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Still between Newburgh and Beacon, I see the shadows lengthening and light adding rich tints of every color.  Can you already identify the tug-barge unit rounding the corner tower of Bannerman’s Castle seawall. I’ve heard a story of a long-distance canoeist who slept inside that low tower, but I digress.

Here’s a clue to the name of that tug: a few years ago, it had a different name.   From the north and bathed in deep color, it’s a southbound ship. That generating station is at the intriguingly named Danskammer Point. Those Dutch really had such wild imaginations they seemed driven by superstition or at least an acquaintance with the supernatural.

Also southbound with a spotlight that caught my imagination . . .

it’s Evelyn Cutler meeting

Kristin Poling, 

but the Da Ming Shan will proceed as Evelyn holds back.

 

 

The color may not be in the leaves yet, but at this hour the color is on them.

 

 

The tug-barge units pass after

the asphalt tanker has gone on ahead into the Highlands.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has again missed all the wonderful activities raising funds for restoration or stabilization of the Bannerman’s ruins.

 

It’s late afternoon when Bruce A McAllister with Double Skin 40 passes my spot, followed

by Marjorie B McAllister, with B. No. 262 behind.

From the south with a motley set of barges . . . .

 

 

it’s Frances. Afternoon light is starting to highlight Mr. Bannerman’s place.

 

That IS a short wire, a necessity given that Marjorie has no upper wheelhouse.

 

 

These low hanging clouds have never left today.

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wants to remind you of the Canal Conference in Staten Island coming up in two weeks.

The day brightens a bit, but I stayed between Newburgh–to my back–and Beacon.

Whenever a boat passed, the gulls followed, feasting on the small fish stunned by the props.

The town below gets its name from the mountain, Mount Beacon.

Local squalls obscured the area north of Newburgh-Beacon.

Following Sarah Ann northbound was the indefatigable Buchanan 12.

 

A few miles upriver Buchanan 12 swapped these scows out for a loaded set, and in a few hours, returned southbound.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

On this day, the area where the Hudson enters the highlands looked every bit the fjord that it technically is. 

I took these photos and was remembering ones sent by Richard Hudson of southern Chile, here.

It’s Breakneck Ridge on the left and Storm King Mountain on the right, with West Point academy buildings in between. Check out those links for all the other names these places have had in the past 400 years.   And who knows what names have existed before then.

By now some of you have identified the two tugs . . .

Brooklyn and Evening Mist.

I was surprised to learn that Poling-Cutler Marine Transportation now operates Brooklyn.

 

Here Evening Mist moves her barge into the terminal in Newburgh.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

And let’s start with the more . . . more photos and info on previous posts.    CCGS Samuel Risley appeared here.  She’s currently approaching the Soo.  What I didn’t know when I posted a photo of her on Lake Ontario is that she was returning from her first trip to Greenland (!!), where she was providing icebreaking support for a supply mission to Qaanaaq aka Thule.

Madison R–and I’ll do a whole post about her soon–now calls Detroit her base, I’m told.

Summer fog veils a Canadian cat and an Erie Canal buoy boat above E11.

How many folks pass by Day Peckinpaugh each summer and have no clue what she is (ILI 101… launched in May 1921!!), how long her work history  (1921–1995) has been, how wide a range of waters  (Duluth to Havana, I’m told) she covered, where her sister  (ILI 105) languishes . . . . .

She gets attention.

Here’s the blue-and-gold yard above E3!!

Yup that’s Urger among them.  And yes, the pause button on scuttling has been activated.

In the legends of Ford, a sign once marked this power plant adjacent to the Federal Lock in Troy as a Ford facility.   Could this have become the location of Ford’s imagined electric car plant?

And this brings us to Troy, these walls where construction workers have staged their equipment.

Scaffold, ladders, floats, and Jackcyn

 

 

and Lisa Ann.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been working his way back to the sixth boro from the heartland.

If you’re local and would like to learn more about the New York State Canals, consider joining the Canal Society and coming to their fall conference . . .  on Staten Island.  I’ll be involved in two events . . .

 

Private planes can’t be fun for slow and prolonged travel, and RVs–unless I could drive something wild like these or a Fuller— leave me cold, but these yachts seem a popular way to see the world . . . at least one of the loops.   What I might enjoy more than a loop is a crossing, a la William Least-Heat Moon, with a smaller and more adaptable vessel.

I was not stalking the yacht below, but here I caught Ann Marie Rose entering the Upper Bay on June 8,

under the 9W bridge in Kingston on June 16, and then

on July 1 in Little Falls, NY.  Maybe I can find them on AIS.  She’s 48′ and registered in Virginia.  I’d say they travel at an appropriate pace, around 200 miles a month.

Copesetic is 46′ and registered in Chesapeake City, MD.  It’s maybe owned by someone with the last name Cope?  I’ve never been inside a catamaran motor yacht.

Ocean Star is truly from Ketchikan, AK and headed eastbound in the Erie Canal. From the West Coast they traveled by truck until they splashed into the Mississippi in Minnesota.

You can tell Scott Free (61′) is in the Canal by the fact that her radar dome and all that supports it is set on her nose, to make the low bridge.  I did a double take upon seeing her, imagining this was a boat inspired by Blount’s Grande vessels.

The natural beauty of the Canal envelopes these three cruisers as they

make their way west to share lock E-18.  The green boat in the middle appears to be a 42′ Kadey Krogen;  a friend has done two crossings of the Atlantic with his, and is now off California, after starting in Panama about a year ago.

I can’t tell you much about Sláinte, but she was pretty in the dawn light.

And this one . . . Boatel I  was headed to Toronto for the season.  It’s a floating accommodation, not to be confused with Botel, where I stayed back in 2014.  Scroll here to see my photo.

Anyone know where she spent the winter?   Maybe it’s “no tell motel.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments and related ones.

Technically, infrastructure could include launch services, without which port activities would slow.

Survey services ensure that channels and depths at docks allow activity without literal impediment.

USACE overlaps with Rogers in some areas.

But more commonly when one thinks of infrastructure, it’s what allows terrestrial activity,

like bridges and their on- and off-ramps.

With all the bridge building and innovation going on the the greater land area around the sixth boro, it’s not surprising to see bridge components arrive this way.   And what travels on the waterways post-demolition isn’t only parts of roadways; here large pieces of scrapped vessel traveled.

New bridge component above, old bridge component below . . .

Without liquid infrastructure, these would not be moving.

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Looking from the Anthony’s Nose side of the bridge down toward Jones Point, you can sense the scale of the terrain from the way it shrinks the ship,

BBC Seine on the Hudson passing Iona Island.

That’s the south slope of  Bear Mountain to the right.  I’m not sure whether the other peaks have separate names.  More of that mountain can be seen below and was included in this post from almost half a year ago.

BBC Seine was moving quite fast with a favorable current . . . 15+ kts, I believe.

How’s that for a wake.  Is there another word for this indication of turbulence?  Anyhow, at that point, I heard a noise from high up on the bridge that

sounded like this.

Such was the occurrence.   Can anyone identify the prey by the feet?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Pre-foliage spring is optimal time for seeing the landmarks along the Hudson.  This one is near Wilderstein (scroll), but I’d never seen it before.

Esopus Meadows cannot be missed either down bound or up.  Get on the wrong side, and you’ll regret ever being here. Click here for tugster posts showing the light in all the seasons.

I wonder what the crew on the anchored bulker thought of the Beaux-Arts structure on the bank.  I wonder what some of foreign crews coming up river think of the river as a whole?

Comet heads northbound with segments of dismantled TZ Bridge.  The first specific example I’ve heard of reuse is here, in Mount Vernon. 

At first glance, I thought this was odd snow accumulation on the banks,

closer up . . . an auto auction lot.

Tilcon operates one of the most conspicuous quarries along the river, seen here last week from the water and here

from the train.  Quarrying has been a major activity along the river.  And here finally I see the derivation of “trap rock,” which this crushed aggregate is sometimes called:  trap, as in stairs, for all those Dutch speakers out there.

I’ve been curious about this large crane near Chelsea NY since last summer.  Now my best guess is that it’s related to NYC Water Tunnel No. 3.  Any DEP readers help out?

Just below the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge, we meet the Buchanan 12 and her herd of barges, heading up to Tilcon for trap rock.  For many more views of Buchanan 12, click here.  We met her just as she left the sublime highlands.

Of all the many posts I’ve mentioned Bannerman’s in, here and here are my favorites. For close-ups, click here.  In this era of gun questions, here’s an article with specifics of his unregulated trade.

Breakneck Ridge looked particularly ominous with afternoon sun cast shadows.  It appears MTA trains will stop there if you have a ticket.

And movement on a ridge in Little Stony Point . . . a photographer.  Like me.  And the “point” . . .   it was once an island. 

South of here, more beautiful scenery awaited, but I got distracted and took no more photos in the fading light of late afternoon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a Hudson down bound set of three posts I did five years ago, in a different season.

This trip starts at Scarano’s just south of Albany, where a crew picked up excursion boat Kingston for delivery to Manhattan.   Last fall after delivery up bound, I posted these landmarks.

Spirit of Albany (1966), operated by the Albany Port District Commission, is a regular for the Waterford Tugboat Roundup parade.

High above Castleton, name going back to Henry Hudson, is that Sacred Heart Church?

Two bridges cross just north of Coeymans are the Berkshire Spur of the NY Thruway and the Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge, the furthest south operational rail bridge over the Hudson.

Katherine Walker performs spring buoy planting south of Coxsackie.

I’ve heard a story behind the “parked” marine equipment in Athens NY, but need a refresher.  Anyone explain how this came to be frozen in time here?  The view is only possible if your draft allows you to navigate the channel on the west side of Middle Ground Flats.

Hudson-Athens Light is one of the lighthouses saved from demolition at a point when all lights were being automated.  Back when I did more hiking, I looked down on the Hudson and some of these landmarks from the heights, in “what Rip saw,” as in the long sleeper.

South of Catskill Creek, you can see snow still covering the slopes of the Catskills.

Marion Moran pushes Bridgeport upbound.  That’s the east shore of the Hudson beyond her.

By the time we get to Saugerties, snow seems to be creating whiteout conditions on the Catskill escarpement.

We head south, here meeting Fells Point pushing Doubleskin 302.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  For more on the lighthouses, click here. In the next in the series, we head farther south.

And for what it’s worth, I’m still in the market for some “seats” photos.

 

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