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Gene Chaser appears to be a sister of Ad-Vantage, which appeared here a year and a half ago.  Click on the link at the beginning of the first sentence and you’ll see some interior shots of this 55-meter yacht support vessel. At some point, yacht support vessel Ad-Vantage was available for charter for a mere 67,500 Euro per week.

The script below the name Gene Chaser puzzles me, especially since I see signs for multiplication and addition.  Maybe someone can translate?

Shooting into the sun from a low-on-the-river angle provides this unsatisfactory image. 

 Shooting down from Brooklyn Heights, as Claude Scales did for this shot, gets this image.  Is that a submarine near the stern of Gene Chaser?  In case you were wondering about the name, it makes sense when you consider the vessel below is the annex to Dr. Jonathan Rothberg‘s Gene Machine, currently off Connecticut. Rothberg is an American chemical engineer, biologist, inventor and entrepreneur. His business involves developing a high-speed “next-gen” DNA sequencing process.  I think these vessels make him a polymath on the seas, an early 21st century version of Jules Verne’s Captain Nemo.  

On the west side of Manhattan North Cove the other day, I walked past this eye catcher . .  .

The cockpit of this “center console” Alen Yacht 45 is quite narrow and not enclosed,

but don’t underestimate this

Turkish beauty.

And to go to the other end of the tech and financial spectrum, what’s the story with the heavily loaded red 16′ Old Town Penobscot Royalex canoe?  The paddler is not yet IN the sixth boro, but heading this way.

It’s Neal Moore, heading 7000+ miles from Astoria OR, city of the fisher-poets, TO the sixth boro, with an ETA of . . .  whenever he gets here, but likely in December or January, depending on the assistance of “river angels” and relying on his own fortitude. As of this posting, he’s paddling the Erie Canal somewhere east of Lyons and west of Oneida . . . .  That trip is longer than and tougher than the Great Loop.  Technically, the Erie Canal is closing soon, but it’ll be open for him.  Wave if you see him.

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Check out his website for lots of photos and articles like those excerpted below.

 

Many thanks to Claude and to the webmaster at 22Rivers for their photos;  all others, WVD.

I could have called this post about this vessel out there on a hazy midday “people movers 15″, because this is a cruise ship, unique in many ways:  size, shape, and place of origin.  I could also have called it “newest hull in the sixth boro 11″ because it is, although there are three other candidates that arrived here for the first time this past weekend.  I could have called it “exotics 28″ since I assumed this was another wind farm-related bathymetric vessel or some other research vessel like OceanXplorer, which came here not quite a year ago. A lot of wind farm vessels vessels in the sixth boro have either ocean or explorer in their name. 

See the notations on the hull?  According to this summary here, it’s a Norwegian design,  ordered by a Florida company, built by a Chinese shipyard,  flagged Bahamian, and operated by a company owned by a Bostonian.    Got all that?

She came into the sixth boro yesterday, traveled up to Hyde Park anchorage, and in the wee hours arrived at the Manhattan passenger terminal from the north.

She’s the second of her class, which will be comprised of seven vessels, one of which will be named for Sylvia Earle.  She departed Haimen CN in late July, stopped in Manilla first to crew up, and then in Malta to get hotel crew and supplies, and then the UK to begin a cruise.  I’ve no idea which all stops she made, since according to this notice, the 2021 cruising season was Covid-cancelled.

She did transit the Cape Cod Canal, where she was examined stem, stern, masthead to waterline by a drone.

That Ulstein bow was seen on a vessel in the Hudson four years ago exactly here, and in Cape Town nine years ago here.

More on Ocean Explorer here.

With dimensions of 343′ x 60′, she carries twice as many passengers as Grande Caribe or Grand Mariner,  the Blount “small ships,”  162 guests with 77 cabins of which 15 are solo cabins.  Her 162 passengers represent less than 4% of the number of passengers on Symphony of the Seas Ocean Explorer has been referred to as a polar expedition cruise vessel, like Fram, because of the construction of its hull. 

All photos and any errors, WVD.

As of posting, she’s at the north side of Pier 88.  Did anyone get pics of her in Provincetown?

 

Since we’ve had some extreme weather, how about a different type of extreme . . .  with NYC DEP sludge tanker Red Hook approaching the unique Riverbank State Park, one of three state parks within Manhattan, the one with a wastewater treatment plant beneath it.  I’ve just read that it’s now renamed the Denny Farrell State Park.  Who knew . . . ?

Many thanks to Greg Hanchrow for these photos from a few winters back.

Daniel Meeter, frequent commenter on the blog and so much more, happened to overnight in Huron OH and caught these photos of Kristin Noelle shuffling some dredge equipment around.

 

I happened upon Huron OH here a few winters back . . .

Jonathan Steinman caught this photo of Atlantic Salvor returning to the sixth boro some time back;  Jonathan used to send an occasional photo from the east side of Manhattan, but now he’s gotten really busy on the opposite side of the island.   Of course, that’s the GW Bridge in the distance.

Need launch service for supplies or crew change on the upper Mississippi River?  This launch can be trailered to the nearest boat ramp and then rendezvous with the client.  This photo and the one below comes thanks to Trucker Tim.

Sharon Jon has spent its entire life–older than me by a decade–in the Duluth area;  her days may now be done however.

My sister of the Maraki crew got these photos of Bradshaw McKee last week as it backed out of Grand Haven MI. 

I’m surprised by this, since I thought that barge was now married to Prentiss Brown, but those two tugs have quite different superstructures, and this is unmistakably Bradshaw McKee.  The barge, St. Marys Conquest, began life in Manitowoc WI as a tanker in 1937.

Many thanks to Greg, Daniel, Trucker Tim, Jonathan, and Lucy for these photos.

As of this morning, USS Slater is back to Albany again, after its latest shipyard visit.

Below, thanks to Tim Rizzuto, are some photos from exactly 27 years ago, showing two McAllister tugboats assisting the large Russian, now Ukrainian, tugboat Gepard, which successfully delivered Slater from the Mediterranean to the sixth boro. I know this is a digression, but Gepard has an “exciting” history.  It’s still working, currently in the Black Sea.

Maybe someone can assist in identifying the two McAllister tugs.  This photo shows the significant difference in beam:  Gepard 66′ and Slater 37’…

 

From 1993, let’s jump to 1997.  Jeff Anzevino got the following photos as the destroyer escort made its initial trip up the Hudson to Albany.  Jeff has contributed many photos to this blog, going back almost to the beginning.  The tug pictured her is Rainbow, currently called Patriotic, which has been in the Morris Canal for quite a long time.  Patriotic is a 1937 Bushey build.

Also assisting in the 1997 tow were Benjamin Elliot and Mame Faye!

Jeff also caught the tow back in 2014.  And  . . . is that Margot on starboard?  That IS Benjamin Elliot on port.

Many thanks to Tim Rizzuto and Jeff Anzevino for use of these photos.  If you’re interested in donating to USS Slater.org to help defray expenses, click here.

I’d really appreciate identification of the McAllister tugs above.

My previous Slater posts can be found here.

 

Today will be a two-post day.  Here’s the first one, and it follows on this May update.  These photos come thanks to Kevin Oldenburg.  The next post will come in an hour.

She was headed up to Feeney’s Shipyard in the Rondout for a continuation of the conversion from oil spill response vessel to pilot boat mother ship.  Atone point, she was identical to New Jersey Responder or Deep Blue Responder.

Unlike her move back in May, only a few miles, this time she traveled under her own power.  And travel she did . . . . 13 knots worth.

Hat tip to Kevin.  Previous photos attributed to Kevin can be found here.

 

White, blue, and red comes in different contexts, and

this one along with the name on the trailboard does give pause.

Glenn Raymo took these photos in Poughkeepsie Sunday, and they were my introduction to an ambitious sailing project.   The best I can tell this project began in Petrozavodsk, a city on the western shore of Lake Onega, in northwest Russia, a few hundred miles east of access to the Baltic at St. Petersburg.  Lake Onega is connected to both the Baltic and the Arctic Ocean via the White Sea Canal. As a person who fancies himself somewhat well-versed in canals, I was ignorant of the White Sea Canal until now:  mostly hand-dug by prisoners of the USSR in the 1930s

Pilgrim is a lodya, a traditional sailing vessel of this area.  Along with the koch, the lodya is an ancient Rusian polar exploration vessel.

If you follow along on the “news” link, you see their step-by-step voyage from Russia.  Exactly two years ago, eg, they had just crossed the Bay of Biscay!   News articles go all the way back to 2006.

To my friends along the Erie Canal, once the waterway is open, keep your eyes peeled.

Many thanks to Glenn Raymo for this catch.  Previous posts with attribution to him can be seen here.

It reminds me of all the memorable vessels that have transited the Erie Canal:  Bounty*, Draken Harold Fairhair, Pinta, Sequoia**,  Hokule’a, Ra, When and If, Amarah Zee, the future Oliver Hazard Perry, Lois McClure . . . I have no doubt left some out.

*I have photos but I’ve not posted them on tugster.   **One of the planned but not realized posted is a review of Capt. Giles M. Kelly‘s book;  any volunteer to write a review?  You’ll get a free book.

And to the crew of Pilgrim,    попутный ветер, друзья мои      I hope I spelled that right.

The whole trip, dock to dock, lasted almost exactly 24 hours, although given some delays, it could have been a few hours shorter.  Call this post “day and night,” or more accurately, “day, night, and day.” Here was part a.

Let’s start some hours later on day 1.  Most river traffic does not draw spectators like this did.

 

Even the family dog came out.

Twelve or so hours after that, a blistering summer sun had given way to the Thunder moon, here lighting a path northeastward from Staten Island.  I took this photo before 0500.

 

After biding time for a few hours here,

Nathan G let go lines and Slater began the  final leg of the trip to the yard;  Sarah D is over there, but the illusion is almost that Slater is underway on her own power,

watchman mimicking deck gun, pointing the way.

Once in the KVK, a blazing summer sun returned, replacing the Thunder moon.

Pier assignment received, the tugs eased the destroyer escort into the dock.

Many thanks to Bill Stolfi and Steve Munoz for the first three photos;  the sixth boro harbor photos by WVD.

For more info on USS Slater, click here and here.

Here , here, and here were posts from the 2014 dry-docking.

In July 2020, she heads down to Staten Island for another dry-docking, partly to address issues other than in 2014.  The photo below captures an 0600 view.  Today’s post covers the first three hours of the next 24, as it makes its way down to the Staten Island shipyard.  Tug Sarah D (roughly 90′ x 29′ and rated at 2000hp) arrives.  It’s a spectacular morning.

The ship and museum are located near the “U-Haul truck on building” which you may see driving through Albany NY, and have no idea what lies below on the river.

By 0730, Nathan G (roughly 73′ x 24′ and 1200hp) has arrived, and both tugs and all three crews are ready to move;  a series of unheard commands, a burst of power, a foamy wake, a tensing of the towlines, a hint of expended fuel . . . and

 

away they go.  The wealth of spectators reported farther downriver is already evident here.    Does anyone have photos showing the crowds on the shore?  Please get in touch if you are willing to share photos showing this.

Sarah D rotates Slater 180 degrees to point her downstream toward the tank farms and grain silos of Port of Albany.  The dimensions on Slater are 306′ x 37.’  Her engines are “cosmetically maintained” and she has an operating generator.

By the time the tow passes the very Dutch place name of “Paarda Hook,” or Horse Point, it is already 0830, and we, aboard the warm and elegant Dutch Apple II,  turn back.

More tomorrow.  Here’s Slater‘s history.  Her namesake is Frank O. Slater, a USN seaman who died near the Solomon Islands during an attack on USS San Francisco in November 1942.  Here’s an extensive history.

A bit more detail I learned, and hopefully noted accurately,  aboard Dutch Apple II:  Slater is one of 479 destroyer escorts built that remained in the USN, 44 of which were named for seamen from New York state.  She’s the only one preserved in the US.  Her mission, with her 216 sailors, was to accompany the North Atlantic convoys, of which she performed five;  no vessels were lost to U-boats during those five crossings.  After four years in the USN, she was sold to the Greek Navy, where she served forty (!) years; hence many more Greek seamen served aboard her than US seamen.

The dazzle paint reproduces her appearance during WW2; it was intended to confuse U-boats of her type and direction so that any torpedoes fired would more likely miss their targets.  After the U-boats were equipped with acoustic (sound homing) torpedoes, she and other DEs would tow foxer (or FXR) cables  [aka Kreissäge (circular saw) or Rattelboje (rattle buoy)] to lead the torpedoes off course.

For more info on the museum, click here.  If you use Facebook, they are here.

To repeat, I’m interested in photos of the crowds along the river Sunday to greet the ship; I’m also interested in photos of Slater alongside Intrepid from 1993 until 1997 and the initial tow upriver in 1997.

Social distancing  . . . we hope it’s playing a role in defeating the spread of infection, so it’s not really true that we’re going stir crazy; instead, we do good by limiting travel and seeing this time as a godsend, an opportunity to face long-postponed tasks.  So for the near future, we’ll be posting from the archives and soliciting –ster posts.  Got any?

These and this text from Phil Little, who has a most ideal porch view, right across from the Manhattan Passenger Terminal.  Phil’s sentiments are inside quotation marks.

Cranester?  I took a series of shots from the balcony here in June 2016 of a tower crane boom extension being installed at 899 Avenue in Port Imperial NJ. Not exactly 6th Boro, but if they dropped it, that’s where it would be!   The pics are pretty much self explanatory. Those guys obviously don’t have acrophobia.”  If you want to know all about a tower crane, getting to the cab and operating the crane, click here.

1. “Picking up the assembled section.”  Notice the triangular Via 57, which some call a pyramid on the Hudson, others call a hyperbolic paraboloid. It’s 57 because it’s on 57th Street.

2. “Here she comes! Get ready!”

3. “Pin A goes in Tab B….I think!”

4. “Ok! Got her hung!”

5.  “Everybody always gets together after the job for a beer or two!”   Uh, Phil, I don’t think that’s beer.

Many thanks to Phil Little for these photos.

Hats off for the folks doing essential work.  Stay healthy.

Related:  tugster posts focusing on cranes can be found here.  Also, if you’re not familiar with NYC and its ferries, NY Waterways, whose boats you see in some of these photos,  IS an interesting story, a ferry company created by a trucking magnate… a 20th-century version of Vanderbilt, who was a ferry magnate who created a railroad network.

And here’s a virtual tour you can sign up for and take from anywhere in the world:  Wartime Production in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  I plan to take it.   Here are more.

 

 

Published in error . . . but oh well.   These photos were taken ten years ago . . . almost, early February 2010.

I took them my first time ever to see ice boating.  It was cold but glorious.  Yes, those are the Catskills on the other side of the Amtrak rails. If you travel the river, you recognize the contours of the peaks.

 

Conditions for ice boating do not happen every year.  In fact, most years you cannot go ice boating because it’s too warm, ice has snow on it, ice is too rough . . .

As a result, members of the HRIYC has some quite old boats that have not been used much.  I was told a 100-year-old boat might have been used only 10 seasons.

 

Wind bellies the sails and the boats race!

 

 

You can find a thread into my post from 10 years ago here.

All photos, WVD.

 

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