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Tomorrow I head back out on my longest gallivant yet, even before I process what could be from the previous jaunt.  But I have a list I’ll work on when energy and wifi coincide.  But not to worry if I’m silent for a day or a week or three.

Part of me would be happy to stay in the boros;  if you’re near the sixth boro with a camera, keep your eyes open for  Ariadne,  the perfect name for a cable-laying vessel.

In the past month, I passed under more than a hundred bridges, and over a bunch also.  On July 22, we passed beneath the TZ Bridge, one space to the east from the main channel because of ongoing work to complete the last span.

Just to reiterate the record, the old bridge opened in December 1955.

 

That gap will be filled with these, then still also 100 miles away.

On July 23 we passed under these next two bridges, the Smith (1928) … the southernmost freight rail bridge since 1974.  Here’s who the Smith memorializes.

Beyond the rail bridge is the Castleton Bridge (1959), the connector between the Thruway and the MassPike. “Castleton” is a village of fewer than 2000 people.

I call this the Albany Swivel, but the more accurate name is the Livingston Avenue Bridge, opened

in 1902!  You’d think it abandoned, but if you’ve ever traveled on Amtrak through Albany, you’ve been on it.

I don’t know the actual name or alphanumeric designation for this one, but its carries all the freight/passenger trains through the Mohawk Valley.

A blurry photo I know, but it shows an Amtrak train crossing just east of lock E-19 in Frankfort NY, once world renowned home of Carlotta the lady aeronaut and the Meyers Balloon Farm.

All photos, sentiments, and any errors by Will Van Dorp, and more bridges to come as wifi and inspiration provide.

 

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“Motor city” is another name for Detroit, but “detroit” is only part of the name for the waterway given by the French explorer Cadillac when he led the first Europeans to settle “Fort Pontchartrain du Detroit” on a bank of “le détroit du lac Érié,”  the strait of Lake Erie), linking Lake Huron and Lake Erie; historically,  the strait included the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River.

Some time after departing the Cuyahoga, we pass this mysterious site.  Any ideas?  I’ll identify it at the end of this post.

If you’re not at the helm, straits bring the treat of relatively close passage with other traffic, like Dorothy Ann and Pathfinder here.

Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial is a 352′ monument we can all live with, sans controversy.

As we approach the center of the contemporary city of Detroit, traffic and industry intensify.   I’d never noticed GLW’s glowing slag heaps, like crafted flows of lava.

On the Windsor side, Frontenac transfers payload .  . not sure what.  Salt maybe?

On the American side, 1000′ Edwin H. Gott is likely discharging Superior ore or taconite.

Sturgeon Bay-built Sam Laud watches from the Rouge.  Laud, the namesake, moved from shop painter and riveter to CEO of GATX.

Folks on the bridge of Algoma Olympic, Port Weller-built and down bound here just south of the Ambassador Bridge, must be experiencing the frustration of having to worry about devil-may-care recreational boaters.  Recently, a high profile meeting of stake holders was held at Port Huron to deal with difficult small boat operators, one in particular who decided to play chicken with a freighter .

Last year this China-built tug was called Victorious;  now she’s know as Leo A. McArthur, and as then, she pushes hot asphalt contained in John J. Carrick.

Patricia Hoey (built 1949) is a good example of the extended life experienced by freshwater boats.

A McAsphalt unit like Leo A. McDonald, Everlast, matched as always with Norman McLeod, is Japan-built.

I’d love to learn more about this Windsor home, but the name on the facade is that of the Massachusetts-born founder of Canadian Club whisky.

Just north of Belle Isle, SS Ste. Claire, Boblo ferry sister of SS Columbia marks Kean’s Marina.

And with night falling and work for me to do, we’ll leave this post only partway through the strait with Kaye E. Barker, once Benson Ford III.  Notice the GMRenCen in the distance just forward of the front of the self-unloading arm?  GMRenCen was built by Ford.

The return of daylight will find us in Lake Huron.  To see the St. Clair River by daylight, click here.  All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

The sinuous structures in the top photo depict Cedar Point as seen from a few miles out in the lake.

 

 

 

I took these photos over a two-day period in late July, traveling the entire 130 miles of the Hudson from the Battery to Troy while on the trip from Narragansett Bay to the “source” of the Chicago River.  RV Shearwater here surveys the river/bay;  that’s Willy Wall on the horizon left, so the Battery is behind us.

The Tappan Zee nears completion:  the gap on the left side is all that needs to be bridged.  The Left Coast Lifter will then become the “left coast lowerer,” I assume.

Infrastructure materials come out of the ground here in Haverstraw,

Viking passes below Osborn Castle,

summer play happens in the Hudson,

Buchanan 12 pushes more raw materials for infrastructure,

a tribe paddles over to Bannerman’s,

a truck lifts three vessels in imitation of Combi-Dock III,

Vane’s Delaware pushes DoubleSkin 50 upriver,

Spring Sunshine offloads aggregates at Caymans, where

a 400-ton 12-story structure awaits (then) its float down to NJ [more on that soon],

yacht named Summer heads south for Key West,

raw materials that once rolled on roads await the trip back to the blast furnace,

a horde does sun salutations on shore,

the American goddess Columbia trumpets at the top of a needing-to-be-updated soldiers/sailors monument in Troy,

 

and an oracle wearing a sea creature hat and using an old-school device taps out verbiage suggesting I’m headed for Ithaca and not Chicago, although I’m pleased with that too.

All photos and observations by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to the oracle.

Somewhat related:  Click here for a CNN Travel clip called “Liquid City” and starts out with the sentence “most people think NYC has five boros, but there’s really a sixth one;  it’s the largest one and it connects all the others.”  I heard it while waiting at the airport in Indianapolis the other day and was stunned.  Do you suppose Justin Davidson reads tugster?

For blog posts written by folks going first northbound and then southbound on a LNV tug, click here and here.

 

You saw Lauren Foss in yesterday’s post here.  Here’s a followup, from sixth boro interiors I don’t get to much.  Richie Ryden writes:  “Look who showed up on the Hackensack River in Kearny NJ:   Lauren Foss with the barge American Trader in tow with the new deck for the Wittpenn Bridge. The bridge deck was built in  Vancouver, Washington  shipped through the Panama Canal to NJ.”

If I read the AIS info correctly when I first saw Lauren off Sandy Hook, that voyage took about a month and a week.

 

And thanks to Joseph Chomicz, here’s more of that area, photo taken just upstream of the others.  Joseph writes:  “Lauren Foss was destined for the Hackensack River.  She brought in the lift span of the new Route 7 lift bridge they are building.  Also Donjon is [nearby] in the process of moving coal out of the power plant on the Hackensack River as well.   [I could count] four Donjon tugs in the photo below:  Meagan Anne, Thomas D, Emily Ann, and Sarah Ann.”

From a decade ago, here’s a post I did about the Hackensack River, including a photo of a barge delivering that coal to the plant.  The deliveries used to be made by ExpressMarine equipment. 

Thanks to Richie and Joe for these photos.

For you not familiar with the area, the green line below represents rough approximation of the track Lauren Foss followed in and

the red circle, the location of the Wittpenn Bridge.

For more of the story–on four more bridge section deliveries–click here.

 

 

 

I’ve mentioned Heraclitus before here . . . he’s the guy credited with observing that you never step into the same river twice.  It’s certainly true about going to a the Kills with a camera.  Take Saddleback . . .  never seen it before I thought  . . . although on longer reflection, yes I had here, doing what it’s designed and built for back in 1992 and in the North River back in the winter.  Stern view just looks different than profile.

As my eye followed Saddleback to the east, I noticed this “neck,” and for some instants wondered what was afoot, or afloat at least.

I didn’t have long to wait . . . it was Weeks 526 pushed by Shelby, Norfolk bound as it turns out.

Mr Russell usually stays upriver, but shuffles are sometimes necessary  . . .

I suppose some of this equipment will end up in Boats and Harbors once the TZ project is complete.

Gelberman  . . . at first I thought she was headed here to fuel, and that would have surprised me because I’d never noticed that before, but when the fishing poles came out,

I realized they had a different objective, one

that boats like this benefit greatly from.

I’ll end this foot-in-the-water with Gabby, pushing a small barge with reinforcing forms.

 

More soon.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally . . . a research request:  a friend is looking for photos of McAllister workboat M. L. Edwards.  Birk writes about it here, and Bob Mattsson includes this photo

of it here.

 

It has suddenly gone from winter to limbo to spring, and that brings folks outside.

Out in small boats, meetings for dock plans,

surveying this strange place called NYC,

keeping bow watch,

racing geese,

or stowing wires . . .

 

 

 

it’s all easier on spring days like this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments focusing on background.

Sometimes the partial reveal and the juxtaposition highlight what’s on the shorelines, like those triple deckers in Bayonne that would blend in perfectly in many 19th century mill towns.

Or the hugely forgotten Singer plant in Elizabeth, hugely forgotten by most residents of Elizabeth, that is.  Imagine, if someone could turn the clock back on that one, 10,000 people would have manufacturing jobs . . . either sewing machines, or

weaponry of all sorts.

 

But one detail on the bank over by the NJ-side of the Bridge caught my attention.  So I thought these beams would be trucked from the disappearing bridge to a scrapping yard.  How surprised I was when the crane lifted the beam off the truck not 1000 feet from where they’d been on duty for decades and

lowered them

one after the other

to what might be a series of trucks below.  I can’t quite see what becomes of the beams on the ground at Bergen Point.  And I think that’s the Passaic small boat.  ??

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Keep your eyes open and stay safe.

or Bridge.

Below is a photo I took in October 2011 . . .

Also from October 2011, when the bridge looked like this,

squeezing under the roadbed looked like this, and

the McAllister stern quarter escort looked like this . . .

the mighty Maurania III, that is.  Here’s the complete post I did back then.

But five and a half  years have elapsed, not without change.  So earlier this week, Suez Canal in the KVK and under the Bayonne Bridge looked like this.  See the worker above the new roadbed?

See him now?

 

So this week it was Marjorie B on the stern, and

 

Ellen forward.

 

 

I hope to be around and doing this five and a half years from now to see what there is to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday I mentioned the request to help the Roaring Bull ferry project, and that’s now fully funded. Thank you.   Here’s another and more somber request that you might consider, the Captain Joseph Turi Memorial fund.

I didn’t want to overload yesterday’s post, so I’m continuing it here.

08:44

To add a detail here, each time a ship or boat big or small approached, someone up there sounded an aerosol can horn;  once the vessel passed, a second “all clear” blast was made.

And whereas larger vessels stayed the middle of the channel, smaller ones like Jessica Ann prudently avoided the center of the channel above which the bridge work was happening.

08:45

 

08:46

08:59

Just a bit more info on the ship . . . she’s not that large (997′ x 131′) although I don’t know her air draft.  She’s not new . . .

launched in 2003 as Maersk Kolkata. as you can see from the remnant seven-pointed star. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The 1931 bridge has been so prominent on this blog over the past decade plus that the past few years of construction and now deconstruction mesmerize me.  Just look at the header photo I’ve not changed since 2006.  I’ll never change it now.

I spent a few hours watching the work yesterday and share some of the photos here today and tomorrow.  Photo 1 was taken at 06:49 before work began, from what I could tell;  I’m the observer only and speculate sometimes because I’m not privy to the communications.  NY is to the left and NJ to the right.

06:54 … NJ side.  A safety and planning meeting?

07:01.  Workers use various means to venture out to the severed transverse beam (?) to begin its removal.

07:30.  Similar activity starts on the NY side.

07:52

08:25.  Almost imperceptibly slow, the movement of the transverse progresses.

08:28.  And then it speeds up.

08:36.  A flatbed trailer has backed into place to receive the beam.

08:38.  Meanwhile, over on the NJ side, a similar evolution has begun.

08:39.

Meanwhile, at 08:43, a container vessel is rounding Bergen bend  and headed for sea, after “threading the needle,”  …  well, not really, it made it in with those beams in place . . .

08:43, and we’ll pick up the evolution here tomorrow with MSC Kolkata   . . .  Note the crewmen on the bow?

I’d like to give a hat tip to all the Bayonne Bridge workers who work with such skill and safety in this enormous project, one of at least six bridge projects happening simultaneously in the greater sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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