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Anyone know the story of this lobster tug over at Pier 81 Hudson River?  Its current name?

 

Discovery Coast was standing by a tank barge at Pier 8 Red Hook.

 

Next pier south, Pier 9, Evening Tide hibernates. I guess it’s not true that all parts of “time and tide wait for no one.”

Continuing in that direction to the south of Erie Basin, a Dann Ocean fleet waits:  l to r, Captain Willie Landers, Sarah Dann, and Ruby M.

In the anchorage, Susan Rose awaits her next appointment with the RCM 250.

Fells Point heads to the Narrows to retrieve her bunker barge.

Bruce A. McAllister escorts bulker Thor Fortune into Claremont for a load of scrap.

And finally, Everly Mist is the newest renaming I’ve seen.  Ellen S. Bouchard has also been renamed Jeffrey S, but I’ve not caught a photo yet.

 

All photos, WVD.

Earlier in the month, I got views of the first details marking the October awareness of the scourge, one of many.  Since then, I saw more, which I honor here.

Eastern Dawn marked it.

Kirby Moran shows the awareness.

So do Mary Turecamo and Laura K mostly obscured.

ONE Stork and ONE Wren have that color as livery.

Marie J Turecamo does too.

Sapphire Coast does.

 

All photos, WVD, who tips this hat.

Lightning is here and has been for at least four years, and Thunder is on its way.

From 2014 and therefore two years newer than Lightning, Adeline Marie, previously Denise A. Bouchard, was heading over to the Industry Day on Wednesday. I caught a few photos of her as Rubia in between her original and her latest livery. 

The 2006 Kristin Poling first came to the sixth boro as the 5000 hp 111′ x 36′ Chesapeake.   Here was my first good view of her as a Poling/Cutler tugboat.

Atlantic Enterprise has been keeping busy with runs with dredge spoils from the North River passenger terminal out to the dump site aka HARS.   For a day’s worth of reading, click here for a July 2022 report on HARS. 

The 1981 Susan Miller pushes a small deck barge through congested waters here. She’s been working in the boro for as long as I’ve been doing this blog. 

The 1968 Marie J. Turecamo has worked in the Moran livery for over 20 years. 

Scale is clear from this side-by-side photo of the 2007 Saint Emilion (105′ x 38′ and 4800 hp) and the 1982 McCormack Boys ( 74′ x 26′ and 1200 hp), both hauled out over at Bayonne Dry Dock. 

The 2007 Normandy (79′ x 27′ and 1900 hp) has been in the boro since 2015. 

The 1981 Navigator (64′ x 24′ and 1200 hp)  has to be one among the busiest boats in the harbor and the region.

The 1975 Mary Emma (100′ x 31′ and 3900 hp) has worked under this livery since 2021.  I caught her transformation here about a year ago. 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who thanks you for continuing to read this blog. 

All day long, one ferry or another crosses the harbor, and one tug or another

travels light from point A to

point B and

makes up to another vessel

to move it to where it’s needed.

I was fortunate to see this vignette

of one part of someone’s day play out.

All photos, WVD.

Crushed stone is a commodity indispensable for construction.  Previous commodity posts can be seen here from 2010, here 2011, here 2013, here 2017, and many other instances not identified as such, like this one.

Here’s a new name on this blog:  Posillico, operator of Breakwater Marine and tugboat Deborah Quinn, the 1962 one.  Does anyone know the intended outcome of this work on the Manhattan side of the Williamsburg Bridge?

As it turns out, there’s another tugboat that once carried the Deborah Quinn name.

This Quinn is a large boat:  92′ x 27′.

Sea Lion is a regular on the East River, here heading into Newtown Creek. 

At 65′ x 27′, Lion dates from 1980.

 

Brinn Courtney is fairly new in the sixth boro, and

appears to be keeping quite busy.

The first time I saw her she still had some red livery on her here.

 

 

All photos, WVD, whose previous iterations of this title can be seen here.

 

 

Let’s jump back to the present . . .  and Doris Moran, both light

and moving containers across the harbor to the other container port back fields. If I count right, that’s 160 containers not on chassis pulled by trucks on the BQE, SIE, or other such clogged arteries.

Brinn Courtney is moving a scow, as

is Eastern Dawn.

Mister Jim and all the CMT boats seem to

be getting

a makeover.

Marjorie B. might be going to pick up her daily train cars.

Kimberly Poling basks in the dawn liight.

All photos, recently, in the sixth boro, WVD, who won’t be in the boro for the rumored tugboat race this weekend.  If you’re out there, take photos, especially ones with splash!

 

Sometimes you need a spell out of the routine to spawn new ideas.  My long sweltering time in the GOM this summer communing with alligators and sugar cane may have had that effect.  In this case, the “new” idea–as it often is–is to go back to an old idea, but twist it in a new way.  I started “non-random” tugs way back in 2009 here.   I’d done a variation on this actually two years earlier with the “bronze” fleet and here and here.  There have been others too, but I think you catch my drift.

So let’s go.  Between my two stints in the torrid GOM, I was hoping to catch a photo of one of the sixth boro’s “newest” names, Brinn Courtney.  Below is closest I got, and it was certainly a photo I’d not run without context. 

After returning, I caught John Joseph–when i first saw it in the distance I thought it was the elusive Brinn Courtney.

A short time later, I saw it in formation with USCGC Willow, although I wasn’t sure if John Joseph was escorting Willow, or vice versa.

A few days later, I caught John Joseph on the move again.

Imagine my joy then to catch Brinn Courtney twice yesterday, once pushing a barge and then

light.

All photos, WVD.  More fleet sets to come.

More past sets can be seen here and here and here

Let me interrupt my “out of the bayou” aka “regular programming” posts to a) announce my return to the sixth boro and b) update you on some exciting cargo that arrived in the sixth boro earlier this week.  For the first 4 photos, I’m grateful to Benjamin Moll, since I had not yet returned here when he took those.

But first, do you remember 20 Barges, the post about a delivery of that many barges on a barge in June 2016?  This is similar. Tradewinds’ Caitlin came into the sixth boro with barge Prometheus, seen below.   Prometheus is a large 300′ x 100′ barge that came to the sixth boro at least once before and reported on here, back in spring 2019.

Two tugs also tagged along as cargo.

 

Eastern Dawn provided the assist.

I took the rest of these photos.  By the way, as of today’s posting, Caitlin and Prometheus are still in town, over by the Weeks yard.

The new vessels will operate for the Haughland Group. More on Haughland tomorrow before I return to my Gulf of Mexico reporting.

Sarah D was assisting over at Weeks yesterday.

 

Many thanks to Ben for sharing his photos. Some previous posts with Ben’s photos can be seen here.

Any errors can be pinned on WVD, who provided the last four photos.

 

I’ve compartmentalized my photos from the Pioneer sail the other night, in part because in a short two-hour sail there was so much to see.  For starters, Stephanie Dann had earlier just rushed eastward and came back with Cornucopia Destiny, a dance partner on her starboard side.  I can speculate about this, but I don’t know the details.

As we headed into the Buttermilk, we met Susan Rose AND

Jordan Rose, ex- Evening Breeze and Evening Star, respectively.

This sweet downeaster passed.

I suspect Jordan came along to assist 

Susan into the notch.

Meanwhile, a ways down the piers, Stasinos Jimmy and currently still Evening Tide were rafted up for the moment.

Whatever brought Jordan to the Red Hook piers, by the time we had sailed passed the gantries, she was overtaking us.

On the return, as night began to fall, we met Thomas D. Witte and

then her fleetmate Douglas J.

At this point, my photos were pixelating, but I still managed to get Eastern Dawn, heading back to the “barn” at dusk.

All photos, WVD, who has handed the keys to the tower over to the robots again for a while.

 

All these tugboats have a common design feature.  I’ll let you figure it out. 

Eastern Dawn pushed a load of scrap westbound in the Kills.

James William showed off her bow as she traveled light toward the Upper Bay.

 

Ditto Buchanan 12, usually confined to pushing up and down the Hudson with a train of rock scows.

 

Robert IV does a plethora of jobs, spot work I think it would be called, from her base at Caddell’s.

Eastern Dawn returns from Newark Bay with a light scow.

 

And finally . . . where’s the tug pushing this deck barge with a boring machine?

It’s the shorty but mighty Jimmy!

And what they have in common is the squared off versus model bow, with knees designed for pushing.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

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