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Here was the first post with this title, from almost 9 years ago!  But for the first image of Cheyenne, I can go back to February 2007 here.

Anyhow, less than a half hour after leaving the dock in Port Newark, she rounds the bend near Shooters Island,

departs the modified Bayonne Bridge,

exits the KVK for the Upper Bay and North River . . .

and a half day later, shows up in Poughkeepsie, as recorded by Jeff Anzevino and

Glenn Raymo.

Jeff and Glenn, thanks. Uncredited by Will Van Dorp.

And Cheyenne, tugboat of the year but not present then at the 2015 Tugboat Roundup in Waterford . . .  she’ll be there this year on her way to a new home a good 1000 nm to the west.  Here and here are my photos from 2015, which already seems long ago.  I’ll miss the Roundup this year because I’ll be eastbound on the waterways from Chicago, but there’s a chance we’ll pass Cheyenne on the way!!

Is she the last Bushey tug to leave the sixth boro?  If so, it’s a transition in an era or something . . . .

Safe travels and long life in the fresh waters out west.

 

 

Yesterday’s post requires a complement, so here it is.  The flight out was less turbulent but equally rewarding for folks looking out the window.  Behold the Tappan Zee.  This stretch of the river–from Piermont “pier” (created by the Erie RR) on the west side of the Hudson to Croton Point on the east and a little margin on either side represents approximately 10 statute miles, by my estimate.  Rockland Lake,  directly across the river from Croton Point and usually obscured by Hook Mountain just south of Haverstraw, can clearly be seen here.

Here’s the next stretch of river from Croton Point north and almost to Poughkeepsie.  That’s about 40 statute miles, as the crow flies.  By slow boat, that’s the better part of a winter’s day.  Note the long skinny reservoir,  DeForest Lake, at the 4 o’clock point of the photo.

From my seat on the starboard side, I was hoping for a glimpse of Lake Ontario, but this is way beyond my hopes:  despite the clouds, a clear view of the 27-mile Welland Canal from Port Colbourne on Lake Erie below to Port Weller on Lake Ontario above.

Last summer we exited here, near the MRC scrapyard at Port Colbourne just after 1600 after having entered the Welland Canal

here at Port Weller, just before 0900 that day . . . so the aerial above represents a day’s traverse through the Welland locks, with no delays.

By this time, I was starting to think the pilot of this aircraft must have wanted to be credited on this blog, for as we headed into Detroit airport, he gave me this final treat:  a view of the 740′  Algoma Harvester upbound through the cutoff leaving marshy Walpole Island to starboard and the more substantial Seaway Island, ON to its port. The natural flow of the St Clair River–and the international border– is along the far side of Seaway and Miller, MI.

My week away involved another flight, a long drive, and then the flight with my camera–not my phone.  Since I’m on an aerial fling, I’ll share some of those tomorrow.  Below is a sample, for you to savor if you want to guess my destination.

 

 

I’m told this vessel from bottom of keel to mast tops measures more than 8 feet.  Can you identify its location?  Here’s some more info:  “Marcus T. Reynolds designed the weathervane atop the center tower, a 400 pound replica of the Half Moon, which is 6 feet, 9 inches long and 8 feet, 10 inches tall, and the largest working weathervane in the US.”

The photo above was take in March, and the one below  . . . in February 2017.

It spins with the winds incessantly atop this building and will never make it to the major river less than a quarter mile beyond.  Know it?  It was built for a railroad and now it’s a university administration building.

Here’s a photo I took in September 2012 from the Hudson side.  The weather vane looks like a mere speck.  It’s less than a mile from the northern end of the Port of Albany oil docks.

And here’s the answer.  The source of the quote is here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has done many previous Half Moon posts here.

 

A month or so ago, I talked with Don Lake, who wanted to tell me some family history, which I transcribe here:  “My family has been on tugs for many years, beginning with my grandfather, Captain James Lake, who began his career as a young boy on Rondout Creek, NY, in the late 1800s and later moved down to New York harbor where he acquired his Master Mariner’s license with unlimited tonnage and pilotage.  In the early 1920s he was also instrumental in the formation of Local 333 along with Captain Joe O’Hare, who organized the tug boat workers of NY harbor.

I have relatives who worked for M. J. Tracy for many years, an old line company in NY, specializing in coal delivery to the power generating stations in NY and NJ at Con Edison and PSE & G.

There’s a great history of the company in a back issue of Tug Bitts from the Tug Boat Enthusiasts organization.”  [The organization is now dormant.]

Helen L. Tracy has since ultimately been rechristened Providence, and I posted a photo of the boat here a few months back tied up on the Mississippi just around the bend downstream from New Orleans. That is, it is the same boat unless I’m confused here.    Another question . . . what was the connection between Avondale Towing Line and M. J. Tracy Towing Company?  I could call Don, but I’m putting the question out to blog readers.  Here’s what I learned about the photo from the Portal to Texas History.

At times like this I really wish there was a digital archive of the years of Tug Bitts.  Is there any plan to do this?  I’d be happy to contribute some ducats for this to happen, and I’m sure lots of other folks would too.

Again, many thanks to Don for writing and sending along a photo I need to frame.

Here’s more on Rondout Creek, currently home to Hudson River Maritime Museum and formerly headquarters for Cornell Steamboat Company. And if you haven’t read Thomas Cornell and the Cornell Steamboat Company by Stuart Murray, here’s how you can order this must-read.

Click here for a Tracy boat from the 1952 tug boat race.

ooops, new pigs, there must have been an incident.

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A little background . . . .  A conductor of the The Timbuctoo, Khartoum & Western Railway Marching Band & Chowder Society emailed me yesterday about what they said was “strange small boat activity” just north of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.   Since I was in the area, I thought I’d check it out, and what I saw would be

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considered at very least unorthodox nets on small boats, now that we are in harbor “fishing” season.  Pannaway is dredging for critters, I believe, although I’m puzzled by her New Hampshire registration, if I’m not mistaken.

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See the rig with “sock” skimming the surface?

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These rigs are designed to soak up stuff that should not be in the water, as opposed to critters that find it acceptable habitat.

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Ken’s Marine does a lot of types of work, and

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responding to spills is one of them.

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The news had nothing I could find, but I’m guessing

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there was something under-reported here.  By the way, a flat oil absorbent product is often called a diaper.

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Again, thanks to the good conductor for the tip.

All photos and speculation by Will Van Dorp, whose already taken but too few rides on the Timbuctoo, Khartoum & Western Railway.

An added plus of my trip here was to have another look at Soldiers and Sailors Monument, which I’ll feature in an upcoming post.

 

I shouldn’t be surprised to find pricey boats in a city like NYC, but I still am.  I took the first two photos here in Chelsea Piers, and I imagined their understated elegant lines meant they were affordable.  Well, maybe they are easily affordable by the incoming executive branch standards, but for most folks, not so much.  Look them up . . . Van Dutch boats.

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I also shouldn’t be surprised how fast some boats travel on the Hudson, but this one flew past at

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least 35 knots, and it wasn’t small.  I’ve no idea who the manufacturer is.

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Traveling in the canal makes for a slower pace, with people going for the distance, like

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Pioche.  They must know about some new navigation canal infrastructure plans I’m not privy to.  And I wonder who they hope to meet in Pioche.

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If I bought another cruising boat, I’d want something like this . . .

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here upbound the St Lawrence.  I’m not positive it’s a pleasure boat, but PCF does not mean patrol craft, fast.  It could be Provincial C___  for Fisheries?

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I’m not sure what this is, besides a boat.  Anyone know the story?  She was up north of the Scarano barns in Albany.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

. . . and in case you’re rummaging through your change drawer for some cash to buy something for yourself or someone else special, here are some ideas.  Buy a raffle ticket for an opportunity next summer to ride an Interlake Steamship vessel on the Great Lakes . . .  Here’s a post I did a few months back on the classic Interlake Oberstar.   And from International Shipmasters’:  The funds from sales keep our lodge financially secure and we donate every year to other various maritime related non-profits. Sea Cadets, Whistles on the Water, and Shipmaster Grand Lodge Scholarship Fund.  Our own scholarship fund is endowed and gives 3 scholarship awards each year of $500 to each, 1 Canadian, 1 US, 1 hawse piper.   Click on the image below for information on purchasing a raffle ticket.  I have mine . . . and I imagine these would make a great gift for lots of folks you want to give a gift to.

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If you win and need something to do when you’re not just mesmerized by Great Lakes scenery, here are some books to consider.  Of course, you can read them any time . . . real books, not device books. Here’s what the Icelanders say about giving books.

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Here are some of the books I’ve read this past year.  I’d recommend all of them.

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The Big Book of Real Boats and Ships was an impulse buy after someone mentioned it on FB.  George J. Zaffo did a whole series of these books back in the 1950s and 1960s.  Here’s more on his and similar books. What makes it interesting for me is that real means real;  here’s the info on C. Hayward Meseck, the vessel in the illustration below.

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Also from Zaffo, here’s info on the tug in the foreground below, Barbara Moran (1948), scuttled in 1990 and sits upright about 70′ below the surface. 

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This past year I’ve met lots of folks whom I’ve encouraged to write their stories or have someone else write them.  Bob Mattsson did that a few years ago, and I finally read it this year.

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Here’s part of page 1.

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Up River is another one I read this year, one that helps you see what you can’t see from the river.  The cover photo below shows Tomkins Cove Quarry, one of many quarries whose scale you get no sense from the river.  Recently on a trip from NYC to Waterford on the river with some folks who had never done the trip, I brought this along and noticed they paged through during the entire trip as a way to “see” what they otherwise couldn’t.  Thanks to Capt. Thalassic for introducing me to this book.  You can “page” through the entire book here!

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All those books . . . this time of year, it all reminds me of a post I did here 10 years ago about the circumstances around the first Christmas presents I ever got .  .  .

 

Let me start to play catch up here, since I have not done one of these posts in over half a year.  Anyone know why HMCS St. John’s (FHH-340) steamed into the sixth boro yesterday, Thanksgiving Day?  To assist this 45′ USCG response vessel and all the land-based law enforcement in keeping order on the so-called “black friday” chaos, perhaps?

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USNS GySgt. Fred W. Stockham (T-AK-3017) was waiting in the anchorage,possibly for a berth at GMD Bayonne. The vessel namesake had an interesting set of deployments.

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Icebreaker Penobscot Bay (WTGB-107) headed upriver a half month ago, but there was no imminent ice formation at that time, unless one traveled  well north of Inukjuak, but it would take some extraordinary turn-of-events for WTGB-107 to deploy there.

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The sixth boro has a number of these 29′ patrol craft.

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And to close out today’s post, USACE Moritz passes the evolving Rockefeller University campus expansion just north of the Queensboro Bridge.

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All photos in the past month by Will Van Dorp.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed the “whatzit” series as much as I do.  The photo below I took on October 22, 2016.  A minute or so earlier, I was thinking we were about to meet some traffic.  At this point I realized there were islands where I’d no recollection of seeing islands.  So what is it?

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Here’s a similar “island,” photo taken on November 14, 2016.  In the Thousand Islands, such a small island with at least three trees would not have been out of place, but here . . .   ?

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Until I saw this, and a few seconds later . . .

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this.   By the way, these photos were taken not far north of Saugerties.

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These camouflaged hunting platforms reminded me of some hunters we waked a few years back on Urger.  You can’t slow down if you don’t see the reason to.  Once we waked a few in a boat right along the bank–no photos because we didn’t see anything until we had passed by–we learned to “see” them and respond.

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Here are a few we spotted in time.

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We saw this guy, but he kept paddling madly as if to race us, all while keeping his face turned away.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who reiterates his suggestion from yesterday here:

“If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.”

On the cusp of wintriness if not winter per se, the Hudson Valley is spectacular.  Let’s start with Fred Johannsen pushing this crane barge northward.  That’s the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge aka George Clinton Memorial Bridge (DeWitt Clinton’s uncle)  in the distance.

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Here Treasure Coast urges Cement Transporter 7700–one I’ve never seen before–the last mile to the cement dock.

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This reflection was so magical, I needed to include this closer-up.

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Emerald Coast pushes a fuel barge downstream.

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Sarah D moves a motley pair of scows upstream.

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Eastern Dawn moves a fuel barge downstream.

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Mr Russell shifts a barge near the TZ Bridge.  What is in those tanks?

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Might that be Marion Moran pushing sugar barge Somerset up toward Yonkers?

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I believe this is Doris Moran moving cement barge Adelaide downriver.

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And as a last-but-not-least photo today, here’s Cornell conducting a TOAR sign off session.  Here’s a post I did three years ago with the same activity but using a different barge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a proposal below:

If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

Also, you may be “choosing” ed out by now, but here’s a set of thoughtful, well-reasoned and -articulated perspectives on the Hudson anchorages question that is open to public discussion until early December.

Also, if you’re planning to be at the WorkBoat show in New Orleans next week,  I’ll be wandering around there, maybe looking for some extra work.  I hope to see you.

 

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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