You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Marie J. Turecamo’ tag.

Lightning is here and has been for at least four years, and Thunder is on its way.

From 2014 and therefore two years newer than Lightning, Adeline Marie, previously Denise A. Bouchard, was heading over to the Industry Day on Wednesday. I caught a few photos of her as Rubia in between her original and her latest livery. 

The 2006 Kristin Poling first came to the sixth boro as the 5000 hp 111′ x 36′ Chesapeake.   Here was my first good view of her as a Poling/Cutler tugboat.

Atlantic Enterprise has been keeping busy with runs with dredge spoils from the North River passenger terminal out to the dump site aka HARS.   For a day’s worth of reading, click here for a July 2022 report on HARS. 

The 1981 Susan Miller pushes a small deck barge through congested waters here. She’s been working in the boro for as long as I’ve been doing this blog. 

The 1968 Marie J. Turecamo has worked in the Moran livery for over 20 years. 

Scale is clear from this side-by-side photo of the 2007 Saint Emilion (105′ x 38′ and 4800 hp) and the 1982 McCormack Boys ( 74′ x 26′ and 1200 hp), both hauled out over at Bayonne Dry Dock. 

The 2007 Normandy (79′ x 27′ and 1900 hp) has been in the boro since 2015. 

The 1981 Navigator (64′ x 24′ and 1200 hp)  has to be one among the busiest boats in the harbor and the region.

The 1975 Mary Emma (100′ x 31′ and 3900 hp) has worked under this livery since 2021.  I caught her transformation here about a year ago. 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who thanks you for continuing to read this blog. 

Apologies in advance for possible whiplash, but let’s return to the sixth boro.  I write blog posts one day at a time;  only rarely do I schedule posts in advance, so more photos of the December road trip aka F2 remain and will be posted later in the month.  When I post them, you’ll understand why I delayed.

Given how bright today is, let’s peer back at yesterday’s sixth boro fog.  Marie J.

assisted Stolt Focus from a berth to an anchorage in the Upper Bay, as

Berto L. Miller traveled westbound in the Kills.   The word focus here seems important.

One thing I love about fog in photos is its selecting foreground details only, narrowing the field of view, if I’m understanding the terms correctly.

Going wider angle here, all that pops out of the textured gray water and the uniformly gray sky are the boats, channel marker, a bank, and some disused pilings.

The blue tug, Sarah Ann, is the central focus here, with no distracting details in the background.  Treasure Coast is there with the cement transporter, but that, I think, enhances the focus on Sarah Ann.  I don’t think about all this while taking photos;  I just go for what looks good to me.

All photos yesterday, WVD. 

I will return to road photos and even street photos in Louisiana later this month, and pick up the New Jersey road photos after that.

The sixth boro offers many vistas.  Enjoy a few, starting with Sarah D towing a deeply loaded scow past Bay Ridge. 

At sunrise, Atlantic Salvor and Patrice McAllister head in the same direction for different tasks past Stapleton Heights.

Jonathan C works shipside on the ConHook range in the sixth boro

Julie Anne heads north or so inside the VZ Bridge.  I should know what buoys are there, but . . . I don’t.

Sarah D again and here shipside in the KVK.

Mary Turecamo assists alongside a rust-flecked box ship.

Seeley pushes Weeks 250 eastbound in the Kills.

Kirby Moran, Patrice McAllister, and Gregg McAllister assist another box ship, as Marie J Turecamo heads in their direction.

Sea Fox moves a barge past Global terminal in Bayonne.

Navigator rotates clockwise away from St George and heads north.

And finally, Charles James stands by with a scow off Sunset Park.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

I happened onto a very busy sunrise this morning, five ships of which two were ULCVs and a half dozen of so tugboats can be seen.

The first ULCV was CMA CGM Chile,

and the light, as last night’s Hunter’s Moon settled in the west, was perfect.

Marie J Turecamo and Margaret Moran assisted,

Here were Mexico and Brazil.

The sixth boro terminals are doing something right, because no backups as in southern California and Savannah are happening here.

All photos, WVD.

Elli, built in 2010 and with 113k capacity, gets an assist out of the berth from Ellen McAllister.

Kimberly and Brendan assist STI Finchley,  2014 and 38k, out of a dock, and 

and Ginga Cougar, 2005 and 26k, heads into that same dock.

See the blurry name above, and somewhat blurry below?

I’d seen it before in the boro as King David and then King Dorian

 

 

Khawr AlAdid is a crude tanker, 2006 and 106k.

 

When I saw Maersk Navigator on AIS, I’d expected a box ship. 

It’s a tanker, 2016 andn 46k.

Seabreeze is 2007 and 54k.

 

Persepolis, a classical name for a world heritage site,

was launched in 2018 and 74k.

Front Clipper is huge for the harbor, 157k and built in 2017.

And closing it out . . .  all rise for The Judge, an asphalt tanker, 2016 and 37k.

All photos, WVD.

Here’s a tanker with a great name I stumbled upon while looking through the November 2016 archives.  St Aqua . . . i’ll expand that St to “saint,” who we sometimes need  . . .

 

Most of you know that dawn is my favorite time. Yesterday dawn–between 0545 and 0645–was quite busy;  two of the five vessels that transited the KVK were among the largest–so far–that call in the sixth boro.

Pink sky with gradations, faded purple Brooklyn, huge but silent shapes, and spots of artificial lights.

Birds silhouetted and reflections in the still water make the scene as one point over by central western Brooklyn turns a deeper shade of red.

When the ship blocks the blinding rising sun, its name becomes legible.

Once CS Rose passes my vantage point, all that light illuminates the details.  Three tugboats along her starboard, one on stern, and one on the far side, the port side.

Not much later–another smaller container ship has passed–the next hulking shape appears, and the light has already turned gradations of yellow.

When CMA CGM Mexico blocks the rising sun, details become available  . . .

 

By now, 0645, the light suggests the sun has created daylight.

 

Tugboats on Rose include  James D, Mary Turecamo, Kimberly Turecamo, and Kirby.  Tugboats on Mexico include Marie J Turecamo, JRT, Kimberly Turecamo, and Miriam.

All photos, WVD.

 

This photo is out out order in this sequence, just to show scale.

Before a tanker leaves, the boom gets removed by these small boats, which

also help handle the lines.

Miriam came in to deliver the pilot(s).  She then gets a line toward the stern to pull the tanker off the dock.

Marie J. gets a line on the bow to pull it away from the dock for the turning.

The top photo would come here; once the bow has moved off the dock sufficiently for Marie J to get behind the bulb, she does so . .  and pushes the bow around while Miriam holds the stern.

 

 

She’s now more than 90 degrees off the starting point, and turning into a flood tide, if I remember correctly.

 

Once the tanker’s turned 180 and pointed into her desired course, Marie J. speeds ahead to get onto the port side of the tanker.

All photos, WVD.

Mary Turecamo, 4300 hp and waiting for a ship at the Narrows, could not look better.  She’s an almost 40-year-old product of Matton Shipyard.  In fact, she was their last product.

Christiana heads out as

Virginia, 1440 hp and launched in 1979,  comes in

from sea, out of the haze.

Christiana was launched in Marinette WI in 2007, a year after Brandywine and a few years after the Molinari class of Staten Island ferries.  She’s married to Double Skin 143, another Marinette vessel.

Barney Turecamo (1995 and 5100)  and  barge Georgia gets rotated by Marie J Turecamo (1968 and 2250). Yesterday I started a re-read of the 1956 book Tug Boat:  The Moran Story, and am finding it very satisfying.

Here’s a dense pack over at the east end of IMTT:  Josephine, Evelyn Cutler, and Cape Lookout:  (2018 and 4560), (1973 and 3900), and (2018 and 5000).

Crystal Cutler arrived here from the shipyard in 2010 and works with 1500 hp.

She’s pushing Patricia Poling

And finally, a light Hunting Creek, 2011 and 3000 hp.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

Name that tug?  She’s 91.5′ x 26.8′ and used to be called Traveller.  Answer follows.

Part of a defacto ghost fleet around the sixth boro, it’s J. George Betz, and mostly invisible beyond, Rhea I. Bouchard. J. George is longer, stronger, and newer.

Also in the dry dock a week or so back, it’s Emily Ann.  My favorite story of this tug dates from a time she was called Cabo Rojo.

Lincoln Sea  was featured in my second ever tugster post, back in November 2006.   In the background, that looks to be Mount St. Elias

I usually see Captain D alongside a DUP barge, but behold, in good light, she’s light.   That’s my acronym, DUP.

Ditto . . .  Robert Burton.

Ruth M. Reinauer was just a year old when it appeared here in 2009.  Ruth is 112.9′ x 35′.

Ellen McAllister . . . what more can I add to what I’ve written already about this former USN YTB.   I know three of her dozen or so siblings, ex-USN YTBs, include Robert E.Timothy, and Stacy.

Miriam and Doris Moran follow along a ship, ready to put their force where needed when needed.

More fleetmates to Captain D and Robert Burton above, it’s Paula Atwell and Pathfinder . . . all unusually light.

And finally . . . that tug in the top photo . .  it’s Marie J. Turecamo.

All photos, WVD.

On we go . . .  Alexandra does not appear frequently here. If my count is correct, this is only the third time since and including 2008 that this 120′ x 34′ 4000hp boat’s been posted here.  She’s currently working on a dredging project near Sandy Hook.

An action shot here of Mister T doing what the 82′ x 24′ 2400hp Mister T does.

Pegasus has to be among the cleanest looking boats, a fact accentuated here by the rusty stains on the hull of the tanker beyond her.  Dimensions . . . 75′ x 26′ x 1900hp.

The Browns . . . James  and Joyce, move this car float across between Owls Head and Greenville.  The absence of leaves on the trees shows how long ago I took this and most of these photos.  They are 74′ x 30′ x 1000 and 78′ x 26′ 2400, respectively.

Patrice, 105′ x 34′ 4500, has been here almost 10 years.

Nathan G, 73 x 24′ 1200′, moves a scow  westbound on the KVK.  I’d have guessed her larger than that.

Paul Andrew does the paper barge.  She’s 64′ x 23′ and 1200hp.

And finally, JRT sees one ship out and positions herself for the next job.

Here was my first photo of the 6000hp 89′ x 38′ tugboat back in late 2015.  The photo reminds me I should use the fisheye more often.

All photos, WVD.

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