You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Atlantic Salvor’ tag.

My rules for this series:  all photos need to have come from the month in focus but exactly 10 years earlier.  It’s a good way to notice change.

Take Capt. Log.  I used to love seeing that boat, now long scrapped.  I have photos of her as a heap of scrap pieces and have never posted them.  I’m guessing the Chandra B crew are happy to have that new boat, but Capt. Log was such a unique sight.

Baltic Sea . . .   I’d love to see a current photo of her from Nigeria.  See more of her departed K-Sea fleet mates here.  Sunny Express is now Minerva Lydia, and still working, I think.

Taurus has moved to the Delaware River and has some splotches of purple a la Hays.

Volunteer has been scrapped.

The orange June K is now the blue Sarah Ann . . . .   I still miss that color….

Charles Oxman is no longer in service . . .  I last saw her here in 2016.

APL Egypt used to be a regular here, and of course John B. Caddell . . .had only a few years left at this point before getting cut up.  For a “what’s left . . .” of John B., click here and scroll.

I’m not saying everything is gone or has changed.  Walker and Salvor still work here and –to the untrained eye–look exactly as they did a decade ago, even though these days from any distance, I  can’t tell the distance between Atlantic Salvor and Atlantic Enterprise.  And those crewing on these two vessels, I can’t tell if anyone working then on each boat still does. For Walker, it’s very likely it’s an entirely new crew.

I hope you enjoyed this glance back.

All photos in February 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

 

The other night in a diner 300 miles from the sixth boro, Jim–holding the remote below and to the left–mentioned his boat models.  His favorite, he said, was Mister Darby.  My interest was piqued, but he went on, describing it as about five feet long and having an automobile battery as a power source.   In fact, he said, one time he sank the model as a result of taking an abrupt turn to port;  the battery wasn’t adequately secured, flipped on its side, dooming the tug.

I met Jim last year in connection with an old boat up on the Saint Lawrence.  I had coffee with him the other day in connection with another boat, one that’s been featured on this blog many times.

Anyhow, when he was finished, I asked if he had a photo of Mister Darby;  sure enough he did.  When I asked what else he knew about Mister Darby, he said it was last in Indonesia.  JMC on the stack expands to Jackson Marine Corporation, a Halliburton company.

So for Jim and everyone else, here’s Mister Darby –now Atlantic Salvor–as she appeared in the September 5, 2010 Great North River Tugboat Race.

 

 

And in late November this year, below she heads west under the Bayonne Bridge.

These days, Atlantic Salvor has a “twin” in the boro also, Atlantic Enterprise, ex-Mister Pete.

The first two come from Jim;  the others by Will Van Dorp, whose favorite Salvor photos were posted here.

By the way, here’s the Mister Darby kit.

Navigator looks great in the yellow trim.  For some quantifiable info, she dates from 1981 and reports 1200 hp.

Ellen always strikes me as a brawler, more so than identical YTBs.  Maybe it’s the ships’ hull paint she’s rubbed off with the bow rendering. For numbers and facts, she dates from 1967, built in Marinette WI, and currently has z-drives putting out 4000 hp. Click here for photos I took in Marinette this past summer.

Dory looks great, having added an upper wheelhouse.  Click here and scroll for photos of Dory over the years, pre-upper wheelhouse.  Who operates her now?

Amy Moran and Atlantic Salvor meet under the bridge.  As an indication of winds, notice the bridge “curtains” movement.   Numbers:  AM 1973 and 3000 hp.  AS 1976 and 6480.  For previous Atlantic Salvor posts, click here.

If Buchanan 5 looks like she has new paint, she does.  It used to work around here as Taft Beach.  Numbers:  1983 and 2600 hp.

Normandy benefits from a simple and classical paint scheme.    2007 and about 1900 but with triple screw.  As I understand it, she used to work in Colombia.  Anyone have info on her propulsion plant?

Kimberly Poling got a makeover almost 10 years ago and she is just a beauty.   1994 and 3000 hp.

I’ve long heard Thomas D. Witte once worked the Erie Canal as Valoil, but I’ve never seen photos of her superstructure from that time.  Anyone help?   1961 and 1500 hp.

And finally, Matthew Tibbetts once won the most attractive tug at a North River Tugboat Race, and she truly looks good.   1969 and 2000.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Kirby Moran and James D Moran wait, like a team of horses, actually a team of 12,000 horses.

Here’s a different perspective on Kirby as she returns from a job.

CMT Otter and a salt barge lies alongside Nord Summit while along the other side, the venerable Twin Tube reprovisions from stern starboard.

Atlantic Salvor (or Enterprise??)  . . . I’ll never catch up as she heads for one of the many skylines of Brooklyn.  By the way, has anyone caught a photo of Hunter D in the sixth boro?

With Shooters Island and beyond that the cranes of Howland Hook in the background, it’s Discovery Coast, these days somewhat rare in the sixth boro.

Mister Jim is looking sharp these days, much better than her earlier livery.

Kodi is quite far away here, but she is a mere 42.6 footer.

Bering Dawn . . . she’s been on the East Coast some time now,

but all told, she’s spent more time on the West Coast.

The elusive Thomas stopped by the salt pile the other morning to retrieve a crane.

Margaret Moran . . . as always assisting ships into and out of the sixth boro.  More Margaret soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I take a lot of photos.  A few are extraordinary, IMHO.  The photo below ranks among that select set.

Above and below, it’s Jonathan C Moran.  Sharon Sea heads for sea above.

Atlantic Salvor takes yet another scow filled with dredge spoils out to the dumping grounds.

Atlantic Dawn heads out.

Emily Ann tows Chesapeake 1000 down toward Norfolk.

St Andrews moves a petro barge.

Frances has a headline to a barge in the anchorage.

Two Vane boats wait in Gowanus Bay.

And James D. has a line onto ONE Stork.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Hats off to Glenn Raymo for figuring out where to be to catch this tow at first light.

I know it’s fruitless to wonder whether any archive has photos of any previous trip Ward’s Island made on the Hudson.  The only other trip it’s made may have been northbound in the late 1930s.

Hats off to the crews who can do this safely. With the rounded bottom propped up by welded on support beams,

she looks like an animal once living.

Dimensions of the hull are 115’6″ x 38′  x  14′.

 

It’s a job and it’s a melancholy sight too., knowing the next stop on this express route is the bottom of the ocean off Fire Island.

Many thanks to Glenn for catching this.  Previous “canal reef express” posts can be found here.

Behold the Atlantics  . . . being A Salvor with the dump scow Witte 4003  and

A Enterprise . . . with the Chesapeake 1000. It’s delightful to see them now as twins, which they are, but hadn’t appeared to be.  Before we move to the next pictures, though, what are the “poles” beyond the dump scow?

The ridge is the highlands of Monmouth County above with West Bank Light below.

Mary Alice and Atlantic Salvor have been shuttling quite a few dump scows the past few weeks, it seems.

 

Caitlin Ann–which I first saw as Vivian L. Roehrig and later as Caribbean Sea— followed Enterprise in.

Different day, different towing arrangement . . . Atlantic Salvor returns with a light dump scow Weeks 258.

Caitlin Ann heads under the Bayonne Bridge, past its dismantled piers.

And the “poles” belong to  L/B Vision coming into the harbor with

her 95′ spindly spuds.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Call it a sea change.  The air warms up although the water is still very cold.

Sea Lion does what it has all winter, but what’s different is the reappearance of non-workboats.  Sea Lion has some history on this blog.

Evening Light moves north in anticipation of summer.

Pleasure boats move into an environment that has been consistently about work throughout the winter.

Mischief passes New Champion and Stephen Dann, which brought in highway ramp sections.  Would these sections be for the Bayonne, the Tappan Zee, or another?

Small party boats

head out to catch what spring fish migrate in. Should there be a Really Never Snuff Express?

Bigger party boats appear as well.

Fast open boats and

slower enclosed cruisers, of all sorts

pass Atlantic Salvor as it returns from another dredge spoils run.

Norwegian Escape has smaller boats

accompany it on its way into the Narrows and the harbor.  If my numbers are correct, Escape has capacity for 5999 souls, including crew, which is more than the population of Taos, Marfa, and well more than the town where I grew up.

I’ve not seen many of these smaller boats since early last fall, and on a warm Sunday, they start to reappear.  Drive safe; work safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose other posts about small craft can be read here.

 

Just to reiterate . . . random in the sixth boro these are.  And the other day, I felt blessed for reasons you’ll understand by the end of this post.  Here Atlantic Enterprise emerges from the Arthur Kill and heads for home in Newark Bay.  That church, “a scaled down copy of the great cathedral at Cologne,” makes this seem quite a European-inflected image.

I took all these photos that weather day last week . . . note how the rain in downtown Elizabeth washes out the Union County Courthouse tower.

A bit later Mister Jim enters the east end of the Kills and then

feigns a ship assist.

The mighty Patricia travels east for a scrap run.

 

as Janet D moves in the direction

of her base.

Why did I feel blessed . . . ?  In the same but of morning, I saw both Atlantic Enterprise and Atlantic Salvor

although not in the same frame, they must have met up in the DonJon yard over in Port Newark.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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