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Excuse the duplication here, but since this was a long voyage, I’ll repeat some of the early shots and add new ones farther down the page.  A Great Lakes mariner took this is Manitowoc on May 29. 

Jeremy Whitman got these as the tow left Manitowoc on May 30.

 

Jake Van Reenen got this in Clayton NY.  Note that the tail boat above, Candace Elise, has been switched out.  Now below it’s Molly M I.

René Beauchamp got this in the South Shore Canal, near Montreal.

A week later almost, Jack Ronalds got the next three shots at the Strait of Canso and its lock, separating Cape Breton from the mainland of Nova Scotia.

Many more of Jack’s photos can be seen here.

The tail boat here is Svitzer Montreal.

And finally, posted yesterday on St. Lawrence Seaway Ship Watchers FB by Stephen Graves, who stated the photo was not his, the tow arrives in Kittery ME, home of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. 

Bravo to all the crews and pilots and photographers!

Jeremy Whitman took this photo of the big blue Konecranes #38 crane.  Tail boat is Candace Elise, prior to 2015 known as Stephen Dann, as hereOXBO is managing the transport.

They departed Manitowoc a week or so ago and are now in a very wide portion of the Saint Lawrence, downstream from Gaspé Peninsula.  Manitowoc, among other things, is the western terminus of SS Badger. 

Jake Van Reenen took this photo as they passed Clayton.  Molly M I has replaced Candace Elise.  The barge supporting the barge is Cashman Equipment Corp.’s JMC 253, with dimensions of 250′ x72′ x16′ deck barge.

René Beauchamp got this shot –and more on FB Seaway News-Voie maritime Infos–of the tow.  His vantage point over the South Shore Canal portion of the Saint Lawrewnce Seaway  was the Cartier Bridge.  ETA for the tow at the mouth of the Piscataqua and Kittery ME is June 17.  I look forward to photos from there.

Harry McNeal moved deck barge 1962 with crane away from the IMTT docks the other day, 

Face on, the crane appeared to be straight up.

Allan Seymour caught this Denali with tank barge DBL 104 upbound on Penobscot Bay yesterday.  If I have the right number, DBL 104 has a capacity is just over 105,000 barrels.

I spotted Paul Andrew with the recycling scow DS 171 heading for the Arthur Kill.

The destination for this is PS&S/Visy Paper.

Erich A. caught Emery Zidell up the Hudson in the notch of 83,000 bbl tank barge Dr. Robert J. Beall.

James Turecamo meets the Centerline unit up in the scenic Hudson River below Albany.

And I saw Eastern Dawn aka Toula pushing two

mini-barges.

The minis, one at a time, carry dredge spoils from the depths of Gowanus Canal.  Prior to this project, I’d never seen mini barges, or scows.

All photos, as credited: Jeremy, Jake, René , Erich, and WVD.

Unrelated, the highest bid for tug Grouper as of this morning is $26.00.

 

Location 1?  Do you know this tug?

Location 2.  Tug Rachel is with this

unusual looking cargo ship, Lihue.

Viking pushes southbound past Castle Rock and

Comet northbound along the Hudson River.

Near the west end of the East River, it’s C. Angelo and

near the east end, it’s Navigator with GT Bulkmaster heading west and Ellen McAllister, east.

Working near the TZ Bridge some years back, it’s Tappan Zee II.

And finally, on the northern end of Lake Huron, it’s Avenger IV

heading for the Soo.

To answer the first question, that’s Coney Island with the Goethals Bridge and Linden refinery in the background, making this the Elizabeth River in Elizabethport NJ.

And the second question, it’s Seattle.  Photo thanks to Kyle Stubbs. Lihue, ex-President Hoover III, ex-Thomas E. Cuffe, 1971,  may be at the end of Rachel‘s towline along the coast of Oregon, heading for the Panama Canal and then . .  . Texas for scrap.  She’s probably the last of LASH (C8-S-81e) vessels built, along with President Tyler IV and President Grant V, scrapped more than 10 years ago.  She’s been a survivor.

Click on the photo below to learn more about a 1970 container ship still moving boxes, up to 482 teu at a time.  Explorador!

All other photos, WVD, at points in various places since 2017.

At first light, Navigator passes a docked Saint Emilion

This 1981 build has called the sixth boro her home since 2015.  Saint Emilion (2007) has been here in two previous liveries and names.

Barney Turecamo was launched in 1995.  Note her cutaway forefoot.

Barney, married to Georgia, gets an assist from Doris Moran, 1982, as she departs the dock.

 

Meaghan Marie, 1968, follows a box ship into port but is not involved in the assist.

Meaghan Marie is a former fleetmate of Margaret Moran, 1979, doing the assist.

Emily Ann, 1964, moves a sanitation scow.

 

And finally, coming in from sea with a dump scow, it’s Captain Willie Landers, 2001.

When she first appeared on this blog in 2015, she had a prominent mast, not an upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD.

If you follow this blog, you know I look for novelty:  new vessels, new roles, new perspectives I don’t always even initially or ever understand.  Here’s for me a new boat, Cape Fear, 2018, another Sassafras class tug.

 

Brendan Turecamo, 1975,  has appeared here many times, but in the past week, I’ve seen her in two configurations, doing ship assist below and

slinging barge Connecticut below.  Yes, it’s the same tug, house down or house up.

With the bronze monument, aka Teardrop Memorial, in the background, Marjorie B. McAllister delivers nearly a dozen rail cars on NYNJ100

to cross over the harbor from NJ to NY. The run is usually performed by Brown tugs.

Chemical Pioneer, a sixth boro icon, here is assisted into the anchorage by  . . . Franklin Reinauer.

Matthew Tibbetts stands by as Dylan Cooper (correct me if I’m wrong) with RTC 108 lighters Gulf Coral. 

Taking a break from the dredge project over by Sandy Hook, Neptune travels west in the KVK.

Sea Lion pushes a barge westbound on the East River, past the old banana pier and Vladick Houses of the Lower East Side in the background.

Ivory Coast stands by with an Express Marine (former owner?) barge over in the Wallabout section of the East River. 

Christian Reinauer and barge RTC 145 stand by over in the anchorage below Fort Wadsworth.

And finally . . .  over in Red Hook, Eastern Dawn hangs alongside Meaghan Marie. Stand by for a new paint job of Eastern Dawn.

All photos, any errors, solely mine, WVD.

ROROS of various sorts you can find here.  But let’s take three that have called in the sixth boro during this month.  These are three of many more.  See if you can rank them by age and size.    It should be fairly easy.  The three are Polaris Highway,

Paganella (which I erroneously thought was Pagan Ella),

and Grande Halifax.  In the photo below, see the three tugboats, of which only one was assisting.  Grande New York first arrived here in spring 2018, where the christening occurred.

So again . . . size and age, age and size.   A ”  Highway” sister vessel arrived here in fog a few years back.

 

 

Here are some details, like cooling water from the bow thruster,

port of registry,

and bow. 

And the results, by size, small to large, it’s Paganella, Grande Halifax, Polaris Highway.  By age, old to new, it’s Paganella, Polaris Highway, Grande Halifax. Paganella dates from 2009, Polaris, 2017, and Grande, 2018. 

Polaris Highway, a K Line pure car truck carrier,  encloses parking for 7500 CEUs (car equivalent units).    Think this way, a standard car has dimensions, but if the vessel is transporting trucks, the actual number will be different.

Grande Halifax, a Grimaldi vessel, has capacity of 6700 CEUs.

Paganella, named for an Italian mountain, is the oldest of the F. Laeicz line, and is rated at 5000 CEUs, still quite the number of cars. 

All photos and data interpretation, WVD.

I’d seen Ocean Tower on AIS earlier and watched it pass along with its tow, but I was focused on something else, so this was my best shot.  I had caught its reddish color, the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock color. 

Phil Little caught this photo from his Weehawken cliff.  I believe the tow had gone up the North River to wait for a favorable time through Hell Gate on the other side of the island.  

Later in the day I got a query from Lew.  This was the closest he could get from his vantage point, and he wondered what that gargantuan crane was.

I concluded I should contact my friend Nelson Brace, whose photos of Cape Cod Canal transits I always found spectacular.  Nelson told me he works with a group called ‘Photogs Я Us’ .  They even have a FB page that’s a “must-see” if you do FB.

And here’s the close-up of the dredge from ‘Photogs Я Us’ …  It’s the dredge New York. I’m not sure where she has more recently been working, but she’s currently heading for Boston, where the harbor channel deepening process is on.

Her bucket can dig down to 83′ down and take up to 25 cubic yds of material.

Many thanks to the fine photographers of ‘Photogs Я Us’ for these closeups.

Also to Phil and Lew for contacting me.

I recall when GLDD’s New York was operating in the sixth boro, deepening the channels here and here.  Also, she was passively involved in an incident some of you may recall as well.  Below are more photos I took of dredge New York working just NW of the Staten Island Ferry terminal in fall 2010.

Captain D is the assist boat.  These photos show the role of the derrick over the Liebherr 996. 

Here’s a crowded dredge zone.

 

Here’s the USACE on the project in Boston.

 

The first boat I saw in the morning fog was buff and green . . .  Meaghan Marie, moving what appeared to be a Cashman spud barge.

Meeting her was Vane’s Philadelphia.  I’m curious . . . do any readers have a photo of a Vane unit operating on thew Great Lakes or arriving there via the Saint Lawrence?

I could hear Shannon Dann‘s EMDs throbbing as she moved Weeks 105

Pathfinder moved light trash containers to a marine transfer station.

A light Treasure Coast headed from Duraport to the Upper Bay.

Seeley pushed sand scow Weeks 250 eastbound.

As the sun started to burn through the morning clouds, Janet D made her way to a job.

Pegasus returned from a job, out ahead of two Moran assist tugs.

St. Andrews got underway from the Centerline dock.

Brendan headed off to an assist.

And just as I needed to leave, Franklin showed up to assist Gracie out of her dock.

All photos, WVD.

Angelina Autumn . . . that’s not a common sixth boro boat . . .

so of course I needed to go check her out as she entered the Narrows yesterday with a deck barge headed for Coeymans NY.

Arriving with Angelina Autumn was Shannon Dann,

towing a huge Weeks crane.  I did not get an ID on the crane.  Neptune was in the procession also, but it was miles back and I had other places I needed to be.

Genesis Eagle had GM 11103 alongside a tanker.

Josephine came in from sea with

RTC 83.

Lois Ann L. Moran departed the Narrows

bound for Philly with the barge Philadelphia.

Anacostia headed out as well with

with Double Skin 510A.

I should know but am just guessing . . . Nicole Leigh Reinauer alongside Energy Centaur over by the Sandy Hook Pilots’ station.

All photos, WVD.

 

Alongside Pilot No. 1 New York, the current one, it’s the newest-in-name vessel in the sixth boro . . .

Meaghan Marie, exKathleen Turecamo, has become part of the same green & buff fleet as Joseph John.

Here’s a photo I took of her in port of Albany, September 2013.

A different use of green . . . Vane’s Philadelphia, a 4200 hp tug launched in 2017.

A slightly darker buff, it’s Matthew Tibbetts.  What I didn’t realize until I looked it up just now, Tibbetts was launched as Dann Ocean’s first boat to carry the name Ocean Tower.  More on that later.

It’s always a good day when I catch two Reinauer tugboats together, Haggerty Girls (4000 hp) and Ruth M. Reinauer (4720 hp), with a deeply loaded RTC

Alex puts its 4300 hp to bear on Viktor Bakaev.

I mentioned Ocean Tower earlier . . .  here’s the current tugboat by that name. It’s about a decade newer, one-third more horsepower, and 15′ longer, and 5′ broader than the earlier boat, now Tibbetts.

Kristin Poling began life as Chesapeake, an early version of Patapsco but longer, broader,and with a full 5000 hp.

And to conclude, examples of the classes of the two largest tractor tugs in the sixth boro . . . Capt. Brian A. and

JRT, each approaching their next job.

All photos very recently, WVD, who has more tugboat race photos from previous years . . .

 

 

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