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Before 2000, the Canal was operated by the Panama Canal Commission; beginning on January 1, 2000 (Y2K), the Commission was replaced by the Panama Canal Authority (ACP).  It appears the first tugs purchased by the ACP were from Canada, specifically from Irving Shipbuilding.  One was Colón.  It arrived in Panama in late 2001.  

We encountered this tug near the Atlantic Bridge project, which will span both the 1914 locks and the latest set, Aqua Clara on the north end.

Compared with the US-built ones in yesterday’s post, the Canadians are about 5′ longer and 2′ wider. Colón is rated at 54 tons bollard pull generated by two Deutz SBV-8M-628s produced 4400 hp transmitted by Schottel SRP 1212s with Kort nozzles.

Coclé, shown here in Miraflores Lake, was the other tug in that contract.

Herrera, shown here assisting a bunker from the Miraflores lock to the Pedro Miguel, fits the same dimensions and arrival time in the Canal, although I’ve not sure how to explain how the Irving order went from two to more.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers more tomorrow.

 

A different post was scheduled for today, but when good fortune smiles, I smile.  Behold  J. Adams bound for sea, as she could not have a year ago . . . in fact, she may very well not even have been completely fitted out a year ago. As of this writing, I believe that J. Adams and T. Roosevelt are the only two of CMA CGM’s 14,414-teu vessels calling in the sixth boro. CMA CGM has just launched a 20,600 tee vessel, not scheduled to call here.

I’ll smile even more once the walkway on the bridge opens, allowing photos from a different perspective.  Such a change in capacity from the vessel carrying the first containers outbound from the sixth boro back on April 26, 1956!  This tech spec sheet starts out with an interesting graph of vessel capacity since 1980, and much more.

Kirby Moran (6000 hp) looks small here, and notice the two bow thrust symbols on the bow, which–if I interpret this info correctly–operate with 5000 hp.

Captain D and her trash barge provide some sense of scale here.

 

 

 

For cleaner port air, she’s equipped with an HVSC by Wärtsilä , which also provides the propulsion power.

 

Kirby Moran–work on this vessel complete– heads back to sail the next ship out of port.

Following are James D and JRT.

I don’t know the calling ports for the other two 14,414 teu vessels:   A. Lincoln and  T. Jefferson.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Recall that I refer to the sixth boro of NYC as the water, which has served to create and develop the city’s other boros and to connect it via waterways to places near and far.   Also, on this blog, fifth dimension is time, a vehicle to ride backward in it to where the nature is the same but the machines and structures are mostly gone or changed.  “IS” here refers to Ingrid Staats, who has been digitizing her father’s photos and is sharing them here.  Her father worked on a Sun Oil coastal fleet vessel.  So let’s have some fun.  I know a bit more than I’m telling about some of these photos, and will share that tomorrow or soon.  Here’s your chance to identify and/or speculate.

Photo 1:  What tug?  Which location/direction?

Photo 2:  Location?  More?  Date?

Photo 3:  Tug?  Company?  Anything else on any of these photos?

Ok . . .  more soon along with the info I know.

Here’s a link to a book that deals with an aspect of Sun Oil I’d never considered but which has NO relationship with the photos Ingrid has passed along.

Many thanks to Ingrid to sharing these.

Yesterday morning two container ships with length (loa) of 366 meters or more occupied dock space in Port Newark.  To my knowledge, no longer cargo ship has yet called here, and since they’d each been in port more than a day, I figured I’d get some photos of them outbound under the Bayonne Bridge.  One was 366 m x 48 m (144,131 dwt), and the other was possibly 367 m x 42 (116,100).  Either would be great, both would be superb.

And remember last month I had the photos of JRT Moran underway moving astern?  Well, check out the photo of James D Moran below, on a towline with the 367 m Gunhilde.

I’ll identify these tugs (l to r) so that you can trace their evolution in this turn.  James, Brendan, JRT, and Kirby tethered to the stern.

 

Translating that 42 m breadth, I count 17 containers across.

James D efficiently drops the line and pivots to starboard.

 

Here I assume Brendan is still on the portside.  Was Miriam (farthest left) involved all along or simply passing through?

In that clutch of three Moran tugs, 18,000 horsepower labors.

Kirby Moran is still on the towline.

 

x

Ringkøbing sounds like a pleasant place to visit in summer, not really a port.

So here’s a puzzle:  Gunhilde left port around noon yesterday, but by evening she was back after merely traveling to the outside of the Ambrose Channel , making a wide turn to port, and then re-entering the Channel to anchor overnight in Gravesend Bay.  As of this writing, she appears to have set out for Norfolk once again.  Any stories?

Also interesting, if the AIS info was correct, Gunhilde arrived in NYC after a nearly 19-day voyage from Salalah, the old spice and incense port.  Look it up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what Gunhilde‘s air draft is.

And as it turned out, the 144, 131 dwt vessel left port  . . . after dark.

 

Here was the first in this series of titles, from almost seven years ago.

The barge with green containers, the bridge, and the Glovis roll on-roll off (RORO) vessel all look great bathed

in January morning light,

a bit of wolf moon light thrown in as well.

I don’t know if this RORO has called here before, but she is less than a year old,  

and you can tell.

She leaves our fair city for Tema, Ghana.  I’d love to see her in tropical light.  Anyone there reading this?

And here’s the FLOFLO for today, this common goldeneye who flew onto this water and will flow off north when the days lengthen and the sun gets hotter.   The last other type of FLOFLO–the one that floated Peking out– was documented here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s eager to hear from folks in Ghana on this vessel.

About four years ago she arrived  . . . and has been lifting into place this huge structure sometimes described as one of the largest current civil engineering project in the country.  Her original name Left Coast Lifter , a ZPMC product, stuck despite attempts at New Yorkizing it, renaming it I Lift NY or Ichabod Crane.

I saw the size of those blocks recently when I drove across the new bridge for the first time, but being alone in the car . . . obviously, no pics.

But the Lifter has been repurposed now.  I don’t suppose my attempt to rename her now will succeed any better… But how about Downstate Dropper, Tappan Zee DeconstructorDewey-Driscoll-Wilson Dismantler?

But thankfully, the crane does more than just drop the sections for scrap, and I’m often not so thrilled by state or federal decisions, but here’s a good one:  sections of the old bridge will be used to replace compromised infrastructure in the Hudson Valley.  Here’s a story.

And the rest of these photos, thanks to Glenn Raymo, show these sections on their way to re-use, signs and all.

 

 

Many thanks to Glenn for use of these photos.  The top three photos by Will Van Dorp, who has posted about this bridge many times . . .. 

 

. . . the tugs, starting with . . .

Prospector,  built in Indiana 1982, 48′ x 6′ and 800 hp; and presumably the right stuff for this job.  Would you guess the location as the Hudson River from the photo immediately below?  Hook Mountain is a beauty that I really need to hike!

But back to Prospector, a name that connotes seeking gold in them thar  .. . places, and this place has truly seen the distribution of gold.

 

Imagine the stories Tarrytown Light could tell of her 130 years standing on the eastern side of the Hudson.

 

The new TZ is usually described in superlatives, here by the builders and here by states folks.

 

I’ve now driven and ridden over the bridge a number of times, but from there, the view is never as good as this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did the first post in this series here.

Click here for some views of the TZ Bridge area from eight years ago.

 

 

This view looks south at what for a short term will be two TZ Bridges.

Lurking around the supports is the Tappan Zee II, bridge-dedicated tugboat, profiled a year and a half ago here.

 

At some point soon, the bridge to the right will be gone.

I’ve read the new TZ Bridge has a projected lifespan of a century.  What will the shoreline look like in 2117?

Where will the Left Coast Lifter lift next?

And here’s the current view looking northward.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

More on the TZ construction can be found here, thanks to William A. Hyman.

From this angle, Fort Lee–birthplace of the motion-picture industry– looks quite pristine.  Yes, that’s the west tower of the GW Bridge.  Am I correct in thinking the marketing name of the twin towers in the distance is the Moderns 1 and 2?

And on the subject of “towers” that Ocean Tower, a name I never know how to pronounce, as I first raised the question here over nine years ago.

Here’s the tow I saw last week.

 

Judging from the barge name TZC-102,  these bridge supports will undergird parts of the TZ Bridge, the completion of this huge project will soon transform into a huge sale of assets.

And where are these supports pre-cast?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks you might enjoy this recent Scientific America article on suspension v. cable-stay bridges.

Tomorrow I head back out on my longest gallivant yet, even before I process what could be from the previous jaunt.  But I have a list I’ll work on when energy and wifi coincide.  But not to worry if I’m silent for a day or a week or three.

Part of me would be happy to stay in the boros;  if you’re near the sixth boro with a camera, keep your eyes open for  Ariadne,  the perfect name for a cable-laying vessel.

In the past month, I passed under more than a hundred bridges, and over a bunch also.  On July 22, we passed beneath the TZ Bridge, one space to the east from the main channel because of ongoing work to complete the last span.

Just to reiterate the record, the old bridge opened in December 1955.

 

That gap will be filled with these, then still also 100 miles away.

On July 23 we passed under these next two bridges, the Smith (1928) … the southernmost freight rail bridge since 1974.  Here’s who the Smith memorializes.

Beyond the rail bridge is the Castleton Bridge (1959), the connector between the Thruway and the MassPike. “Castleton” is a village of fewer than 2000 people.

I call this the Albany Swivel, but the more accurate name is the Livingston Avenue Bridge, opened

in 1902!  You’d think it abandoned, but if you’ve ever traveled on Amtrak through Albany, you’ve been on it.

I don’t know the actual name or alphanumeric designation for this one, but its carries all the freight/passenger trains through the Mohawk Valley.

A blurry photo I know, but it shows an Amtrak train crossing just east of lock E-19 in Frankfort NY, once world renowned home of Carlotta the lady aeronaut and the Meyers Balloon Farm.

All photos, sentiments, and any errors by Will Van Dorp, and more bridges to come as wifi and inspiration provide.

 

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