You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Reinauer Twins’ tag.

The challenge here is to have clear photos and lights.  Evening Star with B. No. 250 starts us off,

Jean Turecamo is on assignment with a barge,

Reinauer Twins heads back for the Kills,

TRF Memphis waits in Stapleton anchorage,

Mount St. Elias departs her barge,

and Alice Austen, usually the wee hours ferry, runs early.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Another day I went out and lots of Reinauer boats were around, like Gracie M., which I’d not seen up close.  Launched in the second half of 2016, she’s the fourth of their Twins series and the newest vessel in  the fleet.   Here’s the first Twins post I did and here’s another where she appears.

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Curtis has slightly less hp than Gracie M and follows the B. Franklin line.  

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Christian came by;  at 7200 hp  and dimensions of 118′ x 40′, she’s a big boat.

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Here’s Christian in profile.

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Zachery is one of the oldest in the fleet, built at Matton up near the Canal, and formerly a Mobil tug.

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Now that we have a few different classes already in this post, you can see that Dean, like Gracie M, follows the Twins class.

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B. Franklin, mentioned earlier, spawned Curtis, so to speak.

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And here’s another slightly different angle on Gracie M. 

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The photo below I took in Auguast 2006.  Subtle differences are visible in the background, like the color of the cranes over in Erie Basin.  The slightly different shade of bronze and red may be due to the fact that I used a different camera.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Bear with me here.  Let’s go back to 1999.  Nicole Leigh Reinauer was built in Alabama Shipyard to push a 135,000 brl barge.  Look at the lines of this 118′ x 40 tug working with 7200 hp.

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Ruth M. Reinauer is Senesco hull # 202, 112′ x 35′ and 4000 hp. She is the first of the “facet tugs.”  As you can read in the link in the previous sentence, the design change was driven by easing the construction process of both tugs and double-skin barges.   If the shape of the reminder of tugboats in this post seem odd to you, read this interesting article by Casey Conley with a title that alludes to the (now retired) F-117 fighter.

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Laurie Ann Reinauer followed, same dimensions and power and hull # 203.

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Reinauer Twins came out in September 2011, same basic dimensions by greater horsepower . .  4720.

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I’m not sure what happened with hull#205, but #206 is B. Franklin Reinauer, 110′ x 33′ and 4000 hp.

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By the way, there’s a LOT going on in the background of this photo, including what appears to be dredge Atchafalaya in dry dock.

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Curtis is hull# 207, same numbers.

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Haggerty Girls is hull# 208, same numbers.

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Dean Reinauer is hull# 210, 112.2′ x 35′ and 4720 hp.

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And that brings us up to date with respect to Reinauer facet tugs . ..  it’s Dylan Cooper, operating less than a full year now, with the same numbers as Dean Reinauer.

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Note that it was exactly five years ago that we were following the trials and tribulations of loading the previous Curtis and Dean Reinauer  onto the heavy lift ship for West African waters.   I’d love to see photos of those tugs five years on and working out of Nigeria.  Does anyone out there have access to such?

For extensive documentation of many of these facet tugs during the building process, click here for the bulging albums created by Rod Smith at Narragansett Bay Shipping.

All photos of the handsome set of workhorses by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Please read the El Faro Relief event notice at the end of this post.  TODAY is the deadline to sign up.

It’s rained most of this week and last . . . and the forecast is the same for next week, but that just means sheltering (and wiping) the lens of the camera, as needed.    I wonder if John Huibers knows something we need to pay attention to . . .  but that’s another story.

For now, I noticed a lot of Reinauer boats the other day, like  . . . the 1971 Matton-built Zachery Reinauer,

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interrupted by the 1960 Blount-built Eric R. Thornton with the best logo in the sixth boro,

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the 1984 Rayco Ship and Main Ironworks Franklin Reinauer,

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the 1983 Cenac Shipyard-built Stephen B,

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the 1967 Main Iron Works Jill Reinauer,

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the 1966 Allied Shipyard Brian Nicholas,

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1973 Jakobson Lucy Reinauer,

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the 2010 G and S Marine Incorporated Crystal Cutler,

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the 2011 Senesco Reinauer Twins.

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and the 1978 Eastern Dawn, though I know not the builder.  And it appears to the the 1947 Harbor II alongside, though I noticed that almost too late.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been evading raindrops.

Anyone have more info on the previous Lucy Reinauer, the 1943 Odenbach Shipbuilding M/T?  Birk has this photo, but I’d love to see some more and to know what became of her.

And here’s a note from the organizers of the El Faro fundraiser event:  “On Sunday,  May 15th from 12-2 at Club Macanudo we will be holding a fundraiser for the families affected by the loss of the El Faro. All proceeds will go to the Seamen’s Church Institute El Faro Relief Fund. Pricing is $75.00 per person with Beer and Wine being served. Email me at Goodwindmaritime@hotmail.com. Please see the attached flier (the link in the first sentence above).
Please send your checks as soon as possible.   Make the checks out to Good Wind Maritime Services and mail to Good Wind Maritime Services 14451 25th Drive, Flushing, NY 11354″

With a tip of the hat  to Hildegarde Swift and Lynd Ward, the title that came to mind as I shot these, and you’ll see why by the end.  See the road signs up there intended for drivers on the Triboro Bridge?

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Rewarding my wait, it’s Jaguar towing Highlander Sea into the Gate,

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past the Ward’s Island Footbridge, and

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past Archibald Gracie’s cottage on the point. Click here for peers of the 1978 Jaguar.

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Westbound the tow came at almost slack water and past

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RTC 104 and

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the Twins bound for Riverhead.

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More on the brick building there with romanesque windows and green roof at the end of this post.

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And here, when they were under the Queensboro Bridge,  the title occurred to me . . . having the same syllabication and cadence as the Swift and Ward title.

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Now we need a story, one that starts as hundreds could in tiny but huge Essex.  Click here for my previous posts on Essex.

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Maybe one about a fishing schooner design turned pilot boat turned yacht turned school turned . . .

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fish market and restaurant/bar in the sixth boro.  I hope they sell monkfish.  These photos are compliments of my brother taken in Zwolle at a

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pop-up market.

Thanks bro . . .

All other photos here by Will Van Dorp.

So, thanks to identification by Jonathan Steinman, the brick building there is ConEd’s cogeneration plant at East  74th St.  And this is a digression, but 74th Street has long been quite the interesting place.

November, port month on tugster, ends here, making this GHP&W 30.  Here’s how the month began.  One thing I learned putting together this post is that Port Richmond and Mariner’s Harbor appear not to share a border, at least according to the wikipedia map.  Between the western edge of Port Richmond and the eastern edge of Mariner’s (the west side of the Bayonne Bridge) is a neighborhood called Elm Park.  I’d never heard of it.  Also, look at the northeast tip of Port Richmond . . . it’s in the water only and includes the Caddell yard.  Furthermore, Port Richmond never seems like much of a port if you see it by road only.  Click here for photos of the land portion of Port Richmond.  Click on the map to make it interactive.

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A google satellite view shows the northernmost margin of land is port-intensive.  Click here for many vintage photos of Port Richmond, pre-Bayonne Bridge, back when Port Richmond was a major ferry/rail link.

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Although the late fall midday sun backlit these shots, let’s cruise the waterside of Port Richmond, starting at its northeastern point, where the Wavertree (1885) project is ongoing.

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Delaware River & Bay Authority’s Delaware is undergoing some major repowering work. 

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Frying Pan . . . light of the night vessel from up at Pier 66 is having some work done.

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In the belly of Frying Pan, where the engine and machinery used to be, a night club sometimes comes to life.    Click here for some renderings of the vessel by the elusive bowsprite.

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Miss Liberty, built 1954, is nearly finished with this dry-docking.  Notice here she is high and dry?  Well, just 45 minutes later, she had been

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splashed and was being towed to a wharf by Caddell’s own L. W. Caddell (1990).

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Continuing to the west, it’s the yards of Reinauer and Moran. From l to r, here, it seems to be Meredith C. Reinauer (2003), Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), Reinauer Twins (2011), and Dace Reinauer (1968 but JUST repowered). . . and Joan Turecamo with (?) Brendan Turecamo.  The McAllister tug between the Reinauer ATBs . . . I’ll guess is Bruce A. Marjorie B. McAllister.

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This photo, taken a half hour earlier and before Joan Turecamo (1980) tied up, shows Kimberly Turecamo (1980), the very new and beamy  J. R. T. Moran (2015), and Brendan (1975).

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On the west side of the Moran yard, it’s Cable Queen (1952).  Click here for photos of this cable-layer at work through the years.

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And for the last shot of Port Richmond–although this may be straying westward into Elm Park waters, it’s Metropolitan Marine Transportation’s newest Normandy.

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All the photos today by Will Van Dorp.

So as I said at the beginning of this post, so ends the “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves” series.  However, precedent on this blog makes it really easy to do a Port Richmond 2, 3, 4 . . . . etc. post.  also, if any of you feel like contributing a set of photos from a port of gunk hole, no matter how large or obscure, I welcome it.  Besides, there’s always then possibility of doing an “upland” version of any port, focusing on land-based businesses serving the work vessels.

And as for December, let me reprint this idea for a December theme:

How about  antique/classic workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  ‘The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.’  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.”

Many thanks to all of you who sent along photos, contributed ideas, and commented in November.

Here were 1 and 2, going back quite a few years.  Back then, I used to describe photos beneath them, instead of my current practice . . .  above.

So, below . ..  it’s a light Stephen-Scott, which way be the oldest vessel (1967) in the Reinauer Transportation Company fleet today.

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Morgan Renauer (1981), here pushing RTC 101, was originally built for Poling Transportation.

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Jason Reinauer (1968), up in Albany since last winter’s ice, dates from 1968.

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Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), dating from the first generation of facet tug construction, moves RTC 85.

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B. Franklin Reinauer (2012) is the first of the second generation of facet tugs.  Click here for a Professional Mariner article on what a “facet tug” is.

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Reinauer Twins (2011)–referenced in that PM article above–if compared with the photo above, shows design differences between the two facet tug generations.

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Dean Reinauer (2013) is similar to Reinauer Twins and

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Haggerty Girls (also 2013) resembles B. Franklin Reinauer.

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Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962) either has been of will be scrapped.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who accepts blame for any errors in information and who would love to see a launch at the Senesco yard, where many of these have had their first splash.

Kristy Ann    2000 hp

Jason  2000 hp

Stephen Scott   3400 hp

Morgan  3900 hp

B. Franklin   4000 hp

Laurie Ann  4720 hp

Twins  4720 hp

Dean  4720 hp

 

 

What’s this?  Reptile skin?

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A major East coast river.

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Here’s the post I did when Reinauer Twins came to the sixth boro for the first ever time.  What pushes this bow through the ice . . .

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some 400+ feet back . . .

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is Reinauer Twins in her third winter, probably

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her toughest winter yet.

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Hope the cabins are warm . . .

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The unit goes through the ice like a dart.

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I can’t wait til July, myself.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

A late addition .  . I’ll add it to tomorrow’s post too . . . what would our northern neighbors do on a river like this?  You gotta see it here.

All fotos here from yesterday . ..

Liberty Service as you may never have seen her.  Here (third foto in this link) she was four years ago.

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Ditto Huron Service.  Repainting on Huron seems farther along than that on Liberty.   Here’s how Huron Service looked a year and a half ago.   Get ready for Genesis Energy. 

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In the past year, this Pegasus has sprouted an upper wheelhouse;  compare with here.

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Welcome to the waters around Houston.  Well . ..  I do mean the 118,000-barrel barge married to Linda Moran.  Uh . . . do tugs and barges ever get divorced?

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Trucks on the water pushed by Shawn Miller.

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I realized only later that–had my conveyance lingered here–I would have seen Catherine C. Miller push past with FIVE trailers/tractors on a barge.  See her in the distance there beyond the bow of  RTC 83.

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Reinauer Twins waits alongside RTC 104 with a faux lighthouse in the background.

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Lucy Reinauer–earlier Texaco Diesel Chief built in Oyster Bay NY–is the push behind RTC 83.

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DBL 29 pushed (ok, will. . .  open eyes.  thanks for the correction.)  moved alongside by Taurus.  See some of my previous Taurus fotos here and here.

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And thanks to wide-eyed bowsprite, a vessel I’ve not seen before pushing stone.  It’s Patricia.  She reminds me of a vessel I spotted along the road a few years back . . . Hoss.

So, this is the “plus” in the title, the group-sourcing request portion of this post:  what company is operating Patricia?

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And another question . . . from an eagle-eyed upriver captain.  Notice the weather instruments on this channel marker just off Bannerman’s Island (I am planning to do another post on this unique location north of West Point.) And . . .

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here are more weather instruments on this federally-maintained channel marker off the Rondout.  Questions:  who’s responsible for these and is there a website where  the data collected can be monitored?

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except for the last three, which come from bowsprite and Capt. Thalassa.

Speaking of bowsprite, today she’s running Radio Lilac and I’ll be there tending bar.  Here’s something of the inspiration.  Come on by if you have the time.  Teleport in if you’re otherwise out of range.

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