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This exact title–sans the number–goes way back to 2007 here.   The orange vessel doing surveys in 2007 has been replaced by the one below, which I’d not seen until very recently.

The USACE has several survey boats in the boro, as

does Rogers.

Alpine Ocean has been surveying the harbor and the bight for some time now . . . with R/V Shearwater, which I’ve seen as far south as Norfolk.

Shearwater is 110′ loa; clearly here you see how Dina Polaris shrinks her size, the latter has five times the number of berths.

She was in briefly and out this past weekend, so I devote more space to her.

 

 

 

And while we’re in this general group, I couldn’t pass up this vessel, which I’ve not seen.  She may be the one doing working on the WW2 tanker wreck Coimbra, 30 miles south of Shinnecock Inlet. Has anyone gotten photos of her?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you all a happy may day . . .

 

 

I walked along the Hudson and past the Vessel the other day because it was flat and scenic.   I also wanted to see what progress was happening at Pier 55, aka on Diller Island.

Beneath, from small boats  .  . . these workers attended to several of the 132 pots that make up the island.

Michael Miller stood by Weeks 526, as

at this moment did  Shawn Miller.

 

Meanwhile, coming upriver was another Weeks crane, the 533,  with Susan Miller on port bow and

Elizabeth supplying power.

 

 

At a certain moment, Shawn departed the 526 and headed over to the Weeks 533

to assist.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently saw Weeks and Miller tugs working on 533 here.

 

 

I’d say a “dance of cranes,” but then you’d think of the plumed type.  So plethora will have to stand in.  If you look at any links in this post, check out this one from November 2007, where the gantry cranes appear to tango . . . or duel with booms as blades maybe . .  .

Suddenly I had cranes on my brains, like these shoreside ones around the slight bend from Matthew Tibbetts.

Or these over by USNS Pomeroy, which last had a rehab in February 2014.

Busy discharging salt with clamshells are the shipboard cranes on Sinop, and then

there have recently passed lots of cranes on barges like this one moved by Emily Ann and

whose logo I don’t recognize,

this one pushed westbound by Joyce D. Brown and whose logo I’ve

not noticed before either,

and this Weeks 524 around sunrise moved

by Susan Miller.

And to close this post out, this endangered crane, ice-encased and non-functional on a 6-above days.

All photos taken in 2019 by Will Van Dorp.

More cranes from 2010 here,   and from 2009 here  and here  and here.

That’s enough for now.

 

 

 

 

Click here for the 43 previous posts if you don’t understand the title.  If your thoughts on being the image below were of high heels sans the rest of the impractical shoe, mine were the same.  Of course, you can read Weeks 526 clear as day, so  . . . whatzit?

Here’s a bit more context.  That’s the Hudson River, old pilings for old Pier 55, I believe, just north of old Pier 54.

Piers of Manhattan once welcomed ships and ferries, cargo and passengers transitioned between land and water there.   Then people patterns changed and these piers little by little have transformed.

So what is it?!@#@!!

Come back in a few years and hang out at new Pier 55, the on–then off–then on again park idea funded for $250 million by Barry Diller.   The project reminds me of the vessel, another Heatherwick Studio creation.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with a cell phone.   I’ve been losing a grip on patterns these days myself.

Before I started blogging, Pier 54 hosted the Nomadic Museum, for a half year or so.  I loved it.

 

In only ten years, a lot of changes have happened in the sixth boro.  I wish I’d started this blog 30 years ago to document even more, but 1988 predated blogs, the internet, and digital photography.  Wow . . . how did people relate back then?

Joking aside, let’s see some that have moved on.  On January 11, 2009 Kristin Poling, the 1934 tanker, still operated.

January 12.  Sun Right, built 1993 and already dead, moved westbound in the KVK escorted by Eileen McAllister.  What’s remarkable to me is how large the tug looks in compared to the ship in contrast to tugs today looking miniature on the stern of a ULCV.

Five minutes later . . . Odin.  Indeed I was smitten by this unusual vessel, which has since moved to the South and lost her ability to rise up as if on hind legs.  I’ve no sense of what it was like to work on her.

January 15.  Never did I imagine then that this Dean Reinauer would be replaced by this Dean.

January 18  The boro’s big story of January 2009, of course, was the plane crash in the Hudson.  Here the efforts to lift the USAir Flight 1549 out of the water have just begun.  Thomas stands by Weeks 533.

January 29  NYC DEP’s Red Hook had just arrived in the harbor, and it seemed she was escorted everywhere by James Turecamo. Sine then, NYC DEP has added a  whole new generation of sludge tankers aka honey boats.

January 31  Taurus has become Joker, another intriguingly named tugboat operated not in NYC but Philadelphia area by Hays Tug and Launch, with fleet mate names like Purple Hays, High Roller, Grape Ape, and more.

Let’s leave it there.  Happy new year’s greetings still ring in my ears, leaving me with an ongoing inexplicable smile and desire to treat all with respect.  Go out of your way to smile at someone today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose smile gets hidden by a respirator whenever he goes into the archives on Tugster Tower.

 

I missed Josephine Reinauer (actually I saw her but couldn’t get a clear shot)  when she visited town recently, but I did catch Jacksonville, the latest Vane machine in the harbor.

For some reason I expected her to look different, but it’s an Elizabeth Anne class tug, which’ll look a lot like most of the rest of the Vane fleet.

Eric and the other McAllister escort tugs have been quite busy recently.

Ernest Campbell has been here about a half year doing bunkering, I believe.

Trevor usually works as a dredge tender, focusing on the Jersey shore this fall.

Brooklyn was called Brooklyn Service when I first discovered the sixth born.

Daisy Mae is just over a year old.

Normandy came to the sixth born from Colombia a few years ago.

Rowan has been working in the sixth boro of late.

In fact, almost seven years ago, it was Rowan that brought Patrice McAllister into the boro after the tragic fire during her delivery from the Great Lakes to this salt water.  These days, Patrice is looking great.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has heard about but not yet seen Hunter D.

 

[Note:  investigation of the Christmas pirate break-in is ongoing at Tugster Tower.  Culprits once located and questioned may face a job offer. ]

Weeks 533, the one that lifted Sully’s plane out of the Hudson, was moving up to either Port Elizabeth or Newark, using a three-tug configuration.

What impressed me was the lean-in, seen here by Michael Miller and

relayed by Catherine.

 

Causing this huge box-in-the-water to turn to starboard takes a lot of persuasion.

Thomas Weeks, likely providing the bulk of the forward movement, stays largely even keeled.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose done more posts here featuring this crane.

 

Mr. Connor has been in the area for a few weeks now, but here’s the first good set I’ve gotten.

The logo on the stack is unmistakeable, Marquette Transportation Company Offshore, one of three companies under the Marquette banner.  Click here for previous Marquette boats on tugster.

She might be working in dredge support.

Holden Marine Towing is also working in dredge support.

Based on the livery, I thought I’d never seen Bayou Babe before.

But a little digging showed that I’d seen her in 2009 as a Weeks boat, Virginia.  Equipment changes hands;  Bayou Babe now operates under Holden Marine, but before she was Virginia, she was Misener Marine’s Bayou Babe, built as such in 1979.

All photos this month by Will Van Dorp.

Pacific Reliance (9280 hp) transfers cargo before heading to Texas . . .

with the 155,000 bbl barge 650-1.

B. Franklin Reinauer (4000 hp) passes by

with RTC 82 (80,000 bbl, if I read that right)

and Austin (3900 hp) eastbound here light.

Dean Reinauer (4720 hp) moves westbound under the Bayonne Bridge.

Foxy 3 (1600 hp) and Brooklyn (2400 hp) wait at the dock west of Caddell Drydock.  Foxy was previously Barker Boys, and this Brooklyn, Labrador Sea.

Brooklyn on her way to a job.

Delta Fox (1200 hp) and Morton S. Bouchard IV (6140 hp) tied up here  just east of Foxy 3 and Brooklyn.

Morton S. Bouchard IV makes up the next three photos here:  in front of a Saint Lawrence like eglise

against the Brooklyn skyline, and

and still more in front of T-AKR-306 USNS Benavidez.

And let’s finish up with Patrica (1200 hp) and Robert (1800 hp).

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in info here.

 

 

Along the Jersey shore . . .  it’s Candace, a Damen Shoalbuster design . . . built at Eastern Shipbuilding in 2004.

Hete’s a slightly sharper, closer shot.

Working with Candace in dredge support, it’s Trevor.

Trying to keep her ground tackle tackling the bay bed, it’s Linda Moran holding with Houston.

OSG 350 is practically a ship . . . and she’s pushed by

a force more powerful than what drives some ships, the 12,000 hp OSG Vision.  I first saw her here in 2010.

Also, holding fast or trying to, it’s Genesis Valiant, previously Erie Service.

In much calmer weather, it’s Nicole Leigh Reinauer and

Atlantic Enterprise, formerly Barents Sea.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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