You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘lightship’ category.

Frying Pan came back to Pier 66 yesterday after several months at Caddell Dry dock, assisted by Dorothy J.  I use this photo with permission from Renee Lutz Stanley.

12916832_1001411543282506_42771383470867769_o

It turns out that I also recently received a photo and spec sheet from barrel, formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers.  When I looked up where Liston, the vessel below, was built, I

Tug Liston

 

tug liston build sheet

learned that it was being built the same time as the lightship listed as Frying Pan Shoal.  First, it makes me wonder whether a photo exists that shows them both on the ways.  Second, I wondered if there was an error in shipyard site here about the initial name of the lightship, or if there was a time when the word “shoal” got dropped from the name of the vessel.  Third, the shipyard site says that LV115 became a museum in Southport, NC.  Click here and scroll through for a photo I took in Southport five years ago showing where some folks had wanted to build a museum with LV115 as the centerpiece, but it had never happened.

Some years ago, I used to spend a good amount of summer evening time at Frying Pan/Pier66.  If you’ve never been, you should try it once.  Here are some photos I took way back then. I must have many more somewhere.  Pier 66 opens in early May, and I think it’s time to have a large gathering there once again.  Let’s agree on a date and meet there, eh?

Many thanks to Renee and barrel for use of these photos.

But a closing shot, barrel writes:  “USACE TUG LISTON    became ARGUS of Salter Towing in 1970. #561597. At a later date became fishing vessel MR. J.C. now out of documentation.”

USACE TUG LISTON

What better vessel to post about on the winter solstice than a lightship.  Here, here, and here are some previous ones.

0aanh3

This particular lightship I saw east of Rotterdam in May 2014.

0aanh2

It’s not particularly old, so I hope it’ll be a reminder in dark times into the distant future.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s part of the story.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

One more winter solstice post from the archives here, but this year I’m not thinking about the 182 or whatever days until the summer solstice.  Maybe it just feels like the world’s a darker place than it used to be and we need light and relief now.

Here and here are previous posts that feature this vessel, LV-87 Ambrose.  The first two photos below come from Birk Thomas in late winter 2012, as Ambrose was finishing up some yard work and then

011412

in March headed back to South Street Seaport Museum. 

0312

I took the remaining photos, the one below as the lightship was bathed in fireworks light on July 4 this year.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The next two photos I took last week, trying to highlight Christmas red.

121516

By the way, next week I plan a post of any work vessel–or replica thereof–decorated for Christmas in some way.  I have a few already, but if you have such a photo to share, send it along soon.  Click here for some Christmas-related workboat photos from two years ago.

121517

Two older sister ships of Ambrose are Barnegat, LV 79, ex-Cape Lookout Shoal,  and delivered on 1 December 1904, now languishing in Pyne Point NJ; and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Swiftsure, LV-83, ex-Relief, and delivered on 22 December 1904.  I’m wondering if there’s a photo showing both vessels in Camden at the shipyard in –say–October 1904, just prior to delivery.    I took both photos in summer 2010.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Going back to this record of New York Shipbuilding history, does anyone know what became of LV 88 Columbia River, supposedly sold to Japan in 1988?

This post shows a photo of LV 84 Brunswick and tells of its demise.  Click here for other posts on lightships.  One lightship I’d really like to see is this one from 1911 in Surinam.

The top two photos credit to Birk Thomas;  all the others to Will Van Dorp.

 

Yesterday’s post led with Jared S aka Cheyenne II, and so I’m grateful to Jason LaDue for sending along a photo he took before she sank into the Genesee River, where she still lies.

0aarrb1

This next photo was taken by Renee Lutz Stanley, recently, as Pelham assisted the dead but lively Frying Pan to Caddell for some work.  This is my first time seeing Frying Pan away from her berth at Pier 66.  Previous posts with Frying Pan include this, this, and notably this;  in the fifth photo of the “notable” third link there, you get a little background on Frying Pan and its name, as well as see the location the lightship MIGHT have ended up at as mainstay of a North Carolina maritime museum, which would have put it much closer to Frying Pan Shoal.  Here and here are some recent posts with Pelham.

0aarrb7

The next five photos I took on a recent gallivant down east.  Little Toot, who works at Washburn & Doughty ( W & D) of East Boothbay, ME, appears to be a pristine-looking 1953 product of Roamer Boat company of Holland, MI.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On the opposite side of the big blue shed at W & D is one of East Boothbay’s newest almost completed tugs, likely the JRT Moran.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I saw Dorothy L (1965) twice while I was in the area inland from Monhegan, this time and once later but at about 0600 h and the light and motion of my ride didn’t lend itself to a good photo.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And here are some from the sixth boro, Haggerty Girls in the notch of RTC 107, and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And finally, a veteran . ..  it’s Freddie K Miller inside the water and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

out.  For a wide range of photos of this boat’s life, click here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Thanks to Jason and Renee for use of their photos.  For more of Renee’s photos of the Frying Pan move, click here.

And here, verbatim, is my call for collaboration for November posts.  Thanks to those of you who have already responded.

“And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.”

First, if you’re free today and within travel distance of Lower Manhattan, do yourself a favor and attend this event, 4 p. m., a book signing by Dr. James M. Lindgren.  His new book is a much needed complement to Peter Stanford’s A Dream of Tall Ships, reviewed here a few months ago.   Details in Preserving South Street Seaport cover almost a half century and will enthrall anyone who’s ever volunteered at, donated to, been employed by, or attended any events of South Street Seaport Museum.  Lindgren laments SSSM’s absence of institutional memory saying, “Discontinuity instead defined the Seaport’s administration.”  Amen . .  as a volunteer I wanted to know the historical context for what seemed to me to be museum administrations’ repeated squandering of  hope despite herculean efforts on the part of volunteers and staff I knew.

As my contribution to creation of memory, I offer these photos and I’d ask again for some pooling of photos about the myriad efforts of this museum over the years.

Pier 17.  April 17, 2014.  According to Lindgren, this mall opened on Sept 11, 1985 with a fireworks show.  Its demise may by this week’s end be complete.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

April 12, 2014.  Photo by Justin Zizes.

0aaaap412

Feb 23, 2014.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jan 21, 2014 . . . Lettie G. Howard returns.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sept 20, 2013.  This is the last photo I ever took FROM the upper balcony of Pier 17.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sept 12, 2013.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

July 2012.  A fire had broken out on the pier, and Shark was the first on scene responder.   Damage was minimal, despite appearances here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now for some photos of vessels that have docked in the South Street area in the past half century.

July 2012 . . . Helen McAllister departs, assisted by W. O. Decker and McAllister Responder.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

June 2012.  Departure of Marion M as seen from house of W. O. Decker.  Photo by Jonathan Boulware.  The last I knew, Marion M is being restored on the Chesapeake by a former SSSM volunteer.

0aaaaaaaapjun12

Lettie G. Howard hauled out in 2009.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2009. The Floating Hospital . .  . was never part of the SSSM collection.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2009.  Maj. Gen. Hart aka John A. Lynch aka Harlem.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Helen McAllister with Peking and Wavertree.   Portion of bow of Marion M along Helen‘s starboard.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mathilda posing with W. O. Decker in Kingston.  2009.

0aaaaaaaap

Moshulu now in Philadelphia.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2005, I believe.  Spuyten Duyvil (not a SSSM vessel) and Pioneer.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thanks to Justin and Jonathan for use of their photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  For many stories on these vessels, that mall, and so much more, pick up or download these books and read them asap.

 

 

Sunsets can gild and indemnify the efforts of the day.  A lightship can help safely navigate the impending darkness.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

but sunsets can also torment.  Although it’s the last day of September and progress has been very slow in trying to raise the $$ to save Bertha,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

there is still time.  Someone must know someone who

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

can help so that this hull gets completed, surfaces get gets sandblasted and repainted, and all the rest so that

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

this handiwork will be complemented with

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

clear views out these lights, and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

celebration.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So that these D13000 speak again.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And splash gurgle back out to sea

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Anchors lowered

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

get raised.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Help.

0aaaab14

Final foto by Allen Baker.  All others by Will Van Dorp, whose previous Bertha posts were here and here.

Here’s Bertha‘s blog.

Here was ASB 2.  There might be eight million stories in the naked city, but in its primary boro aka the sixth boro at least half again that number of other stories could be told  . .  by the collective whoever knows them.

Captain Zeke moves with the diverse stone trade past folks waiting below our very own waving girl and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

all those folks waving and taking fotos from the ferry and every other water conveyance.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The 1950 Nantucket‘s back in town . .  for the winter.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Yup . . . no one could have predicted these . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

back when Shearwater was launched in 1929.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A cruise ship shuffles passengers as Peter F. Gellatly bunkers.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kristy Ann Reinauer stands by a construction barge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mary A. Whalen . . . is a survivor from another time.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A barge named Progress has returned to South Street Seaport Museum, here between Wavertree and Peking.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Emerald Coast is eastbound on the East River.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Two views of Adirondack, one with WTC1 –or is it 1 WTC or something else–and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

another with the Arabian Sea unit.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And Sea Wolf heads north . . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m enjoying this time travel back to the late 70s–early to mid 80s, and I hope you are too.

Foto #1:  Between Yonkers and Hastings, lightship is No. 84, Camden-built 1907, the one that later did bottom duty in Erie Basin, until the Ikea development made it disappear. Can anyone identify the white vessel north of the lightship?

0aaaaft

Foto #2.  Today Mathilda rests on the north bank of the Rondout in Kingston, as I photographed her almost exactly five years ago.  I never knew she also crawled out awhile on Pier 94.

0aaaaft1

Foto #3.  A Moran tug escorts ACL Song through the Newark Bay drawbridge on its way to Port Elizabeth.  Drawbridge and vessel are long gone.  I can’t identify the tug.

0aaaaft2

Foto #4.  James Turecamo looked like this when she carried Turecamo colors.

0aaaaft3

Foto #5.  Beside the heavy traffic, do you notice something odd about Empire State V, one of a long list of training vessels assigned to SUNY Maritime?

0aaaaft4

Foto #6.  Listing perhaps?    On a sandbank near LaGuardia perhaps?  Frances Turecamo holds station to staboard.  I can’t  identify the tug to port.

0aaaaft5

Foto #7.  Anyone know anything about a sunken lounge/restaurant once known as Drifters I?

0aaaaft6

All fotos taken by Seth Tane about 30 years ago and used with his permission.

This “fleetless” 2013 fleet week in the sixth boro is an ideal time to look back at previous fleet visits, using these vintage fotos taken almost a third of a century ago by Seth Tane.  Here’s my “fleeted” fleet week fotos from 2012.

Foto #1.  USS Mount Whitney arrives in town with airship escort.  Which lightship might that be off LCC-20’s port bow?   My thanks to Jed for identification of LCC-20.

0aaaafd1

Foto #2.  Victory ship USNS Twin Falls as campus for Food and Maritime Trade high School rafted up along the North River with Liberty ship SS John W. Brown, a floating nautical high school.   Which pier# or street were these docked at?  Can anyone share fotos taken inside these unique school vessels?

0aaaafd2

Foto #3.  Comparing with this foto of Wire WYTL 65612 taken less than a year ago, it appears changes have been made over the past 30 years to her house.   Also, notice the “previous” version of the  Staten Island ferry terminal off her starboard.

0aaaafd3

Foto #4.  Seatrain Lines vessel Transindiana after some altercation.  Transindiana was initially built as a WWII USN transport vessel.  Enjoy these other Seatrain fotos.

0aaaafd4

Foto #5.  Intrepid initially arrives in the North River to begin service as a museum ship.  The foto is taken from a vessel on Pier 9 in Jersey City.

0aaaafd5

All fotos thanks to Seth Tane.  And, I again invite your comments and reminiscences.  If you missed it, here was the first installment of this series.

Click here for my serendipitous fotos of WLV-612 under way a few months back.  I traded those fotos for a tour.  But  the vessel immediately below is not 612 . . . it’s LV-87, 43 years older than the 612.  Check out the riveted hull.    Here and here are some previous posts on that Ambrose showing vintage in situ views and high and dry ones at Caddell’s last spring.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In comparison, here’s the bow of the 1950 Nantucket aka WLV-612.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The C covers a hatch which when swung outward is marked with a U so that from a distance, one would still read the name on side as Nantucket.  I’m not kidding.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This is what a welded lightship stern looks like.  But where is Nan, with whom I had the appointment to view the vessel?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A cellphone call brings movement to a forward portlight, and with the right password,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

this hatch swung open.  “No, I’m not selling anything or giving away religion . . . I just being tugster.  A tour maybe?”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Spirals still lead between decks, although I’m guessing that everything about this vessel has been redone to yacht standards.  For the official site fotos of what’s below decks, click here. There are many more fotos on this listing . .  for less than $7 m it can be yours.  It will probably leave the sixth boro before the end of this month.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Prominently framed below, the builder’s plate. But how did WAL become WLV?  Addendum #2  Here’s the answer.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This vessel was the USCG last working lightship until 1983, and it did “other tasks” until being decommissioned in March 1985.

For a PDF on many US lightships, click here.  Two of them are abandoned on a riverbank in Suriname.  For some haunting fotos of a similar 1910 Dutch lightship (Lichtschip Suriname-Rivier) along that same river, click here.   It seems there is a restoration project underway, as filmed here in the past month . . . but in Dutch.  Basically, the narrator says “don’t fall through the deck, vessel came here in 1911, here’s the washroom, the kitchen, the anchor machinery, the light tower . . . here’s the companionway heading below, yes . . . there’s water down there but we’re hoping to get her dry.”  Come back when the job is done;  meanwhile I am NOT going down below where some nasty critters might have settled in.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 973 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Free showing of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Click the image below to order your own copy!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

July 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 973 other followers