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Here are previous posts in this series, and here’s probably the most dramatic set of photos ever from Paul, taken January seven years ago.

Below, that’s the view of the mouth of the Rondout . . . . and the light at the end of the north breakwater, which looks so beautiful here.

Here’s a view along the deck of Cornell, when

Frances was about to pass, headed north on the Hudson,

which looks like the concrete parking lot of an abandoned shopping mall.

 

 

But commerce goes on, Katherine Walker on station

and Haggerty Girls moving heating oil.

Daisy Mae, however, is making her maiden voyage home, up to Coeymans.

Many thanks to Paul Strubeck, who sent me these photos as soon as he thawed out from the trip.

And completely unrelated, I just added a new blog to my blogroll, GirlsAtSea, started this month by a Romanian bridge officer named Diane.  Check it out here or from the blogroll.

 

As this blog evolves, I sometimes try to show what’s up in those hills, as seen from the hills like this one in March 2017, instead of

what you see in instances when then light is unfavorable.

Olana is the hilltop mansion above the Rip Van Winkle Bridge, built by an artist whose commercial success allowed him to travel, become inspired by the 19th century “near east,” and scrap his plans to engage architect Richard Morris Hunt and instead design and build a neo-Persian palace on the site where once he painted with his mentor Thomas Cole, whose home was just across the bridge in Catskill.

The photo below looks down the Hudson Valley toward the south.

This looks along the south side of the house facing west and the town of Catskill.  Kaaterskill Falls is lost somewhere below the front of the jet trail.

Looking out a south side window, there’s a northbound tug/barge just barely visible.

Directly behind me are these treasures.  Mark Twain–see his own house here— once stood on that stage and discoursed on all things wise, hilarious, exotic,  and jaundiced.

I used the word “treasure” above because here’s a closer-up of that unit approaching from the south–it’s Pearl Coast with a cement barge.

And now a more focused view along the south side and toward the Rip . . . Bridge, see the tug/barge there southbound?

 

It’s Treasure Coast, with another cement barge.  I know there’s a work of Church’s with a steam ship on it, but it’s so far eluded me.

Olana is just one place up on the hilly banks, and so other many places along the river I hope to visit . . . one of these months or years.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has posted Hudson Valley photos here and here, and in many other places as well.

As to seeing Olana from the river, here’s what morning light does,

and here below, late afternoon.

Go visit Olana some time in 2018, and while you’re there, visit the Cole home across the river..

 

Crossing Bear Mountain Bridge the other afternoon–it’s December–I saw this light for the first time.

A bit later on the east side of the River, I pulled off at the “scenic overlook” because I knew this tug and barge were approaching, southbound.  See the same star near the ridge line, directly above the flat snow-covered roof to the right of the lights around the skating rink?

Here the unit–Morton S. Bouchard Jr. and (I think) B. No. 210–pass between Iona Island and the east side of the Hudson.  I’m guessing the buildings on the island date from its time as a US Navy ammunition facility.

 

This angle provides a good view of the barge notch into which the tug fits.

And if I had not yet seen enough lights, a northbound freight came around Jones Point, the edge of Dunderberg Mountain.  Fifty years ago, the Hudson River Reserve Fleet aka ghost ships stretched from there southward.  Here and here are posts I’ve done about the ghost fleet.  Washington Irving also wove the landscape into his tales inspired by that very landscape.

I took the photo below in August 2017 of Perkins Memorial Tower, a CCC project atop Bear Mountain but not visible the other afternoon from my vantage point.

Below is a photo I took of Morton S. Bouchard Jr. last week at the Bayonne Bridge.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

About four years ago she arrived  . . . and has been lifting into place this huge structure sometimes described as one of the largest current civil engineering project in the country.  Her original name Left Coast Lifter , a ZPMC product, stuck despite attempts at New Yorkizing it, renaming it I Lift NY or Ichabod Crane.

I saw the size of those blocks recently when I drove across the new bridge for the first time, but being alone in the car . . . obviously, no pics.

But the Lifter has been repurposed now.  I don’t suppose my attempt to rename her now will succeed any better… But how about Downstate Dropper, Tappan Zee DeconstructorDewey-Driscoll-Wilson Dismantler?

But thankfully, the crane does more than just drop the sections for scrap, and I’m often not so thrilled by state or federal decisions, but here’s a good one:  sections of the old bridge will be used to replace compromised infrastructure in the Hudson Valley.  Here’s a story.

And the rest of these photos, thanks to Glenn Raymo, show these sections on their way to re-use, signs and all.

 

 

Many thanks to Glenn for use of these photos.  The top three photos by Will Van Dorp, who has posted about this bridge many times . . .. 

 

A week ago or so I did a post called Sarah D moving light;  in the next two photos she has a scow that appears light.   Earlier this year, I caught her at the Narrows at dawn headed for Queens.

 

Just a little earlier, Jane A. Bouchard heads down bound with B. No. 225, her usual.

Click here for Jane/225 photos from back more than five years ago.

 

Carolina Coast and Pegasus nose up to a barge at American Sugar in Yonkers on a cold morning,

and Normandy hangs out just north of the passenger terminal with some extraordinary buildings.  For a photo from five+ years ago with Pegasus pre-upper wheelhouse, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who celebrates an anniversary today. Any guesses?

 

Of all the area Tilcon sites, this one at Clinton Point is the most conspicuous one as seen from the river.

If you’ve taken the train northward along the Hudson, you traveled just inland from this structure.

To see the cavity quarry behind the silos, click here and go to page 57 of what has become one of my favorite books. The quarry, where rock has been dug since 1880,  dwarfs the shoreline buildings.

Buchanan 12, a regular on the river doing Mississippi style assemblages of scows, here prepares another group for travel downstream.

 

I wonder if Tilcon welcomes visits by reporters . . . as this one in Illinois does.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It’s always a joy to be under way on the Hudson.  Enjoy these shots from last week.

Stephanie Dann passes a chimney of what may once have been an ice house.

Click here for previous Stephanie Dann photos.

With the Rip Van Winkle Bridge in the background, Sapphire Coast approaches pushing Cement Transporter 1801.

 

 

Near Catskill she passes Coral Coast with another cement barge.

 

And here my first time to see the rebranded Kristin Poling, moving Eva Leigh Cutler.

x

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . the tugs, starting with . . .

Prospector,  built in Indiana 1982, 48′ x 6′ and 800 hp; and presumably the right stuff for this job.  Would you guess the location as the Hudson River from the photo immediately below?  Hook Mountain is a beauty that I really need to hike!

But back to Prospector, a name that connotes seeking gold in them thar  .. . places, and this place has truly seen the distribution of gold.

 

Imagine the stories Tarrytown Light could tell of her 130 years standing on the eastern side of the Hudson.

 

The new TZ is usually described in superlatives, here by the builders and here by states folks.

 

I’ve now driven and ridden over the bridge a number of times, but from there, the view is never as good as this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did the first post in this series here.

Click here for some views of the TZ Bridge area from eight years ago.

 

 

Here was 1 in this series.

About a month ago, I caught up with Buchanan 12 moving crude materials, as is almost always the case with Buchanan 12, aggregates, one of the basic elements for most construction projects.

According to this lohud.com story, about three million tons of aggregates were shipped on the Hudson in 2014.  My guess is that it’s higher today, since there’s long been  rock in “them thar hills.”

 

 

 

Some aggregates further move east toward the Sound, as these in the East River are.

Mister T is a Blount built tug.

And these seem mixed aggregates.

 

More statistics on aggregate production–including a listing of all the types–can be found here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

Many thanks to Capt. Justin Zizes for these next six photos, all taken on November 6 during the transit of two Scarano schooners from NYC’s sixth boro up to Albany.

I would have joined as crew, but had obligations down river.  Here they glide under the TZ,

 

and northward . . . .

The highlands look positively fjord-like, because of course that is what that stretch of river is.

Here the boat approaches the bridges in Poughkeepsie.

Not quite a month ago–October 19–I caught another Scarano schooner up

by the Bear Mountain Brdge.

Unrelated:  Here’s an article on damage to insured recreational vessels from the hurricanes of 2017.

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