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Mackenzie Rose and Paul Andrew are eastbound, and Mary Turecamo, westbound.

 

A light Haggerty Girls westbound,

passing Laurie Ann Reinauer.

Kimberly Poling moves a barge out of the Kills.

 

A bulker in the anchorage gets bunkered by

Kings Point.  Katya Atk needs to repaint the name on the starboard bow.

And Helen Laraway makes her way east.

 

All photos, WVD.

The light could not have been more beautiful as I swooped into the boro, metaphorically speaking:  Peace Victoria in the foreground, Coral Queen (not the other Coral Queen) loading scrap mid-distance, and that ridge the Watchung Mountains defining a horizon.  Note the Tsereteli monolith mid left margin of the photo.

Closer than Peace Victoria, Zola dispensed Egyptian rock salt.

Note the front end loaders shifting salt within the scow?

Down at water level, Curtis Reinauer squeezes into the notch of RTC 42.

Helen Laraway heads over to Zola to shift scows filled in  the salt dispensing.

Jill has been called to assist Curtis out of the dock, 

passing Nicole Leigh at the Reinauer base, adjacent to the Moran base, marked by the white “M”.

The assist begins and

soon Curtis is eastbound. 

And this is just the start of my focus of 1/100th of the doings in the boro.

All photos, taken between 0700 and 0800, WVD.

Entirely unrelated but fascinating, here’s a NYTimes article and video on oil smuggling into North Korea.

Salt 14 dates from November 2017, with previous installments going back to 2009, when bulk carriers could not yet dock at the current location of Atlantic Salt aka “the salt pile”.  As of this time, there’s not much of a pile at the salt pile.

With our mild weather for the early part of this winter, no salt resupply happened until recently.  Strategic Unity brought in a load,

which she discharged using her own buckets. Those are big buckets though.

Then Katerina brought in a load.  Katerina left port last night.  I forget which, but one of these was from Mexico and the other from Egypt . . . imported road safety product.

Meanwhile, Pacific Talent is still here, from India.

She lightered in the anchorage

discharging off both sides

for a few days.

 

before moving to Duraport, where she is currently.

All photos, WVD.

 

This photo of aframax BW Thalassa I took on Friday.  Note the green BW slash about a third of the shiplength back from the bow. 

Here’s a photo from Saturday, 24 hours later, after rain and fog have moved in.  Note the green BW slash on the tanker beyond the Evergreen ship?

Ever Focus appears to have a maximum load aboard as she speeds toward Colon PA.  A bit beyond Ambrose, AIS showed her at 19.2 kts, 22 mph.

See the Manhattan skyline?  Not much.  A few outlines appears along the shore of Manhattan, but nothing more shows.  The new Janice Ann Reinauer is among the tug/barge units anchored there.

Bruce A. heads for a job,

as do Miriam and Helen.

CL Christina was inbound for Claremont, but again, fog obscured the bright shiny detail.  Of course, the scrap loaded in Claremont has no bright shiny detail either.

All photos, WVD, who finds the fog frustrating even though it was around 50 degrees F, but this is how the harbor looks sometimes.

Unrelated:  I just finished Shadow Divers, an account of the discovery of a U-boat wreck 60 miles off Point Pleasant.  It’s a compelling read.  It turns out there’s a counter-narrative also, Shadow Divers Exposed by Gary Gentile. 

I recall my first time seeing the KVK, astonished by the density of commercial traffic.  Of course, I’d just come from northern New England’s freshwater meandering rivers, surfable sandy coastlines, and marsh creeks. 

Patrice steamed westbound, light,

Kimberly eastbound,

Josephine,

Daisy Mae, moving a half acre of scows…

Helen Laraway,

Daisy Mae again a few seconds later.

But to put it all together, here are Pegasus, Josephine, and Cape Henry

Pegasus and Patrice,

Josephine, Kings Point, and Cape Henry….

It was a busy morning.  All photos, WVD.

 

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

A new tug in town . . .  Osprey?  Built in 1961, she’s a sibling of Kodi.  Photo thanks to Tony A.

B & B . . .  it’s Brendan Turecamo in the distance and Bruce A McAllister.  It turns out they are not clones:  Brendan is a year newer, and Bruce A. is few feet longer and packs a few more horses.

Curis Reinauer is the third tug to carry that name.  This Curtis dates from 2013.  The previous one was sold to Nigeria, and the one before that has been reefed.

Emily Ann dates from 1964;  she appeared on this blog just a few weeks ago but out of the water then.

Mister Jim, 1982,  has been in the sixth boro for about eight years. 

Doris Moran, also 1982, is a powerhouse.

Navigator, 1981, is the only boat currently operated by Balico Marine Services.

Gulf Coast, 1982, got her upper wheelhouse up at Feeney‘s on the Rondout.

Patrice, 1999, has so far spent half its life working on the Great Lakes.

Shannon McAllister is a rare one in the sixth boro, but she passes through here once in a while. like this week. She dates from 1991.

Thx to Tony for that first photo;  all others, WVD.

I caught this small open boat eastbound on the KVK.

She passed Ernest Campbell.  Clearly by her markings, she’s a survey vessel. 

Between traffic, they seemed to focus their work near the transition between the KVK and the ConHook Range . . .

returning to their area of interest, as I said, between traffic.

Work completed, they headed back west

from where they’d first come. 

That might be a cold job with minimal protection for employees of Aqua Survey Inc.  in

a crowded waterway . . .!

All photos, WVD.

It appears that Aqua-Survey Inc. (ASI) has another boat called RV Tesla, which I’d love to see.  I caught R. E. Hayes here over 10 years ago, also an ASI boat.

It still says Eastern Star Dawn, but now it’s Toula!

She’s going to look great all buff and green.

Barry Silverton finally

has a lion on its stack!  All those birds?  It’s water teeming with the bunker, the bunker that recently drew a humpback into the Upper Bay.

Pelham, launched in 1960, is always a pleasant sight.  She has a list of previous names almost as long as my seasonal wish list this year.

Here she took a wake on the bow.

James William used the waters off the salt pile

as a turning basin.

And finally, after a long hiatus down south, CMT Pike has returned.  When i caught her, she was being pursued

by this container ship.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated but of interest, below . . .

yes, Grain de Sail is a 72′ schooner coming into the sixth boro with a 50-ton cargo hold, some of it refrigerated, bringing in French wine.  She’ll set up a market in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for about a week.  Contact info and an e-shop can be found here, although you’ll have to use a machine translate if you’re not up to functionality in French.  

Grain de Sail is involved in triangular  trade, French wine to here and the Caribbean, and then Caribbean chocolate and other products to France . . . .  Something similar in sail freight  domestically has been done by Ceres and more recently by Apollonia.  The most recent international sailing cargo into the sixth boro that I know of was Black Seal, a three-masted schooner.

This is an impressive load of scrap, pushed along on a barge CMT Y Not 2, which I’ve usually associated with piles of sand.

Given the height of the pile relative the wheelhouse,

a watchstander is positioned to maintain a clear view of the waterway.

Pushing this load is Mackenzie Rose,

 

Surprisingly, this load was headed for the Delaware River.

A decade ago, Mackenzie Rose was green and called Vernon C.

Back in June, I saw a similar load but on CMT Y Not 1 and towed by Daisy Mae.

All photos, WVD.

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