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. . . and beyond.  Let’s start with August 7, 2008 . . . up by the Iroquois lock of the Seaway.  And Canadian Provider . . .  well . . . in 2013 she was towed to Aliaga as OVI, and scrapped. Note that she’s a straight-decker . . . no self-unloading gear.

August 14 . . . reef-making consisted of sinking subway cars.  These went off Atlantic City.  To see their condition now, click here.

August 16 in the Arthur Kill, Volunteer was off to remake the tow.  Built in 1982, she met the scrappers earlier this year.

August 20 . . . Laura K and Margaret–I believe –have just helped Glasgow Express to Howland Hook terminal.  Glasgow (2002) is still at work, and so are Laura K (in Savannah) and Margaret in the sixth boro.

August 23 . . . Colleen McAllister and Dean Reinauer bring a barge through the Gate, reading for the Sound.  Colleen is now owned by for Port City Tug Company of Grosse Point.  Has anyone seen her in operation?  Dean went to Nigeria aboard Blue Marlin. 

Christine M McAllister stands by in Erie Basin on August 24.  This 6000hp tug is currently working down south of here.

August 27 . .  . the reclusive Susan E. Witte eastbound and Adriatic Sea westbound.  Beyond Adriatic, that might be Aegean.  Adriatic is currently on a tow on the 2000+ stretch of Ocean between Honolulu and Kwajalein!  Can someone confirm this?  Nine years ago, I caught Adriatic near the Bear Mountain Bridge here (scroll).

August 29 . . . Coral Sea westbound, while later in the same day,

the scarcely-seen up here Paul T Moran heads for the Bridge while Maryland approaches from that direction.  Coral Sea has gone to West Africa, Maryland has become Liz Vinik, and Paul T stays mostly around the Gulf.

The Tugboat Races and other contests were on the 31st that year.  Here Justin shows good style hitting that bollard.

HMS Liberty mixes it up with some real history.  Edith went down to Trinidad and the venerable Dorothy Elizabeth (1951) was scrapped the next year. Liberty is still in the sixth boro.

And to close it out . . . the 1907 Pegasus made a showing at the races that year.  She’s laid up on the morris Canal so far as I know.

  

I hope you enjoyed these walks through waters no longer here.

Now my big announcement:  as this posts, I’m on board Grande Mariner for the next seven weeks, Chicago bound.  I will post when I can with what photos I can.  But I’ve done that before.  GWA (Going west again) was my series title last year.  You have to read this one about my role on the vessel.   GW was the title I used in 2016.

Maybe this year it should TGWYA . . . thank god i’m going west again . . .  Anyhow . . . this is my version of a “gone fishing’ sign.

 

 

Since W. O. Decker may soon be seen albeit briefly in the sixth boro, let’s start with this photo from July 2008, as she chugs past the waterfall under the Brooklyn Bridge, thanks to an Icelandic-Danish artist named Olafur Eliasson.

Reinauer had some of the same names as now assigned to different boats here a decade ago but now no more on this side of the Atlantic, like Dean.

Some names have not (yet) been reassigned like John.

Now for some that are still here, though some have different paint and names:  Juliet is now Big Jake.  Matthew Tibbetts is still all the same, externally at least.

Stena Poseidon–a great name– is now Espada Desgagnes, and Donald C may still be laid up as Mediterranean Sea.

The long-lived, many-named Dorothy Elizabeth has been scrapped.

Rowan M. McAllister is still around, but the Jones Act tanker S/R Wilmington has succumbed to scrappers’ tools in Brownsville TX.

Falcon has left the sixth boro for Philly and Vane, and Grand Orion, as of today, is headed for Belgium.

And finally . . . June K here assisting with Bouchard B. No. 295 . . .    she’s still around and hard  at work as Sarah Ann.

All photos by Will Van Dorp in July 2008.

 

Let’s start out at Little Falls NY, above Lock E-17, where Jay Bee V had just departed and was now delivering the Glass Barge to the wall there.  Notice C. L. Churchill along the left edge of the photo.

Here above Lock C-7, it’s Margot.

On the Hudson River, tis is my first closeup view of Liz Vinik, formerly Maryland.

Westbound on the East River, it’s Sea Wolf moving uncontainerized thrown-aways.

Farther east, it’s Hudson with a fuel barge,

and meeting her, it’s Morgan Reinauer with the same.

Notice here, looking toward the Queensboro Bridge, Morgan and Hudson.

Here at the Spuyten Duyvil Bridge project, it’s  Dorothy J.

and to close this post out back on the Hudson, it’s Elizabeth, moving Weeks 533.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Kudos to Ginger, who guessed what the anniversary alluded to yesterday was.  Today begins year 12 of this blog.  So in the midst of all the references to CYBER- this and that, I’ll be my default contrarian self and call the next series a CYPHER series, lots of posts beginning with the number 12.  In today’s I took a photo from the top “hit” month in each year since 2006.

So in 2006, December was the top month, and the photo below (or one like it)  appeared in KVK.

In 2007, September was the top month, and this was from Historic Tug.

In 2008, June, and this was from Transitioning.

September in 2009 and from Divers 2. 

In 2010, November, and this is from Pilot and the Princesa.

June 2011, and context is Like Groundhog Day 3. 

2012, May, and Blueing Beyond the Sixth Boro. 

2013, March, and Looking for a Ship.

2014, March, and Botruc Plum Isle. 

March again in 2015, and this has context in Highway 4. 

March yet again, 2016, and Backing Down Heina. 

And finally, the greatest number of hits in 2017 was in July, likely because of the posts related to Peking‘s move. 

A reason to glance backward periodically is to see what has changed.  The corollary then is that a reason to do a daily waterblog is to record what was present when. And doing that permits me to see changes in myself and my tools.   Blogging, as you might guess, takes a fair amount of my time and guides a bulk of my focus, but it rewards me enough to continue.  I can’t say for how long, nor do I have to.  I’ve always refused to sign my boss’s multimillion dollar contract, although that might cost me the cover story on some high-profile magazine . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And let’s hear some applause for Ginger.

 

Here was 1.

Bob Stopper sends along this foto from Sodus Bay on Lake Ontario.  Miss Debbie,  1969, was originally 30′ but extended to 46′.

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Here’s a bow shot I took a few years back.

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The Bronx and W. O. Decker here headed up along the west side of Manhattan before the 2010 Hudson River tug race.  Click here to see a clip called Bootleggers Return to the Bronx, re-enacting a 1922 federal raid on a barge where “hootch” was sold.   The clip was sent along by Robert Apuzzo, who samples the bottle on the bow of the tug in the clip.

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From the 2008 Hudson River tug race, Terilou, I believe.   I know nothing about Terilou‘s past or present, although it may be tied up on the Raritan River.

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And here’s a boat i just stumbled onto .  . .  Cynthia Garner.  Anyone know her story?

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The first foto comes compliments of Bob Stopper, the eyes on western NY waterways.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Some folks do spring cleaning;  I do winter culling.  And have been doing a lot of it, including in my foto library.  Considering the library as a whole, it’s constantly in flux . . . stuff out; better stuff-I hope–in.  Many quotes say this;  my favorite version is “you cannot step into the same river twice.”

Same is true of a harbor; what vessels inhabited it when I first paid attention are no longer here, at least not in the same way.  Take Odin, about which I’ve heard a lot of chatter this week.  Great name.  Perfect candidate for an award for eccentricity, but I smiled every time I saw Odin.   I never saw the closest vessel to her in DNA, the ill-fated Red Wing.  You can tell this is the older Odin because the house rests on a hydraulic ram.

 Here her house has front legs.

Here’s Odin, house down, bunkering a Princess vessel.

Dean Reinauer has also left the sixth boro; she traveled out on the back of Blue Marlin last summer.  Where she is today, I’m SURE she’ll see no snowfall like this, taken a few years back over by Howland Hook.

Ditto Great Gull . . . down in Venezuela . . . no snow.  I recall fondly how excited I was when I first saw Great Gull, turns out built by the same folks who built barges for Europe as part of the Marshall Plan.

And the ORANGE June K.  I know she’s still around as Sarah Ann.  But that original color was almost institutional, almost spring time.

And then there’s Rosemary McAllister, now working on lease down south without her last name and with an all-white stack.    Her christening was a seminal bowsprite/tugster collaboration.

She worked in the harbor for too short a spell, from my POV, before migrating to Houston, but what do I know about the economics.

Scott C is now Weddell Sea.  Dorothy Elizabeth (star  . . . well, an extra . . .  of Carlito’s Way) has now been scrapped.

Finally, there’s Kristin . . . , once with a telescoping house like Odin, now scrapped.

I have others, but it’s amazing how much changes in five years of  observing the harbor.  All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Given my vintage, the sound that personifies change for me is this song by Jefferson Airplane.  

Here was H & D 6.

Thanks to Stuart, Harold, and “Ann O’Numess”  for identifying the Kosnac tug steaming past Riker’s in Carlito’s Way.  Here’s a foto I took three years ago, and below I took of Dorothy Elizabeth (1951)  in Tottenville a month ago.  Might she really already be slivers of scrap?

Hercules (1963), sibling of Maverick and others, awaits her emigration with

the return of Blue Marlin.  Note Alert (1976) in the lower left.

Matthew Tibbetts (1966) was high and

dry on Saturday.

With unusually high exhaust, that’s Marlin (1974)  on left and Penn No. 6 (1970)  beside her.   No one has yet told me how designers decide to run such long exhausts v. equally serviceable short ones.  Sea Raven is another high-exhaust vessel.

Click here to see Kathleen Turecamo in its element, not where it stood last weekend.

Barents Sea (right) and Na Hoku  . . . I wonder how long they’ve spent tied up here.  I recall feeling excited when I first spotted Barents (1976) more than three years back, and Na Hoku (1981) used to work the California-Hawaii run, but I can tell you when she last floated on Pacific water.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who DOES reduce foto resolution before posting them here.

The idea here comes from the “eyed but not seen until it’s noticed” department.  I noticed the Brooklyn church on the hill behind Linda Moran only recently.  I’ve no doubt I’d seen it many times before, but my glance never lingered there.  Now, I am unable to NOT see it.  It is the basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, OLPH, for short.    Between Linda and OLPH is the Brooklyn Army Terminal, designed by the legendary Cass Gilbert.

This got my wondering about other churches visibly prominently  from the sixth boro.    Like St. Michael’s in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.  I know some might find this heretical, but as a newbie in the sixth boro, I considered the possibility that the 200′ egg-tipped spire might be a minaret.

Just forward of Megan McAllister is St. Mary Star of the Sea in Bayonne, as seen from Richmond Terrace, Staten Island.

Just above Ellen McAllister‘s stacks, Our Lady of Mount Carmel is mostly obscured here by the IMTT tanks.

St Peter’s in New Brighton, Staten Island can’t be missed.

Just astern of Kristy Ann Reinauer, St Patrick’s in Elizabeth, New Jersey, has two spires.  The single white spire to the right of the courthouse tops First Presbyterian on Broad Street in Elizabeth, a congregation going back to 1664.

From this 2007 foto, it’s Riverside

Church in Manhattan.  In the foto above, left to right:  Dorothy Elizabeth, Patapsco, Lucy Reinauer, and unknown.  Can anyone identify this Moran boat below?  Answer below.

And since I’m asking, here’s a church along the Brooklyn side of East River aka Easy River, taken in 2007, I cannot identify.  Anyone help?

If you wish to add other church landmarks, let me know.

All fotos here, Will Van Dorp.

Moran boat below Riverside Church is Paul T. Moran, answer thanks to Allen Baker.

First this, . . . from a certain waterblogger I tandempost with,  about a Saturday gathering.

The Dann Ocean towing boat below bore no identifying info.  At first I wondered if it was Allie B returned from Romania, but it seemed smaller than Allie B.  An erudite reader helped me identify it.  Answer follows.

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Here’s another shot, with Dorothy Elizabeth on the Staten Island side.

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I posted Outrageous a year ago here moving a barge on the hip westbound on the East River.   Just today, thanks to Bob Beegle on the tugboats yahoo group I learned it’s the ex-Maya “built in 1981 by Dravo Steelship for Apex Towing Company (Apex Oil), as a shallow draft tug capable of working both inland and coastal waters and fitted with both steering and flanking rudders.  Reportedly very maneuverable.”  Great name, unusual profile.

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Brian Nicholas 1966 (ex-Banda Sea, Jenna B., Bunker Tide, Dad II)  pushes

aabn

a scow.  Note:  Dad is an acronym.  Expansion comes tomorrow.

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Approaching is Dorothy Elizabeth 1951! (ex-Gotham and Christine Gellatly) with its unmistakeable color scheme.

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And we’ll end as we started with a Dann Ocean Towing boat . . .  but this one is identified:  Thomas Dann 1975 (ex-Yabucoa Service, Yabucoa, Yabucoa Sun), named for a town in southeastern Puerto Rico.

aatd

Here’s another shot of Thomas Dann.

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So if you identified that first boat as Comet, you’d be right.  Thanks to Harold E. Tartell for the ID.  I ran a foto of Comet here a year ago.

I hadn’t planned to post on Charles Oxman again, but I felt encouraged by emails and  recollection of a discussion board last year or overhearing in conversation someone comparing the visorless wheelhouse to the conning tower of a cold war submarine . . . aaaacox

Oxman, then known as Falk was designed that way back in 1940.  Were other visorless siblings also built for some specific purpose?  Was Falk a one-off wheelhouse design?  I’ve also  always wondered about the choice of “Falk” as this vessel’s name:

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“Falk” is the title of a 1901 short story by my all-time top five writers, Joseph Conrad.  Read the short story here. “Falk” happens to be a recollection of events in life of a British tugboat captain working in Thailand a century ago.

aaaacox3

Back to Oxman, the vessel is named for a community college professor as related in this article I’ve always liked.  A close-up of Oxman (go here and click click on foto)  shows another name Oxman‘s carried, St. Petersburg,  which

aaaapb

–though unrelated–is similar to the name of this vessel.  I took this foto in Kingston almost a year ago.    Petersburg, I believe, is the tug I couldn’t identify at the end of the post here on QE2’s final departure from the sixth boro back last October.

aaaapb2

Back to Oxman, this Pusey and Jones tug also went by the name A P St Philip.  Anyone have fotos of the vessel bearing these names?

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