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Here are previous installments and related ones.

Technically, infrastructure could include launch services, without which port activities would slow.

Survey services ensure that channels and depths at docks allow activity without literal impediment.

USACE overlaps with Rogers in some areas.

But more commonly when one thinks of infrastructure, it’s what allows terrestrial activity,

like bridges and their on- and off-ramps.

With all the bridge building and innovation going on the the greater land area around the sixth boro, it’s not surprising to see bridge components arrive this way.   And what travels on the waterways post-demolition isn’t only parts of roadways; here large pieces of scrapped vessel traveled.

New bridge component above, old bridge component below . . .

Without liquid infrastructure, these would not be moving.

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Call it a sea change.  The air warms up although the water is still very cold.

Sea Lion does what it has all winter, but what’s different is the reappearance of non-workboats.  Sea Lion has some history on this blog.

Evening Light moves north in anticipation of summer.

Pleasure boats move into an environment that has been consistently about work throughout the winter.

Mischief passes New Champion and Stephen Dann, which brought in highway ramp sections.  Would these sections be for the Bayonne, the Tappan Zee, or another?

Small party boats

head out to catch what spring fish migrate in. Should there be a Really Never Snuff Express?

Bigger party boats appear as well.

Fast open boats and

slower enclosed cruisers, of all sorts

pass Atlantic Salvor as it returns from another dredge spoils run.

Norwegian Escape has smaller boats

accompany it on its way into the Narrows and the harbor.  If my numbers are correct, Escape has capacity for 5999 souls, including crew, which is more than the population of Taos, Marfa, and well more than the town where I grew up.

I’ve not seen many of these smaller boats since early last fall, and on a warm Sunday, they start to reappear.  Drive safe; work safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose other posts about small craft can be read here.

 

Pre-foliage spring is optimal time for seeing the landmarks along the Hudson.  This one is near Wilderstein (scroll), but I’d never seen it before.

Esopus Meadows cannot be missed either down bound or up.  Get on the wrong side, and you’ll regret ever being here. Click here for tugster posts showing the light in all the seasons.

I wonder what the crew on the anchored bulker thought of the Beaux-Arts structure on the bank.  I wonder what some of foreign crews coming up river think of the river as a whole?

Comet heads northbound with segments of dismantled TZ Bridge.  The first specific example I’ve heard of reuse is here, in Mount Vernon. 

At first glance, I thought this was odd snow accumulation on the banks,

closer up . . . an auto auction lot.

Tilcon operates one of the most conspicuous quarries along the river, seen here last week from the water and here

from the train.  Quarrying has been a major activity along the river.  And here finally I see the derivation of “trap rock,” which this crushed aggregate is sometimes called:  trap, as in stairs, for all those Dutch speakers out there.

I’ve been curious about this large crane near Chelsea NY since last summer.  Now my best guess is that it’s related to NYC Water Tunnel No. 3.  Any DEP readers help out?

Just below the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge, we meet the Buchanan 12 and her herd of barges, heading up to Tilcon for trap rock.  For many more views of Buchanan 12, click here.  We met her just as she left the sublime highlands.

Of all the many posts I’ve mentioned Bannerman’s in, here and here are my favorites. For close-ups, click here.  In this era of gun questions, here’s an article with specifics of his unregulated trade.

Breakneck Ridge looked particularly ominous with afternoon sun cast shadows.  It appears MTA trains will stop there if you have a ticket.

And movement on a ridge in Little Stony Point . . . a photographer.  Like me.  And the “point” . . .   it was once an island. 

South of here, more beautiful scenery awaited, but I got distracted and took no more photos in the fading light of late afternoon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

On a day in the sixth boro, you’ll see a lot of working boats that’ve been around a while.  These are randomly chosen.  Lynx dates from 1967.

Stephen Dann from 1999.

Weddell Sea from 2007 and Lincoln Sea, 2000.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002.

Buchanan 1 . . .  is she aka Buchanan 10?  If so, 1967.

Marty C, 1981.

Little C, 1988.  She looks somewhat similar to Lil Rip. 

Pearl Coast, looking huge out of the notch, 1978.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous weather posts.  Below . . . that’s easy:  it’s a local shower;  Evening Tide and Evening Light were in the rain, and I was not, yet.

But a half hour later at the opposite end of the KVK, the clouds were truly wild.  Is there a word for these conditions?  Again, it wasn’t raining at my location.

Air currents swirled beyond the busy waterway, l to r, Stolt Loyalty, Stone 1, Phoenix Dream, Kimberly Turecamo, and Hoegh Seoul assisted by Bruce A. McAllister.

The Stolt tanker passes Graecia Aeterna before meeting the wild swirl head-on.

Add one more tug to the mix.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d like to know what you call this type of fast-moving dispersal of fog.

 

 

About four years ago she arrived  . . . and has been lifting into place this huge structure sometimes described as one of the largest current civil engineering project in the country.  Her original name Left Coast Lifter , a ZPMC product, stuck despite attempts at New Yorkizing it, renaming it I Lift NY or Ichabod Crane.

I saw the size of those blocks recently when I drove across the new bridge for the first time, but being alone in the car . . . obviously, no pics.

But the Lifter has been repurposed now.  I don’t suppose my attempt to rename her now will succeed any better… But how about Downstate Dropper Lowerer, Tappan Zee DeconstructorDewey-Driscoll-Wilson Dismantler?

But thankfully, the crane does more than just drop lower the sections for scrap, and I’m often not so thrilled by state or federal decisions, but here’s a good one:  sections of the old bridge will be used to replace compromised infrastructure in the Hudson Valley.  Here’s a story.

And the rest of these photos, thanks to Glenn Raymo, show these sections on their way to re-use, signs and all.

 

 

Many thanks to Glenn for use of these photos.  The top three photos by Will Van Dorp, who has posted about this bridge many times . . .. 

 

It’s always a joy to be under way on the Hudson.  Enjoy these shots from last week.

Stephanie Dann passes a chimney of what may once have been an ice house.

Click here for previous Stephanie Dann photos.

With the Rip Van Winkle Bridge in the background, Sapphire Coast approaches pushing Cement Transporter 1801.

 

 

Near Catskill she passes Coral Coast with another cement barge.

 

And here my first time to see the rebranded Kristin Poling, moving Eva Leigh Cutler.

x

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m not shifting the focus of this blog to photography–although it’s always been photo driven–but it’s fun to shoot what the light allows, which in this case somewhat obscures the identification of the tug in the foreground and highlights in profile the construction over by the Goethals Bridge.  Also, I’ve not forgotten a realization of a few weeks back about there being nothing random;  context here is recent sixth boro.

Anyhow, name that tug?

Meanwhile, north of the GW, it’s Joan Moran (1975) with a coal barge, from what I could tell.

Farther downriver, it’s Atlantic Coast (2007) with a dredge scow.

On that same dredge project, Shannon Dann (1971) stands by with GL 602.

Wye River (2008) waits over by the Palisades,

Sea Wolf (1982) holds steady over by –is that?–Edgewater.

Barry Silverton counts down for an appointment with Fight ALS,

Brendan Turecamo (1975) hangs with Connecticut, and

that brings us back to the first photo, now benefitting from a different light and easily identifiable as

Doris Moran (1982).

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

From this angle, Fort Lee–birthplace of the motion-picture industry– looks quite pristine.  Yes, that’s the west tower of the GW Bridge.  Am I correct in thinking the marketing name of the twin towers in the distance is the Moderns 1 and 2?

And on the subject of “towers” that Ocean Tower, a name I never know how to pronounce, as I first raised the question here over nine years ago.

Here’s the tow I saw last week.

 

Judging from the barge name TZC-102,  these bridge supports will undergird parts of the TZ Bridge, the completion of this huge project will soon transform into a huge sale of assets.

And where are these supports pre-cast?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks you might enjoy this recent Scientific America article on suspension v. cable-stay bridges.

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