You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Coeymans Marine Towing’ category.

I’m always on the look out for new tugboats in the harbor, and Camie mostly fits that bill.  A bit of research, though, finds she’s been on the blog a few times already, however.

Here, l to r, it’s Polar Bright, Ava, New York, and Stephen B.

Robert Burton here is tending a rock scow in front of the very busy Bayonne background.

James Brown moves some scrap barges . . . likely in the direction of the East River.

Weddell Sea stands by with Penn No. 90, demonstrating all the components of “push gear.”

Maybe someone can clarify here, but it appears No. 90 has cargo heating gear.

 

Helen Laraway moves a scow toward a morning.

And Fort Schuyler heads straight for us–I’m zoomed in–away from a marine/industrial Brooklyn background.

For the last day of November 2019, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally, click here for Paul Strubeck’s Vintage Diesel Design blog post on tugboat Luna in Boston.  It expands a post I did on Luna here almost four years ago.

 

Here’s another calendar’s worth . . . starting with Josephine.  I have many more of this bot coming up soon.

Capt. Brian heads out through the Narrows to meet a tow.

Cape Lookout returns for her anchored barge.

Nathan G delivers a brace of scows.

Ava M heads out for a job.

The “new” Kristin Poling returns to her barge as well.

Ellen and Bruce A follow a job.

St Andrews heads east and

Ernest Campbell, west.

Challenger, some weeks ago, brings a Weeks crane up for a lift.

Stephen B has some additions to her paint job since last I saw her.

CMT Pike heads back across the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who can’t believe it’s already mid-November 2019!!

 

 

Here’s a calendar’s worth of harbor tugboat shots, starting with Sarah D., looking brand new although built in 1975, her colors matching the shades of Manhattan building materials in the background.

Brian Nicholas (1966) moves into the Upper Bay, her blue repeated in the sky and water and more.

Buchanan 12 (1972) heads down bound and then

back upbound, day after day and year after year.  It’d be interesting to quantify the tons of aggregates she’s moved out of Hudson Valley quarries.

A Blount-Barker product from 2002, Brooklyn moves from Brooklyn over to Bayonne.

HMS Justice is one of the newer boats in this post, launched in 2012.

Kristy Ann is the newest boat in this post, having arrived here last year to replace the nameplate of a boat from 1962.

James E. Brown,  here assisted by Janet D, both 2015 products of Rodriguez Shipyard, brings a daily load of rail cars across the harbor.

Ruth M.Reinauer (2008) heads back to her barge.

The 1979 CMT Pike  . . . I can’t not think of Odin when I see her.

JRT Moran (2015) rounds the KV buoy with Kristy Ann in the distance.

We started with Sarah D and we’ll end with her.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been a few months since number 265, so let’s catch up.

Kimberly Poling had brought product upriver via Noelle Cutler, and you can tell some time has passed since I took this photo by the foliage.

Edna A was assisting a crane barge working on the power lines near Hudson NY.

Challenger came in through the Narrows yesterday, delivering a crane barge.  A few years back she delivered what was initially a mystery cargo here.

Eli stood by as salt was transshipped from scow to large truck.

Mister T was westbound for the Upper Bay with four scow to be filled.

Pokomoke brought petroleum upriver.

Memory Motel, the original exotic,  . . . I wondered where she had gone until I saw her high and dry up by Scarano.

Betty D and Mary Kay . . .  they were docked just south of Albany.

Mary Turecamo brought container barge New York from Red Hook to Port Elizabeth . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has many more saved up from the summer and early fall.

BW2M, being “backwards to Montreal” and here, it’s aggregate land.  Once it was about coal and brick coming down river and into the systems…. long before my time…. but today it’s earth products moving both ways.

You can’t have the supertall buildings of 57th etc. or the new streets and bridges without rock.

Frances stands by as the crushed Catskill is conveyed in.

 

Two loaded Witte barges wait for a prime mover

 

with what appears to be slightly different cargoes.

Meanwhile, Mister Jim pushes a barge load of sand upriver for projects there.

I’m not sure the function of this equipment.

Doesn’t this look like southern New Jersey sand?

Cement moves out and

down bound, while

salt comes upriver to nearly salt country from the ocean.

Later, Frances arrives in the sixth boro with barges from two different locations for materials for projects in the dryland boros

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes he got all of that right.

 

Here are the previous three installments of this title.  After seven straight weeks away, I’m back in the boro for a while, a short while, and it seems the best way to catch up–attempt to–is to work backwards, starting from now.

A welcome sight on the west side of midtown . . . . Chandra B, ensconced here in the marine guard.  A great name for an organization?

Nearby, Miss Circle Line stands at the ready.

Still earlier this morning, I caught St. Andrews, 

and before that Frances.  More of her as I work backwards in time.

Earliest of all today . . .  Helen Laraway.

 

One from our arrival yesterday . . .  it’s Thunder Bay, an icebreaker assigned to summertime and UN Week duties.  As the name of a Lake Superior port, this name goes with lakers as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who feels a bit like Rip Van Winkle this morning.   Maybe I should gallivant a bit in the sixth boro . . .

 

How’s your Greek?

Cape Taft, here with Miriam Moran, has been in the boro before.

Stolt Ocelot appears on the blog for the first time, as

 Fivelborg and Maria G. await dock activity.

Here’s USNS Sisler dug in before she departed for sea trials.

Celebrity Summit is currently in port  . . . for enough time to debark one set and embark the next set of passengers.

Acrux C followed by Mary Turecamo and  . . . Helen Laraway.

Cape Ann (T-AK-509),is still in the East River, as is Cape Avinoff (AK-5013),  pictured here, here, and here.

Bright Ocean 3 (III) is headed for Turkey, after having made a stop on the Delaware River.

Weco Josefine is currently Egypt bound.

All photos since the start of summer by Will Van Dorp, but one of the photos was not taken in the sixth boro.  Any ideas which?

Unrelated but current:  yesterday the USACE tender Hudson was reefed off Fire Island.  You can see three photos I took here, and the press release from the USACE here.  The press release answers a question I long had:  where was it built.  The answer is Paasch Marine Services on the Delaware River.  This is itself confusing, because Hudson is not listed as being built in Paasch Marine, which was in Erie PA and did build boats.  There is a Pasch Marine on the Delaware River (actually in Easton PA–opposite side of the state from Erie PA) but I don’t know that they ever built boats there.    Hmmm.

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Here’s my article on Daisy Mae in the August 2019 issue of Professional Mariner magazine.  And as I have often done, this post is mostly images that didn’t make it into the magazine.

All the specifics are in the article, but here’s the SW New Jersey dock where this sand is loaded.  Washed sand from the conveyor in center right of the photo below is falling into the barge CMT Y NOT 2.

Here’s the shore side loading, and

here’s the waterside view.

Once loaded it’s a short but

tricky run out of tidal Salem River when there’s sufficient water.

After arriving in Delaware Bay, the transition is made from push gear to …

[I’ll bet you didn’t expect this front-end loader here.]

… the wire.

 

I know the coastal NJ waters are not always this flat.

Just outside the Narrows, the tow is remade so that

 

 

the last few miles to the Brooklyn dock

can be performed with precision and efficiency.

Many thanks to CMT and the crew for helping me tell their story.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Check out the link to the story here.

 

Here was the previous installment in this series, half a decade ago.

Now let’s take a high lift lock, a Thruway access road bridge, and “just my luck.”

When I arrived the other day, this double-locked unit was exiting the lower side of E-17.

CMT Pike was eastbound with barges used for a job in Syracuse Inner Harbor, I believe.

So after CMT Pike was on her way, I walked to the top of the lock to see what I could see and saw . ..

another unit eastbound and just arriving on the upper side.

Oh THAT Three Sisters.  Click here and scroll . . .  might these be the same boat just four years apart?

 

And eastbound they go.

Since I was here waiting for something else, I took the time to read signage I’d never noticed.  Double-click enlarges the text;  this sign dated 2005 gives some perspective to a high lift on the Erie Canal, albeit built a century ago, with a high lift on –say–western rivers a half century ago.

Click here and here for previous examples of commercial tugs on NYS canals.  Of course, here and here are more . . . the classic Cheyenne.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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