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This next batch were all taken from the deck of tug Dalzellaird. Steve writes:  “Captain Bob Munoz helped us aboard the tug Dalzellaird at 0800 hours. His tug was normally the Dalzellera, but it was out of service for many months because of damage to the variable pitch propeller and awaiting replacement parts from Holland. Looking out across the East River toward Brooklyn, Brooklyn was not to be seen because of the fog. It looked as if the parade wasn’t going to happen. However at about 0900 hours we pulled away from the pier with our portion of the press corps. The Dalzellaird headed down the East River, swung around Governors Island where we should have been able to see the Verrazano Bridge. It was not there.”

Vessels included Bluenose II, currently doing the Great Lakes Challenge 2019.   She recently appeared on tugster here.

Gorch Fock II at anchor.

Sagres musters the crew forward to ready sail,

With crew high in the rigging, USCG Eagle passes USS Randolph-CV15 . . .

. . . with lots of small boats being reviewed as well.

Marie J Turecamo and Mobil 12 make an appearance,

Libertad unfurls sails

Bluenose II moves through the Upper Bay,

Esmeralda gets underway,

 

tug Esso Massachusetts sails with ceremonial flags,

St Lawrence II and Esmeralda and a brace of USCG 40-footers , and we’ll end this series with

Esmeralda passing the NY skyline, such as it was in 1964.

Let’s close the narrative getting back to Steve’s words:  “Toward mid-afternoon it was time to return to pier 8 and let the press return to their offices to make the deadline for their stories in the newspapers. As we were about to come alongside the dock and all of the press were anxious to get off the boat, Capt. Munoz stopped and went full astern with the engine and stopped again. He leaned out the pilothouse window and looked down at the press as they looked up at him. He asked them if they got good pictures, got good stories, had a good lunch and had a good day. They all answered with a resounding yes. He said that he was busy all day making sure that they got their good pictures and he didn’t have time to take one picture. Because the Dalzellaird was a bell boat, he told them his arm was about to fall off from the constant bell ringing to allow them to maneuver in and around the ships-all for them. He asked if any one of them could possibly send him a few photos of the day’s activities.

The overwhelming response was, of course, ‘Cap, give us your address.’ He pulled the Dalzellaird up against the dock and they all rushed off. All these years later, he is still waiting for a few photos.”     Maybe they got his email address wrong?

Thanks much, Steve, for sharing this.

Any errors here are entirely mine.

 

 

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

There is some self-disclosure here:  since last winter and thanks to my movie-buff son, I’ve gotten hooked on movies based on comics.  So, recently, to my surprise, while watching Gotham, I saw Marie J. Turecamo and one of the 6000s in a CGI-noir of an East River scene.  She’s unmistakeable.  Season 1, episode 11 has all these, along with some FDNY vessels, a NYCDEP tanker, and recognizable barges.

And with apologies to the actor, that is one of the Harley boats, St. Andrews (my guess) or Liberty.

And this . . . ABC-1, with a very odd mast.

I realize some of these are not tugs, but categories are made to be challenged.  In the next two photos, I’d heard that Lilac was used for a Daredevil scene, so I watched the series–not liking it at first–until I got to the scene.  By the time I got there, I was a fan.

Clearly filmed in the Navy yard, I have to say I’m impressed by the magic of cinema, and that’s why it’s the economic powerhouse it is.

All “screen-grabs” by Will Van Dorp.

Somewhat related:  Come celebrate the launch of film maker Thomas Halaczinsky‘s “Archipelago New York”: June 18th, 6PM at Rizzoli Bookstore at 1133 Broadway Manhattan.

Here are previous installments.  And here are names and numbers of all who have all paraded in front of my lens recently.

Amy Moran, 1973, 3000hp

Joan Turecamo, 1980, 4300.

James D. Moran, 2015, 6000.

Jonathan C. Moran, 2016, 6000.

Marie J Turecamo 1968 and 2250, and James Turecamo 1969 2000 or 1800 or 1700

Marion Moran 1982 and 3000 4610

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

What gives the location away . . . if you’ve never seen Albany, is the prolate spheroid along the right side of the photo.   Prolate spheroid?  Think football.  But actually that one is called the egg.  It’s a performing arts center, and I’ve never been inside. Albany is the new home of Marie J. Turecamo.

You’ll often see a Reinauer unit parked here, this time it was Haggerty Girls with RTC 107.

Two of these Liebherr Mobile Harbor Cranes serve to transfer heavy cargoes.

 

Although Albany is over 120 miles from the Atlantic, ocean-going vessels call here regularly.

Road salt was the

cargo delivered by Siirt.

Mary Kay stands by;  she previously appeared here as Mary Loy Turecamo.

Closing out this look at the port of Albany, a common barge cargo out of Albany is scrap metal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post again after finding reliable wifi.

I’ve left on another gallivant before “processing” photos from the trip in from Chicago, these being from a portion of the Hudson in various times of day, qualities of light, and types of weather.

Down bound in the port of Albany, we pass Daniel P Beyel, Marie J Turecamo, and –I believe– Comet.

By now, Daniel P is part of the way to Florida.  And I’m intrigued by the units on the dock beyond her stern . . .

…nacelle covers–and I assume the innards–for what looks like 20 wind turbines.  This led me to find out how many wind turbines are currently functional in upstate NY.  I come up with a total of at least 770 as of a year ago: 528 installed since 2006  in the northernmost band from the Adirondacks to the Saint Lawrence Valley, 165 since 2007 in western NY, and 77 since 2000 in central and Southern Tier NY.  Read specifics here.

Treasure Coast loads cement in Albany County, where Lafarge has just dedicated an upgraded facility. 

Pike awaits the next job at Port of Coeymans.

B. No. 225 gets moved northward

by Jane A. Bouchard.

And Tarpon–has to be the only one in the Hudson–moves a fuel barge as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Photography means “light writing,” or writing with light.  George Eastman said, “Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography.”

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Obviously I’m interested in the subject matter, but playing with light makes the subject matter more fun.

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“What makes photography a strange invention is that its primary raw materials are light and time.” John Berger

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To comment on the ships, anyone know what product is being discharged from Tatjana?  I believe that’s Frances alongside.

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What makes getting up early so easy is this:  the glow.  Of course, I need to get out there to get the shot.  As Henri Cartier-Bresson said, “It’s an illusion that photos are made with the camera….they are made with the eye, heart and head.”

Merci, Henri.

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That’s NS Stella above and High Strength and Harbour First below.

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The photo of Silver Sawsan below was taken about half an hour after the previous ones, and the light by then is less rich, no matter how bright the orange is.  Ernst Haas says, ““You don’t take pictures, the good ones happen to you.”  And they USUALLY happen during that first hour after dawn and the last one before dusk.  

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I used to fish a lot, and I thought the same thing about fishing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the previous in the series . . .

but for December 2016, Robert IV leads the way with season’s wreathings, at least the first I’ve seen.  All these photos were take on a windy day a week ago.

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Quantico Creek crosses westward toward the Kills  . . .

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while at about that same moment, Marie J Turecamo heads in the opposite direction, passing

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the Lafarge barge Alexandra (It’s likely Doris Moran standing by off her stern)  and JRT Moran escorting in Auriga Leader.

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Bering Sea also heads eastbound,

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as does Joyce D. Brown . . .

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while the longtime HMS tugs Liberty and

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St Andrews.  With them virtually side-by-side, I can see some livery nuances distinguishing them.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Paris this springtime has seen new waterfronts, quite miserable for anyone wedded to the old margins.  Click on the image to read the story.

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But I’m not focusing here on “paris,” but rather “pairs” that have been “pairing” around the sixth boro.  And that appears to be Flinterland over beyond the warehouses just arrived from Paramaribo.   Both Paris and Paramaribo are on my list of “gotta got there soon” places.  In the foreground and eastbound on the East River, it’s Foxy 3 and Rae.

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I caught Marie J Turecamo and Mary Turecamo doing the do-see-doe allemand left recently just off Caddell.

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The background margins seemed to be trying to add a script.

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With the Turecamos, the background served as a record of change on the Bayonne Bridge.

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And Mary appears to have just had a makeover.

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And what’s this on the margin of the sixth boro and Brooklyn . .  other than a surplus military vessel in the Navy yard?  Here’s a previous allusion to IX-514.

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Are there pairs in those boxes?  Yes, I know these are the flocks of pigeons that are said to create art when they fly.  Here though in daylight they look like Joseph Perkins boxes with living creatures in them, mimicking a microcosm of the residents of NYC.

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But I’ve somehow gotten myself off topic, but no matter, it’s springtime.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who took a break from catfishing and stumbled onto an answer thanks to the site naturalareasnyc.org.  According to them, NYC includes over 76,000 acres of open water, i.e., the sixth boro.  That number of acres converts to about 119 square miles (mi2).  Manhattan, in comparison is only 23 mi2.

Here are the other land boros’ areas:

Bronx, 42 mi2

Staten Island,  58 mi2

Brooklyn, 71 mi2

Queens, 109 mi2

And size matters.  It’s time for the 119-acre-boro to have its own official name and status.

OK, I’ll hand this back to the robots and reel in my catfish.

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

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Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

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heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

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Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

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Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

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North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

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Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

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Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

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Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

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that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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