You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Gellatly & Criscione’ category.

I hope you enjoy looking back 10 years as much as I do, although some might say I live in the past a little too much.  Here’s some dense traffic, l to r, Twisted Sisters, Lucinda Smith, Maurania III, and Petrozavosk

Up in Lyons NY at the drydock, Governor Roosevelt shows her deep 8′ 6″ belly. Rosie will turn 100 in summer 2027.

Greenland Sea . . . one of my favorites is likely on her terminal lay up.

Does Duty still do duty on the Delaware?

Maria J is now Nicholas Vinik.

Charles D. is still working hard  in the boro, as she was here helping Zim Virginia around Bergen Point.  I do miss the walkway on the WEST side of the Bayonne Bridge.

This Peter is now Long Island . . . or Long Peter if you like.

Resolute assists Maersk Kentucky around that same point.

Amberjack is now Kirby Dann Ocean white and blue, and some of the Bouchard boats are now this Penn Maritime gray. 

Giulio Verne was in town for some submarine cabling, and I’ve heard tell there was a fabulous Italian chef on board.  She’s now docked in Naples IT.

I went to Detroit for Thanksgiving, and made a stop at Mariner’s Church, alluded to in “Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” [In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed.  In the maritime sailors’ cathedral.  The church bell chimed ’til it rang twenty-nine time…]  .  I’m told the pastor at the church objected to the word musty and now Lightfoot sings it as “In a rustic old hall in Detroit …”  In fact, you can confirm that here.

And let me throw two more in.  I took this photo seven years ago from Rhinecliff as I headed south the day I completed my season on tugboat Urger.  This was my way of reconnecting with the sixth boro. Maryland is now Liz Vinik.

And finally, a photo from Jason LaDue . . .  it’s Grouper as she looked in 2000.  A week ago her second auction concluded with a winning bid of $4850, but I don’t know who tendered that bid.  According to my source, no movement has happened since the auction concluded. 

Happy November.  All photos except Jason’s by WVD.

 

Let’s do 2013 and 2014, or redo them, same conditions as I stated yesterday. But first let’s look at the 2013 crowd, packing in like you wouldn’t with covid.  Here was the crowd at 1010 and

by 1035 they had grown significantly.

The compulsory muster takes place, irrigated by fireboat John J. Harvey.

Once the race begins, a front-runner like Decker

might soon get left in the wake.

The fire boat slices up from behind and

propels itself between two Miller boats.

Pushoffs happen next, sometimes quite equally matched like here, with 3900 hp countering 4200.

Let’s jump ahead to 2014, with the arrivals on the watery carpet,

the processing to the starting line,

and get straight to racing without all the preening and posturing.

Someone seems a bit oversize in that gray livery.

This is a fairly mis-matched pair:  Wayne at 5100 hp, and Ellen at 4000.  Maybe a re-match is in order Wayne v. Ava.

Thanks to Jeff Anzevino for this shot, the Media Boat has military background in common with Wayne.

After Wayne has strutted its stuff in the push-offs, some of the boats lined up for the roping the bollard.

Let’s hold it up here.  All photos, WVD.

 

Want to check out Random Tugs 001?  The  001 got added more recently than 2007 because back then,  I had no idea I’d go on.  In the 2007 photo, might that be Mary Turecamo along with the Reinauer tugs, which are also still at work operating out of the sixth boro.  The other morning Mary Turecamo was assisting MSC Maria Elena  . . . . The tugboat has always been known by that name.

The many times renamed and reconfigured Brooklyn approaches from . . .. Brooklyn.  I first saw her as Labrador Sea.

Brendan Turecamo, also renamed a number of times,  takes the back channel out the Kills.  That’s Bayonne in the background and a crane in Port Elizabeth beyond that.

Catching Genesis Eagle out of the notch is a treat.  The third photo here shows a photo of the same boat as Eagle Service in roughly the same place a decade ago, although I was catching the opposite perspective.

 

It’s been quite a while since I’ve seen this particular Mary Gellatly moving around the sixth boro, but here she is, and I  recognize the man with a camera between the wheelhouse and the stacks.

She was previously Vernon C, as in the top two photos here.

Dory is another boat that has changed hands and names and appearances.  See her here . . .  if you scroll.

Dory appears to be working with a Harley barge alongside a ship, bunkering ? . . . Kitikmeot W.

And let’s conclude with one of the newest boats in the harbor . . .  Ava M McAllister, here returning from escorting a c-ship out toward the Narrows.   Click here for photos from her christening half a year ago.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

 

Let’s start with the photo I did NOT get, but jag9889 did;  click here to see Resolve Commander and (in the photo stream) the barge it towed Thursday carrying the remaining TZ Bridge structure out to sea.   Bravo jag . . . . I’ve long enjoyed your work.

The photo below raises some questions . . .  not because of Mary Gellatly, which has long been there, but because of the MSRC Responder vessel beyond it and tied up at the Sandy Hook Pilots’ dock.   Something’s happening here. . . .  I don’t believe it’s the local New Jersey Responder.

Stephen Reinauer headed out the Narrows, and shortly thereafter,

Dace came in, offering a comparison of the outline of the two boats.  Stephen dates from 1970, 3000 hp, and 100.2 loa;  Dace, 1968, 3400, and 108.8.

Below we can do a different comparison:  Dylan Cooper, 2015, 4720 hp, and 112.2;  Lincoln Sea, 2000, 8000 hp, and 118.6.

 

L. W. Caddell is the yard tug at the repair yard.

Emily Ann, 1964, 3000 hp, and 89.4.  My favorite story about this boat formerly called Cabo Rojo (among other names) can be found here.

Emily Ann crossed paths with Caitlin Ann, 1961, 2400 hp, and 78.9, here moving a light scrap scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s that time again . . .  a glance back at exactly a decade ago.  Back in June 2009, the 400th anniversary of the Half Moon going up the Hudson kicked off with a 20th century version of the Half Moon going up the Hudson.  Note the banner hung to the old TZ Bridge along the right side of the photo.   That replica is now in the Netherlands, looking for a new home, and that bridge–parts of it–have become fish structure somewhere off Long Island.

A newish boat in town was Peter F. Gellatly, now Vane’s Long Island.

Bounty–alas her fate–was still an irregular visitor to the sixth boro.  Here she’s made up to Harvey just outboard of Frying Pan.

Brian Nicholas moves a scrap barge out of the East River.

Paul T. Moran made one of her really rare visits to the sixth boro.

Container vessels calling in the ports of NY and NJ had not yet become UL . . .  ultra large versions

Harvey follows Half Moon northbound on the Hudson.

Michigan Service and Erie Service gather near IMTT.

Sisters assists with a tanker, and

here’s more of the River Day procession marking the year of Half Moon the first.

All photos taken in June 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been a few months to do a sixth-boro look around here.  Of course it’s never the same.  Never. Not even from one day to the next.  Let’s start with Weeks tug Elizabeth.  If I’m not mistaken, this machine’s carried that name ever since it was launched in 1984.

James William has been a regular in the sixth boro the past five years or so, but she started  as a Moran tug in 2007.   Note the eerie fog around the base of the Staten Island-side bridge tower.

Choptank [which the pesky auto-correct insists should be spelled Shoptalk] passes in the foreground;  Mary H in the distance. Choptank is back from several years in the Caribbean.

Paula Atwell is almost 20 years old, having started out as Crosby Express.

Northstar Integrity . . . quite the mouthful of syllables . . . seemed an unknown to me, until I realized I knew her as Petrel . . .

Not long ago I caught Marjorie at work on the Hudson down bound.

Mary Gellatly emerges from the fog.

Evening Star rests B. No. 250 at anchor with Brooklyn in the background.

Mister T heads for the mooring . . .

All sixth boro photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a backlog of so many collaboration photos that I might be alternating much-appreciated “other peoples photos” posts for a while.

 

 

I suppose I could call this RT 163b, since the photos in both were taken the same day, same conditions of light and moisture.

Let’s start with Charles D. McAllister with Lettie G. Howard bare poles in the distance.

ns10

Evelyn Cutler with Noelle Cutler is tied up alongside a barge with Wavertree‘s still horizontal poles. Click here to see Evelyn as I first saw her.

ns9

Viking is high and dry, post the winter work.

ns8

Timothy L. Reinauer is back in town after a very long hiatus, at least from my POV.  This may have been the last time I saw her.

ns6

Mary Gellatly gets some TLC as well;  click here for the previous time she was in a “random” post.

ns7

Beyond Mister Jim, a pile of sand is growing in the yard just west of the Bayonne Bridge on the Staten Island side.

ns5

Elizabeth and Marjorie B. McAllister head out for a job.

ns4

Tasman Sea heads for the yard as

ns2

Amberjack departs.

ns1

 

And for closure, it’s Marjorie B passing in front of a relatively ship-free Port Elizabeth.  Click here for a photo of Marjorie B high and dry a few years ago.

ns3

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And in contrast to all that, in Niigata earlier today, here’s some great vessel christening photos from Maasmondmaritime.

This is day 8 of the GHP&W series, so let me break pattern a bit.  If you missed the beginning, GHP&W is not a law firm; it’s abbrev for “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves.”  I haven’t dusted off any wharves yet, but two-thirds of the months still lie ahead.

The story here is that TS Kings Pointer was out serving as a training platform and not at Kings Point, although there was a potential meeting somewhere south along our track to Portsmouth, VA.

Mile 1, 0738 Wednesday, heading for the Throg’s Neck Bridge.

0aafn1

0756.  Passing SUNY Maritime and TS Empire State. Click here for photos from her summer sea term 2015.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

0804, Robert Burton, a Norfolk boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

0907, Mary Gellatly with a sand scow at the southern tip of Governors Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1010, passing the northern tip of Sandy Hook but looking back at Naval Weapons Station Earle, with USNS Medgar Evers at the wharf.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1017, Romer Shoal Light and Coney Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1517, Capt. Willie Landers northbound off Beach Haven, I think.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1612, FV Jonathan Ryan and tug Pops in the distance.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1618, entering a grid marked “numerous scientific buoys.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1657 off Atlantic City, with unidentified tug and barge

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1740 and about to switch watch.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thursday, 0852, looking north into the Chesapeake after going wide around Fisherman Island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

0910 . . . it’s the current  TS Kings Pointer, ex-Liberty Star. . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

. . . heading along Virginia Beach

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

before turning northward toward Long Island Sound.  Her former sister ship–Freedom Star–was in the area but we did not see her.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Meanwhile, we head north into the Thimble Shoal Channel Tunnel and into port, which you can follow tomorrow.  And that tug and crane barge in the distance . . . survey work for new infrastructure or maintenance dredging?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.  It was a smooth trip.

November 2009, not very long after she was delivered  from the Thoma-Sea yard.

0aaaaaapg1

September 2013

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

January 2014 . . . Peter F. Gellatly has seen some subtle exterior changes.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 13 . . . from what seems ages ago.

And the next few?  A freak snowfall in the sixth boro?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And might these be protest signs?

0aaaaaaaaaas4

Not at all!  Today is open house in lots of places in NYC, including the “salt pile” aka Atlantic Salt.  And kids at local schools have prepared banners to adorn a ship.

0aaaaaaaaaas5

0aaaaaaaaaas6

0aaaaaaaaaas7

This ship . . .  already seen in this blog last week here.  Here and here are fotos I took at the “salt pile” previously.

0aaaaaaaaaas8

. . . out of the mouths [and from the brushes and paintpots] of babes . . .  and young’uns come some impressive sentiments.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fotos 4 through 7 were taken by Brian DeForest, Terminal Manager, who also took the first six fotos here.  The others . .  Will Van Dorp.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,540 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary “Graves of Arthur Kill” is currently available only through tugster

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

May 2022
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031