You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Hudson River’ category.

or I can call this Port of Albany 2, or better still Ports of Albany and Rensselaer.  Albany’s fireboat Marine 1 has been on this blog here.  Anyone know where it was built?

The port has not one but . . .

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but two large cranes.

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And bulk cargo is transferred through the port in both directions, whether it be solid or

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dusty.

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Over on the Rensselaer side, scrap seems to be a huge mover.

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North of Port Albany is USS Slater, about which lots of posts can be found here.  But it’s never occurred to me until now that the colors used by Slater camouflage and NYS Marine Highway are a very similar gray and blue!

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Kathleen Turecamo (1968) has been in this port–135 miles inland–for as long as I’ve been paying attention, which is only a little over a decade.

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This September, NYS Canal Corp’s Tender #3, which probably dates from the 1930s, traveled south to the ports of Albany and Rensselaer.

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The port is also a vital petroleum center, both inbound and out.

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With the container train traffic along the the Hudson and the Erie Canal, I’m only less surprised than otherwise that Albany-Rensselaer currently is not a container port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s general info about the Port of Albany, although a lot of info there seems a bit out of date.  For a blog that visits visits the ports of Albany and Rensselaer more regularly, check here.   Here’s the port of Albany website.

And last but not least, check Mark Woody Woods’ broad sampling of ships heading to and from Albany-Rensselaer.

 

aka GHP&W 5

You saw the tug Cornell moving Clearwater to the Rondout in this post in late October.  But if you wondered how the Maine-built sloop was loaded, today’s your lucky day.  First, the truck comes to deliver the wood to support the keel on the barge before the

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Travelift moves Clearwater.  Along the left side of the photo, that’s Norman’s Kill near where it flows into the Hudson.

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When the blocking is ready, the Travelift moves down the tracks alongside the “pit”

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and final adjustments are made.

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Jacks provide stability.  Note the large green building in the background;  that’s Scarano Boat Building, where the Manhattans and many other vessels have been built.

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Click here to see the 3m31 sec YouTube of the process of getting the loaded barge out of the pit for the southbound trip to the Rondout.

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Many thanks to Paul Strubeck for these.

The Cornell (1950) with Clearwater (1969) on Hughes 141 photos come with thanks to Glenn Raymo.  The Hudson Valley is particularly beautiful this time of year, especially if you catch it in the right light, which of course is true everywhere.

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The other tugboats and landscapes in this post are mine.  In the KVK, Sarah Ann (2003) passes RTC 135 just as the morning sun clears a bank of low-lying clouds.

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An upriver-bound Navigator (1981) clears the Kills with HT 100 around the same hour.

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. . . passing lighthouses,

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gantry cranes, storage facilities,

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high ground, 

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and impossible towers.

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Many thanks to Glenn for use of his photos.  I’m sure Paul Strubeck plays a role here also.  And I took the photos of Sarah Ann and Navigator.

Here and here are some previous photos of Clearwater on its winter maintenance barge.

Here are previous posts with photos by Paul, who decks on Cornell

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which does most of its work on the Hudson.  Deborah Quinn (1957) has been here several times, the first here.

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Here’s old and new side by side in Red Hook Erie Basin, Scotty Sky and Chandra B.

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And some old boats together, Spooky, Pilot, and Gowanus Bay. Click here for one of my favorite sets of photos involving Gowanus Bay.  Pilot and Spooky (as Scusset) both came off the ways in Wisconsin in spring 1941 as USACE vessels.

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Evelyn Cutler first appeared on this blog as Melvin E. Lemmerhirt.

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I don’t know the story of the seaplane landing on the Rondout on the far side of Cornell, but soon I will be putting up a photo I took last weekend of a seaplane on the St. Lawrence.

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It’s that time of year, with hints of

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the dark side.

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Many thanks to Paul, who took all of these photos.

Safe travels.

Click here for posts from lots of other years.  In today’s post, you’ll see almost all blue-and-gold before the parade, i.e., heading for the muster

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entering the top of lock 2

It was great to have two covered barges for events.

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Lehigh Valley 79, dry dock repairs complete, heads for the sixth boro this week. 

Urger exits the low side of lock 2 and  . . .

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enters the Hudson.

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Note the Waterford wall with the covered barges in the distance.

The federal lock at Troy leads into the rest of the Hudson . . .

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After the dignitaries are picked up,

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the flotilla heads back north into the Troy lock,

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and

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the parade has begun.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Many thanks to tug44 as host and photo boat.

For more photos, check these from the Daily Gazette.

 

How about cold pics today, like these first two of Line.   For the story, click here, an article that never got paper published.

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What floats in the Hudson here is like what floats in my tea all day.   I recall that the crew I interviewed here told me I should try to see one of these in dry dock to understand how the design of the hull makes these small tugs great for breaking ice.  “It has an ice pick,” one person said.

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Well, finally I got to see Swivel high and dry.  Swivel is no longer owned by the USCG.  It may belong to an entity called GIPEC.

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Anyhow, this is about WYTL design.  See the ice pick?  The bow rides up on the ice and the perpendicular notch saws through.

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I’m glad I finally got to see this, and I hope you too are chilled by thinking of icebreakers and the beautiful season shaping us a half year from now.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday, I had permission to board the 1905 ferry Binghamton for the first time in almost four years.  I had studied my 2011 photos a little, but the boat is so changed inside that I really should have printed out some 2011 shots to try to replicate them.  That said, it’s so modified that that might not have worked in some cases.  Enjoy.

Shoreside entrance in October 2011

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and the same mirror but more context in August 2015.  Preserved or cashed in?

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The south end in October 2011

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and in August 2015.

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The whole vessel in 2011, noting the detail left on the wheelhouses

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. . . and  in August 2015.

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East side as seen from NYWaterways in 2011,

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with a (blurry, sorry) close-up;

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and yesterday, August 201,

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with a close-up,showing that someone clearly detached the name board and stowed it on the river side of the wheelhouse.

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The top level east side of the bar in 2011, and

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2015, showing a more sinuous row of clerestory windows mostly broken.

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This is looking southward along the river side lower level and  . . .

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same shot from 2011 but cropped closer to the landing and

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the same landing in august 2015, with the surveyor showing scale.

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This is looking northward toward the GW Bridge in 2011, and

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and the current less enclosed view.

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The rest of the photos just document the current historic ferry as she looked on August 5, 2015.  For comparison, check “Last Call 1, 2, 3 . . .”   and “After Last Call 1  and 2” .

These are the remains of built-in benches, not add-ons.

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This is looking northward toward the GW Bridge along the west side and

 

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a close-up of decking on that quarter.

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On the same side this is the passageway once leading to the four-cylinder double-compound reciprocating power plant rated 1,400 horsepower,  and from

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from farther southward showing silt left by higher tides.

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This is the opposite passageway to the engine on the sunny riverside,

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and the same from farther southward.

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This is the grand staircase looking southward shoreside

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with mirrored ceilings creating a dusty but otherwise Escher-like possibility as go up to the bar.

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This is the south end of the bar deck looking across the river, and the same

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direction as seen from farther northward.

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A patron at this bar might be very tired and very merry, but the mixologist prepares no more drinks and this

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ferry is definitely out of service.

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And we need someone to update Edna.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for some photos of the ferry by Vlad and Johna.   Here’s an almost 20-year-old story about the sad demise of one former owner.

I went quite close to the source of the Hudson four years ago . . . here.   But earlier this summer I stopped in Glens Falls, just because I wanted to see the falls.

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Glens Falls as seen from the Route 9 bridge

Here’s more . . .

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and more.

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Glens Falls as seen from below the Route 9 bridge

And here’s looking down the Hudson from below the bridge, with Finch Paper to the left and SCA Tissue to the right.

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Back to the Route 9 bridge, here’s the old central office, and click here for an interesting Finch Paper history.

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But here’s the real nugget . . . the really interesting piece of history, and it’s UNDER the bridge.  Charles Reed Bishop, local boy orphaned by age 4, who tagged along with a friend with connections–William Little Lee.  At age 24, the two of them headed for San Francisco, and since this was 1846, that meant sailing around Cape Horn and stopping in Hawaii along the way.  Bishop stayed, became a citizen of the Kingdom of Hawaii, and the rest of the story is here.

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How’s that for an unlikely trajectory for a Hudson river boy AND information found under a bridge?   And about 50 miles south of here, in Troy, along the river’s edge is another plaque celebrating another Hudson river boy with an unlikely trajectory into the Pacific.

Photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the index.

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Of course, it’s two boats, the sloop Clearwater tied up to the ex-NYC DEP skimmer Cormorant.  As I understand the situation, it’s on the market . . . again.

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I don’t know the date of this photo or the identity of the person showing scale.

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Dimensions are 114′ x 44′ x 10′

And here’s Clearwater pulling away.  But, before they cast off lines, their crew was on the dock checking

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this short nose sturgeon.  Now I can’t prove a connection between dead fish and TZ construction, but a few days ago I read this article at the Lohud site that included this paragraph:  “In June 2012, the fisheries service determined Tappan Zee construction would injure or kill some sturgeon but was “not likely to jeopardize the continued existence” of the fish. Under a federal permit issued to the Thruway Authority, two of each species can be killed during construction.”  I’m surprised such language exists in the paperwork.  And what happens if this limit is exceeded?

 

Well,  here’s another paragraph from the article:  “[Riverkeeper]  said 100 Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon have died since the start of construction in 2012. From 2009 to 2011, it said six sturgeon deaths were reported to the state Department of Environmental Conservation.”

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Here’s a statement of Cormorant‘s mission, now turned over to the USACE.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, back on June 12, 2015.

But first, from less than two months ago . . . this photo taken by O. Nonimus Bosch shows Fells Point, Sassafras, and Pocomoke temporarily immobilized.  Here and here are parts of the story.

3 Barges Panorama

Recently in t-shirt weather in the sixth boro . . . it’s a classic, Thomas J. Brown.

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Ellen S. Bouchard,

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Resolute with a Bouchard barge,

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and Evening Star, also with a Bouchard barge.

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Elizabeth McAllister light,

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Robert E. McAllister,

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Ross Sea, 

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Eric McAllister,

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and finally Ellen McAllister shifting

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Cielo di Roma . . .

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Thomas J. Brown . . . enjoy another look at this classic.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.   And in the post above, subtracting the three tugs in the O. Nonimus Bosch photo, you have over 25,000 horsepower, of which 1000 of those ponies are generated by Thomas J.

 

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Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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