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March 2009 . . . Stephen Scott here passes Port Ivory, near my old job, pushing RTC 70.   I’m still looking for Stephen Scott photo is her new profile, sans upper wheelhouse.  Port Ivory was an intriguing place name for me when I first moved here;  once a North Shore Branch of the SIRR even had a station there.

Kimberly Poling already had the color scheme, but adding a few more teal stripes to her current appearance is a big improvement.

Lettie passed by once while I scheduled my lunch break.  As of today’s posting, Lettie G is in Mobile AL!!  If she continues, she could end up back in Lake Erie by way of the great loop.  Is that what’s happening?  A few months I caught her at the top end of the Welland Canal here.

More Port Ivory area, Specialist was around, then called Specialist II.

So was the huge K-Sea fleet, which included Falcon.

This post should be called “sixth boro and beyond,” since I took this photo of Justine with RTC 120 up near Saugerties.  Back then,

was that a red canoe along her portside rail?

Side by side  in the Rondout 10 years ago were Hackensack, the 1953 colorful one, and Petersburg, 1954 vintage and still in the general area.  Last I knew, Hackensack was in Guyana pushing molasses barges.

And going  farther out, it’s Allie B pulling Goliath on a cargo barge Brooklyn Bridge out of Quincy MA, with assistance from Vincent D. Tibbetts Jr and Justice.

Here’s a closer up of Liberty.  For the entire reportage on that journey to Mangalia, Romania (!!), click here.  Damen operates the crane in their shipyard there, the largest shipyard in the Damen collection.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you enjoy these looks back as much as I do.

More of the Great Race soon . . . but a bit of back story.

When I moved to our fair metropolis in 2000 and started paying attention, I was taken by the Bayonne Bridge, so enamored in fact that I choose it as the header image for this blog in 2006, and now out of stubbornness– or something– have kept the old view.

I renewed my focus on the Bridge in 2011, “turning” became the key word in the titles.  Click here to see posts I did for its 80th, 84th, and 86th anniversary of initial construction, and here I marked the 80 mark again twice.   Over 10 years ago I alluded to the raising for the first time here.

Here’s a single post that looks at the change from 2011 until 2017.

For a baseline, let’s use sunrise April 24, 2008, looking from the west, those two boats are Justine McAllister and Huron Service, now Genesis Victory.

And from the east, December 2011, and that boat was Barents Sea, currently known as Atlantic Enterprise.   As to the bridge, note the box-grid work (not a technical term) on the Bayonne side of the arch.

From Richmond Terrace (Staten Island) perspective, here’s the bridge in February 2012.

By September 13, the box grid was covered, possibly to allow sand blasting.

By January 2014, the cover was off the box grid.  Yes, that’s Specialist.

By October 2015, the box grid was being extended upward, as

the vertical supports were being erected farther into Bayonne.

Here’s a December 15 view, showing the symmetry of the construction.

Here’s March 2016, and you can begin to see the location of the raised roadbed.

Here’s a view from May 2016 from the west side of the Bayonne shore.

By August 2016, the new span has been completely defined.

Here’s a closer up, showing the old level–still poet traffic–and the new level, along with the device used to place pre-cast portions of the new road bed.   The tug is Taft Beach.

Here, as seen from the west side, is most of the bridge in September 2016.  Note the gap still remaining on the Staten Island side.

By March 23,  2017, the upper deck was open to wheeled traffic, and the lower deck was ready to be dismantled.

Here’s a closer-up of that opening.

By April 2, a gap existed, and

by April 11, 2017, ships that might have scrapped  year before were shooting through the opening that grew wider by the week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will continue this progression soon.

To start part 2, I’ll go back upriver a bit to Esopus Island.  Craig Eric Reinauer with RTC 103 is anchored to the south.  Much of the Hudson has  associated with some unusual characters, both in fiction and in real life.  Esopus Island is no exception:  about a century ago it was the magical hideaway of Aleister Crowley.  My friend Mitch–Newtown Pentacle–wrote about him here.

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Farther south is a place with a magical name but a quite mundane though necessary construction on it.  This is the current resident of Duyvil’s Danskammer Point, idled in litigation I think.  The Dutch called it “devil’s dance chamber” because they saw natives doing a ceremonial dance there by firelight . . .   A lighthouse and several brickworks also once stood here.

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Looking back upstream . .  the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge and Danskammer Point in the background.  Foreground is picnic boat Gem.  A Hinckley?

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River Rose previously appeared here about three years ago.

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Justine McAllister . . . I caught her the day before east- and then northbound at the KV buoy pushing RTC 120.  Also, three years ago I caught Justine towing the same barge on the Hudson.

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Upbound off Cornwall . .  it’s Kimberly Poling, also a frequenter of both this river and this blog.

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I’m not sure why so many large yachts were on the river the other day . . . off Bannerman’s Castle, location of a ceremonial swim a few months back, it’s Blue Moon.

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Here’s Bannerman’s from the south side, juxtaposing the residence (left) with the warehouse.

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I’ve yet to deliver on closeups of the residence, but here’s a preview.  The “picture window” serves to illustrate the interior for now.

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That’s Bannerman’s in the background as Black Watch passes northbound.  Slope on the right is dauntingly named Breakneck Ridge.

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The Hudson is truly loved.

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Here a crowded Clearwater lowers sail in the Hudson Highlands.

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Seastreak New York, usually shuttling south from the sixth boro, travels north when the leaves start to turn color.   Not pictured to the left is West Point.

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Peak behind Bear Mountain Bridge is Anthony’s Nose, which I scaled back in April.

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And finally . . . just south of the Bear Mountain Bridge . . . it’s another people mover usually associated with the confines of the sixth boro, Circle Line Queens, here assisting in leaf peeping.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I thought I’d used this title before, but I was thinking about this one, backgrounds.  The idea here is similar.

From this angle, can you identify this vessel?

It’s a shipshape Pegasus!

From the same perspective, Justine McAllister and Franklin Reinauer leaving the KVK for the AK.

Ditto equally shipshape Mary Turecamo, from a perspective such that the visor practically obscures the house windows.

What’s the tale of three wakes . . . one recent and the others less so?

This is a good view of how a model bow fits snugly in the notch.

Where’s this and what’s this?  Although it looks like a building being overrun by tropical flora and fauna,

this might generate a different set of associations.

This was taken from the same  vantage point but with the camera pointed a bit higher yet, and it makes all the difference.

It’s OSC Vision entering the Upper Bay last weekend, giving new meaning to the term “shipshape.”  And the fauna here could be called landscaping goats . . . . or “scapegoats,” for short.

Two ships . . .  well, at least until you examine the farther one more closely.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who did this earlier goat homage here.

Need sunglasses for this drama on the Hudson?   “Random” means … spotted  in a plethora of places, like Elizabeth, passing the Hudson waterfront at dusk with a barged Weeks crane 532 in tow.  Note the Crow or Cheyenne in push gear with barge on the far left.

Paul T Moran at Gulf Marine Repair in Tampa.  Not to be insensitive to customary modes of dress, but–as east river pointed out– doesn’t this vaguely like a burka or abaya from the eyes down on the tug?

Justine McAllister pulling a light RTC 120 south of Catskill.

Atlantic Coast pushing Cement Transporter 5300 south of –you guessed it–Cementon, NY.

Meredith C. Reinauer pushing a loaded RTC 150 toward the Highlands.   By the way, if you’re looking for a fun read, try the novel by T. C. Boyle called World’s End . . . my current source of chuckles.

Sea Hawk in Brooklyn Navy Yard last June appearing tied up to sludge tanker North River.

Connecticut (1959?) crosses the Sound north to south.

That’s it for now.  Thanks to Deb DePeyster (who previous contributed to this) for the foto of Elizabeth,  and to eastriver for the foto of Paul T Moran.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Ice . ..  white gold for some.  Imagine the videos you’ll find at the end of this post.  Imagine tugboat Cornell powering through it:  two soundtracks being a smooth 16-cylinder engine and stuccato crunching of ice.

A tribulation for others.  And like many dangerous things, ice can be beautiful, reminiscent of  Thomas Cole

Through this, your petroleum products must flow, safely.  Here Sturgeon Bay cuts a trail for Davis Bay and DBL 28, loaded with 30,000 barrels of home heating oil, but

on a cold day, the ice chunks have already started to re-freeze before the square-fronted barge gets there.

Passing us is Justine McAllister pushing a light Reinauer barge, RTC 120 past the small village of Port Ewen, once home to Sojourner Truth.

Davis Sea‘s path here is flanked by Thunder Bay (port) and Sturgeon Bay (starboard).  Each of these 140′ USCG icebreakers has a bubbler system that makes the hull slippery, preventing a “plug” of ice from building up around the hull.  When you watch the video on Cornell, notice the plug moving forward in front on DBL 28, impeding progress.

At breaktime yesterday, Davis Sea, having delivered its load to a local oil distributor, comes out of the notch to raft up with Cornell.  Elise Ann Conners . ..  dates from 1881!  Consider that Cornell dates from 1949 and Davis Sea from 1982!

All part of getting your home heating oil to the burner in your basement.

See a tugster video below.

and a video by Harold Tartell below showing progress of Taurus southbound through Poughkeepsie.

Unless otherwise attributed, all fotos by Will Van Dorp.

And a year ago tonight, recall this ice adventure?

Unrelated first:  trimaran Zamna . ..  was identified by Soundbounder‘s Matt Housekeeper, foto’d by Bowsprite’s magic lens in September, and posted on asleep-at-switch tugster twice… most recently two days ago here (scroll to the end).    Here’s Zamna’s own site.  Is anyone who took fotos of it close-up at Chelsea Piers willing to share them here?  . . . apparently it’s currently sailing to Greece.   I’m especially curious about the figurehead.   Now back to stacks.

It appears a “stacks” series could go on a long time, but within a given fleet, stacks differ in shape, number, and relative size.  These fotos go back two or three years, so I don’t know whether all these boats still carry the red-and-white rings.  One is a trick:  it does NOT carry the McAllister name although it may belong to a subsidiary fleet.  Clues exist in the fotos, so I won’t give the names until the end.  See how many you can guess.  Remember, double clicking enlarges.

Single stack, squat but rounded and trapezoidal.  A single large tube protrudes.

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Single and tall, like a stoogie.

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Two of them, squat but rectangular and again trapezoidal.  One wider and two thinner protruding tubes in each.

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Single oval cylinder rising just slightly above the top of house, with two protruding pipes.

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Quite similar to the previous.

aafgReally high single with no tapering at all.  Has guy-wires.

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Ditto the first foto:  Single stack, squat, rounded and trapezoidal.  But two large tubes protrude.

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Like the previous but flanked by ladders.

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Paired but really squat relative to the house.

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Paired and flanking a companionway.  One large pipe protrudes quite far from each.

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Paired with a dividing companionway, flanked by ladders, and more acute angle in the protruding tubes.

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From the top,  the boats are:  Colleen 1967, Amy C 1975, Charles D 1967, Ellen 1966, Elizabeth 1967, Fournier Girls 1968, Helen 1900  [!!], Justine 1982, Marjorie B 1974, McAllister Girls 1968, Rosemary 2008, and Rowan 1981.

Charles D and Justine are both ex-Exxon boats:  Exxon Bayou State and Exxon Carquinez, respectively.  Elizabeth is ex-Fournier Boys and ex-J. A. Witte.  I’ve not seen Elizabeth in the sixth boro for quite a while.

And from yesterday’s post, why DOES Iona have only one “l” in its McAlister.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I know I skipped “C,” but my editor lets me do anything I want . . . like rearrange alphabetical in order.  For the record, I have already gone to “C”  (pun intended) and will return but feel excited today to do “D” first.  Thanks to all for your comments/corrections/clarifications . . . I responded in a megacomment to the left.

Question answered at the end of this post:  how many National Parks find themselves in NYC and how much area do they cover?

“D”is for details.  I’d soon atrophy and die if I were sensorily-deprived and unable to seek details.  Like the canoe on Justine‘s boat . . . er . . . canoe deck.  Guess the manufacturer?

aaaad1 Coleman!  I imagine my little car underneath it, and how much of the canoe would extend forward and back of the cabin roof.  Check out a canoe post sent along recently by Kennebeck here.  I’m eager for some canoeing this summer.  Kennebeck own site here echoes Peter’s invite to Dickmas;  only a little over three weeks remain til Dickmas.  Are you ready??

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Yesterday’s post had full frontal on Stolt Capability;  up above the tank is their Yokohama in the case  . . .  there’s interest in a tubing party at sea.  If you haven’t already, check out Bowsprite’s reflections of prototypes for Yokohamas.  On those prototypes,  wonder how this is dealt with in Taiji.

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Another look at the bulb of Ever Radiant;  ….and I always thought these fairly common marks resulted from props in the wrong place.

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I just happened to catch Ever Radiant coming into the sixth boro 18 hours before;  based on the percentage of bulb exposed in each, I’d wager she left lighter than she was upon arrival.

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Falcon . .  always that low in the water . .  full of fuel?

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Exercise equipment  . . . or auxilliary power?

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Cruise ships . . . crews think . . . glad there’s no brightwork . . . or brass to polish or

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Oops!

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Is it just me  not noticing this type  of detail before . . . looking like human curves or the pouch of a lady slipper?  Any guess where it’s located?

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It’s the hawse of barge Charleston.

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Finally, here’s a shore detail I’ve long wondered about:  east bank of the Hudson just north on New Hamburg is the Tilcon Quarry at Clinton Point . . . it looks like a stupa or temple.  Anyone know more about it.

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Two more details:  I’ve shouted out Mitch’s “Newtown Pentacle” blog recently; let me do it again with his post about a seaplane landing on Newtown Creek.  That’s right . . . that Newtown Creek.  Maybe some fisherman decided to do the NYC Creek this year rather than the Allagash.  I wrote about a similarly delightful landing on the East River a spell back.

Last but certainly not least:  The answer is 10 Parks and 27,000 acres.  In these days of ubiquitous iPods, National Parks of New York Harbor Conservancy has put together an interesting partnership between the National Park Service and other entities to create downloadable podcasts/maps to guide your way around NYC.  Check out their boat tours and walking tours here.

Also, if you VOTE in NYC, here’s a public service announcement from the “mayor of Coney Island, the man behind the mermaid parade.”

One more from Bernie:  turtles close runway at JFK!!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Jason for contributing info to this post.

If you’ve never sat along the KVK, you might have no idea how much traffic passes.  I left two hours early for work yesterday to allow a 120-minute savoring.  What you see here is only the big stuff.  Zim Virginia bound for sea.  Note the apparent lowering of the hook onto the house of Maria J.

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Notice the port of registry:  Haifa.

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Next vessel out, bound for sea and escorted by Laura K Moran:  Ever Deluxe.

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As Ever Deluxe bends to the north in the Constable Hook Reach, she passes Michigan Service and Stephen Reinauer.

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Next outbound vessel is Tessa PG, with  Justine McAllister looking to assist.  By the way, where’s Douglas?  Answer below.

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Actually providing the assist is McAllister Responder.

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Inbound is Americas Spirit, an aframax tanker.

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And just as I know I have to rush to work, outbound sashays MSC Endurance, (ex-Sea Land Endurance) guided by Marie J. Turecamo to port and . . .

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Kimberly Turecamo.  See the guy descending the ladder.  Would he be

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deckhand?  And all the spectators?

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Maybe I’ll put up more fotos of Endurance and others later, but my point here is . . . two hours equaled five large ships with combined 278,000 deadweight tons.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp on June 23, 2009 between roughly 0700 and 0900 h.  By the way, if it seems dark in these fotos, New York has seen rain every day except a handful since the start of June, nine inches over the past 30 days versus the “normal” three.

Douglas . . .  port and largest city of Isle of Man.  Douglas population is almost 27,000!

Unrelated:  I might not post  this Saturday because I’m  . . .er . . .  er . . . going for a hike on the Appalachian Trail, probably the South Carolina portion, said to have stunning vistas, easily confused with the southern hemisphere, I hear.

A week into spring, with ice long gone from the mid-Hudson and  a forecast for rain,  Bowsprite and I decided no better time offered itself to go north from the sixth boro.  Along the way, river traffic charmed us with  hide-and-seek in the blurs, like this unidentified Bouchard unit upbound or

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Norwegian Sea in the mist downbound.  And when the stillness of an overcast noon found us at Saugerties,

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and  Justine McAllister glided past,  Bowsprite, Jeff Anzevino, and I had no choice but to

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to record the beauty of this one face of spring upriver.

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And when the day ended many hours later but much too soon, we thanked our hosts as they motored their way back to Kingston and we caught the train for the sixth boro.

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More on the trip soon.

To see the same day in the Bronx, check out Voyages.

All fotos above by Will Van Dorp.

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