You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mary H’ tag.

All photos in this post come from Paul Strubeck, who has started a blog here called vintagedieseldesign.

Mary H is the right size to serve the fuel storage in Newtown Creek, a renowned location in the sixth boro. Here are previous posts I’ve done there.

The first oil refinery in the US was sited here, and that industry fouled it, given attitudes at that time toward the environment and disposal of chemical waste.

Today a lot of commerce happens there from oil storage to scrap metal processing.

 

 

 

 

The creek has its advocates, these folks and others. At its headwaters lies Bushwick, not for everyone but vibrant in its own way.  Here’s a post I did last fall after a tour on land and on the water of Bushwick.

Again, thanks to Paul for these photos.

 

Stephen B heads light westbound about to pass under the Bayonne Bridge, as

Mary H, especially busy during the cold times of the year, pushes some petroleum product in the opposite direction.  Soon leaves will decorate Shooters out beyond her. There’s a pool hall in Queens by the name Shooters, so to clarify, here are some Shooters history posts from way back.

Mr Jim moves some aggregates, also eastbound out of Newark Bay.

James D. nudges Dublin Express as needed into Howland Hook.

Eric and Capt. Brian A. assist a CMA CGM box ship.

Evelyn Cutler moves some petroleum along the supply chain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s burning high octane himself these days.

Related:  Let me reiterate Lee Rust’s question of a day or so ago:  What is the current working estimate of operating tugs in NY’s sixth boro?  For starters, I think it’s hard to count because of the dynamic, transient nature of traffic.  Just ballparking it without breaking it down by company and enumerating, I’d say 75 at least.  For consistency, let’s say we can count a tugboat as present if it shows up on AIS/VHF/traffic control at least once a month.  I’d love to hear you estimates.

It’s been a few months to do a sixth-boro look around here.  Of course it’s never the same.  Never. Not even from one day to the next.  Let’s start with Weeks tug Elizabeth.  If I’m not mistaken, this machine’s carried that name ever since it was launched in 1984.

James William has been a regular in the sixth boro the past five years or so, but she started  as a Moran tug in 2007.   Note the eerie fog around the base of the Staten Island-side bridge tower.

Choptank [which the pesky auto-correct insists should be spelled Shoptalk] passes in the foreground;  Mary H in the distance. Choptank is back from several years in the Caribbean.

Paula Atwell is almost 20 years old, having started out as Crosby Express.

Northstar Integrity . . . quite the mouthful of syllables . . . seemed an unknown to me, until I realized I knew her as Petrel . . .

Not long ago I caught Marjorie at work on the Hudson down bound.

Mary Gellatly emerges from the fog.

Evening Star rests B. No. 250 at anchor with Brooklyn in the background.

Mister T heads for the mooring . . .

All sixth boro photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a backlog of so many collaboration photos that I might be alternating much-appreciated “other peoples photos” posts for a while.

 

 

I’ve done posts with titles like 15 minutes or 18 . . . but here’s a set shot in just three minutes, just after that strange cloud–comet’s tail?–passed the day the temps went up to 65 midday for a few hours, setting a NYC record for that day.

Here’s Jonathan C from head-on, with Shooters Island off the stern.

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Zooming out shows Pegasus and Kimberly Poling using Edwin A. Poling, and the cranes at Howland Hook.

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It looks like some refinishing is happening on Pegasus.

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Mary H pushes Patriot heading the other direction.

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That church in a lot of photos is Immaculate Heart in Elizabeth NJ.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It surprises me sometimes what titles I’ve not re-used.  This blog has little grand design;  I choose to let to drift serendipitously according to what I see or what you choose to share, and I am grateful to you all for sending along photos and suggestions.  Rock Juice the title came out of a conversation some time back with one of you;  thanks and I think you know who you are.  Here was the first in the series.

Diane B pushes a load of it in John Blanche.

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Magothy . . . and  . . .

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and I missed the barge info.

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Dory and Port Chester . . . .  And notice just forward of Dory‘s wheelhouse, it’s

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Navigator . . . doing something at an oil dock.

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Ditto Mary H, over between the Empire State Building and BW Kronborg.

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Ditto Kimberly Poling.

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And McKinley Sea . . . with the icicle hanging from a scupper hole as evidence that oil is going for heat.

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Last one for now . . . Calusa Coast getting ready to hook up to a barge to take . .  well . . . down the coast.

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All photos yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who has to run.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here was 5 in this series.

This is the view from the bridge looking forward on Key Frontier, built 2011 in Maizuru, Japan.  From this point to the bow is 638′ and to the stern is about 100′.   Note the approaching tug and barge.


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The length on the tug is 64′ .

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The orange tanker in the distance is 800′.  See the crewman standing  on the edge of hold #4 just to the left of the green half mark for the helipad?  He’s around 6′.

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He’s a spotter for activity below inside the hold.

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The bucket can hold holds 30 tons when full.

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When a hold is just about empty, a loader is lowered to assist in filling the bucket.

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These trucks can hold up to 40 tons.  The ship transports between 50 and 60 thousand tons.

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Safe driving on the ice.

All Fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Brian DeForest for access to the process.

Here Key Frontier‘s itinerary for the past six months:

2014 January 23rd, 14:30:44 UTC New York /u.s.a.
2013 December 26th, 12:00:22 UTC Tocopilla /chile
2013 November 19th, 22:00:34 UTC Roberts Banks
2013 November 19th, 22:00:25 UTC Roberts Banks
2013 November 19th, 22:00:14 UTC English Bay Anch.
2013 October 21st, 10:00:12 UTC Lanshan/china
2013 August 19th, 19:00:37 UTC Mejillones/chile
2013 August 9th, 15:00:13 UTC Cristobal,panama
2013 July 31st, 15:00:14 UTC Baltimore/usa
2013 July 12th, 21:30:58 UTC Rotterdam/netherland

Roberts Bank and English Bay are both in British Columbia.

Actually, this is a reprise of a post I did earlier this week . . .  Ferry Coursen carried trucks.  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Mary H pushed a creek-size barge.

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Winter fishing continued apace aboard Eastern Welder.

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I got a close-up of Mary H.

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Brendan Turecamo headed out for an assist.

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A slightly different angle on Sorensen Miller shows the yellow as strapping.

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More shots of John P. Brown moving railcars over to New Jersey.

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A Moose boat on patrol barreled right at me.

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Hunting Creek got light at the mooring.

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And a USACE boat practiced bathymetry.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  For fotos of Hamilton (ON) harbor delights, click here.  Here’s more info on the 1935 tug he shows.  It’s for sale for less than a loaded Escalade.  Unrelated . . . another blog I read these days is Ohio River blog with good inland rivers fotos here.   And since I’m all over the place today . . .check out this Flickr page by Guillermo Barrios of southern South American tugs and towboats.  And finally  check out these fotos of the old bridge in Bucksport, ME.  I haven’t crossed that bridge–about to be demolished– in over two decades . . . .

Unrelated to stacks:  as of this moment–8 am local time sixth boro–Flinterborg is off Sandy Hook inbound for Albany to load the Dutch barges for return.  Through Narrows by 9 at this rate?

Stack logo on an independent boat like  Shenandoah reminds me of nose art on WW2-era airplanes.  I’m surprised nose art– way forward @ waterline — hasn’t emerged as a trend in tugboat painting,  given the pivotal  (yea . . . pun intended) role of noses in much tug work.

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Stack art could proclaim regional pride like Buffalo does,

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although the conflict between the Canal’s western terminus city and eastern gateway town needs to be resolved.

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Stacks on steamers like Hestia–I’m still working on getting info together on her–eject some many particulates (count them) that anything painted here would soon be . . . coated.

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Always iconoclastic Patty Nolan –“mystery tug” shown in the fifth foto down here–borrows an idea from trucks . . . with a stainless steel (?) stack.

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Pleasure tugs, of which Trilogy is a paragon of style, might proclaim a family coat-of-arms, faux or genuine.

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Mary H carries some sporty lines on her stack.

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Empire sports the most squared off stacks I’ve ever seen.

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The Chancellor demonstrates classic passenger liner–think SS United States–arrangement:  longitudinal.

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Last one for now . . . Samantha Miller . . . packs her stacks as widely spaced as possible to free maximal work and supply space astern.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Mary H. commands her own interest, but look beyond her to the other side of the bridge, where something immense approaches  Bergen Point.  Anyone have old pics of the now-gone Bergen Point Lighthouse?

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All 960+ feet of APL Egypt taxis out of Newark Bay as

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Rosemary stands by in case a nudge is needed to rotate Egypt in front of Shooter’s Island,

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leaving Mariner’s Harbor in the background and

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bound for sea

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squeezing under the Bayonne Bridge, where

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Rosemary‘s escort task’s nearly complete and the next client soon to beckon.

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An unsettling feature of these behemoths made clear to me this snowy afternoon is not how noisy the engine is [it’s silent] , but rather how loud the swish of displaced water, as the bulbous bow froths as it plows a furrow through the Kill.

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At a maximum speed of 25 knots, Egypt could no doubt outrun Rosemary.  Anyone know Rosemary‘s maximum speed?

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Egypt shrinks  Caddell into plaything proportions.

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Totally unrelated, here’s a pre-Mardi Gras tribute to a New York dancer who went by “Little Egypt.”

All images, Will Van Dorp.

Kudos to Harold E. Tartell for correctly identifying the “mystery tug” in RT 32 as  Harry McNeal.  I took the foto below at Howland’s Hook May 2008.   (McNeal …Louisiana 1965.)

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Here are more.  Weeks’ Virginia, who positioned in the plane-receiving barge about two weeks ago, Ocean   (Virginia …Louisiana 1979, ex-Bayou Babe or “By you, b’abe” )

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Peter F. Gellatly raced southbound in the Arthur Kill just yesterday, a new vessel to my eyes,  (Peter F. …Louisiana 2008)

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Hornbeck’s Brooklyn Service–another new vessel for me– headed north on Thursday,  (Brooklyn …Louisiana 1975, ex-Peggy Sheridan),

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Dann Ocean Towing’s Allie B has done a lot of work in the boro this winter,  (Allie B …built Louisiana 1977, ex-Express Explorer)

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Henry Marine Service Dorothy J headed westbound in the KVK a week or so ago, (Dorothy J …Louisiana 1982, ex Angela M)

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as did Mary H,   (Mary H …Louisiana 1981)

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as well as Sea Bear,   (Sea Bear …Illinois!  1990, ex-Bay Star)

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and a far-off shot of Baltic Sea, 11:09 am the other day, upbound North River.  (Baltic …of course, Louisiana 1973, ex-S/R Albany and ex-Tahchee).  Anyone upriver have fotos of Baltic breaking ice upriver?

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Please check out the history blog bowsprite and I collaborate on to mark the 400th anniversary of  Henry Hudson’s memorable trip through our boro.  Primary and secondary sources coupled with imagination’s license generate Henry’s Obsession.  A new post about a January 1609 non-random web of characters in Amsterdam has gone up today.

Photos, WVD.

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