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I’ve noticed and mentioned patterns before today.  A pattern in my book has to be made up of more than two items or occurrences.  So Marilyn George by itself is not a pattern.

Having Kimberly Poling show up while Marilyn George was at the IMTT dock is not a pattern either.

 

Kimberly appeared to be settling into their space east of Caddell’s but then abruptly turned out and westward.

That Crystal Cutler powered into my view should not have surprised me, since I’d noticed her northbound on the AK

By this time, I’d not yet realized I could have gotten all three boats into the same frame.  By the time I noticed the pattern, the opportunity had passed.

Know the launch order?

Patricia E. Poling . . . number of barrels?  Answers follow.

 

All photos, any errors, WVD, who took these photos in the space of an hour.

Crystal Cutler– 2010, Marilyn George-2004, Kimberly Poling-1994.

And Patricia E. Poling –2010.  Capacity . . .  15,000 barrels.

To repeat, any errors, WVD.

Seth Tane took this photo on the Columbia in 2000.  This was my sense of tugboats back then.  I had little sense of their age, power, crews, skills needed for operation, etc.  Take a guess on those features of this boat, and I’ll provide you some answers at the end of this post.  Note that this tug and barge are at a log dock, a trade unknown in the sixth boro or the NE US.

Here’s a shot I took in 2002 while hanging out on what I called back then the “waterfront” and saw this vessel.  Again, I had no idea of those same features as they pertained to this vessel, nor of the logic of this design.  Test yourself, and then some info can be found at the end.  

I took this photo in 2004.  My 15 years in coastal NE had given me an interest in schooners but I’d never sought an opportunity to crew on one, until my move to NYS, first on and then off the live-aboard.

Note the warehouses still standing where Brooklyn Bridge Park is now located.  Volunteer crewing on Pioneer and the other boats at South Street Seaport Museum kept me on the Upper Bay for long hours, and I  saw lots of new things, 

some things whose uniqueness I didn’t even fully appreciate.  Anyone know what’s become of that tugboat Rachel Marie?  I don’t.

Some things intrigued me, 

and other things like this derelict sugar mill and sunken lightship were soon to disappear.

I started to see interesting tugboats in unexpected places.

Little did I expect then the  changes that would happen.  Know the boat above and below?

All photos, WVD.  Answers below. 

Craig Foss, 1944, 116′ x 30′.  Here are more particulars, but as good as the boat appeared the top photo, she was purchased by unqualified parties, detained, and eventually scrapped.  You need to read the story here;  some crew were lucky to have survived. 

The second photo shows Coral Queen, a motor tanker that carried petroleum from 1920 (!!!) until 2011.  That is a long working life.  Here are the particulars from Birk’s data base.  From Auke Visser’s site, here are more particulars.  And finally, from my Barge Canal series last year, here are images of her generations of fleet mates;  her design relates to her work as a tanker in the “inter-connected waterways,” the Great Lakes and salt water connected by the Barge Canal.

The 1885 Pioneer still seasonally sails with professional and volunteer crews, and the 1893 Lettie G. Howard does the same on Lake Erie mostly.

I’ve no idea what became of Rachel Marie.

Meow Man traces are still around.  

The sugar mill area now has an Amazon facility, and the old shipyard is the Red Hook Ikea parking lot, and the sunken ship reefed,  the piers scrapped. 

Grouper, frozen in ice, is still waiting to be scrapped, but as of March 2, 2023 is still entirely intact.  The orange livery has disappeared from the sixth boro; that boat June K is now Donjon blue.

Ultimately, the more I found answers to questions I had, the more I was drawn in to learn more, a fact that keeps me looking and asking. I really never expected to be in the boros and fascinated by the sixth boro as long as I have been.  Recently, I had a conversation with a friend from another NYC life and she reported never to have heard of the sixth boro.  I guess that’s as shocking as hearing that someone’s not heard of the legendary Meow Man, the saltwater equivalent of Kilroy, or the US version of Maqroll, whose exploits need to be written down.  As of the date of these photos, tugster the blog had not yet been launched.

I’m not sure when I’ll post anything next, but it could be tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

If it seems I have a dirty lens, I don’t, but this winter has been a season of the good light and my schedule not coinciding.  No matter . . . the subject just looks grayer than I’d like much of the time.

When this ULCV arrived the other day with Mary Turecamo as one of the assists, I was reminded of how high the deck is on these ships, and they’re getting ultra-larger and higher.  In this post, Mary’s upper house was way above deck level on the tanker. 

Will this nose be superseded by Marco‘s style of nose?

Janet D was sharp, but note how hazy the distant shore is.

HMS Liberty is appreciably closer than Barney Turecamo, and therefore is sharper, until 

Barney gets closer. 

Enjoy these others:  Jillian Irene, 

Horizon’s Edge (a newby in the boro?) and Regulus

Schuylkill

another shot of Liberty

Crystal Cutler and Patricia E. Poling

and finally Margaret

All photos, WVD.

A few photos from the recent week . . . like Cape Fear heading over to Gowanus Bay and 

Miss Madeline coming from there, passing the KV buoy and 

more . . ..

Notice anything unusual but entirely understandable about the photo immediately below?

The barge is the 80,000 bbl Edwin A. Poling and the 

tug is Saint Emilion, usually mated with barge A87.  

All photos, WVD, who will be inland and rolling on the rails most of the month of March….

I caught her at the fuel dock the other day, and knew a bit of back story.  Do you recall seeing her before on this blog?

Since she was fueling and I was not waiting around for that process to end, I left.  I wish I’d gotten a 360-degree view, because changed paint really changes appearance.

She used to be Marion Moran, as seen in these Bayonne Bridge April 2013 photos

here muscling a HanJin container ship around Bergen Point. 

Another new name . . . Marilyn George, stencilled on for now. 

As you can see, before that she was Steven Wayne and before that . . .

she was 

Patapsco, as seen here in a September 2008 photo.

Welcome Marilyn George and Topaz Coast.  All photos, WVD. 

 

Daisy Mae . . . time flies and this 82′ x 30′ and 3200 hp boat has been around since 2017 already.

Crystal Cutler, 67′ x 26′ and 1500 hp, I remember when she first arrived in the boro.  I mist be getting old here. 

Evelyn Cutler, 117′ x 32′ and 3900 . . .  I recall when she was Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

Discovery Coast, 96′ x 34′ and 3000 hp . . .  she’s been around by that name since leaving the shipyard a decade ago. 

Capt. Brian A. McAllister, 100′ x 40′ and 6770 hp . . . half a decade here. 

Brian Nicholas, 72′ x 23′ and 1700 hp, I never saw her as Banda Sea, although I saw many other Seas.

Charles James, 77′ x 26 and 2400 hp . . . I recall her as Megan McAllister

Navigator, 64′ x 24′ and 1200hp**,  arrived here as that.  Saint Emilion . . .105′ x 38′ and 4800hp, I’ve known her as Arabian Sea and Barbara C before that, and this blog has been doing this since before she was launched. 

All photos and any errors, WVD.

**We know about autocorrect.  Here’s a message from Capt. Tugcorrect:  “Re 1200 hp, she’s been repowered and info should reflect that she  ‘boasts two MTU 12V2000s rated at 900hp each for a total of 1800.’ ”  Thx, Tugcorrect.

Many thanks to my friend Lew who sent along the next two photos of MNI (Mohawk Northeast Inc.) boats. Michael is a 2004 Bayou La Batre build, 71′ x 28′ and bringing 2100 hp to the job.  Previously, I’d seen MNI tug Swift, with its unique yellow livery, in the sixth boro. 

Lew also got this photo of Judy M (57′ x 22′ and 1200 hp) and Bridgeport (82′ x 28′ and 2400 hp).  Tug Bridgeport used to be a regular in the boro as a Gateway boat, but this is the only the second time I see her in MNI yellow. Before the Bridgeport moniker, she was known as Dragon Lady.

I saw Copper Mountain in Tampa Bay this summer, and got photos, but they must be among ones OBE (overcome by events) and I’ve not posted them yet;  Tony A caught her light.  Note she’s a triple engined boat and large:  116′ x 38′ and 6000 hp.

Tony also sends this next batch along.  Name the tug below?

Here’s context . . .  lots more boats:  Vulcan III (I think), Iron Salvor, HJ Reinauer, Caspian Dawn, and Shelby Rose to the right. 

Here, with Diane B in the background, is a better profile of Caspian Dawn, which with her 73′ x 26′ dimensions and 2380 hp spent most of her life on the west coast.  To me, her lines say west coast, not unlike Lynx.

Many thanks to Lew and Tony for sending along these photos.  Any errors, WVD.

 

Marjorie  moves her train cars.

Nathan G goes for fuel.

Crystal Cutler pushes her barge.

Paula Atwell travels light for a change. 

CMT Pike does her harbor rounds. 

Mister Jim here looks brighter than usual in the morning sun; in cloudy weather, that gray livery

obscures details. 

Robert IV assists at the stone anchorage.

Cape Henry leaves her barge to take care of some business. 

Captain Willie Landers makes a pass through the boro. 

And a rare sighting, Sea Crescent transits the boro on her return from Port Hawkesbury NS to Fort Eustis VA.  It’s likely that Sea Crescent originated this voyage from a port on the Saint Lawrence or even the Great Lakes.

All photos, any errors, WVD, whose 380 in this series was posted here.

Here was the post I’d planned for yesterday, put together in a moment when I thought a single focus was too elusive, random scenes, like a container ship anchored off Stapleton, elusive detail in a set all diverging from usual patterns. 

Or seeing a Mein Schiff vessel in town after a hiatus… with Wye River passing along her stern?

Or this bayou boat discovering it offers solutions all over the boro and beyond, here passing a lifting machine?

How about this speedboat chasing a tugboat, or appearing to, with lots of hulls in the distance?

Or a single terrapin crawling out of the surf in a non-bulkheaded margin of the wet boro?

Two pink ONEs at Global terminal?

A ketch named Libra or Libre heading south with a scrap ship at Claremont?

Two commercial vessels out at Bayonne?

Two Ellens?

And finally two elongated RIBs with

camouflage-clad Coasties aboard?

All photos, seen as slight deviants from existing patterns, WVD.

 

Let’s jump back to the present . . .  and Doris Moran, both light

and moving containers across the harbor to the other container port back fields. If I count right, that’s 160 containers not on chassis pulled by trucks on the BQE, SIE, or other such clogged arteries.

Brinn Courtney is moving a scow, as

is Eastern Dawn.

Mister Jim and all the CMT boats seem to

be getting

a makeover.

Marjorie B. might be going to pick up her daily train cars.

Kimberly Poling basks in the dawn liight.

All photos, recently, in the sixth boro, WVD, who won’t be in the boro for the rumored tugboat race this weekend.  If you’re out there, take photos, especially ones with splash!

 

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