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Weeks 533 has credibility: she lifted the USAir Flight 1549 Airbus A320 out of the Hudson back almost 11 years ago and more.  So the other day when I was on my way to “yon” and saw her “hither” and she was working with Susan Miller, I decided to linger and inquire.

That’s when I noticed the pier 11 Wall Street float was partially submerged, and a heavy lift crew was aboard securing cables.

Besides that crew, one tug and Susan Miller, even the Green Lady was craning her neck overtop the ferry and over in my direction, paying attention.

 

When I managed to board a conveyance and get to the middle of the East River . . .

I saw there were actually four tugs involved,  two Dann tugs and another Miller tug.

Once the landing barge was lifted over the spuds and large pumps installed–I think that’s what I saw–Susan Miller whisked the barge away to be repaired, rehabbed.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who calls this another feat for Weeks 533.

Lots more tugster cranes here.

Sarah Dann left the sixth boro the other day with

this deckload on CBC Savannah.

Some questions I had were  . . . what and where to?

Inquiring ducks wanted to know, and yes, this is the opposite scenario of “little loquacious birdie.”

 

Modular structure for a refinery perhaps?  As of this posting, she’s nearly off Charleston, South Carolina.

Photos and curiosity by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday was a day to hold onto to your hat . . . or tighten the straps.

Ruby M splashed in toward the Kills, where Maersk Vilnius was exiting, but it was the yawl Mah Jong

that appeared to thrive in these conditions, passing Corpus Christi‘s stern.

Meanwhile Caitlin Ann delivered the netted paper to the recyclers.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who stood at a diagonal into the wind while snapping these shots of the sixth boro.

Here–for the most part–are previous winds and windy posts.

For folks who’ve been watching sixth boro traffic much longer than I have, Lyman must conjure up a sense of ressursction that I don’t have whenever I see the profile.  Then called Crusader, she was tripped by her barge and sank just over 30 years ago.  I’ve almost always seen her with

barge Sea Shuttle, towing sections of subs. For a spectacular view of this tow in the East River seven years ago click here.

Rockefeller University’s River Campus makes an unusual backdrop here for Foxy 3.   See the support structure for the campus being lifted from the River here.

Treasure Coast . . .  offhand, do you know the build date?

Carolina Coast,

with sugar barge Jonathan, which you’ve seen some years ago here as Falcon.

Pearl Coast with a cement barge off the Narrows remaking the tow to enter the Upper Bay.

In the rain, it’s Genesis Victory and Scott Turecamo, and their respective barges.

Franklin Reinauer heads out with RTC 28, and heading in it’s

Kimberly Poling with Noelle Cutler.

And let’s stop here with JRT assisting Cosco Faith.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who’s been inland for a week now and sees Shelia Bordelon on AIS at the Stapleton pier this morning.   Anyone get photos?

 

 

 

I missed her here five years ago, just barely.  At that time, she was delivering TZ Bridge construction components, more of which arrived a month later here.

Given her rare appearance in the sixth boro, I thought to get photos of her with some iconic parts of NYC skyline,

including Hudson Yards and the Edge.  But what vessel might Miss Lis have spent a two-week voyage delivering?

Eh voila!  So given the size and carrying capacity of this barge, I’m wondered what it came up here for.

I’d chosen my location well, since the tug spun off the wire and did the evolution off alongside the far side right in front of me.  Over beyond the dock, notice the big pink ULCV?  She’s now left the western hemisphere for a couple months.

As of posting, Miss Lis is over by the Global Terminal.

All photos and observations by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts of Tradewinds Towing can be seen here.

And while we’re at exotics, has anyone gotten a photo of Dina Polaris, currently working “just-over-the-horizon” from Jones Beach?  I’d love to see and post some photos.

Prometheus appeared here once before, but that was a different Prometheus.

 

March 2009 . . . Stephen Scott here passes Port Ivory, near my old job, pushing RTC 70.   I’m still looking for Stephen Scott photo is her new profile, sans upper wheelhouse.  Port Ivory was an intriguing place name for me when I first moved here;  once a North Shore Branch of the SIRR even had a station there.

Kimberly Poling already had the color scheme, but adding a few more teal stripes to her current appearance is a big improvement.

Lettie passed by once while I scheduled my lunch break.  As of today’s posting, Lettie G is in Mobile AL!!  If she continues, she could end up back in Lake Erie by way of the great loop.  Is that what’s happening?  A few months I caught her at the top end of the Welland Canal here.

More Port Ivory area, Specialist was around, then called Specialist II.

So was the huge K-Sea fleet, which included Falcon.

This post should be called “sixth boro and beyond,” since I took this photo of Justine with RTC 120 up near Saugerties.  Back then,

was that a red canoe along her portside rail?

Side by side  in the Rondout 10 years ago were Hackensack, the 1953 colorful one, and Petersburg, 1954 vintage and still in the general area.  Last I knew, Hackensack was in Guyana pushing molasses barges.

And going  farther out, it’s Allie B pulling Goliath on a cargo barge Brooklyn Bridge out of Quincy MA, with assistance from Vincent D. Tibbetts Jr and Justice.

Here’s a closer up of Liberty.  For the entire reportage on that journey to Mangalia, Romania (!!), click here.  Damen operates the crane in their shipyard there, the largest shipyard in the Damen collection.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you enjoy these looks back as much as I do.

I love the morning, and I’ve never gotten a better photo of Tasman Sea.  She’s a product of Main Iron Works, class of 1976.

Kirby Moran heads out on a job.   There’s no angle from which these Washburn & Doughty 6000s look anything but stunning.

Ernest Campbell, from Southern Shipbuilding’s class of 1969, comes by to pick up a barge.

James E. Brown, a recent product of Rodriguez Shipbuilding, leaves the dock and heads to the railroad, rail float that is. Daisy Mae came out of the same yard two years later.

As Robert Burton makes her run with a less than loaded barge, I hope commuters appreciate that this stuff is not traveling by road.

Lucy Reinauer is a powerful local 1973 product;  she came out of Jakobson Shipyard in Oyster Bay.

I’m planning a post on nothing but Brown boats, but I put Thomas J. in here because she’s bathed in that same rich morning light.   She’s a 1962 product of Gladding Hearn and is rated at 1000 hp, same as James E.

Elizabeth McAllister has a dramatic and rich history, which you can read here.  To summarize, in May 1988 as Elizabeth Moran, she was t-boned in the fog in Lower New York Bay.

And finally, two of Brewster Marine‘s workhorses . . .  Helen Parker (2005) and Ava Jude (2013).  In the distance is Neptune, built 1992 and sailing for Dann Ocean since 1996.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments and related ones.

Technically, infrastructure could include launch services, without which port activities would slow.

Survey services ensure that channels and depths at docks allow activity without literal impediment.

USACE overlaps with Rogers in some areas.

But more commonly when one thinks of infrastructure, it’s what allows terrestrial activity,

like bridges and their on- and off-ramps.

With all the bridge building and innovation going on the the greater land area around the sixth boro, it’s not surprising to see bridge components arrive this way.   And what travels on the waterways post-demolition isn’t only parts of roadways; here large pieces of scrapped vessel traveled.

New bridge component above, old bridge component below . . .

Without liquid infrastructure, these would not be moving.

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

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