You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Hudson River’ category.

. . . or I could call this another unusual tow or unusual cargo, but Kevin took these photos, as he did some of those here.

Megan Beyel has towed cargo down the Hudson before, as these two posts, but she’s hardly a regular.  I’ll bet that unit weighs upwards of 150 tons.

The other striking thing I find about these photos is their depiction of some of the variety and beauty of the Hudson River.  Many folks are familiar with the Hudson as it appears flowing through the sixth boro, but farther up, as it defines the edges of the Catskills, as here at the Hudson-Athens light, it’s a gorgeous river.  By the way, if you’re wondering why there’s a light there, it marks what was once referred to as Swallow’s Reef, and if you’re wondering why it was called Swallow’s Reef, well . . . there was once a steamboat called Swallow and it had an encounter on a reef there.

Many thanks to Kevin for taking these photos.

Related:  Another GE related cargo was depicted here, headed for lock E8.

And, a half hour or so after Kevin took the shot above, Megan Beyel and Paisley Alice would pass under the Rip Van Winkle Bridge and within sight of Olana.

 

 

 

Did I remember I’d seen her before in the same estuary and in the same time of year?

No, but I had.

Did I know the difference between bitumen and asphalt?

No.  But now I do.

Keeping a daily blog of my sights and evolving understanding of them brings wonder.  Did I know the reference in the name, Da Ming Shan?

No, but I’ve since learned it . . . a place as satisfying maybe as the Hudson Highlands.  Should you care?  Not really, but I’m glad I looked these things up.

Bon voyage, watch stander…

 

as you head for Gibraltar and beyond.

All photos and musing by Will Van Dorp, who’s written about freshwater asphalt haulers here.

Here’s a company I’ve not encountered before . . . LMZ.

LMZ Europa was northbound at Stuyvesant as we passed, and following her

were James Turecamo and

Turecamo Girls, both

 

have been regulars down near the mouth of the Hudson, but these days the

main ship assist horsepower up in this part of the River. As it turned out, the ship had completed discharging cargo in Coeymans (named for the Koijemans family) and was headed north only briefly to spin around.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to see them again in these parts a few weeks farther toward winter.

 

 

Last year I called it the same but without a date.  See here . .    here . . .  and here for all the rest.

We’ll start and end with Dylan Cooper.  Is anyone shocked by this tow tube behind the small boat?

Mary Alice returns with a dredge spoils scow.

Bear?

Durham and rebar?

Remnants of the TZ Bridge. . .

and “chewing” hard on other remnants.

Stony Point Light . . .

Tug Kristin Poling heads for Jones Point, and

Dylan Cooper moves toward the tanks in Newburgh.

All photos on Monday by Will Van Dorp, and this was Manhattan to Newburgh.

Click here for the 43 previous posts if you don’t understand the title.  If your thoughts on being the image below were of high heels sans the rest of the impractical shoe, mine were the same.  Of course, you can read Weeks 526 clear as day, so  . . . whatzit?

Here’s a bit more context.  That’s the Hudson River, old pilings for old Pier 55, I believe, just north of old Pier 54.

Piers of Manhattan once welcomed ships and ferries, cargo and passengers transitioned between land and water there.   Then people patterns changed and these piers little by little have transformed.

So what is it?!@#@!!

Come back in a few years and hang out at new Pier 55, the on–then off–then on again park idea funded for $250 million by Barry Diller.   The project reminds me of the vessel, another Heatherwick Studio creation.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with a cell phone.   I’ve been losing a grip on patterns these days myself.

Before I started blogging, Pier 54 hosted the Nomadic Museum, for a half year or so.  I loved it.

 

Thanks to Timothy Cole for this photo . . .

that’s the Hudson, looking south. Croton Point is the near low spit mid photo left side.   Who would guess that more than 10 million people live within a 50 mile radius of this spot?

Timothy took his photo on December 1, 2018.  Bill Moyers called the Hudson  “a waterway of ethereal beauty” .  .  . and more.  But that says it all.  That photo is sublime.

Below are two similar shots I took.  First July 17, 2009 looking south toward the Bear Mountain Bridge and

this one looking west above Saugerties on June 28, 2016.

The Hudson is indeed worth traveling upon whenever,

even when the river looks like a frozen desert,

and critters walk upon it, as here.

Thanks again to Timothy for the top photo, and to Paul Strubeck for the last photo.

 

 

Still between Newburgh and Beacon, I see the shadows lengthening and light adding rich tints of every color.  Can you already identify the tug-barge unit rounding the corner tower of Bannerman’s Castle seawall. I’ve heard a story of a long-distance canoeist who slept inside that low tower, but I digress.

Here’s a clue to the name of that tug: a few years ago, it had a different name.   From the north and bathed in deep color, it’s a southbound ship. That generating station is at the intriguingly named Danskammer Point. Those Dutch really had such wild imaginations they seemed driven by superstition or at least an acquaintance with the supernatural.

Also southbound with a spotlight that caught my imagination . . .

it’s Evelyn Cutler meeting

Kristin Poling, 

but the Da Ming Shan will proceed as Evelyn holds back.

 

 

The color may not be in the leaves yet, but at this hour the color is on them.

 

 

The tug-barge units pass after

the asphalt tanker has gone on ahead into the Highlands.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has again missed all the wonderful activities raising funds for restoration or stabilization of the Bannerman’s ruins.

 

It’s late afternoon when Bruce A McAllister with Double Skin 40 passes my spot, followed

by Marjorie B McAllister, with B. No. 262 behind.

From the south with a motley set of barges . . . .

 

 

it’s Frances. Afternoon light is starting to highlight Mr. Bannerman’s place.

 

That IS a short wire, a necessity given that Marjorie has no upper wheelhouse.

 

 

These low hanging clouds have never left today.

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wants to remind you of the Canal Conference in Staten Island coming up in two weeks.

The day brightens a bit, but I stayed between Newburgh–to my back–and Beacon.

Whenever a boat passed, the gulls followed, feasting on the small fish stunned by the props.

The town below gets its name from the mountain, Mount Beacon.

Local squalls obscured the area north of Newburgh-Beacon.

Following Sarah Ann northbound was the indefatigable Buchanan 12.

 

A few miles upriver Buchanan 12 swapped these scows out for a loaded set, and in a few hours, returned southbound.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

On this day, the area where the Hudson enters the highlands looked every bit the fjord that it technically is. 

I took these photos and was remembering ones sent by Richard Hudson of southern Chile, here.

It’s Breakneck Ridge on the left and Storm King Mountain on the right, with West Point academy buildings in between. Check out those links for all the other names these places have had in the past 400 years.   And who knows what names have existed before then.

By now some of you have identified the two tugs . . .

Brooklyn and Evening Mist.

I was surprised to learn that Poling-Cutler Marine Transportation now operates Brooklyn.

 

Here Evening Mist moves her barge into the terminal in Newburgh.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,327 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

January 2020
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031