.  Here and here are some discussions of that name . . . originally “beautiful opening.”

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Sea Lion pushes a recycling barge up toward the Bronx River, I think, with

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Dorothy J alongside, until

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she makes the turn in the direction of the Harlem River, where the E. 91st marine transfer station–I think–is being built.  It’s been a long time since I’ve walked around up there.

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And finally . . . it’s Mister T pushing scows eastbound and under the 59th Street Bridge.  And the aerial tramway to  . . . the sixth boro’s ski slopes?   Here’s the website for the operator . . . Leitner-Poma.    But I digress.

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At the right times of tide, the waterway between Roosevelt Island and Manhattan Island move a lot of cargo.

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All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

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