You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Navigator’ tag.

I took this photo after dawn, technically, and what detail of tug James D Moran is lost because of low light is somewhat compensated for by the lights of the boats and on the Brooklyn background.

Ditto . . . a few minutes later, the lights are dramatic as James D passes the illuminated IMTT facility.

Evelyn Cutler passed a bit later;  light was still low from an overcast sky.

JRT Moran heads back to base, the sky is still overcast, wind brisk, and standing around taking photos was cold.

Paula Atwell is quite common here, but usually the boat is obscured by the containerized garbage she pushes.

Navigator passed with her barge . . .  and the sun I’d wished for was still not forthcoming.

Barry Silverton . . . pushing a deeply-loaded Fight ALS toward the Sound.  Here’s a document I’d never seen in its entirety explaining the Harley “naming” project.  It turns out that Mr. Silverton was a victim of ALS.  What I thought was a one-off vessel naming is actually a fleet-wide enterprise.  For example, Dr. Milton Waner is named for a pioneer in the treating of hemangiomas.

Franklin Reinauer, passing Nave Ariadne, has operated with that name–I believe–since she first came off the ways.

Marjorie B McAllister waits alongside New Ability to assist an incoming container vessel.

which Capt Brian A. McAllister is already assisting.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who at this point had the luxury of having some indoor work to attend to while warming up.

When the temperatures drop and days are short, tug and barges units in the NE get busier than in summer.

RTC 42 here gets pushed by Franklin Reinauer, as Gracie-above–waits at the dock with RTC 109.

 

A bit later, J. George Betz moves her barge B. No. 210 toward the east.

Navigator appears from the east with her barge.

 

Barney moves Georgia toward a Bayonne dock, with assistance from Mary.

 

And Curtis comes in with RTC 81 for more product.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, currently in the state of Georgia, but a few days back when I took these, needed some of that fuel to stay warm. Here from 2007 was my first post by this name.

 

Well, maybe your subscription to something has expired, but reading tugster requires no subscription, and no lucre flows into tugster tower from your –I hope–daily habit of checking in here.

It is April first, and I quite like the day. Here was what I did April 1, 2010, and here  . . . .   the day in 2009.  I don’t always mark it, although once I shifted focus of the blog entirely to trucks, the first time.  That generated a bit of hate mail . . . which led to a whole new division of tugster, i.e., trickster. which autocorrect always wants to spell incorrectly.  Truckster it is.

Since you’re here, let me share some miscellaneous photos.  Sea Hunter has recently turned up near the McAllister yard.  I posted my photos of Sea Hunter as she appeared in Boston three years ago here.  Anyone know what fate she’s hunting for in the sixth boro?  Also, on the photo below, there’s the Atlantic Trader barge.  That’s  the short-sea shipping hull I last saw in 2015 here.

Here’s a dense shot:  near to far, the far tugs are Crystal Cutler, Jacksonville, Navigator, and another unidentified Vane tugboat.

So while I’m at it, let me share some mail.

From Phil Gilson, an article about fast US Navy vessels converted into shallow draft speedy banana boats, and that’s no April Fools joke.  See it here.

And finally here’s an oldie-but-goodie from Steve Munoz.   Jane McAllister (1968) and Margaret M McAllister (1928, converted from steam to diesel in 1957)  assist a Sealand ship in Port Elizabeth back in 1986.  Note the Old Bay Draw is still bissecting Newark Bay in that shot.

Thanks to Phil for the story/link and Steve for the photo.

The other photos by Will Van Dorp, and inscribed in tugster tower by invisible watermarks.

 

Navigator looks great in the yellow trim.  For some quantifiable info, she dates from 1981 and reports 1200 hp.

Ellen always strikes me as a brawler, more so than identical YTBs.  Maybe it’s the ships’ hull paint she’s rubbed off with the bow rendering. For numbers and facts, she dates from 1967, built in Marinette WI, and currently has z-drives putting out 4000 hp. Click here for photos I took in Marinette this past summer.

Dory looks great, having added an upper wheelhouse.  Click here and scroll for photos of Dory over the years, pre-upper wheelhouse.  Who operates her now?

Amy Moran and Atlantic Salvor meet under the bridge.  As an indication of winds, notice the bridge “curtains” movement.   Numbers:  AM 1973 and 3000 hp.  AS 1976 and 6480.  For previous Atlantic Salvor posts, click here.

If Buchanan 5 looks like she has new paint, she does.  It used to work around here as Taft Beach.  Numbers:  1983 and 2600 hp.

Normandy benefits from a simple and classical paint scheme.    2007 and about 1900 but with triple screw.  As I understand it, she used to work in Colombia.  Anyone have info on her propulsion plant?

Kimberly Poling got a makeover almost 10 years ago and she is just a beauty.   1994 and 3000 hp.

I’ve long heard Thomas D. Witte once worked the Erie Canal as Valoil, but I’ve never seen photos of her superstructure from that time.  Anyone help?   1961 and 1500 hp.

And finally, Matthew Tibbetts once won the most attractive tug at a North River Tugboat Race, and she truly looks good.   1969 and 2000.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

You can find the first eight installments here.

Little C is a relatively seldom seen harbor tug

dedicated to Warren George projects.

Coal?

Navigator these days has been pushing coal around the harbor, coal as I understand it thanks to ws–a frequent commenter here–that

was previously intended as fuel to the now-retired Hudson Generation Station.

Transport of some of the coal out of the sixth boro has been performed by SBI Jive;  from here, the vessel’s traveled to Rotterdam, then Ust-Luga on the Baltic.

Photos by Will Van Dorp; thanks to ws for following the coal.

As to SBI Jive, she has fleet mates with gambolling names like SBI Macarena, SBI Swing, SBI Zumba, SBI Reggae, SBI Mazurka, SBI Samba, SBI Capoeira . . . and more.

First, thanks to Joseph Chomicz . . . it’s Rebel and Dolphin over by the Philadelphia Navy Yard   . . .

Quo vadis, Rebel?

And the second batch comes from Ingrid Staats with likely the most unusual backstory ever on this blog . . .  Ingrid took the photos from a room in New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where her healthy baby was born. She writes, “We had an amazing view of the East River and for four days as Mom & babe recuperated. I amused myself by capturing as many tugs as possible.”    Congratulations to all and here they are:

Sea Lion above moving recyclables and and Evelyn Cutler pushing petroleum product.

TJ and Catherine Miller . . . and is TJ really doing all the work here?

And finally . . . Navigator light and Gulf Enterprise pushing a petroleum barge westbound.

Many thanks to Joseph and Ingrid for these photos.  And I’m happy to hear that one of the next generation of tugboat watchers has been born.

 

Kirby Moran here seems to have some symbiosis going on with the gulls,

and Jonathan C comes in for a closer look.

Zachery Reinauer repositions light under the parking lot forming on the lower deck of the Bayonne Bridge.

Diana B moves another load of product, likely to the creeks.

 

Thomas D. Witte is on the paper recycling run, I think.

Does anyone have a photo of her working up in the canals?

I’ve not yet seen Sapphire Coast light.

And finally, the unique paint scheme on Balisco 100 

moved into the Kills by Navigator.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

You may recall that back in 2014, I often juxtaposed  canal&river/rail in photos like the one below.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This post was originally going to feature only photos of the river and canal from the rails, like the one below, but

rr1

then I decided to pair photos from the train toward the water with the opposite:  photos from the water toward roughly the same land area where the rails lay and the trains speed.

rr1b

Train shots are difficult because of speed, coatings on the windows, trees and poles along the tracks . . .  but I’m quite sure a letter that begins “Dear Amtrak:  could you slow down, open windows, and otherwise accommodate the photographers” would not yield a positive response.

rr2

I hope you enjoy this attempt on my part.  And if you ever have a chance to ride Amtrak along the Hudson, Mohawk, and Lake Champlain . . . sit on the better side of the car; switch sides if necessary.

rr2b

Here we’re on the Livingstone Avenue Bridge looking south and

rr3

here we are south of it, looking north.  Yes, that’s Crow, Empire, W. O. Decker, and Grand Erie passing through the open swivel.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s the pedestrian bridge in Amsterdam

rr5

as seen from both vantage points.

rr5b

The 1766 Guy Park Manor from a speeding train and

rr6

from the Mohawk River/Erie Canal, where post-Irene repair has been going on since 2011.   Here’s a photo taken soon after the unusual weather.

rr6b

Schoharie Aqueduct from Amtrak,

rr7

a slow boat, and

rr7b

the east bank of Schoharie Creek.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Little Falls onramp to I-90 from rail and

rr8

below.

rr8c

The rail bridge at Lock 19 from the span and

rr9

from west of it at Lock 19.

rr9c

And these all east of Utica I can’t pair, but decided to include here anyhow:  a dairy pasture,

rr10

a construction yard, and

rr11

a truck depot.

rr12

Maybe if I write that “Dear Amtrak” letter, I could just ask if the window could be cleaned a bit.  If you’re going to try this, take amtrak when the leaves are off the trees.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who embeds this post from “Good Morning Gloucester” to reveal a bit of my past . . . 1988.  Scroll all the way through to see a piece of shipwreck “treasure.”

A random gallivant around the sixth boro the other day showed these boats, starting with Iron Mike (1977) under the Williamsburg Bridge.

rrt

a trio of Navigator (1981), Susan Miller (1981) , and Quantico Creek (2010) over by Con Hook,

rrt1

Robert IV (1975) a little farther north and east,

rrt2

Scott Turecamo (1998) headed for the Kills,

rrt3

HMS Liberty (1978) in the anchorage,

rrt4

Amberjack (1981) facing Yonkers,

rrt5

Barry Silverton (2015) swinging toward the Palisades, and

rrt6

Rhea I. Bouchard (1982) making way for a point up north.

rrt7

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let’s start with Bjoern’s photos from a month ago just about already.  The New York Media Boat runs almost all year round and provides wet and cold weather gear.

op4

 

op5

Actually I took this photo, intending it as a baseline photo for the process of preparing the barque to travel the Atlantic next spring, on the deck of a heavy lift ship. I took this photo near Caddell Dry Dock almost two weeks ago.

op6

A really gallivanting Larry Seney took the next few photos in Hawaii:  Namahoe,

op1

Mahi, and

op2

Hoku Loa.  More info on Hoku Loa can be located here.

op3

Thanks to Alex Weiss for this photo of Independence.

op99

Ted M sent this papa smurf aka Pleon photo taken in early August in New Bedford.  Now it’s over in the Arthur Kill.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And the last photo comes from an East River jogger, Art Feinglass, who took this photo of Navigator passing the old Domino Sugar refinery, an architect’s playground.

op8

 

Thanks to Bjoern, Larry, Alex, Ted, and Art for these photos.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,339 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

March 2020
M T W T F S S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031