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What made this stand out was the mostly horizontal member quite high off the water.  So I started snapping.

I’d noticed a few days back that Pelham had headed unusually far east in the Sound, and had run

sometimes tandem with Captain Willie Landers.  So this must be the tow.  

Any guesses?  

Names are always a clue. 

McInnis is a name that has appeared on this blog previously.  Here’s their network;  in that link, click on the map enlarger.  Below that, Van Aalst is another clue, given what they do.  So if you looked up both links in this paragraph, you can identify what this is. 

Put them altogether, and you’ve solved this whatzit puzzle:  it’s a dry bulk ship unloader built for McInnis.

Where it is headed and why . . .  

now I’ve no clue. A decade ago, I saw an antique specialized barge like this on the Maas (or Meuse) River;  the barge was named “graanzuiger no. 19,which is pretty explicit Dutch for what it was designed to do:  graanzuiger translates literally as “grain sucker.”  This barge Resolute might be called a cementzuiger. A similar vessel called a floating grain elevator incorporating some of the same principles used to be quite common in the sixth boro, back when our watery boro was a major grain transshipment point. 

All photos, WVD.

 

The sun was setting when we met Allie B

and her tow:  Weeks 533 with Robert as tail boat.  I’d seen the big crane only a week or so earlier doing some lifts in the sixth boro.  This blog has featured this crane in a number of sixth boro jobs and moves going all the way back to hoisting US Airways 1549 out of the icy Hudson 14 years ago. 

At this point, Allie B and tow were westbound at the west end of Buzzards Bay

on their way to the Cape, or so it appeared later.  And yes, as contradictory as that previous sentence sounds, I meant it that way.

Had our meeting been a half hour later, I’d not have these photos. 

 

Allie B has fascinated me since her epic 2009 voyage, when she took barge Brooklyn Bridge to the Black Sea. 

 

Like I said, it was a fortunate meeting as we all sailed in the last minutes of brilliant light before the long winter’s night.

 

 

Enjoy the light show. 

 

All photos, WVD. 

From right to left then, that would be Allie B, Sarah D, and Weeks 533.  

The two tugs assisted the crane barge that lifted a large electrical component onto a many-wheeled trailer inside the Red Hook container port.  I’ll post my photos of the truck on my next truckster! post. 

Well over a decade ago, I traveled up to Quincy MA to see Allie B move a long time piece of the landscape out of Quincy and over to the Black Sea port of Mangalia, Romania.  What piece of landscape, you ask?  It was the Fore River Goliath Crane, now painted yellow and set in a yard operated by Damen, although it seems it may now be inactive again. 

Landing the crane at Red Hook yesterday, lifting the cargo, and departing all happened quite fast, less than 90 minutes from arrival to departure. 

 

 

 

 

Happy solstice. Next stop summer.

All photos, WVD.   Hat tip Cyclone Shark.

 

If you’re unfamiliar with NYC, most of the photos in this series are from Roosevelt Island, likely off most visitors’ list of places to see.  That’s too bad, since it offers a lot, including great views of Manhattan and the strait (East “river”) in between.  If you’ve not seen the Nelly Bly memorial at the north end, you’re in for a treat.

 Here are previous posts in this series. Let’s start with the NYS-built Ava Jude, a 600 hp boat not seen on this blog in a while. 

It’s also been a while since Shannon Dann was last on the blog, but that’s because she has had her 2400 hp engines working elsewhere.

Ava Jude‘s 1200 hp fleet mate, William Brewster, has been working on the bulkhead project under the 79th Street bridge for some time. 

This Brooklyn, a Vane boat now but formerly Labrador Sea , also brings 2400 hp to the task, and like Brewster, is Blount built. 

I notice King’s Point‘s training vessel too late to get a side profile shot, but her “name” 142, is a number of great significance at the USMMA.  If you click on no other link in this post, do click on that one. 

Coastline’s Kodi is another New England (Gladding Hearn) built small tugboat, the perfect boat for certain jobs. 

See more Gladding Hearn boats here, although that’s not a complete list, since I notice that Benjamin Elliot and others are missing in that link. 

Michael L. Daigle has appeared on this blog only about once before.  She’s a 4200 hp boat that once wore Kirby colors on the west coast as Mount Bona, named for a major North American peak in Alaska. 

 

All photos and any errors, WVD. 

Happy please-go-vote day.  If you know anyone at all who is eligible to vote but won’t, have a chat with that person.  As a New Yorker, I voted over a week ago . . . early voting on a Saturday afternoon.

Some photos . . .  and your part is to 1) rank these boats by highest to lowest horsepower, and 2) identify which if any were built north of central sixth boro.  I’ve provided dates of initial construction, but tugboats are required to be well-maintained, sometimes repowered and extensively rebuilt.

The 1979 Miriam Moran looked this way in her October markings.  Cancer is a scourge, and I know this remembrance each October means a lot to folks who’ve seen the disease from nearby.

HMS Liberty has worked in the boro for over a decade now.

Laura K. Moran came off the ways in 2008, spent some years here, some away, but now she’s back in the boro.

Mister T, 2001, has carried that moniker ever since. 

Andrea, 1999, has been in the boro a half dozen years.  Here‘s how she looked back in 2016. 

Shannon Dann was built in 1971.

Dace Reinauer dates from 1968 but has been considerably rebuilt from the first time she appeared on this blog here.  See pre-2010 photos of her here and here.

Brian Nicholas, 1966, has been in the boro about as long as I’ve been doing this blog.  I did post a photo of her with Banda Sea name clearly on her bow here 12 years ago.

Foxy 3 was built in 1974 and first appeared on this blog as Barker Boys, a name she carried until 2009, when she was renamed Buchanan 16.  I don’t believe I ever saw her in the Balico livery as BF Jersey although I did see her with BF Jersey nameboards here. Note the folded back upper wheelhouse.

All photos, WVD.

Answers? 

Laura K 5100 horsepower, Dace 3400, Andrea and Miriam at 3000, HMS Liberty and Mister T and Shannon D all at 2400, Brian Nicholas 1700, Foxy 3  1600.

Built north of the sixth boro:  Laura K in Maine and Mister T in Rhode Island;  all others were built in Louisiana.

 

So I’ve seen Thomas Dann before, although not this one.  I’ve seen this tugboat before but not as Thomas Dann, and I’ve seen this barge Somerset before but not pushed by Thomas Dann or any other Dann Ocean boat.

The most prominent feature of the covered dry cargo barge is the hatch cover crane.

Somerset measures 418′ x 75′ and was built in 1990. Any guesses on deep draft?  You’ll see your answer soon.

 

As you can see in the links in the first paragraph, this Thomas Dann appeared here previously as Amberjack, 1981, 106′ x 32′ and 3900 hp.

Here’s today’s deep draft information.

Since Yonkers is her destination, it’s safe to assume the cargo is sweet.

To digress, I’m starting to find Jaume Plensa’s sculpture annoying, bossy, no matter what the intention. For more of his work, click here.

All photos, WVD.

This title goes back almost a decade, and this schooner has been doing cargo runs on the Hudson for a while now, but I’d not seen it yet. 

Fortunate for me, I finally spotted the boat this past weekend, running

from Brooklyn side Upper Bay to Raritan Bay and the Arthur Kill.

I’ve posted photos of autumn sail here and here and in other posts like here, but this one is moving cargo.

As of this posting, she’s in the Hudson Highlands section of the river.

 

 

Cargo or not, sailing vessels have an elegance, a je ne sais quoi . . . .

Wind is the other alternative fuel.

All photos, any errors, WVD.

Apollonia has caught the attention of the NYTimes here about a year ago, and here recently in a Kingston NY paper.  Here’s a joint venture with a microbrewery up the river in Beacon.

Anyone know the story of this lobster tug over at Pier 81 Hudson River?  Its current name?

 

Discovery Coast was standing by a tank barge at Pier 8 Red Hook.

 

Next pier south, Pier 9, Evening Tide hibernates. I guess it’s not true that all parts of “time and tide wait for no one.”

Continuing in that direction to the south of Erie Basin, a Dann Ocean fleet waits:  l to r, Captain Willie Landers, Sarah Dann, and Ruby M.

In the anchorage, Susan Rose awaits her next appointment with the RCM 250.

Fells Point heads to the Narrows to retrieve her bunker barge.

Bruce A. McAllister escorts bulker Thor Fortune into Claremont for a load of scrap.

And finally, Everly Mist is the newest renaming I’ve seen.  Ellen S. Bouchard has also been renamed Jeffrey S, but I’ve not caught a photo yet.

 

All photos, WVD.

Marjorie  moves her train cars.

Nathan G goes for fuel.

Crystal Cutler pushes her barge.

Paula Atwell travels light for a change. 

CMT Pike does her harbor rounds. 

Mister Jim here looks brighter than usual in the morning sun; in cloudy weather, that gray livery

obscures details. 

Robert IV assists at the stone anchorage.

Cape Henry leaves her barge to take care of some business. 

Captain Willie Landers makes a pass through the boro. 

And a rare sighting, Sea Crescent transits the boro on her return from Port Hawkesbury NS to Fort Eustis VA.  It’s likely that Sea Crescent originated this voyage from a port on the Saint Lawrence or even the Great Lakes.

All photos, any errors, WVD, whose 380 in this series was posted here.

Here’s the newest, following directly from 12 for Sandy Ground and 10 for SSG Michael H. Ollis.  Or how about a redux for both

Now unless ferry and tug travel on a maglev frictionless cushion of air when offshore and distant, this is just the fata morgana effect when the vessels are seen a ways off, in this case, about six miles.   In the photo below, there’s a hint that Sarah Dann is riding on a foil board, 

and that the ferry has a dreadnought shaped hull.

Well . . . I’m just messin’.  These were photos of yesterday’s arrival of the third of three new ferries.  Note New York Media Boat out to snap their first welcome photos. Photos of the christening down in Florida happened months ago here.

Here the tow enters the Narrows, and the ocean called the Upper Bay, where Dorothy Day will transport hundreds of thousands and even millions of passengers in the next decades.

Ellen McAllister moves in close, not to provide the assist but rather to convey photographers needing to confirm that the vessel is in fact a ferry for the City of New York.  confirmation provided andn documented.

 

All photos, WVD, who’s ridden aboard MHO but not yet Sandy Ground. 

For reportage on all three newest ferries, check out this report from New York Media Boat here.

 

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