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It’s a dark and soon to be rainy day in the sixth boro, so for your enjoyment . . . colorful photos from yesterday.

This ship uses the old spelling . . .  like Peking v. Beijing.  Know the current spelling?

 

Crystal Cutler came by with Patricia E. Poling, to add some greens to the palette.

 

The Hapag Lloyd box ship was assisted in by James D. Moran and

Mary Turecamo.

So . . . today’s maps would spell this as Qingdao, home to China’s second largest brewery . . . which uses the old spelling too.

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

Excuse the branches and tendrils reaching out over this dense pack of tugboats:  five Bouchard boats plus a Harley behind Denise and a Genesis on the drydock.

Crystal Cutler here in profile is heading for the Kills;  this photo prompts me to wonder how this wheelhouse “window” configuration has worked out.

Stephen B assists Fells Point leaving IMTT with Double Skin 302.

Marie J Turecamo heads east on the KVK.

I can’t recall now whether this is my first time to see Vane’s New York, here with Double Skin 53.

Seeley moves a scow eastbound.

Mount St. Elias goes west here.

And finally . . . J. George Betz heads east, possibly to pick up a barge.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for content . . .

Here’s another calendar’s worth . . . starting with Josephine.  I have many more of this bot coming up soon.

Capt. Brian heads out through the Narrows to meet a tow.

Cape Lookout returns for her anchored barge.

Nathan G delivers a brace of scows.

Ava M heads out for a job.

The “new” Kristin Poling returns to her barge as well.

Ellen and Bruce A follow a job.

St Andrews heads east and

Ernest Campbell, west.

Challenger, some weeks ago, brings a Weeks crane up for a lift.

Stephen B has some additions to her paint job since last I saw her.

CMT Pike heads back across the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who can’t believe it’s already mid-November 2019!!

 

 

I didn’t hear any wind speeds for yesterday, but it was blowing . . . winds of November according to the date, but fortunately not a November witch.

Chem Wolverine scudded through the Bay,

Kings Point went on with her routine,

Gabby Miller returned to home base,

Joyce aimed for the Kills,

Mister T slung a scow, 

Crystal pushed Patricia E. Poling,

ONE Ibis had some containers shuffled after spending time off Long Beach,

Fort Schuyler dispatched Double Skin 30,

and Chem Wolverine, on her way to Albany, passed Dace Reinauer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes a safe day to all.

Previous excessively windy days posts can be found here.

It’s been a few months since number 265, so let’s catch up.

Kimberly Poling had brought product upriver via Noelle Cutler, and you can tell some time has passed since I took this photo by the foliage.

Edna A was assisting a crane barge working on the power lines near Hudson NY.

Challenger came in through the Narrows yesterday, delivering a crane barge.  A few years back she delivered what was initially a mystery cargo here.

Eli stood by as salt was transshipped from scow to large truck.

Mister T was westbound for the Upper Bay with four scow to be filled.

Pokomoke brought petroleum upriver.

Memory Motel, the original exotic,  . . . I wondered where she had gone until I saw her high and dry up by Scarano.

Betty D and Mary Kay . . .  they were docked just south of Albany.

Mary Turecamo brought container barge New York from Red Hook to Port Elizabeth . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has many more saved up from the summer and early fall.

i.e., the 19th month in a row that I’ve posted photos from exactly 120 months before.  Well, although it’s not always this hazy, the Statue still looks the same, but

Responder no longer carries that boom or works in the sixth boro, and neither that bridge nor Coho looks the same.

Coral Sea Queen has been reconfigured into a trillion recombined molecules, and

June K is no longer orange.

That part of the skyline is the same–maybe–but Lil Rip has not been in this harbor in quite a while.

This Rosemary is no longer here nor painted this way, and

John Reinauer . . . I’d love to see her since she transited the Atlantic to work in the Gulf of Guinea.

Flinterborg released these Dutch sailing barges in the waterways of another continent . . . and Flinterborg has not returned that I know of.

Penn No. 4 is laid up, I think.  Does no one use the term “mothballed” any more?  I’ve never mothballed clothes, for what that’s worth.

Laura K Moran works in Savannah, with occasional TDY in other ports, I’ve noticed..

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who himself is no longer the same person he was in October 2009.

Last year I called it the same but without a date.  See here . .    here . . .  and here for all the rest.

We’ll start and end with Dylan Cooper.  Is anyone shocked by this tow tube behind the small boat?

Mary Alice returns with a dredge spoils scow.

Bear?

Durham and rebar?

Remnants of the TZ Bridge. . .

and “chewing” hard on other remnants.

Stony Point Light . . .

Tug Kristin Poling heads for Jones Point, and

Dylan Cooper moves toward the tanks in Newburgh.

All photos on Monday by Will Van Dorp, and this was Manhattan to Newburgh.

This feature of the blog serves to look back at this month exactly a decade ago, i.e., photos from my archives from exactly 120 months back.

John B. Caddell was still kept compliant, spruced up, and –I assume–profitable.

Nathan E. Stewart commemorated a tragic incident but it worked on the East Coast to redeem itself.  That certainly did not pan out.

K-Sea must have been at its peak back then:  in this one shot are Greenland Sea, Baltic Sea, and Houma.

Hornbeck Offshore worked out of a footprint now occupied by Vane.  Their boats like Patriot Service and

Spartan Service and others had a distinctive appearance.

Janice Ann Reinauer seemed much beloved, possibly because of the lush bow pudding missing in the photo below.

Of the boats so far in this post, Freddie K II is the only one that still works in the sixth boro these days.  Of the others, only Patriot Service and Greenland Sea still operate in the US, and at least three of the others here have been scrapped.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you a happy and safe August 2019.

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The 1963 Patricia is always a head-turner, and she was especially so the other morning.  The longer I look at the photo below, the more I imagine it framed.

Her throaty sound catches the ear as well.  Am I mistaken or has that color scheme changed a bit?

Carolina Coast makes the sugar run all year round, but that billowing spinnaker clearly states the season.

 

Nathan G has been spending a lot of time of late on runs outside the VZ Bridge.

 

Here, a busy distant Bayonne port as seen from Owls Head, is Genesis Victory with barge GM 6506 and a very busy background, as

she gets assisted into a lightening position by Pegasus.

James D. Moran escorts a quite empty Leo C.

toward Port Elizabeth.

Discovery Coast here takes on Edwin A. Poling.  It amazes me that the sylvan shoreline beyond the unit is actually in New York City and masks a dense residential area.

Moments before she was headed in from an anchorage area.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who favors another shot of Patricia.

 

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