You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Emily Ann’ tag.

Previous installments can be found here.

Thomas and Ellen,

Thomas and Meagan Ann,

Meagan Ann and DS 71

Meagan Ann solo

Emily Ann and SMM 157, and

Brian Nicholas.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I take a lot of photos.  A few are extraordinary, IMHO.  The photo below ranks among that select set.

Above and below, it’s Jonathan C Moran.  Sharon Sea heads for sea above.

Atlantic Salvor takes yet another scow filled with dredge spoils out to the dumping grounds.

Atlantic Dawn heads out.

Emily Ann tows Chesapeake 1000 down toward Norfolk.

St Andrews moves a petro barge.

Frances has a headline to a barge in the anchorage.

Two Vane boats wait in Gowanus Bay.

And James D. has a line onto ONE Stork.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Following on the photos from April 29 and May 19, here is finale for Tender 6 and Reliable of Utica.  As of this posting, they are 2.5 nautical miles off Shinnecock and 80′ down, precisely placed and not sunk.  My guess is that soon this section of this chart will be updated.

Here is the last daylight for

Tender 6.

Here’s the final journey

 

for Reliable

of Utica.

Thanks for use of these photos to a generous gentleman. More photos can be seen here.

 

On January 10 Emily Ann was moving crane barge eastbound in the Kills.

Columbia New York has lift capacity of 400 tons.

Any time I see Emily Ann, I think of a story shared here by a reader about her role in saving lives in the Florida Strait.

A reliable source tells me that even juvenile loons know this story, although they’ve not yet seen a crane like this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This post follows up on Whatzit 36 . . . here.

Yup, it’s more parts for “the vessel.”

The two photos above come from Tony Acabono.  The rest come from Will Van Dorp.

Here Emily Ann moves some parts on Witte 1402 westbound, which confused me until I understood the routes.

 

So the parts arrive in USA/sixth boro from an Italian port on the Gulf of Trieste via a ship calling in Bayonne. Then they are stored in Port Newark until all efforts converge on getting

them here . . .

over in the the section of midtown Manhattan aka Hudson Yards, yards as in

train yards just of the west side of Penn Station Manhattan.  And there,

this monster called “the vessel” has begun rising.  At that link, you find a great slideshow featuring both with DonJon equipment and heavy lift trucks.

Since we’re talking public art, here is more I’ve seen recently . . .  Dale Chihuly’s blown glass creations displayed in the New York Botanical Garden, now until late October 2017.

Here’s more info on NYBG.

Then there’s this–which I just noticed yesterday– in Rockefeller Center, and which thankfully comes down after today . . . a 45′ gas balloon where the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree stands in late fall/early winter . . ..

Many thanks to Tony for his photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Name that tugboat?

Or this one?

Or these two?  Answer follows.

Enjoy the rest of these for what they are . . .

Bruce A. McAllister above and Fort McHenry below.

Meredith C. Reinauer on a sunny but

cold morning.   Ready for the answers on the first three?

Well, the first was Kimberly Poling, then

Dace Reinauer, which I first saw looking like this.

And finally Emily Ann, which reminds me of an email I once receivedfrom a reader named R. Pena, who wanted to track down the boat to which he owed his life after his own had sunk between Cuba and Florida.  I embed the link to that post here because it’s a story that bears repetition.

And finally pushing New Hampshire around,

it’s Scott Turecamo.  As a former resident of that state, I thought no one ever pushed New Hampshire around!

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Summertime and the living is easy . . . and Sassafras is bringing fuel to MSC Marianna.

rt1

JRT Moran is preparing to assist MSC Busan out of its berth

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Another section of Rockefeller University’s River Campus is shipping in aboard Witte 1401 moved by Emily Ann, 

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passing Zachery and Jason Reinauer and

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and Dean.

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Crystal Cutler moves Patricia E. Poling westbound . . .

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Brendan Turecamo assists MSC Busan back out

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on its way

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to Norfolk.

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All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who is leaving the area for a while.  Details tomorrow.

 

The first six photo here comes from Jonathan Steinman, taken on June 13.  The Donjon tugs has delivered Chesapeake 1000 to a point just off Rockefeller University’s campus to prepare for lifting prefabricated modules for Rockefeller’s River Campus.

0613a

Step one for Donjon is to secure the gargantuan crane.

0613b

Then Atlantic Salvor moves into place to

0613c

receive the massive anchors, a job that Salvor may be IS uniquely qualified to perform.

0613d

 

0613e

The yellow lighted buoys mark the anchors’ positions.

0613f

By the time I got there on June 17, sans camera other than phone, several of the modules had already been lifted from the waterborne transport into the locations where they’ll stay for a very long time.  See time lapse of the installation of modules 1 and 2 on youtube here.

0617a

A dozen more modules will still be lifted when

0617b

water, tidal, and atmospheric conditions allow.

Click here for more information of the River Campus project, one of many construction sights to behold along the East over.  A calendar of additional lifting can be found here, subject to change.

And many thanks to Jonathan for use of his photos and information about the project.  Next time, I’ll bring my good camera.

Previous sights to behold there can be found here.

And while we’re on the topic of heavy equipment, here’s a vimeo update of of invisible gold project happening off Block Island.  I want to get back there soon.

 

 

Here was 4.  Pairings suggest to me springtime, and I certainly am ready for that to happen.

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Here a blindingly cold blue Meagan Ann departs the Kills with a team of scows

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Cape Sally and Cape Heane.  Are there really capes by these names?

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From back in January . . . it’s Chesapeake 1000 towed into the Kills by

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Mary Alice and tailed by

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Emily Ann.

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Non-matching but a pair nonetheless here is Paul Andrew and Liberty V.

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And since this post seems to be sticking to the color blue, here’s a pair I took a photo of midMay last year… Emily Ann driving Crow‘s last ride.

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And although red . . . Little Bear and bigger sister Bear . . . has anyone recently gotten a photo of them you could share here?

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To end on a blue note . . . does anyone ave photos of Atlantic Salvor in its current Caribbean context?

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

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