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Larry J. Hebert has been in the boro a few months, following a GLDD dredging project. She’s from 1981 and rated at 3600 hp.

She headed eastbound in the KVK here with a fair amount of wire out, it seems to me.

Helen Laraway, light, heads west.  She’s the oldster here, 1957, and 2000 hp.

Bergen Point, 1958 and 600 hp,  heads east

and ducks behind an Evergreen ship.

Kristy Ann, the youngster in this batch, launched in 2018, and 4560 hp, left her barge in the anchorage and came in . . . to check in a the yard on Richmond Terrace.

James William, 2007 and 2800 hp,  brings two light scows out of the Kills.

and gave the photographer, I believe, a friendly whistle.

Virginia passes by, the first time in an age that I’ve seen her.  She’s from 1979 and generates 1400 hp.

And Genesis Vision makes an impressive turn in front of Caddells.  She’s a 1981 boat with 3000 hp of push.

All photos, WVD, who is solely responsible for any errors.

 

Call this “thanks to Steve Munoz 20:  the 9th Annual North River Tugboat Race September 2, 2001.”   As Steve writes,  “The tug race on 9/2/2001 was  nine days before 9/11/2001. I was on board the tug Janet M McAllister for the race. My son was on board a Seabulk oil tanker docked in Bayonne and he could see the Twin Towers from his cabin porthole. As the tug headed up the Upper Bay I was going to take a picture of the Twin Towers and decided not to since I had so many already. Little did I, or anyone else, know that they would not exist nine days later. I wish I had taken a picture.

[Participating] include tugs McAllister Bros, Janet M McAllister, Empire State, J George Betz, Mary L McAllister, Irish Sea, Dory Barker, Powhatan, Dace Reinauer, Beaufort Sea, Resolute, Growler, Z-TWO, Janice Ann Reinauer, Katherine, Amy C McAllister, James Turecamo, Kathleen Turecamo, Emil P Johannsen;  also, includes fireboats John D McKean, John J Harvey.

I’ll not identify all the boats here.  As you know, some of these boats, like Dace Reinauer, look quite different now. Also, many boats here, like Janet D. McAllister and Powhatan,  are no longer in the sixth boro,

Z-Two is now Erin McAllister, and in Providence RI.

Emil P. Johannsen is laid up, I believe,

in Verplanck NY.

 

Beaufort Sea has been scrapped.

There were tugboats to port and

tugboats PLUS a fireboat to starboard.  Two things here:  I love the water thrusters deployed from Z-Two.  And Powhatan is now a commissioned Turkish naval vessel known as TCG Inebolu;  as such it was involved a month ago in the tow of a Bangladeshi corvette, BNS Bijoy, which had been damaged in the explosion in Beirut harbor.

 

 

 

Again, many thanks to Steve Munoz for taking us back to September 2, 2001 with these photos.

A different series of tugboat races happened decades earlier, as attested here.  An indicator of how different the world then was is the fact that back then, a rowing contest was included, and crews of ships in port took part.  Those days of break-bulk cargo had ships in port for much longer periods of time,  and “port” included places along the Hudson.

 

This title goes back more than 10 years.  But I got some congested photos recently, so I dredge up an old title.  Count the boats of all sizes here.  Of course, foreshortening makes them seem much closer to each other than they really are.  I count at least 12 vessels on the photo below, including some I had not noticed when I took it.

There are five here, and maybe two miles of separation between the two container ships.

Three operations were happening simultaneously in this stretch of the channel, and all were either stemming or moving very slowly.

Again, there’s lots of foreshortening here.

It may be exhilarating to get this close to a large ship, but if your engine stalls . . .  stuff’ll happen really fast.

Here’s a different sort of “traffic” photo from august 31, 2008 . . . exactly 12 years ago.  And it gives me an idea for a post.  By the way, left to right, can you name at least half of the 12 boats at least partly visible here?

All photos, WVD.

x

Installment 1 was a long time ago.  But the hazy days of summer bring the inspiration back.  Any idea what this is?  Answers follow below.

Or this?  I took all the photos in this post a few days ago–Sunday–afternoon from near the VZ Bridge.

Here’s an easier one maybe.

This one is a bit weird.

This one’s truly unusual.

Below . . . in the foreground that’s the same vessel as seen directly above in profile.

I liked this shot in the camera, but when I put it on the computer, I noticed that bow and stern are bookended by recreational boats.  Have you identified the hazy profiles above?

Here’s the same Capt.Brian A. McAllister following a ship in and the deckhand on the bow prepares to capture the messenger line and tie it to the big line lead from the forward winch.

Answers:  1)  Ram VII     2)  USNS Supply (T-AOE-6) departing Naval Weapons Station Earle   3)  Ellen McAllister  bow first  4)  two large container ships passing in Ambrose Channel, a Maersk ULCV and a Hyundai one  5 and 6) USNS Mendonca (T-AKR-303) with dredger RN Weeks bound for sea in 6)

All photos, WVD, who’s making the best of hazy summer light and air conditions.  Snow-reduced visibility can be seen here, fog here and rain does the same here.

On we go . . .  Alexandra does not appear frequently here. If my count is correct, this is only the third time since and including 2008 that this 120′ x 34′ 4000hp boat’s been posted here.  She’s currently working on a dredging project near Sandy Hook.

An action shot here of Mister T doing what the 82′ x 24′ 2400hp Mister T does.

Pegasus has to be among the cleanest looking boats, a fact accentuated here by the rusty stains on the hull of the tanker beyond her.  Dimensions . . . 75′ x 26′ x 1900hp.

The Browns . . . James  and Joyce, move this car float across between Owls Head and Greenville.  The absence of leaves on the trees shows how long ago I took this and most of these photos.  They are 74′ x 30′ x 1000 and 78′ x 26′ 2400, respectively.

Patrice, 105′ x 34′ 4500, has been here almost 10 years.

Nathan G, 73 x 24′ 1200′, moves a scow  westbound on the KVK.  I’d have guessed her larger than that.

Paul Andrew does the paper barge.  She’s 64′ x 23′ and 1200hp.

And finally, JRT sees one ship out and positions herself for the next job.

Here was my first photo of the 6000hp 89′ x 38′ tugboat back in late 2015.  The photo reminds me I should use the fisheye more often.

All photos, WVD.

Some things like winter fishing in the harbor appear not to change in a decade, but

Houma will never again move Mary A. WhalenHouma, built at Jakobson in 1970, was scrapped in 2017.  PortSide NewYork currently has a berth for the tanker and many other activities in Atlantic Basin, Red Hook.

B. E. Lindholm, built in St.Paul MN in 1985,  is alive and well, currently dredging off Fire Island.

This Kristin Poling was still working 10 years ago, definitely a survivor from before WW2 and also definitely then in her home stretch.  Byearly 2012 she was scrapped.

In March 2010 I also had a chance to gallivant off to Baltimore, home of NS Savannah.  If my calculations are correct, she was in service for 10 years total, and now in mothballs for 48!! Truth be told, she was a prototype, a demo ship with limited cargo capacity but also passengers.  Her beautiful lines were designed by George S. Sharp.  Recently she was at the end of a towline,  a sight I’m sorry I missed.  A wealth of info and video as well as smart comments can be found on this demo vessel here in a publication called Atomic Insights.  Let me quote a small section to tease you into reading the article:  “By technical measures, the ship was a success. She performed well at sea, her safety record was impressive, her fuel economy was unsurpassed and her gleaming white paint was never smudged by exhaust smoke.”

Cajun stood by Chios Voyager near the Inner Harbor Domino Sugars plant.   Cajun still works along the east coast US.  Chios Voyager, built 1984, has been scrapped.

And a somber last photo . . . I caught El Faro in Baltimore 10 years ago.  Little did I expect then what we all know now.

All photos, WVD, in March 2010.

 

For your quick peruse today, I offer the inverse of yesterday’s post:  I went to my archives and selected the LAST photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if that photo was a person or an inland structure, I didn’t use it;  instead, I went backwards … until I got to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Weeks 226 at the artificial island park at Pier 55, the construction rising out of the Hudson, aka Diller Island.

February saw Potomac lightering Maersk Callao.

March brought Capt. Brian and Alex McAllister escorting in an ULCV.

April, and new leaves on the trees, it was CLBoy heading inbound at the Narrows.  Right now it’s anchored in an exotic port in Honduras and operating, I believe, as Lake Pearl.

A month later, it happened to be Dace Reinauer inbound at the Narrows, as seen from Bay Ridge.

June it was MV Rip Van Winkle.  When I took this, I had no inkling that later this 1980 tour boat based in Kingston NY would be replaced by MV Rip Van Winkle II.  I’ve no idea where the 1980 vessel, originally intended to be an offshore supply vessel,  is today.

July  . . . Carolina Coast was inbound with a sugar barge for the refinery in Yonkers.

Late August late afternoon Cuyahoga,I believe, paralleled us in the southern portion of Lake Huron.

Last photo for September, passing the Jersey City cliffs was FireFighter II.

October, last day, just before rain defeated me, I caught the indomitable Ellen McAllister off to the next job.

November, on a windy day, it was Alerce N, inbound from Cuba. Currently she’s off the west side of Peru.

And finally, a shot from just a few days ago . . .  in the shadow under the Bayonne Bridge, the venerable Miriam Moran, who also made last year’s December 31 post.  Choosing her here was entirely coincidental on my part.

And that’s it for 2019 and for the second decade of the 21st century.  Happy 2020 and decade three everyone.  Be safe and satisfied, and be in touch.  Oh, and have an adventure now and then, do random good things, and smile unexpectedly many times per day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will spend most of tomorrow, day 1 2020, driving towards the coast.  Thanks for reading this.  Maybe we’ll still be in touch in 2030.

 

Weeks 533 has credibility: she lifted the USAir Flight 1549 Airbus A320 out of the Hudson back almost 11 years ago and more.  So the other day when I was on my way to “yon” and saw her “hither” and she was working with Susan Miller, I decided to linger and inquire.

That’s when I noticed the pier 11 Wall Street float was partially submerged, and a heavy lift crew was aboard securing cables.

Besides that crew, one tug and Susan Miller, even the Green Lady was craning her neck overtop the ferry and over in my direction, paying attention.

 

When I managed to board a conveyance and get to the middle of the East River . . .

I saw there were actually four tugs involved,  two Dann tugs and another Miller tug.

Once the landing barge was lifted over the spuds and large pumps installed–I think that’s what I saw–Susan Miller whisked the barge away to be repaired, rehabbed.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who calls this another feat for Weeks 533.

Lots more tugster cranes here.

She arrived in the harbor almost six years ago, just before the annual football event, and that’s why I called her that.  Speculation about a name change then from Left Coast Lifter had been rampant, but so far as I know, she has remained LCL.

Above, that’s the last photo I took of her by the TZ Bridge, with Hook Mountain in the background, and below, that’s where she now waits, likely to be down rigged.

I suppose speculation now will be her next destination.  Meanwhile she’ll be a part of the temporary landscape at Weeks, skyline, or crane forest, and she’ll be photographed, as I’ve done here here with MC-41 Snazzy Kitty,

Lady May, and

Thomas J. 

Check her out before she’s lowered for travel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Other large cranes I’ve posted include Paul Bunyan, Grasse River, Pelicano 1, and Herman the German.  Then there’s the Chesapeake 1000.

 

I know others witnessed dawn this morning as the big pink ship came in . . . .

By the way, if you were naming this ONE “bird” ULCV based on this morning’s color, which bird

would

you choose?  Nah . . . it wasn’t that.  More later.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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