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Note:  Early Tuesday morning, the forecast for the rest of the week told me to go out before dawn to record and store what a cold but quiet and sunny morning would look like.  Given the excessive wind of an overcast Wednesday and Thursday, I’m glad I went out.

If harbinger of dawn looks like this over southern Queens,

0aaaaaaaawccc

morning’s first light could look like this an hour later on the KVK.    By the way, the foto above comes thanks to Barbara B, and shows Tuesday morning the same scene she captured here before, during , and after Sandy and after Nemo here.   Tanker Cape Tampa–in orange–was passed in this light by

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MSC Mykonos.  

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Containers on their way to Boston never looked so good.

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And yet . . . as she moves in the direction of the dawn, what I see goes all-gray, all shadows.

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But this monochromatic accentuates the curves in her steel, here meeting Capt. Dann and then

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Explorer of the Seas. 

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Many thanks to Barbara Barnard for the lead foto;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 15.

Cargoes of all sorts move through the harbor.  One that has always surprised me is this ore from the Congo in the first half of the 20th century.

Here’s a vessel–certainly empty as it was towed to drydock in the old Brooklyn Navy Yard earlier this week.  I missed it but John Watson caught it.  Any ideas?  I believe I saw it in Wilmington back in mid-October.

It’s Falconia of the Corral Line, adapted to carry things that go “moo” in the night.  Stephanie Dann and Ruby M act like drovers to get Falconia into its own private East River corral.  Having grown up on an upstate NY dairy farm, I’d love to see a Corral Line vessel loaded and at sea;  even better, anchored on a calm night in a comfortable harbor.

Here’s an additional shot of the cargo barged in last week from Canada, powered by the inimitable Atlantic Salvor.  The cargo, if you missed last week’s post, is antenna sections for the World Trade Center.

Look closely at that patch of blue on Stolt Emerald‘s port side.

Although not cargo, it is truly unique application of paint . . . surfing penguins.

And finally, look at the frontmost cargo on Zim Virginia.

Here’s sideview of two Ford tow trucks, ones to be operated by wrecker drivers rather than towing officers.  And that’s Barbara McAllister running alongside.

Many thanks to John Watson for the Falconia fotos.

Pioneer headed southwest,  then

west.

and Clipper City taking her stern.

Laura K Moran takes the stern of an Offshore Sailing School boat.

A small sloop appears to go head-t0-head with Meriom Topaz and does the same with

Americas Spirit, as the tanker is lightered and provisioned.

And finally .  . is the green cata-schooner passing off the stern of Comet really Heron, which I last saw in Puerto Rico here (last foto)?

Here she tacks to the east just north of the Verrazano.  And Saturday night I spotted her again passing southbound through Hell Gate.

I hope to have more exciting autumn sail soon.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Comet, Eva Leigh Cutler, Manhattan skyline in September 2009.

Ditto . . . . September 11, 2012.

Buildings are replaced,

trade flourishes,

channels are carved deeper,

the open is

closed up,

precautions

are exercised, but

we remember.  Many thanks for the foto below to Capt Jack Joffe, Liberty V of the National Parks Service in the sixth boro.

We heal although scars at times recall pain.

Unrelated:   An NYTimes story about a revival in moving raw product to steel mills on inland waterways.

Tugboats in the sixth boro of New York City vary not quite infinitely, but almost.   Consider Pegasus (1907)here with Lehigh Valley 79 (1914) alongside.  And my social medium tells me they’re about to link up and travel again soon.    Watch Pier 25.

And Coral Coast (1970) versus its fleetmate,

and newest tugboat in the boro .  .  . Discovery Coast (2012).

Amy C. McAllister (1975) and

Bohemia (2007).

Taurus (1979) and

James Turecamo (1969) along assisting Scott Turecamo (1998).

Thornton Brothers (1958),

Caitlin Ann (1961), and

Maria J (1958).

Rounding it all out . . . is JoAnne Reinauer III (1970), here passing the unmistakeable Torm-orange house of Torm Thames (2005), and see this spotlight by selfabsorbedboomer.

Having called this set almost infinitely varied, I must say there’s NOTHING operating in the sixth boro quite an unusual as Joseph Thompson Jr. (portions from 1944), the tug portion of an ATM unit currently working the North Coast between US and Canadian ports.   Thank’s to Isaac Pennock aka tugboathunter for introducing me to this vessel;  For the dizzying set of transformations, read the bio by boatnerd here . . . and follow the fotos, especially the ones by Mark Vander Meulen, Steve Hause, Lee Rowe, and Rod Burdick.

Foto of Discovery Coast by Joel Milton;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Just for the record, here are the first two posts in this series, “1” and 2.

The foto below and the one of Dublin Sea come from Birk.   Greenland Sea is off Barents Sea port side.

 I last saw Barents move in early December here.   This foto is taken from near the old Singer plant in Elizabethport.

From the same vantage point, it’s Yankee, Greenland, and a third tug I should but can’t identify.

Here’s another shot from Birk, Dublin Sea over at the south end of Arthur Kill.  Dublin Sea was launched in Wisconsin in 2009.

First appearance of this vessel on tugster . . . taken a week ago passing Howland Hook . . . it’s Ireland (ex-Yorktown) built

in 1940!!  Some great Coastline Marine Towing jobs fotos can be found here.

Also moving a crane barge eastbound on the KVK, it’s Stephanie Dann (1978, ex-Mary Defelice); meanwhile

that same morning, it’s Taurus, launched under that name in Houma in 1979, heading

toward the North River, as

Turecamo Girls (launched in Savannah in 1965 as Capt. Jan Porel) headed under the Bayonne Bridge, eastbound and

Margaret Moran (launched in Morgan City in 1979) headed westbound.

Thanks Birk.

Not exactly related:  Some big doings on April 10 in Erie, PA as Ken Boothe Sr. and Lakes Contender get christened.  Have you been invited and want to get a few fotos for tugster?  Please get in touch.

I priviledge first appearances.  This is Arbara Ann’s first.  Her registry is Islip, and  . ..  her stern confirmed the missing “B” at the beginning of her name.  Launch date was 1981, loa is 24.’

Fox Boys . . . third time here I think.  1956 and 48′

Pushing barge Fire Island, it’s Thomas Dann, 1975 and 98′  Can I conclude it’s Fire Island area bound?

John P. Brown (2002) has appeared countless times before.

Jean Turecamo (1975, 107′) meets Herbert P. Brake.   You might have seen Jean

here almost five years ago, props and all.Penn No. 6 is long, 141′ launched in 1970.

Sea Lion (1980 and 64′) pushes some dock equipment.

Eastern Dawn ( 1978 and 52′)   wears flags on her knees.

Amy C. McAllister (1975 and 91′) used to be Christine E. McAllister.   In between she was called Jane A. Bouchard.

Close-up Barbara McAllister (1969 and 100′) exudes power.

And finally, this barge of dredge equipment is

moved along by Sea Wolf 1982 and 61′.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Saturday mornings are slow in some places, but not in the shipping channels of the sixth boro, Pearl River 1 enters the Narrows, passes Morton S.  Bouchard Jr., arcs to port into the ConHook Range,

and navigates the KVK with assistance from Ellen McAllister.

At this moment, opposing container ship traffic about 15 minutes away appeared under the Bayonne Bridge, behind Stephanie Dann and an unidentified tug.

It’s a heavy-laden Cosco Osaka, tailing Catherine Turecamo.

As Cosco Osaka aka IMO 9400291 passes the Green 7, it crosses Jane A. Bouchard.

Fifteen minutes later, Ance enters the KVK.

That’s A-n-c-e . . .  not A-n-K-e, which came through the harbor a mere two weeks ago.   Ance . . .

or “Ants,” as I heard it.

Less than 10 minutes behind Ance was this beautiful-orange vessel, here flushing out the starboard hawse.

I wrote about Twinkle Express here a mere two years ago, but that time I didn’t get as close.

And ten minutes behind was this vessel.  Doubleclick on any foto to enlarge;  if you do that here, you’ll see the builders plate proudly announcing this vessel as a June 2010 product of Yangzhou Guoyu Shipyard.

Now . . . given the name and given the frequency of  livestock carriers in the harbor like Shorthorn Express near the end of this post, what do you suppose this vessel carries?

Answer tomorrow.  All fotos (except Anke . . .  sounds like the end of  Yanqui )   taken today in a short two hours on the KVK by Will Van Dorp.

For a distinctly unglamorous view of shipping cleanups after “stuff goes wrong,” watch the slideshow on the TitanSalvage page.

Pushing onto this blog for the first time is Salvage Master,

1970, ex-Weatherbird.

Kimberly Poling 1994,

ex-Jaguar.

Jean Turecamo, 1975, raked and towering above the city.  Ex-Dolphin and Star Tampa.

Captain Dann, 1973, pushing minerals carved from the harbor bed.

Bohemia, 2007.

Laura K. Moran, 2008.

Ellen McAllister, a very young and updated 1966.

John P. Brown, 2002, I think.

Solomon Sea 1964, ex-Brandon C. Roehrig and Diane E. Roehrig

Quenames,

1982.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m not positive, but this might be St. Andrews splayed against the electrical fields of Linden as dusk approaches.  No doubt she’s waiting for that swimming gull, just off the port bow, to clear.

It’s been over two years since I’ve seen Thomas Dann, 1975.

Doris Moran 1982 seems always coupled with Alexandra.  Click here for a foto of and detailed info about Alexandra pushed by another tug.  Thanks, Harold.

I’ve been seen Hubert Bays 2001 in two other color schemes.   Click here for one of them.

Elizabeth McAllister 1967 leverages British Hazel 2004 into the dock.

Davis Sea 1982 might be just a month from ice work, although today’s mid-50’s temperatures belie that.

From my vantage point, Evening Mist Tide 1970 was the first tug to catch morning sun today . . . ironically enough.  Glad you caught that error, Harold.

McKinley Sea 1981 seems scarce in the sixth boro all summer, but maybe I’m looking in the wrong direction when she’s around.

Oyster Creek 2011 looks identical to the other five boats of its class.  I wouldn’t notice if they switched name boards periodically.

Meredith C. Reinauer 2003 with RTC 150.

From left to right . . . Eagle Boston Baltimore 1996, barge New Hampshire 2004 , Scott Turecamo 1998 and Mark Miller 1991.

Hope you enjoyed this late summer’s day.  All fotos in the past few days by Will Van Dorp, who clearly is better taking fotos than identifying them even with the names front and center!

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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