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The flight back home through LaGuardia the other day chilled with its turbulence but thrilled with scenery.  I used my phone rather than camera to avoid hitting the window with the lens.

Here we enter  NYC airspace over Raritan Bay.  Imagine this on a clock face at the 0800 and heading clockwise. The land is the SW corner of Staten Island.  That’s Outerbridge Crossing over the Arthur Kill (AK), and the cargo vessel following the ever-so-strange channel is SCT Matterhorn, all 538′ of her outbound.

Here we look at the creeks in Freshkills Park, Isle of Meadows, and then Carteret NJ on the other side of the AK;  just off the left side of the photo is the location of the marine scrapyard featured in my documentary, Graves of Arthur Kill

A few seconds later, our Embraer 190 crosses the KVK;  dead center is the Bayonne Bridge and Shooters Island at the confluence of Newark Bay (to the north, or right on this photo) and the Kills . . . Arthur and Kill Van.  We’re now at about 0900 on our clock face.

Here’s my favorite shot of the series . . . the entire length of the curvy KVK.  Exiting the Kills and bound for sea past the Staten Island Yankees stadium is the 751′ Hoegh Asia.   I’ve no idea who’s on first.   The salt pile and the IMTT tank farm are key landmarks.

Below are the twin peninsulas of MOTBY, with Bayonne Drydock and the Bayonne Cruise terminal directly across that peninsula.  In the lower rightmost patch of green on this peninsula you can locate the statue dedicated by Putin . . . yes, THAT Putin.    The peninsula to the right–the Global terminals Bayonne— accommodates container ships and ROROs. In the distance Newark Bay Bridge and the rail bridge to its right cross Newark Bay.

Slightly farther north, you can see Global terminals, the Weeks Marine yard, the Greenville rail docks serving NYNJ Rail, and Sims scrap yard in Jersey City, where an unidentified bunker loads.

Approaching 1000 on my clock, here’s the confluence of the Hackensack (nearer) and Passaic Rivers, forming the SE point of Kearny NJ where they become the north end of Newark Bay.  Several hundred ships were built in the Kearny yard–this side of the point–in the first half of the 20th century. The Passaic disappears here into the tall buildings of Newark NJ.

Behold the meadowlands, and if you want to read a good book about that marsh, here’s a review of Robert Sullivan’s book, one of my all-time favorites.  Captains Bill or Hughie give fun tours there too.

So remember this flight is headed into LaGuardia from the NE, so that puts us at 1400 on our clock face, and that means we’re over New Rochelle this point in the approach pattern and that’s Hempstead Bay beyond Sands Point, with Execution Rocks Light looking like a submarine near leftish  center of photo.   The top of the photo looks SE across Nassau County.

It’s City Island, the most unlikely part of the Bronx, to which it’s connected by the City Island Bridge.

And just before landing . . .  it’s Throgs Neck …  and a few seconds later, touch down.

All I can add is that I was glad for a portside window seat on the Embraer.  All that water, that’s what I call the sixth boro.  More Jetster soon . . . .

 

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or Bridge.

Below is a photo I took in October 2011 . . .

Also from October 2011, when the bridge looked like this,

squeezing under the roadbed looked like this, and

the McAllister stern quarter escort looked like this . . .

the mighty Maurania III, that is.  Here’s the complete post I did back then.

But five and a half  years have elapsed, not without change.  So earlier this week, Suez Canal in the KVK and under the Bayonne Bridge looked like this.  See the worker above the new roadbed?

See him now?

 

So this week it was Marjorie B on the stern, and

 

Ellen forward.

 

 

I hope to be around and doing this five and a half years from now to see what there is to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday I mentioned the request to help the Roaring Bull ferry project, and that’s now fully funded. Thank you.   Here’s another and more somber request that you might consider, the Captain Joseph Turi Memorial fund.

If you want to see what I’ve done with this title in the past, click here.

I’ll reveal this set of photos without explaining what’s going on.  Check out the six people in this photo.  They divide into two groups by “uniform,” but how are they related?

 

I might add that these photos are shown in reverse chronological order.

 

See the two men (or one of them at that moment) atop the superstructure in the photo below?

Now we’re moving forward in time again.

 

So the two groups of six total men in the top photo have nothing to do with each other.  The ship’s crew wearing orange were simply photographing the bridge work, demolition at this point.  I can’t say if they communicated, but my guess is that at their closest they were within 50 feet of each other.

 

All photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

Before returning to bends around points on other rivers, I want to share some photos I took yesterday, first in a while at Bergen Point.  Here’s the set-up out of Newark Bay.

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I’d love to know the tension of the line up from Marjorie.

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Ellen pushes on the port stern quarter, and

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Robert counters on the opposite bow.

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It’s gusty.

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But someone calling the shots up there knows how

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to rotate

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just right.  A year from now, it’s possible there will be gaps in that lower roadbed, if any of it left at all.

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I’ve no idea what the clearance was yesterday, and I’m eager for that walkway to be re-opened.

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Another job is almost complete here as of late morning Friday, but the work never ceases, as traffic into the port can be said to

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be ever lining up.  There are 30 (I believe) of these Ever L ships, liberal, lasting, lovely, loading, lifting, lucid, laden, lucky, loyal, linking, and more.

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Lambent left Shanghai in early November  and will be back in Panama Asia-bound late next week.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

Since it’s THE maiden voyage arrival, let’s follow her all the way to “all fast.”  Here were parts 1 and 2, which followed her from several miles out in the Ambrose Channel to the Narrows and then from there to mid-KVK.

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Eric works the starboard and Ellen, the port.

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The turn at Bergen Point is way more than 90 degrees . . . more like 135, and

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takes well-timed thrusting at bow and stern.  Notice Atlantic Concert just above Eric‘s stern?

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Atlantic Concert is completing its clockwise spin here to line up its stern ramp, a maneuver

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that Atlantic Star will replicate.

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Here Eric McAllister is beginning the push on the stern to assist with that clockwise spin;  Ellen and Atlantic Star‘s own three thrusters are also likely engaged.

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Spin complete, Eric moves over to the port side to nudge Atlantic Star gently against the dock.  I wrote about the reverse maneuver here some years ago.

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Getting a profile of these two CONROs lined up . . . is not easy, since they represent nearly a half mile of ship.

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Foreshortening helps a little.

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I’ll be watching for the remainder of the G4 vessels–Atlantic Sail, Atlantic Sea, Atlantic Sky, and Atlantic Sun.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, with thanks  to NY Media Boat.

Also many thanks to JS, a retired harbor worker who made this connection for me between Atlantic Container Line, their generation 2 vessels, and John A. Noble.  The image below comes from pages 210 –11 of Erin Urban’s Hulls and Hulks in the Tide of Time, a must-read for all students of the sixth boro work boats.   Noble called the 1977 print “The Cinderella Passes the Occidental,” and then writes his sense of this new container ship passing the hulk of 1874 full-rigged ship called the Occidental.  He also alludes to having drawn the Atlantic Cinderella when she was brand new, but I have yet to locate copies of those drawings.  Oh well.  Many thanks to JS, whose previous contribution you might have seen here.

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John A. Noble’s “The Cinderella Passes the Occidental”

Why gild the lily?  Why articulate the mood?

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These photos are the result of an hour’s worth of fooling around on a Lower Manhattan cliff top on a cold January afternoon . . .

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looking toward the container ports and

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the glittering salt piles.

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I really should do this more often, and it beats

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being where the wind can cut your skin.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Notwithstanding all that . ..    sometimes the thought that a day is the first day in the rest of one’s life is superlatively vivid.    Enjoy my pics and maybe you’ll get this sense also.

Sunday afternoon, Zhen Hua 10 enters the Kills. Does anyone know if “Zhen Hua” means anything?  Note Manhattan and the tip of Bayonne to the left, and tug Brooklyn, Robbins Reef Light, and the boro of Brooklyn to the right.

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The new cranes arriving and the bridge their squeezing underneath are integrally related parts of the same story, as . . .

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… are the cranes and the dredging equipment in the background.  Note tug Specialist in the background

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Margaret Moran tends the port bow.

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Gramma Lee T Moran supplies the brakes and rudder.

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The ship completes its journey of thousands of miles.  Is it true that Zhen Hua 10 arrived here via Cape of Good Hope?

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On the same theme . .  here’s a handsome team of tugs, good paint all around.  Working on a tandem assignment?

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My thought when I read the name on the nearer tug was . . . this is historic . . . Crow‘s last ride;  the Bushey tug might also be in the last mile of its thousands and thousands in a half century of work.

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She’s being escorted in by Emily Ann . . .

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Crow and her sister Cheyenne DO have classic lines!

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Machines on shore were already staged . . . .

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while not far away a last spring seal lollygags on some warm rusty metal, once also a brand new machine.

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And on the other side of Staten Island rubble of a light indispensable a century ago adapts to a new life as a rookery.

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Many thanks to NYMedia Boat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be transiting himself soon.  Thursday I leave on a grand gallivant, and in early June–if all goes well– I start a new chapter working on Urger, that handsome young centenarian tug you see upper left at the top of the page.

I’d planned something else for today, but when Brian DeForest, terminal manager of Atlantic Salt, sent along these fotos –taken Sunday from a unique perspective, I scrapped my erstwhile plan. See the orange details in the foreground?

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These are fotos from the ship, which is currently moving at 10 to 11 knots southbound off Cape May.   That’s the Bayonne Bridge and

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here’s the arm conveying salt onto the pile.

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I’m sure this has a technical term, but I’ll call it the bracket that supports the arm when not in use.

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And here’s a view into the traveling wheelhouse and

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the hold.

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Here is engine room info.

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Finally, here’s Quantico Creek as seen from the bridge wing.

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Here’s a foto I took nearly six years ago on the KVK looking off the starboard bow of a large vessel of another time–a century ago–that used to engage in a salt trade out of Chile.   Know the vessel?

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Answer:  Peking.  Here’s one of six posts I did about that transit of Peking from Caddell’s back to South Street Seaport Museum waters.

Many thanks to Brian DeForest for all these fotos, except the last one.

A thought just occurs to me:  Chile’s main salt port today is Patache.  Could that word be a Spanish spelling/pronunciation of the word “potash”?

The days to use the westside pedestrian/cyclist lane of the Bayonne Bridge are winding down . .  if plans are to be believed.  And then, in 2014 or so when the work is completed, the walk/cycle lane will reside on the east side.

Note the bulb of a vessel appearing between the support members.  I’m thinking that given the use of “flags of convenience” in this industry, this foto might make a suitable flag for an aquatic micronation like Republic of New Atlantis or Oceania.

Behold a possible 4892-teu vessel headed straight for the narrow channel at Mariners Harbor.

Fortunately, that trajectory will be modified by Amy C McAllister.  But I wonder, what would happen if that bow tug should suddenly lose power.

That gray console on the portside bridge wing, can I cal that a bridge wing helm station?

Note the folded forward mast.  Vessel is APL Oman.  Any guesses where she was built?  A clue is that builder is listed as a company named Daewoo.

Bruce A. McAllister acts as the starboard stern thruster.

She’s five days out of the Panama Canal. Here’s APL’s itinerary for the past two months:

2012 August 19th, 13:00:31 UTC New York
2012 August 14th, 04:00:44 UTC Balboa
2012 July 29th, 00:00:08 UTC Pusan
2012 July 27th, 08:30:05 UTC Yang Shan
2012 July 25th, 00:30:49 UTC Hongkong
2012 July 24th, 11:00:17 UTC Yan Tian
2012 July 21st, 22:00:58 UTC Yan Tian
2012 July 21st, 22:00:40 UTC Hongkong
2012 July 19th, 22:30:28 UTC Kaohsiung
2012 June 18th, 08:00:09 UTC Norfolk

The rotation is progressing well.

It seems the starboard bridge wing helm station is covered,  so portside to the dock?

Color-coded overalls keep hierarchy pronounced?

While I’m up on my vantage point overlooking Newark Bay, I have a chance to see what else is around.  From roughly far left to near right, it’s upper blue wheelhouse of DonJon boat, Bebedouro!!, an unidentified ferry, and Cashman’s drillboat Kraken.

All fotos taken today by Will Van Dorp, whose computers are happier than they were yesterday.

And the place of construction for APL Oman . .. Daewoo Mangalia in Romania!!

I took this foto at 15:40 yesterday, and I’ll call it “prelude to afternoon golden hour,”  but this is a view of the turbine from the Battery Park direction. A few weeks ago, I recorded 18 minutes, so here’s more than twice that.

Geese head to wherever they go at dusk.

SalvageMaster passing Caletta ushers in the golden times, 16:30.

Over toward the Narrows, Hellas Progress radios in an initial departure call.   In the distance, Tokyo Express approaches.

Lucy Reinauer pushing barge RTC 83 exits the KVK, followed

Kristy Ann, her bronze and red color enhanced by the setting sun.

By the time Kristy Ann reaches the Brooklyn half, Tokyo Express has started her approach into MOT, and

Hellas Progress has spun around toward the open sea.

By now, it’s 17:10, temperature starts to drop as quickly as the color intensifies.

It no longer feels like summer in February, nor does it look like it.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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