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People on land like to look out over the water.  Folks working on the water need to pay attention to water spaces, but sometimes they study the banks too.  Here’s the town of Castleton-on-Hudson, east of the river.  I should visit and walk around town one of these days.

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So let’s follow Brooklyn down through part of the Hudson River Valley and see what we see.  The two bridges here are the Castleton Bridge and the Alfred H. (not E.) Smith Rail Bridge.  

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Can you guess this busy port?

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Above is Coeymans, another place to visit.  And below is Coxsackie, west of the river.  Residents of this town signed a declaration of independence and called for opposition to the intolerable acts of the British Parliament from more than a year before that other document by the same name was signed in Philadelphia.  I should go there too.

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What house is this in southern Athens NY?  I was there once, but I need to return there too.

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I think this is the old Lehigh Cement plant.

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I believe this is Clermont, a Livingstone home and supposedly where Robert Fulton docked his North River Steamboat so much that the house name started being applied to the boat.

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Saugerties Light . . . I met one of the keepers last week.  Wanna stay over?  Here’s the info.

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I’m looking to identify the building in the next photos, all between Saugerties and the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge.  Any help?  I know Bard College is nestled in along there, and I’ve been there a long time ago.  Maybe I should go back.  What buildings are these?  Maybe they’re just conspicuous private homes whose owners wish to remain anonymous.

A.   ?

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B.  ?

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C.  ?

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D.  Blithewood Manor, another building on Bard’s campus?

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E.  ?

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And finally, on the west side of the Hudson, beyond the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge or George Clinton Memorial Bridge, that “castle” on the midsize mountain is the Mount Community at Bruderhof. That George Clinton is here, uncle of DeWitt of canal fame, and not related to this George Clinton, I suppose.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos.

 

Let’s start with some photos of the TZ Bridge work taken in October 2013

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This is looking south.

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Ditto.

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Now here are some from February 2016.

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And looking back north.

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And June 2016.

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And two months later,  late August 2016, looking north.

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And looking back southward.

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The February photos come from a friend.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

As of six days ago, that gap was all that seemed to remain for a complete span.  Who knows . . . by now, that may be bridged as well.  Here are some of the posts that show the project of modifying the soon-to-be 85 year-old icon I’ve had on my blog since day 1.  Here were a set of posts I did when the bridge turned 80.

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Once the higher span is complete and open for traffic, the lower span will be dismantled.  I wonder what the arches are feeling.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

What’s this . .  a catatug?  A joke of meowman or purr people?  But first, have another look at more Ocean blue tugs posted on this blog before, including one that was once called Helen M. McAllister.  Click here and scroll.  Also, remember, double click enlarges.

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All the photos today were taken in the port of Montreal.  Let’s start with Ocean Georgie Bain.

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Here are more shots of Ocean Intrepide.

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And that red vessel in the background, here’s

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a cooer look at Peniche and beyond her what I first was a Montreal fan of meow man’s literature.

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MSC Donata here is getting an assist from

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two Ocean tugs,

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Ocean Pierre Julien and

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Ocean Serge Genois. 

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And that returns us to the top photo, seen in its entirety here, Ocean Catatug 2 

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pushing Weeks 235 with some unidentified structural steel, probably related to the new bridge over the Saint Lawrence. So far, Ocean has two of these catamaran tugs.

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Closing out this post, it’s Blizzard Polaire.

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I know there were Ocean vessels in Sorel and Trois Rivieres, which I missed.   Maybe I’ll see more next time, and I certainly want to see any and all in icebreaking activity some winter soon.   all photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Finally, with some wifi and limited time, let me put in photos and fleeting captions from leg 1.  That lady below needs no introduction although she looks alarmed for some reason.

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The TZ Bridge has no traffic jams down underneath.

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Prospector pushes in some bridge components.

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Iona Island has some long unused bollards south of the Bear Mountain Bridge.

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A bulker heads south, as does

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this sloop.

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And this photographer plans his next series.

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as Ocean Tower tows down river with more girders for the bridge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here were the previous posts, the last one being in April.  On June 11, I took the photo below, and since then had not been back until yesterday. Note how far along the Bayonne Bridge was on that date, as well

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Here’s a closer up of the rigging on June 11.

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Now let’s jump forward to yesterday, August 15.  Note where the crane barge

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Claude G. Forbes started the morning, and

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and check the progressing in rigging, compared with photo #2 above.

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Yard tug Jay Bee V came out to

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reposition the barge.  Note the mizzen on the background.

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Then the crane pivoted around and

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the block was lowered and

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straps added and

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all systems checked and

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then slowly tensioned.  One end of the mast lifted from off the deck

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BUT then it was lowered.  I waited around for an hour more, but then had other places to be.    I’ll have to pick up the Wavertree story another time.

Since I mentioned the Bayonne Bridge–its own process–here’s what the work looks like as of August 15 from over off the west end of Caddell Dry Dock .. . aka ex-Blissenbach Marina now known as Heritage Park, which in my opinion, should have foliage trimmed so as to be  more user friendly for land-based photographers.

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Thanks to everyone who braved the heat last night and came to the showing of Graves of Arthur Kill.  Special thanks to those wizards who problem-solved our way through the technical challenges, except I had brought along an antepenultimate version . . .  and sorry I didn’t have a chance to talk with everyone there.  What you want–prepare for an explicit commercial message here– is this version, which Gary and I call “the director’s cut,” available for a mere $11.99.

While I’m doing “commercials,” here’s an opportunity for the right people to sail offshore on South Street Seaport Museum’s 1893 fishing schooner, up to Gloucester for the 2016 schooner races, or back, or some portion thereof. Click here for some of the many Lettie G. Howard posts I’ve done over the years.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

We had a long transit from Detroit to Mackinac, so here are a lot of photos, starting with Federal Kumano and Ambassador Bridge in the distance;

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passing steel operations,

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and the mailboat Westcott.

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Near central Detroit a pilot boards Federal Kumano from Huron Maid.

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Entering Lake St. Clair, we pass Philip R. Clarke, 

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followed by Lubie in China township,

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Radcliffe R. Latimer, 

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Great Lakes Maritime Center,

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lightship Huron,

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and as we headed unbound into Lake Huron, we passed Arthur M. Anderson . . . the last vessel in contact with the Fitzgerald before she was taken by Superior.

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This was sunrise nearing the end of this leg, and in the night and distractions, I missed Alpena.

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This post closes with Buffalo, as she leaves the Mackinac Bridge behind her.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Sometimes I have to ‘fess up:  I miss lots of stories in the sixth boro even though I might know of them.  And here’s another one:  I first noticed the tops of cranes on the south side of the Goethals Bridge a couple of years ago on the rare occasions I drove to work, but that old bridge–much as I admit to liking the name and the connections to both Brooklyn and Panama–has narrow lanes and used to have potholes that once cost me a tire and rim even though I saw myself steering into it.  I did that because with a truck beside me, there was nowhere to go.

Anyhow, thanks to Brian DeForest for this photo he sent me back in July 2014.  This section of the AK is not one I regularly see, although I know some of you see it regularly.

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The rest of these photos all come from Thomas Steinruck, to whom I am grateful.  The new bridge is taking shape.

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A new day dawns for commuters, and it can’t come too soon.

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Happily, there’ll be a walkway over the bridge too.  All the above views look toward Staten Island, and

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these show a bit of New Jersey too.

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And here’s a panoramic shot, showing the new bridge, the old Goethals, and the AK Rail Bridge, with the gantry cranes of Howland Hook off to the right side.  I used to regularly get shots of the Howland Hook terminal and the AK Bridge from the other side, like here.

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Many thanks to Brian and Thomas for these photos.  Thomas took these last six since the beginning of 2016.

For my previous posts on bridges, click here.

No, I haven’t left the sixth boro.  Just yesterday I crossed paths with Allie B here at Atlantic Salt, purveyor of a safety product and patron of the arts.

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It took a gray day for me to notice that the house colors along the KVK are reminiscent of those in coastal Canadian maritimes towns.  Allie B has been one of my favorite tugboats since I saw her depart on her epic tow here and here back in 2009.

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Then I passed Evelyn Cutler, here with Noelle Cutler at Caddell Drydock.  Those are basic Wavertree masts in the background.  I first saw Evelyn

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in red.

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Here’s a first good photo of Dylan Cooper, the Reinauer tug that arrived in the sixth boro later last year.

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I hope to get another of her here in a few years when that bridge is completed.

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I believe Eric is the newest of McAllister tugs in the sixth boro.  And yes, here Eric is using her 5000+ hp to assist Atlantic Star, ACL‘s brand spanking new CONRO vessel into port yesterday on her maiden voyage.  I hope to have a post dedicated to Atlantic Star completed for tomorrow.

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Eric is a product of the same Rhode Island shipyard that produced Dylan Cooper.  In the distance that’s one of ACL’s previous generation of CONRO vessels, Atlantic Concert.  Here’s an entire post dedicated to Atlantic Concert from 2009.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to NY Media boat. 

And yes, I still have more of Barrel’s vintage USACE photos to share.

 

Here are the previous installments.

Rare as it is to see a chemical tanker traverse the East River, there’s no mystery about this vessel’s identity…  Ginga Lion.  For outatowners, the bridge goes by Koch Bridge, 59th Street Bridge, or Queensboro Bridge.

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These photos were taken last Wednesday–October 21–by Jonathan Steinman, frequent contributor of photos from along that tidal strait, which is not really a river.

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So here’s the mystery . . . or at least the question.  Given the Jones Act, how can this vessel make the stops it does.  On this run, it was traveling from Bayonne to Port Jeff, and as of this writing, she’s on her way to New Orleans. Prior ports of call and dates are as follows:  10/8 Gibraltar, 9/10 Pasir Gudang Malaysia, 9/4 Kuala Tanjung Indonesia, 8/18 Nantong China, 8/17 Zhangiagang China, 6/22 Houston.

Ginga Lion is clearly a foreign flagged chemical tanker.

I suspect the answer is that she’s not transferring cargo from one US port to another, just loading or offloading at a series of US stops, which I understand would be permissible.   Anyone clarify?

Many thanks to Jonathan for keeping eyes on the East River and sending along the question and photos.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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