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James William was slinging along a slew of barges.

Galveston (I think) was coming in the other morning with Chemical Transporter.  Usually Freeport pushes Chemical Transporter, so maybe I’m just misremembering.

With the slash of safety yellow across the barge bow, I was initially confused…

until the green with red trim told me it was definitely . . . Pinuccia

Two Vane 3000s separated by five years of work . . .  team up on getting the barge gently into her berth.

Paul Andrew Brian Nicholas gets watched very closely by the Lady of the sixth boro.

And, Matthew Tibbetts exits the east end of the Kills.

All photos, WVD, who is finally back in the sixth boro . . . for a bit.  I will be doing a lot of inland/coastal traveling the next few months.  All photos of workboats wherever you are are greatly appreciated.

 

In case you’re new to this blog,”retro” means I’m looking back to my photo archives exactly 10 years to June 2011.  The “38” here means this is the thirty-eighth month I’ve done this.  It’s a fresh look at June 2011 photos, in some cases informed by whatever the past 10 years has wrought.

Bridge Builder 26 doing what it is named for. 

F. Dawson, 1969, 66′ x 22′ and 1000 hp, in 2011 was working on a bridge project in the Harlem River. I’ve no idea where either of these boats is today.

Patapsco, 2004 and 96′ x  34′ and now known as Steven Wayne, was one of the first Vane boats into the sixth boro.  

Susquehanna is a Patapsco-class tugboat, meaning mostly a clone and three years younger, and still in the Vane fleet.

Marlin (1974, 96′ x 35′, and 4200) and Penn No. 6Marlin‘s now registered in Panama, and the No. 6 is now Vinik No. 6.

Kathleen Turecamo is now buff and green, a Stasinos boat, seen here as Meaghan Marie.

Matthew Tibbetts is still in the sixth boro and at work.

This was the only time I saw Hercules, ex-YTB-766.  In June 2011, it was towed here and then loaded aboard a semi-sub for Nigeria. 

Barents Sea came back to life as Atlantic Enterprise, and is currently working on a salvage/recovery down south.

All photos and memories, WVD.

There will be a mermaid parade later this summerin 2011, it took place on the Saturday closest to the solstice, which would be today.

To highlight the variety, this post will focus on size, horsepower, and age.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969, 92′ x 27′, 2000 hp.  All numbers rounded up if  .5 or more.

Brendan Turecamo, 1975, 107′ x 32′, 3900.

Crystal Cutler, 2010, 67′ x 26′, 1500.

Bruce A. McAllister, 1974, 112′ x 30′, 4000.

C.F. Campbell, 1975, 100′ x 31′, 3400.

Ava M. McAllister, 2018, 100′ x 40′, 6770.

Saint Emilion, 2007, 105′ x 38′, 4800.

Christian Reinauer, 2001, 119′ x 40′, 7200.

Magothy, 2008, 100′ x 34′, 4200.

All photos, WVD.

Two blog-related issues:  Sarah Dann and the big blue crane are now below Quebec City.  And, bidding has begun on Grouper and Chancellor.

 

Not many Bouchard boats are moving these days;  the 2016 Frederick, 125′ x 38 and 6140 hp, is an exception.

I took this just after sunrise for the backlit effect.

The 1961 Caitlin Ann stays busy;  her 2400 hp moves the 79′ x 24′ hull and whatever the load is.

Note equipment of at least three towing companies here.

Cape Henry, 2018, is one of the newer boats in the boro.  Her 109 x 36′ hull is powered with 5000 hp.

 

Matthew Tibbetts was launched the year I finished high school, 1969.  She’s 92′ x 27′ and powered by 2000 hp.

 

Fells Point, 2014, 90′ x 32′, and one of Vane’s many 3000 hp.

 

All photos, WVD.

If you follow this blog, you know I look for novelty:  new vessels, new roles, new perspectives I don’t always even initially or ever understand.  Here’s for me a new boat, Cape Fear, 2018, another Sassafras class tug.

 

Brendan Turecamo, 1975,  has appeared here many times, but in the past week, I’ve seen her in two configurations, doing ship assist below and

slinging barge Connecticut below.  Yes, it’s the same tug, house down or house up.

With the bronze monument, aka Teardrop Memorial, in the background, Marjorie B. McAllister delivers nearly a dozen rail cars on NYNJ100

to cross over the harbor from NJ to NY. The run is usually performed by Brown tugs.

Chemical Pioneer, a sixth boro icon, here is assisted into the anchorage by  . . . Franklin Reinauer.

Matthew Tibbetts stands by as Dylan Cooper (correct me if I’m wrong) with RTC 108 lighters Gulf Coral. 

Taking a break from the dredge project over by Sandy Hook, Neptune travels west in the KVK.

Sea Lion pushes a barge westbound on the East River, past the old banana pier and Vladick Houses of the Lower East Side in the background.

Ivory Coast stands by with an Express Marine (former owner?) barge over in the Wallabout section of the East River. 

Christian Reinauer and barge RTC 145 stand by over in the anchorage below Fort Wadsworth.

And finally . . .  over in Red Hook, Eastern Dawn hangs alongside Meaghan Marie. Stand by for a new paint job of Eastern Dawn.

All photos, any errors, solely mine, WVD.

Long Island, eastbound, gets overtaken by a small fishing boat.

B. Franklin, light, heads to the Reinauer yard.

Doris Moran, light, heads east.

Ellen McAllister assists a Maersk ship through the channels to her berth.

Helen Laraway heads east to pick up a scow.

HMS Justice pushes HMS 2605 through the KVK.

Charles A. and Matthew Tibbetts follow a ship so that they can assist as needed when called upon.

Ava and Kimberly head out to different assignments.

Brendan Turecamo provides port assist.

Mister Jim follows Seeley.

Gulf Coast has been a Dann Marine vessel since it was launched way back in 1982.

All photos, WVD.

It’s the season.

I wonder if the Kimberly crew has marked other holidays and I missed it.  I did catch the red-clad guy almost a year ago.

Mary H and her barge Patriot is likely headed for Newtown Creek.  The 1981 build, such a clean looking tug, has been working in the sixth boro for 33 years.

We’ve had a spate of foggy days.  Beyond Franklin here, notice the bright lights at Bayonne Shipyard where work proceeds on Mendonca even at night.

The mechanical dredge J. P. Boisseau here gets moved to a new worksite by Sarah Ann, with Brian Nicholas standing by.

A Maersk ship came in recently with a gaggle of assist boats:  l to r, Ava, Ellen, and Matthew. Not visible is Charles D. McAllister, and the visible Thomas J. Brown is not assisting.Yes, Matthew Tibbetts is doing a fair amount of ship assist work these days, and why not. 

Here are two more photos of Matthew Tibbetts doing ship assist.

Helen Laraway passed through with a load of scrap.

Poling & Cutler’s Crystal and Evelyn pass in opposite directions.

HMS Justice has eluded my eyes for quite a while, but here she is, with the Centerline Logistics feline on the superstructure.

All photos, WVD.

Alongside Pilot No. 1 New York, the current one, it’s the newest-in-name vessel in the sixth boro . . .

Meaghan Marie, exKathleen Turecamo, has become part of the same green & buff fleet as Joseph John.

Here’s a photo I took of her in port of Albany, September 2013.

A different use of green . . . Vane’s Philadelphia, a 4200 hp tug launched in 2017.

A slightly darker buff, it’s Matthew Tibbetts.  What I didn’t realize until I looked it up just now, Tibbetts was launched as Dann Ocean’s first boat to carry the name Ocean Tower.  More on that later.

It’s always a good day when I catch two Reinauer tugboats together, Haggerty Girls (4000 hp) and Ruth M. Reinauer (4720 hp), with a deeply loaded RTC

Alex puts its 4300 hp to bear on Viktor Bakaev.

I mentioned Ocean Tower earlier . . .  here’s the current tugboat by that name. It’s about a decade newer, one-third more horsepower, and 15′ longer, and 5′ broader than the earlier boat, now Tibbetts.

Kristin Poling began life as Chesapeake, an early version of Patapsco but longer, broader,and with a full 5000 hp.

And to conclude, examples of the classes of the two largest tractor tugs in the sixth boro . . . Capt. Brian A. and

JRT, each approaching their next job.

All photos very recently, WVD, who has more tugboat race photos from previous years . . .

 

 

Enjoy the photos.  Can you guess which of these tugboats is oldest?

Greetings Rae and hello to the crewman at the railing. It’s been awhile since I’ve seen Rae.  The first time I saw her I was with Bonnie and the tug was then called Miss Bonnie.

Several people have said Matthew Tibbetts is the best looking tug in the harbor.  Who am I to argue with them about that?

Pathfinder cuts a sharp image as it leans into its empty trash containers . . . . and the barge CVA-601.

Some mornings the dawn light enhances everything.  Because I was a NASA fan a long time ago, a tug named Cape Canaveral will always get my attention.  I’m guessing she may be the newest boat among these.

Above, along the left side of the photo, see the barge with GL 54 on it?  Ocean Tower was moving it along,as below.

This light perfectly complements Sarah D‘s lines and colors.

The sun is already rising well after 0600;  I took this photo of Ruby M before 0600.

A very light Frederick E. Bouchard passed me by the other day.

Normandy has the throatiest sound of the boats I know best.

And finally,  well before 0600, Emily Ann was moving a scrap (?) barge westbound.  I believe she was last on this blog back in June.

All photos, WVD.

Oh . . . the oldest?  That would be Rae, launched 1952, same as me.

I’d say a “dance of cranes,” but then you’d think of the plumed type.  So plethora will have to stand in.  If you look at any links in this post, check out this one from November 2007, where the gantry cranes appear to tango . . . or duel with booms as blades maybe . .  .

Suddenly I had cranes on my brains, like these shoreside ones around the slight bend from Matthew Tibbetts.

Or these over by USNS Pomeroy, which last had a rehab in February 2014.

Busy discharging salt with clamshells are the shipboard cranes on Sinop, and then

there have recently passed lots of cranes on barges like this one moved by Emily Ann and

whose logo I don’t recognize,

this one pushed westbound by Joyce D. Brown and whose logo I’ve

not noticed before either,

and this Weeks 524 around sunrise moved

by Susan Miller.

And to close this post out, this endangered crane, ice-encased and non-functional on a 6-above days.

All photos taken in 2019 by Will Van Dorp.

More cranes from 2010 here,   and from 2009 here  and here  and here.

That’s enough for now.

 

 

 

 

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