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In my effort to catch up on shared photos, let me start with one I’ve heard about for a few years but never seen yet.

Al Circeo shared these next two over a month ago.  Is this tug still over at Mariners Harbor?  Does anyone know what her owners plan for her?

At one point she went by Sea Monster. ..   as in Monster.com.  Before that she was the Port Athur-built Mars, launched in 1953 and which you can see in the link here.  I don’t know if she’s been renamed, but right now as a yacht she appears to have come out of Monster Garage.

Over a month ago as well, I got this set from Russell Skeris, who took them from his Boston Whaler over by the Moriches Inlet.

Sea Cypress and Hercules were involved, as

were Capt Brennan and

Camie.

All of them in a group shot can be seen below.

A glance at AIS this rainy October morning shows some of these vessels are still working there, as seen below.

Many thanks to Al and Russell for these photos.

 

 

It’s been a few months to do a sixth-boro look around here.  Of course it’s never the same.  Never. Not even from one day to the next.  Let’s start with Weeks tug Elizabeth.  If I’m not mistaken, this machine’s carried that name ever since it was launched in 1984.

James William has been a regular in the sixth boro the past five years or so, but she started  as a Moran tug in 2007.   Note the eerie fog around the base of the Staten Island-side bridge tower.

Choptank [which the pesky auto-correct insists should be spelled Shoptalk] passes in the foreground;  Mary H in the distance. Choptank is back from several years in the Caribbean.

Paula Atwell is almost 20 years old, having started out as Crosby Express.

Northstar Integrity . . . quite the mouthful of syllables . . . seemed an unknown to me, until I realized I knew her as Petrel . . .

Not long ago I caught Marjorie at work on the Hudson down bound.

Mary Gellatly emerges from the fog.

Evening Star rests B. No. 250 at anchor with Brooklyn in the background.

Mister T heads for the mooring . . .

All sixth boro photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a backlog of so many collaboration photos that I might be alternating much-appreciated “other peoples photos” posts for a while.

 

 

Let’s start out at Little Falls NY, above Lock E-17, where Jay Bee V had just departed and was now delivering the Glass Barge to the wall there.  Notice C. L. Churchill along the left edge of the photo.

Here above Lock C-7, it’s Margot.

On the Hudson River, tis is my first closeup view of Liz Vinik, formerly Maryland.

Westbound on the East River, it’s Sea Wolf moving uncontainerized thrown-aways.

Farther east, it’s Hudson with a fuel barge,

and meeting her, it’s Morgan Reinauer with the same.

Notice here, looking toward the Queensboro Bridge, Morgan and Hudson.

Here at the Spuyten Duyvil Bridge project, it’s  Dorothy J.

and to close this post out back on the Hudson, it’s Elizabeth, moving Weeks 533.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to John Paul for this photo of the big crane as seen the land area called Spuyten Duyvil in the Bronx.   The tidal strait–entrance/exit of the Harlem river–is also called Spuyten Duyvil.  That 328′ boom shrinks the swing bridge it’s assisting with the repair of.  Of course the crane is the one that arrived from California 4.5 years ago here to raise components of the new TZ Bridge and lower the old one.

Paul Strubeck caught the crane from the water side, showing relative size of crane and swing bridge.  The higher bridge is Henry Hudson crossing.  For much more info on that bridge, click here.

I got these photos yesterday from Inwood Hill Park.  The railroad swing bridge was opened in 1900, although it was closed for most of the 1980s.  Now it carries 30 trains a day and opens about 1000 times a year, mostly for Circle Line boats.

According to this source, maintenance will focus on mechanical and electrical equipment damaged by Hurricane Sandy.   “Navigation strikes” may be another explanation.

The crane is rated at lifting capacity of 1929 tons, powered by three diesel 601 kW (806 hp) main generators and one 91 kW (122 hp) auxiliary generator provide its lifting power.  It has no propulsion power of its own.

The manufacturer is ZPMC, the same Chinese firm that provides state-of-the-art port gantry cranes here and here.

I’m not sure whose crew boat this is,

but the tugs on the scene are Dorothy J and

Robert.

Maybe I’ll find time to go back up that way tomorrow.

 

Imagine my excitement the other day when I caught Weeks newest trailing suction hopper dredge (TSHD) come briefly into the sixth boro, likely for fuel or gear.  I believe she’s working along the Jersey shore.

Magdalen, named for Chairman Weeks’ mother, is big:  356′ x 80′ with a loaded draft of 25.3′  with hopper capacity of 8550 cubic yards of dredge spoils.  A comparison could be made with TSHD Ocean Traverse Nord with capacity of 1543 cubic yards.

For all the specs, click here and go to page 13 of the Weeks Winter 2017 Newsletter.

 

Her first project was in North Carolina in January 2018.

A similar type TSHD featured here recently was Filippo Brunelleschi, which is significantly larger for different jobs:  465’x 90.2′ with hopper capacity of 14,750 cubic yards.  Currently the world’s largest TSHD by hopper capacity is Leiv Eiriksson, 60,165 cubic yards, with dimensions of 764′ x 134,’  currently in Tuzla, Turkey.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Joyce D. Brown with a resplendent paint job on a bright spring morning.

A new boat entering the Narrows in springtime.  Know it?

Sea Oak, which I last saw in Southport, NC.

Crystal Cutler, also looking great in the spring sunshine.

The extraordinary Bosco, passing the boscage of Shooters Island.

The vertically oriented Genesis Vision, previously known as Superior Service.

Paul Andrew, once sported a respectable Christmas tree here (scroll).

Another great name .  . Sea Fox.

Marjorie B McAllister, perfectly positioned with the arrow on CMA CGM Almaviva,

Rebecca Ann, with a great origin story that maybe someone who reads this knows better than I do.  All I remember is that it was locally built . . . with spare steel . . . I hope I’m right about that.  And she’s currently involved in a project that might place her in tomorrow’s post.  I believe she first appeared in this blog in 2010 here (scroll).

Any guesses?

Answer below.

Yes, Seeley, which was once a Vane Brothers boat called Vane Brothers.

All photos taken in april 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

Traffic on the East River captivates, in part, because of the context, the vertical density shrinks even large vessels, or flotillas like this.

Weeks 531, I’m thinking, must be fairly new, not only because I’ve seen her only in 2018, but more so because she doesn’t show up on the Weeks crane pages.  For a 500-ton lift capacity crane, she’s strangely absent online.

Unlike most crane barges that I’ve seen, she has a prominent superstructure.

When she was “west” bound the other day, Katherine was out front, tailed by

Susan and Michael (ex-Freddie K) Miller.

Back in January I caught the next two photos of Weeks 531 headed directly from the AK into Newark Bay.   At first view, I assumed Weeks had a huge new tug.

That’s Bergen Point between the equipment and my lens.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Can anyone fill in more info on the 531?

Previous posts featuring Weeks equipment can be found here with the Shuttle Enterprise and here with USAirways Flight 1549, in both cases involving Weeks 533, another 500-ton capacity crane.

Check out what British Cygnet looks like less laden .  . later in the post.

MSC Marina heads for sea in the morning light.

Panamax Christina has some cargo (coal, I think)  transferred before leaving town.  I believe that’s Weeks Seeley alongside.

Hafnia Leo waits in the anchorage.

Poland Pearl offloads salt for ice to come after our current supply melts and gets replaced by many more days of winter.

So . . . I wish I could have gotten a bow-on shot of British Cygnet.  There’s a lot of hold under the water when she’s loaded.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who lost track of time today.

 

And random perspectives, like this of James E. Brown approaching the W’burg Bridge, whose namesake was an engineer you’d never guess.

 

Yes, that’s Manhattan.

Marty C is a Weeks tug I’ve never heard of, here assisting Weeks 500 modify shoreline.

If you’re wondering, you’re looking into the Bronx.

 

And finally, with queens in the near background, it’s the workhorse Ellen McAllister.

 

 

And that reminds me, I saw Prentiss Brown this morning, although she was way down on the horizon, so far off I couldn’t even force my camera to focus.  You may recall Prentiss Brown as Michaela McAllister.  And Chicagoans know her barge as the “jinx ship,” back when she was still self propelled.  Now I’m keeping my eyes peeled for the former Katie G and Colleen McAllister.  Have they been renamed?

All photos, etc. by Will Van Dorp.

 

GWA stands “go[ing] west again,”  the next set of posts all attempting to catch myself and maybe you up, if you’re following along, with random and I hope interesting photos from the past almost three weeks.  I realize that catching up is impossible, and in this case while I had vacated the sixth boro, big stuff happened.

A word that comes to mind is protean– named for Proteus.  Type “define: protean” into google and you’ll appreciate why it’s difficult to catch up.  But here goes.

Within a half hour of departing Warren RI, we pass Naema and

Lionheart.  Do check the links.  Either would be worthy of a post in itself.

And still north of the Rte 138 bridge, we see NOAA R/V Henry B Bigelow.

On the cusp of Block Island Sound, we encounter inbound Atlantic Pioneer, where you’d expect her returning from a run. Here’s a post I did almost exactly two years ago when Atlantic Pioneer components still needed to be combined at the shipyard.

A bit further, it’s Carol Jean and Islander, both Block Island bound, although one will arrive much before the other.

By now, we’re into Long Island Sound and being overtaken by darkness.  That’s Atlantic Navigator II as a speck heading toward us.

This dawn photo found us within NYC and approaching the East river.  It’s Fort Totten, designed for the entire US by Robert E Lee.  Here could be a dilemma:  there’s no debate that I know of of striking his name from the credits for this fort.

We pass HuntsPoint Produce Market,

the floating pool,

Marty C–a Weeks tug I’ve never seen,

the “north end” of Roosevelt Island with the Blackwell Island Light,

Gabby L Miller pushing past Cornell Tech‘s yet-to-be used buildings,

the Brooklyn Navy yard with Asphalt Sailor and –I believe– the old Great Point,

swimmers in the water doing a Manhattan circumnatation,

and–let’s end it here for today–a yacht  named  Vava II.  Here’s info on her owner.

Protean  . . . day 1?  It’s not even over, and I think so.

Lots more to come.

 

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