You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Atlantic Salvor’ tag.

As remnants of  Hurricane Nicole pass through the sixth boro, we might have a look back to details of aftermath of Sandy exactly 10 years ago, like this undecked pier over on the NJ side of the Arthur Kill, across from Howland Hook. 

USCGC Spencer came up for the cleanup, as did

then-USCGC Gallatin, now NNS Okpabana

NASA’s Enterprise saw some damage as well, leading to installation of a more robust pavilion

McAllister Sisters assisted ACL Atlantic Concert past the damage to the park shoreline just west of St. George while  

National Guard units staged in the then parking lot area. 

And I have to digress here to rant about a shoreside issue:  hundreds of millions have been spent in preparing this area for the ill-fated “NY Wheel,”  and in the process transformed what had been a simple but pleasant park into a wasteland behind an unsightly green wall and guarded chain link.  Hey mister mayor and mister SI boro president, clean it up and reopen it for the public.  The “wheeler-dealers” and the NYC EDC did more damage here–and allowed it to fester–than Sandy.  Is the small wheel next?

APL Cyprine, then flagged US and carrying USMC vehicles, has gone to Alang flying the flag of Comoros. Ditto ACL Atlantic Concert, shown up the column. 

Patrick Sky was still working back then, and Happy Delta brought in one of the first loads of NYC sanitation cranes. 

That year, by November 9–the date of this photo–we’d already had a dusting of cold, white stuff here. 

Cashman’s TSHD Atchafalaya was in the boro.  She’s still afloat in Florida. 

On black Friday 2012, the high point of my day was seeing Atlantic Salvor return to the boro with Witte 1407 carrying segments of what is visible today as

the antenna atop WTC 1. 

All photos, any opinions and all errors, WVD. 

 

That’s what I’m doing, preferably feeling the water but inside the ship today.  Below, W. O. Decker handles the whitewater created by boats in a recent race with at least 10 times Decker‘s horsepower.

As seen from the Bayonne Bridge walkway, Quenames displaces a fair amount of water, surrounding itself with froth.

Fireboat water in the sky and spray over the bow of these boats racing to the finish line. 

 

 

But today, I hope to be propelled by the wind, maybe with the rail not buried, but heeled over enough that water will be flowing into and then out of the scuppers.

 

Happy Labor Day.  All photos, WVD.

I’m always so grateful when folks send me photos, especially like all of these.  Tony A catches all kinds of boats I miss, like

Anne-Sofie earlier this month in Albany.  I’m not sure what the cargo in and/or out was, but these SAL vessels get around.   Does anyone know if that “float” center just under the crane hook serves as an outrigger for loading/unloading crane movement?  As of this posting, she’s already in Genoa.

Here’s more from Tony . . . Dimuro Clark had been Turecamo Girls for over half a century and appeared on this blog many times. 

 

I like their logo.

And finally, long-time reader and sometimes contributor, Tommy Bryceland sends these photos of a local boat–which appeared in yesterday’s post–far from homewaters,

with guided missile frigate and ex USS Boone on the hip in Campbeltown Loch in Scotland last week.  Atlantic Salvor towed it there from the Philadelphia Navy Yard.  The ship is expected to be used as a target in an upcoming live fire exercise out in the Atlantic Ocean.  Would the frigate be anchored during such an exercise?  I’m imagining it’s expected to sink upon termination of the firing.

Many thanks to Tony A and Tommy for sharing these photos.

It’s been over 12 years that this boat has had this appearance;  before then, it was orange.

Ten years ago, this one was green.

I must admit I’ve gotten used to seeing them both in Donjon blue, and they look great.

A year ago, this boat had not yet entered the state of New York, but when she did, I caught her here and here about to enter the NYS Canal system from the Great Lakes.

Since then, she’s been quite busy.

As have all the Donjon blue boats.

Have a look at Meagan Ann in the 2013 tugboat races here.  And speaking of those races, here and here are photos/videos of Meagan Ann and other from 2009. 

Has anyone heard specifics about a 2022 tugboat race in the sixth boro?  Here are some photos of boats that participated in the 1952 (!!!!) race on the Hudson.

All photos, any errors, WVD.

While I’m at it, let me throw in a photo from the tugboat race in 2010.

 

 

 

It’s time for a February installment of “retro sixth boro,” a glance back at some of the boats working in New York harbor exactly a decade ago.  Cheyenne was still here, pushing a scow out the east end of the KVK.

I’m not sure the 61′ x 22′  1970 Salvage Master is still in the harbor.  Even back a decade ago, I only saw it once or twice.

The 1962 Kristy Ann Reinauer was scrapped in 2015.  The 2000 Tokyo Express is still around;  in fact, I believe I saw it just recently. 

The 1980 Independence was pushing 1982 tank barge OSG 243Independence was scrapped in 2020, and the barge laid up.

The 1981 Huron Service is now Genesis Victory.  The 1976 Atlantic Salvor has carried that name since 1998.

Na’hoku (Na Hoku) is a 1981 tugboat that spent a short time in the boro a decade ago;  later in 2012, Na’hoku (meaning stars, as used for navigation in Hawaiian) was sold to a South Carolina company that kept the name.  As of this writing, she’s in Fernandina Beach FL.  As for DBL 85, a tank barge by that name was built in 2009 and is likely still in use.

The 1976 Barents Sea switched over to Kirby and then in 2016, re-emerged as Donjon’s Atlantic Enterprise.  Along the left side of the photo, Casablanca is a 1987 barge.

All photos, WVD, from February 2012.

Why does time pass so quickly?!  As if it were just a few years ago, I recall this Wilmington NC stop on the road trip return from family in Georgia.   I was surprised by the amount of traffic in this Cape Fear River port, like Margaret McAllister here passing Corpus Christi with Petrochem Supplier. Margaret McAllister is one of McAllister’s ex-USN Natick-class tugs, in Margaret‘s case previously known as Tonkawa (YTB-786)

Kathryne E. McAllister (the 1980 one) followed the Margaret to sail a tanker. 

Kathryne E. is currently laid up, but Moran’s Cape Henry (That’s a popular name for tugboats;  I know of at least two others, one Kirby and one Vane.) below is still working, although currently in the Caribbean.

The first few days of January 2012 were as mild as those in 2022.  Here Ellen S. Bouchard heads west in the KVK pushing B. No. 282.  Ellen S. now wears Centerline’s lion logo.

Iron Mike might still wear Wittich Brothers black, blue and white, although I’ve not seen her out in the boro in a while. 

Atlantic Salvor passes in front of a quite changed Manhattan skyline, as seen from St. George.

Gramma Lee T. Moran has departed the sixth boro for Baltimore.  Southern Spirit is an active crude tanker  but she goes by Celsius Esbjerg, currently departing the Bohai Sea for the Yellow Sea.

A light Mckinley Sea heads west in the Kills.  She’s currently painted in Kirby colors, but laid up in Louisiana. Beyond her, Laura K Moran–now based in Savannah–assists tanker Mount Hope.

Marion Moran is out of the Moran fleet, and is likely wearing Dann Ocean livery, although I can’t confirm that.

The 1983 Sand Master was always a favorite of mine;  she was sold into the southern Caribbean, but she may be scrapped by now. 

Capt. Fred Bouchard was sold to a southern California construction company.

And we hold it up here, midmonth, with a vessel type I’ve not seen in a while . . . a livestock ship, Shorthorn Express, which had come into the Upper Bay for services, not to transfer cargo. The 1998 Luxembourg-flagged  Shorthorn Express is active, currently traveling between Israel and Portugal.  I used to see these regularly coming into the Kuwaiti port of Shuwaikh.  I also recall a horrendous sinking of a livestock ship heading for China back in 2020.

All photos, WVD, in January 2012.

I hope you’re enjoying the morning light as much as I am.  The first four shots here were all from roughly the same location.  I took this one of Seeley first with the sun mostly behind me, and

then the next three with the sun on my right side. 

The lower 40s temperatures make sea smoke on the warmer water.

 

Then I headed down to Conference House in Tottenville in time to catch

Atlantic Salvor connect with a dredge spoils scow to take to the HARS for dumping.

That’s Great Beds Light, named for the oysters that once thrived there.

While waiting for something that never appeared or happened–I seem to do that a lot, said I to my “wise person”–I had an unexpected treat.  I told my wise person that too, that a plus of waiting for nought is that often what you really need but didn’t know you needed often comes by.  But I digress.

This is the first appearance of 1977 West Coast Kodiak on this blog;  there’s also a 1981 Alabama-built tug by that name.  This Kodiak was built in Long Beach CA.

Heading out to assist Atlantic Salvor with that scow, she passed in front of this surprising terrain over along the south shore of Raritan Bay.

All photos, WVD, who needs a wise person now and then.

 

The sixth boro offers many vistas.  Enjoy a few, starting with Sarah D towing a deeply loaded scow past Bay Ridge. 

At sunrise, Atlantic Salvor and Patrice McAllister head in the same direction for different tasks past Stapleton Heights.

Jonathan C works shipside on the ConHook range in the sixth boro

Julie Anne heads north or so inside the VZ Bridge.  I should know what buoys are there, but . . . I don’t.

Sarah D again and here shipside in the KVK.

Mary Turecamo assists alongside a rust-flecked box ship.

Seeley pushes Weeks 250 eastbound in the Kills.

Kirby Moran, Patrice McAllister, and Gregg McAllister assist another box ship, as Marie J Turecamo heads in their direction.

Sea Fox moves a barge past Global terminal in Bayonne.

Navigator rotates clockwise away from St George and heads north.

And finally, Charles James stands by with a scow off Sunset Park.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

The red upper wheelhouse is no more, although I’m not certain what new paint scheme will evolve, or when Evening Star will become Jordan Rose, as Evening Breeze became Susan Rose.  Follow this transformation we will.

Ellen transformed from Navy gray to McAllister colors 20 years ago.

Atlantic Salvor has worn Donjon blue–almost the same as warehouse blue–for over 20 years.

In a different way, Marjorie B profile varies from a lower to higher wheelhouse depending on the job.

Jill Reinauer has worn Reinauer colors for over 20 years also, although she has seen some modifications of profile more recently.

Brendan is currently in dry dock, but when I took this photo, she was standing by with a large barge. I’ll post a photo of her high and dry soon.

This post began with a Bouchard tug in transition.  It’s fitting to end with one that already looks quite different . . .  Evening Light is now Mary Emma. currently on Narragansett Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

It’s hard to believe, but I’ve not been to the Great North River Tugboat Race since 2014, but in normal times, September 5 would see the next race.  But we’ve dispensed with the “normal times” concept for the time being.

In selecting the batch for this post, I wanted splash, froth, bubbles, and the effervescence the river can react with when tons of steel and thousands of horsepower push through the ever changing water.   The next two photos are from that 2014 race. 

It was overcast during the race, but an hour or so later, when pushing contests were happening and

the wakes flattened out and we sized up USAV MGen. Anthony Wayne, patches of blue appeared.  I should leave you in suspense about how this push went.  Let me put it this way;  they left town not long after the push-off.

2013 was an equally overcast day, and again, not to identify every tugboat in that lineup, it appears that W. O. Decker has either jumped the gun or activated its jet drive and will soon rise up out of the Hudson on her hydrofoil assists. I’d guess the latter.

See what I told you . . . Decker has gone so far ahead that it’s already over the horizon.

Second lap maybe for Decker?

It’s starting to appear that in 2012, as in ’13 and ’14, it was overcast.

It was great to see Buchanan 12, usually burdened with a half dozen stone barges, disencumbered and frothing up the river.  That’s the 1907 Pegasus back there too.

In 2011, I was able to get a photo of the racing craft along with sky spray by one of the fireboats present, likely 343.  What’s remarkable comparing the photo above with the one below is the color of the water;  hurricane Irene had dropped a lot of rain upstate and all the tributaries sent that into the Hudson with tribute in the form of silt.

Quantico Creek and Maurania III did an excellent job of stirring up the water.

But again, it was overcast and hazy over silty water.

However, in 2010, we had blue skies that really accentuated the DonJon boats like Cheyenne and

the harbor colossus, Atlantic Salvor.

In 2009, there were wispy clouds, allowing the “queen of the day” to be Ellen McAllister. But look who else showed up!!!!

Urger.   Urger would EASILY have won the race, but she was doing what she does best . . .  urging all the other boats and crews to be fleeter than she, holding herself back, allowed herself to be that day.

All photos and commentary, WVD. See you at the races in 2022.

 

 

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