You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Dann Ocean Towing’ category.

Here’s the newest, following directly from 12 for Sandy Ground and 10 for SSG Michael H. Ollis.  Or how about a redux for both

Now unless ferry and tug travel on a maglev frictionless cushion of air when offshore and distant, this is just the fata morgana effect when the vessels are seen a ways off, in this case, about six miles.   In the photo below, there’s a hint that Sarah Dann is riding on a foil board, 

and that the ferry has a dreadnought shaped hull.

Well . . . I’m just messin’.  These were photos of yesterday’s arrival of the third of three new ferries.  Note New York Media Boat out to snap their first welcome photos. Photos of the christening down in Florida happened months ago here.

Here the tow enters the Narrows, and the ocean called the Upper Bay, where Dorothy Day will transport hundreds of thousands and even millions of passengers in the next decades.

Ellen McAllister moves in close, not to provide the assist but rather to convey photographers needing to confirm that the vessel is in fact a ferry for the City of New York.  confirmation provided andn documented.

 

All photos, WVD, who’s ridden aboard MHO but not yet Sandy Ground. 

For reportage on all three newest ferries, check out this report from New York Media Boat here.

 

The multi-colored lines here show the marathon between Pensacola and Crystal River, a shoreline that seemed endless and relatively featureless . . .  .  Each of the colored lines represents a day of travel.  I learned this part of Florida is called the “forgotten coast” or the “big bend of Florida.”  There may be other names, but the relative absence of settlement intrigues me.  On the other hand, with place names like Sumatra and Tate’s Hell Forest and Swamp, it may be inhospitable.  There’s even a song about Cebe Tate chasing a panther into that wilderness.

After a late departure from Pensacola, we were off the long Santa Rosa Island and its sugarwhite sand by nightfall.

Soon after we departed from Santa Rosa, we had the first heavy rain of the trip, but the storms

traveled fast and soon

we left them behind.

Remember in yesterday’s post I alluded to a contrast between LA-MS-AL (LAMSAL, a new acronym?) and FL waters?  What’s different?

Only everything:  no oil/gas infrastructure and very few boats of any type.  There was one boat, a sport fish, traveling at least three times the speed of Legs III and on a collision course until two sets of five blasts of our battery of air horns caused that boat to drop off plane and then sheepishly [I hope] take our stern.  I suspect the sport fish had all eyes on their lures and none on the wheel.   No, I won’t post their photo and name here.

Our next overnight was off Saint Andrew’s Park, Panama City. Notice the pads 11 feet down in that super clear water.

Beyond Panama City, inland fires suggest agriculture-related burns, but I’ve never traveled by road in that part of Florida.  Yet.

We gave Cape San Blas wide berth because of irregular shallows. The Cape was the site of Civil War activity and a whole series of lighthouses.

The chart said we had plenty of water, but the bands of lighter water suggested maybe we didn’t.  Ultimately, the chart proved itself correct.

AIS said the tug towing tandems was Lady Terea, a name that meant nothing to me until I searched a bit more and found that from 2014 until 2018, she worked in the sixth boro and North River as . . .

Mr. Russell.  Then she carried the livery of Tappan Zee Constructors.

That evening we spent jacked up off a remote area of St. George Island, the barrier beach that defines Apalachicola Bay.  More on the Apalachicola River here.

Seriously, we saw no other boats with the exception of the two I’ve mentioned.  I saw this mast in the distance, and an hour or so when we passed it, it was as minimal as the waters of Florida’s forgotten coast were untrafficked.

Then later, Lady Edwina passed us with a tandem tow;  the captain hailed us to ask where we were headed with Legs III.  He also said he’d started his career out working on liftboats.

A bit north of the mouth of the Crystal River,  I brought the drone as close to the wave tops as I dared to get this shot, hoping for a blinding glimpse of setting sun under the hull, but this is the result . . .   no blinding sun.

Morning showed a Dann Ocean boat and a large Express Marine barge.

Ocean Tower! it was.  

Tending another Express Marine barge was Consort, which I’d not seen for over a decade!

All photos, any errors,  WVD.

Here’s a March 2017 photo of Evening Mist, one of many I took over the years, 

her big tugboat lines lessened by this the second upper wheelhouse she had carried.  A previous one she had as Captain Dann. 

She was recently transformed again, and a few days ago I finally caught Evening Mist in her new livery . . . 

H is for the Haughland Group. 

And she looks great for a 1976 tugboat.   I look forward to seeing more of the Haughland Group.

All photos, WVD. 

I’ve compartmentalized my photos from the Pioneer sail the other night, in part because in a short two-hour sail there was so much to see.  For starters, Stephanie Dann had earlier just rushed eastward and came back with Cornucopia Destiny, a dance partner on her starboard side.  I can speculate about this, but I don’t know the details.

As we headed into the Buttermilk, we met Susan Rose AND

Jordan Rose, ex- Evening Breeze and Evening Star, respectively.

This sweet downeaster passed.

I suspect Jordan came along to assist 

Susan into the notch.

Meanwhile, a ways down the piers, Stasinos Jimmy and currently still Evening Tide were rafted up for the moment.

Whatever brought Jordan to the Red Hook piers, by the time we had sailed passed the gantries, she was overtaking us.

On the return, as night began to fall, we met Thomas D. Witte and

then her fleetmate Douglas J.

At this point, my photos were pixelating, but I still managed to get Eastern Dawn, heading back to the “barn” at dusk.

All photos, WVD, who has handed the keys to the tower over to the robots again for a while.

 

Here are previous iterations of this title.  Currently there’s a dredging project going on just NW of the St George ferry terminal.  Donjon’s Delaware Bay does the dredging, and Stephanie Dann shuttles the scows away toward the VZ Bridge. 

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I think this is maintenance dredging.

The other day Douglas J was making the run to HARS to dump and returning the light scows back to Delaware Bay.

 

Once Douglas J returns a scow at the dredge and makes it fast,

 

Douglas J goes off and takes the loaded scow from Stephanie Dann,

Delaware Bay gets to digging,

 

 

and Stephanie Dann returns to stand by as the next scow is loaded.  And so on until the “excess” is removed.  different days, different tugboats are involved.

Any errors, all photos, WVD.

Dace lighters STI Excel.

 

Neptune comes into town again.

Buchanan 12 makes a rare appearance light, but everyone needs to refuel periodically.

Janet D follows Seeley into the Kills.

How a bout a four’fer . . .   counter:  Marjorie, Kristin Poling, Nicholas, and Jordan Rose.

Sea Lion heads eastbound.

B. Franklin travels west, and

Discovery Coast, east. .  .  both light.

Nathan G moves a deep scow into the Kills with Cape Wrath lurking in the background. 

Traffic never stops, and it’ll outlast me, the photographer, WVD.

 

Here was 1.  Dawn’s early light is my favorite time in the city that never sleeps.

Even Navig8 Gauntlet snoozes, except for the person on watch.

Captain Dann is moving about, spinning

around for an assist.  Radiant Ray is aptly named for this time.

Truth be told, the sixth boro never sleeps.

Ellen, along with

Charles D., was on its way to an assist over at Earle.

Like I said, this is my very favorite time of day.  Of course, you won’t find me awake very much after 2100.

All photos, WVD.

 

Happy spring.  All photos in this post were taken in winter two days ago and over a six-hour period.  Before noon, the five boros and the next state were obscured out of existence. I really think they didn’t exist during those hours, just like the imaginary sun crossed (??) the imaginary equator at 11:33 NYC time.  Crossed .  . by boat or chariot or blimp or goat cart . . .  I don’t know.

Kimberly  passed by and Robbins Reef was barely there.  Mariner brought boxes in, and Kirby passed by, and they might as well have been at sea.

Neptune shuttled by, and hints of Bayonne showed themselves.

Justine came by and the sunshine was making progress burning off the moisture.

When Cape Canaveral crossed in front of me, Manhattan was there, albeit like a matte painting;  right, that’s just a movie set, right?

The large gray ship . . . Soderman, that too was a different painted background, this time for Captain D.

Before Mary Turecamo appeared over on the starboard side of New York‘s trans-harbor load  of containers, I had no idea what I was seeing.

It wasn’t until well into the afternoon and–in the near distance–Bert Reinauer passed overtaking the Vane unit that I saw a boat pass by without a hint of fog.  That, however, was mostly due to the proximity

All photos, Friday, WVD.

I’ve mentioned before that I’m always looking for novelty.  Here’s one, new to me at least,

the 4400 hp Chincoteague with Double Skin 802.  I’d love to get closer-up pics one of these days.

Nicole Leigh Reinauer, a 7200 hp beauty twenty years almost senior, passes Chincoteague on her way to

rejoin her barge, RTC 135.

Meanwhile Miriam Moran follows in a ship as one of the assists.

Moments earlier, the 1979 3000 hp Miriam had accompanied 1982 4610 hp  Doris Moran to meet the ship.

The 2021 4000 hp Jordan Rose, ex-Evening Star and now in Rose Cay colors, is high and dry alongside Sorenson (?) Miller on the hard at Bayonne Drydock.

The 2008 4200 hp Pocomoke passes the KV buoy, which made soothing noises as it rose and settled in the chop.

The 1999 4500 hp Patrice heads out to meet a ship.

 

And finally, 1999 3600 hp Stephen Dann looked particularly good as she headed out to her next job.

All photos, this week, WVD.

 

Thanks for following me down memory lane the past few days, or should I say up recollections river.  My plan for the next bit is to alternate current sixth boro activity with photos from archives of the Canal Society of New York.

I love winter light, when it’s light, as it illuminates parts of NCC Reem and Captain Dann with the bunker barge.

The hot exhaust/cold air differential makes for more shimmering light this time of year.

Images are clear, but fata morgana distortions are more pronounced;  Ellen and Doris here are less than two miles away.

Here the Moran 6000 in MSC Vittoria’s shade is silhouetted, whereas the one following catches the light on its superstructure facets.

At 2 to 3 miles, it’s shimmered again, as two of the Moran 6000s sail Monaco Bridge.

Margaret returns from sailing Conti Cortesia.

And finally, with Coho in the background, it’s Eastern Dawn pushing an almost color matching fuel barge, in Balico colors.

All photos less than a week old, WVD.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,562 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

September 2022
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930