You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Atlantic Salvor’ tag.

Hats off to Glenn Raymo for figuring out where to be to catch this tow at first light.

I know it’s fruitless to wonder whether any archive has photos of any previous trip Ward’s Island made on the Hudson.  The only other trip it’s made may have been northbound in the late 1930s.

Hats off to the crews who can do this safely. With the rounded bottom propped up by welded on support beams,

she looks like an animal once living.

Dimensions of the hull are 115’6″ x 38′  x  14′.

 

It’s a job and it’s a melancholy sight too., knowing the next stop on this express route is the bottom of the ocean off Fire Island.

Many thanks to Glenn for catching this.  Previous “canal reef express” posts can be found here.

Behold the Atlantics  . . . being A Salvor with the dump scow Witte 4003  and

A Enterprise . . . with the Chesapeake 1000. It’s delightful to see them now as twins, which they are, but hadn’t appeared to be.  Before we move to the next pictures, though, what are the “poles” beyond the dump scow?

The ridge is the highlands of Monmouth County above with West Bank Light below.

Mary Alice and Atlantic Salvor have been shuttling quite a few dump scows the past few weeks, it seems.

 

Caitlin Ann–which I first saw as Vivian L. Roehrig and later as Caribbean Sea— followed Enterprise in.

Different day, different towing arrangement . . . Atlantic Salvor returns with a light dump scow Weeks 258.

Caitlin Ann heads under the Bayonne Bridge, past its dismantled piers.

And the “poles” belong to  L/B Vision coming into the harbor with

her 95′ spindly spuds.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Call it a sea change.  The air warms up although the water is still very cold.

Sea Lion does what it has all winter, but what’s different is the reappearance of non-workboats.  Sea Lion has some history on this blog.

Evening Light moves north in anticipation of summer.

Pleasure boats move into an environment that has been consistently about work throughout the winter.

Mischief passes New Champion and Stephen Dann, which brought in highway ramp sections.  Would these sections be for the Bayonne, the Tappan Zee, or another?

Small party boats

head out to catch what spring fish migrate in. Should there be a Really Never Snuff Express?

Bigger party boats appear as well.

Fast open boats and

slower enclosed cruisers, of all sorts

pass Atlantic Salvor as it returns from another dredge spoils run.

Norwegian Escape has smaller boats

accompany it on its way into the Narrows and the harbor.  If my numbers are correct, Escape has capacity for 5999 souls, including crew, which is more than the population of Taos, Marfa, and well more than the town where I grew up.

I’ve not seen many of these smaller boats since early last fall, and on a warm Sunday, they start to reappear.  Drive safe; work safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose other posts about small craft can be read here.

 

Just to reiterate . . . random in the sixth boro these are.  And the other day, I felt blessed for reasons you’ll understand by the end of this post.  Here Atlantic Enterprise emerges from the Arthur Kill and heads for home in Newark Bay.  That church, “a scaled down copy of the great cathedral at Cologne,” makes this seem quite a European-inflected image.

I took all these photos that weather day last week . . . note how the rain in downtown Elizabeth washes out the Union County Courthouse tower.

A bit later Mister Jim enters the east end of the Kills and then

feigns a ship assist.

The mighty Patricia travels east for a scrap run.

 

as Janet D moves in the direction

of her base.

Why did I feel blessed . . . ?  In the same but of morning, I saw both Atlantic Enterprise and Atlantic Salvor

although not in the same frame, they must have met up in the DonJon yard over in Port Newark.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The first six photo here comes from Jonathan Steinman, taken on June 13.  The Donjon tugs has delivered Chesapeake 1000 to a point just off Rockefeller University’s campus to prepare for lifting prefabricated modules for Rockefeller’s River Campus.

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Step one for Donjon is to secure the gargantuan crane.

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Then Atlantic Salvor moves into place to

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receive the massive anchors, a job that Salvor may be IS uniquely qualified to perform.

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The yellow lighted buoys mark the anchors’ positions.

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By the time I got there on June 17, sans camera other than phone, several of the modules had already been lifted from the waterborne transport into the locations where they’ll stay for a very long time.  See time lapse of the installation of modules 1 and 2 on youtube here.

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A dozen more modules will still be lifted when

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water, tidal, and atmospheric conditions allow.

Click here for more information of the River Campus project, one of many construction sights to behold along the East over.  A calendar of additional lifting can be found here, subject to change.

And many thanks to Jonathan for use of his photos and information about the project.  Next time, I’ll bring my good camera.

Previous sights to behold there can be found here.

And while we’re on the topic of heavy equipment, here’s a vimeo update of of invisible gold project happening off Block Island.  I want to get back there soon.

 

 

This collage of orange and blue indicates that something unusual approaches . . .

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0846 hr . . .

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0904

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Atlantic Salvor might have been headed out on a long range mission, but

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at this point, I realized this mission would begin in the Lower Bay of the sixth boro along with

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lots of other vessels, although

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something new this year was the escort of four commercial tugs:  Sassafras, Miriam Moran, 

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Atlantic Salvor, and Normandy.   1150.    I was happy to find someone to talk to.

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It’s fleet week NYC.  Welcome all.

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It’s USS DDG 96,

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HMCS D 282,

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WMEC 911,

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HMCS MM 700,

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HMCS MM 708,

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LHD 5,

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DDG 99,

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and LSD 43.

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At 1216, Eric McAllister joins the welcome party . . .

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WLM 552.

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An E-2 flew by too.

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The message on the port wheel well ((?) amused me.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was last year’s arrival.

 

Kodiak . . . is ex-Vane and Allied.

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Hunting Creek is Maryland-built for Vane.

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Charles A has carried at least four previous names.

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Specialist, I believe the oldest in the set today,  . . . has low sleek lines for an almost 60-year-old vessel.

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When this Pegasus came into the sixth boro, she lacked the upper wheelhouse.

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Atlantic Salvor has for some years–since this one left–been the largest tugboat in the sixth boro.  Rivaling Atlantic Salvor a few years back was the rescue tug turned super yacht called Lone Ranger.

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And finally, for today, it’s Eric McAllister passes Ultra Colonsay, discharging salt over at Atlantic Salt.

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All photos over the last few days by Will Van Dorp.

This is a pair, but it’s a digression at the start.  The left side of the image here is the north side plate glass of the Millennium Hotel on Church Street.

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Here’s the same tower from over five miles farther south.  But the star here is the blue tug, Atlantic Salvor, which two and a half years ago delivered segments of that antenna atop the WTC.  I caught that trip, a return to the sixth boro from greater Montreal here.

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Catching Atlantic Salvor here yesterday was thrilling, because a few months back she did her “sixth boro farewell” and sailed to Jamaica for a job.

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Bowsprite and I were having an all-too-infrequent pique-nique when this unit arrived from that Jamaica job.

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And paired with Atlantic Salvor . . .  there’s the Witte 4001 and I think J. P. Boisseau, as well as

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Caitlin Ann, at least for the passage through the Kills.

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Welcome back, Salvor!

Here was 4.  Pairings suggest to me springtime, and I certainly am ready for that to happen.

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Here a blindingly cold blue Meagan Ann departs the Kills with a team of scows

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Cape Sally and Cape Heane.  Are there really capes by these names?

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From back in January . . . it’s Chesapeake 1000 towed into the Kills by

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Mary Alice and tailed by

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Emily Ann.

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Non-matching but a pair nonetheless here is Paul Andrew and Liberty V.

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And since this post seems to be sticking to the color blue, here’s a pair I took a photo of midMay last year… Emily Ann driving Crow‘s last ride.

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And although red . . . Little Bear and bigger sister Bear . . . has anyone recently gotten a photo of them you could share here?

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To end on a blue note . . . does anyone ave photos of Atlantic Salvor in its current Caribbean context?

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Random . . .  all fotos taken in the past week, and  . . .  let’s start with a tugboat that’s NOT mostly painted white, the 1958 Thornton Bros.  This foto, courtesy of William Hyman, also shows the color of foliage on the New Jersey bluff across from upper midtown.

0aaaaaaaarrrt

2000 Brooklyn, which also has had a long list of previous names.

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1979 Margaret Moran

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2002 Gramma Lee T Moran

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1974 BF Jersey

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1966 Gulf Dawn

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1979 Patrick J Hunt

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And some fotos of vessels operating by night.  ..  1983 Escort

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1969 Robert E McAllister

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1976 Atlantic Salvor.    Notice the tallest building in the distance . . . that’s WTC1.  Eleven months ago, I took these fotos of Salvor steaming int the sixth boro with segments of the antenna that are now assembled and in place atop the tower.

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And once again, the green 1958 tug that started out this post.

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Thanks to William for the first foto;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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