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Lest you think Combi-Dock III and Peking–I will get back to them– are the only thing happening in the watery parts of NYC, here’s just a sampling . . . in a series I started last summer.

SBI Macarena –a fairly new bulk carrier– came in past the Brooklynside ramps for the VZ Bridge,

passing Jo Provel on the way out . . .

looking quite large relative to the new NYC ferry.

Tanker New Confidence tested its systems–water and sonic–as Doris Moran arrived.

Where the Wind Blows sails south toward the Narrows, so fast that

I lost track of her, although I admit to being distracted by this squadron passing overhead Elizabeth Anne.

Pioneer–one of South Street Seaport Museum’s schooners–also sailed past and ever went outside

the Narrows, where I’ll pick this up another day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, waiting for Combi-Dock III action.

 

I’m surprised I’ve not heard this be called DUBQEG, “down under Brooklyn-Queens Expressway of Gowanus” a la DUMBO.

I was here last week waiting for … and when the twin bascules of the Hamilton Street Bridge, I thought it was someone else, but

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I was equally pleased to see Sarah Ann–previously June K–arrive to exchange scrap scows,

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exchanging the light 141 for the loaded 136.

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Two things that really impressed me were (1. the intensity of multi-modal traffic at this location and

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(2. the gentleness with which the Sarah Ann crew negotiated her 2700 hp in such confined space.

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And yes that is a Coney Island bound F train approaching the Smith-Ninth Street Station, the highest subway stop in the system, one from which you can see the Statue.

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Scrapping needs to happen somewhere in the city,

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and it continues to be one aspect of marine commerce in Gowanus.

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Bravo to the Sarah Ann crew for their impressive work.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Most paraders don outlandish costumes, like this one . . . how could there be a chicken-of-the-sea

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named Lady Gaga.

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And these next two photos MIGHT puzzle you . . . since the woman in black shorts and boots seems to command a lot of attention even though she is not particularly be-costumed.

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Lots of attention and with a weird parasol.

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Besides music and dance, I enjoy the costumes–however over-the-top or under-the-bottom– they may be.  Even librarians dress up and carry conventional parasols, as

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do museum folk.

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And it’s fun, except for the man in blue shirt blocking half the street and bombing lots of my photos;  I’m sure I’m not alone in finding that just loutish.  His press pass can’t license him to photobomb that shamelessly, can it?  Maybe someone with a press pass can weigh in on protocols for photographers at events like this?

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Sometimes paraders break out of the procession and pose with the kids at the parade.  I like that.

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If you haven’t seen the 1979 movie called The Warriors, here’s a reference to that.  I like that movie now because it depicts what parts of the city are said to have looked like 40 years ago.

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Well, start counting down the days until the 2017 parade and make plans to be there.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  If you didn’t recognize the woman in the black shorts near the top of this post, here’s the story.

Meanwhile, here’s my second shorter recording of Gypsyfunk Squad.  Here was the first one.

Soon after this shot, the queen of hearts and troupe danced for the judges with this on a loud sound box.  That makes for a good day, even though I can’t remember Alice, a rabbit, or the dormouse.  But that’s one of the things I love about the parade . . . good music and dancing.

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After then parade, Gypsy Funk Squad played on . . .  Here’s my phone-recorded sample of King Jack Neptune playing the oud, with a mermaid queen, percussion and dancers.  Hear more oud–related to the lute–here.

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Of course, Dick D. Zigun, honorific mayor of Coney Island,  always leads off the parade with his drum and band.

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I’ve never seen this sort of Mexican dancer in the parade, but they surely raised the bar for quality.

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And of course, mermaids can make politics much more palatable than most politicians or media marketeers.

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But mostly, it’s exuberant music and ecstatic dancing.

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How many starfish have you seen trumpeting?

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And high octane drumming overcomes stasis.

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Enjoy the photos, the solstice, and the strawberry moon.

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Click here for mermaid parade years and here for annual solstice mermaid migration years.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who WAS a judge!

 

Barges “1” was years ago.  And here are previous posts that in some way focus on some sort of barge.  But the two photos below, which I took in May, prompt this post.  I can’t identify this Bouchard barge, but look at the size of the yard worker in comparison.

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It’s quite likely this is not one of their largest barges, but it is indeed sizable.

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The B. No. 260 is 350′ loa and slightly different design although a similar deep notch.

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The B. No. 220 is 404′ –here along with Normandy and Bouchard Boys–and

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B. No. 280 is 399′.  I’m not sure which tug is driving it.

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Frederick Bouchard here is powering B. No. 264–350′–

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Evening Tide with B. No. 262--350′– and

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the 317′ loa B. No. 250, pushed by Evening Star.  My point was how large and capacious these barges are . . . ,

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and that is measured in barrels of capacity, not feet.  For these barges then, here’s that info:

B. No. 250                    = 59,000 brls

B. No. 260, 262, 264  =  60,000

B. No. 280                    =  80,000

B. No. 220                     = 110,000 brl

 

In many situations, fuel is measured in metric tons, as covered here.

And this tangent started out with photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

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Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

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heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

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Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

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Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

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North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

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Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

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Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

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Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

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that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series.

And today, April 1, I’m not fooling;  Noble Maritime Collection is a “must see” in NYC.  You can actually see their buildings from the KVK, just west of the salt pile.  Their latest exhibition is called “Robbins Reef Lighthouse:  A Home in the Harbor,” a collection of works by contemporary artists asked specifically to depict the light.  The painting below “The Barbican of the Kill van Kull” is by Pamela Talese.

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What follows below are just a few of the pieces from that one exhibit.

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The photo above is by Michael Falco.

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William Behnken and

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L. F. Tantillo 

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and others also have pieces.  If you’ve never been to the museum and you devote two hours to all the fine maritime treasures there, you’ll still feel rushed.

Here and here and here are some previous posts I’ve done about the museum.

 

 

I’d thought this tanker was part of the Eagle fleet . . . although occasionally I’d wondered if there might be this laker connection, too.   Maybe if I’d been more familiar with a certain border region in the US quite far away from the sixth boro, I would have grasped the name immediately . . .   Answer follows, if you don’t know.  Also, how many McAllister boats can you spot here?

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Did you get this one?  Can you identify it now that you’ve seen the first two photos?

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This one is Robert E., leaving the other as quite likely Ellen.

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And another question–this one from long-time reader WS–what connection has Eagle Ford with El Faro?

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That’s the Seabulk logo.

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EagleFord and El Farro were both built at Sun Shipbuilding, as hull #668 and 670, respectively.   Thanks to WS for pointing this out.

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And Eagle Ford . . . it’s a town in Texas that’s associated with oil shale.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s pick up from yesterday and follow Atlantic Star from the Narrows to the part of the KVK called the “salt pile.”  To the right off the stern of Atlantic Star, that’s lower Manhattan.

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Ellen McAllister swoops in to deliver the docking pilot.  The signature “G” on the stack points to Grimaldi Group, of which ACL is an associate. Grimali’s West Africa service is a regular in the sixth boro with such vessels as Grande Morocco.

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Seen from head-on, the bow is knife edged, but in profile it’s plumb. Yes, that’s the Statue of Liberty in the distance.

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That’s Robbin Reef Light and WTC1 just off its right.  Atlantic Star and the other G4 vessels are operated by a crew of 16, compared with 21 for the G3 vessels like Atlantic Concert.

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The cranes in the distance are at the MOTBY terminal.

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We’re now in the KVK with the salt pile to port and

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the Bayonne Bridge ahead, and Atlantic Concert being assisted beneath.

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Eric McAllister joins, and we’ll pick it up there tomorrow.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the NY Media Boat for conveyance.

Here was Atlantic Star approaching the Narrows on Saturday, still a half hour outside the Narrows.  She was launched at the Hudong-Zhonghua Shipyard almost a year ago, and this maiden cargo voyage began in Hamburg on December 9, 2015.    Note the FDNY escort boat just forward of her bow.

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That’s the Verrazano Narrows Bridge off her bow and a fog-beshrouded WTC off her stern.

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The generation 4 (G4)  Atlantic Star followed a G3 Atlantic Concert into port.   Here and here are views from different perspectives of other G3 ACL vessels, all dating from the mid-1980s.

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More photos of the arrival tomorrow.

For a comparison of the G3 and G4 vessels by the numbers, click here and here.  For more detail on the vessel, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, protected under creative commons license.  Also, conveyance would not have been possible without the NY Media Boat;  thanks Bjoern.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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