You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Weeks Marine’ category.

Here’s GLDD’s cutter suction dredge Florida as seen from above the cutter head and

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photo taken October 2010 in the KVK

from alongside.  I took the first three photos in this post.

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photo taken October 2010

Here’s Weeks cutter suction dredge C. R. McCaskill with Sea Wolf serving as a tender.

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photo taken near Rockaway Inlet September 2013

USACE E. A. Woodruff was built in 1873 and worked the Ohio. Technically, I think Woodruff was a snag boat.

0aab1E A Woodruff Corps of Engineers Snag Boatc 1910

USACE Florida was the most technologically advanced dredge built when it was launched in 1904.  Unfortunately, she sank with loss of life 14 years later and is currently a dive site.

0achsDredge and Snagboat Florida - 1918

USACE Barnard was built in 1904 as well in Camden and sold to Mexico in 1942.

0achs1Dredge Barnard Tampa 1924-1925

Here’s another view of Barnard with

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a tender alongside.  It looks a lot like the buoy boats on the Erie Canal.

0achs3Dredge Bernard Tampa Florida - 1924

Dredge Welatka was built in 1925.

0aab2Dredge Welatka Florida 1938

Dredge Congaree was built in 1914 in Charleston SC.

0achs4Dredge Congaree intercostal Water Way - 1940

Here’s USACE Potter originally built in 1932 and still in use.

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For many more vintage USACE photos, click here.

Many thanks to Barrel for this trip through USACE technological history.

Icy roads are here again.  Well, even if they’re not–not yet– in the downstate area, New Yorkers place a value on being prepared.  You might call that a NY value, but I’m not going any further there.  And more accurately, preparing for the future is a universal value.

And in this season, bulkers arrive with beautiful names like Lake Dahlia and with holds filled with dozens of thousands of tons of “de-icer,” this load being off a desert in Chile.  A previous ship had come from this part of Mexico.

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In less than a handful of hours after “all fast,” clamshells start discharging at the rate of 30 tons per scoop.

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Two operations happen simultaneously . . . cranes empty the holds and

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loaders fill the trucks.

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When that ice starts coating the roadways,

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you and all the others thousands of drivers have a lot

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better chance of staying on track to

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your intended destination.  The photo below suggests it’s coming time for another truckster post.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt.

 

 

Here were the previous in this series.

The first three photos here come from John “Jed” Jedrlinic, whose previous contributions can be found here.

Coral Coast is a venerable 3000 hp 45-year-old, like some others I know, although they might not see all that horsepower as complimentary.

photo date 8 FEB 2011

photo date 8 FEB 2011

Katherine, same horsepower, is nine years newer.

photo date 8 FEB 2011

photo date 8 FEB 2011

This Michael S is based in Port Canaveral, where Jed took this photo.

photo date 4 MARCH 2011

photo date 4 MARCH 2011

Harry Thompson, whose previous contributions include this one, sent this along of Russell 11 (I believe that’s eleven, not two) compliments of his brother.  Does anyone know Russell 11‘s years of service?

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And the rest of these come from Barrel, who has sent along many others I will share this month.

Tug Bay Hawk dates from 1942.  Thanks to Birk’s site, here’s some info on her.

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Here’s Crowley’s Ensign on the Delaware River, 7200 horsepower.   Here and here are tugster posts of similar Crowley tugs.  In the distance, that looks like a Vane Brothers tug.

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Teresa McAllister, 1961,  was most recently on tugster here.

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And to close out today’s post, it’s Tenacious, now a 55-year-old freshwater tug.

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Many thank to Jed, Harry, and Barrel for these photos.

 

What is this?

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How about a little more of the same shot?  Now can you guess?  Cashman is a familiar New England company .  . . but that tug, Todd Danos, is not exactly a name known in these parts.

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Have you figured out the location?  Dace Reinauer and Senesco are the best clues here. Of course, this is the Narragansett Bay.

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Weeks tugs Robert and

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Elizabeth sometimes work in the sixth boro . . . as here in June 2012.

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“Invisible gold” is the term used at the event below–subject of tomorrow’s post.  The speaker to the right is Jeffrey Grybowski, CEO of Deepwater Wind, the project to place wind turbines in +70′ of water southeast of Block Island.  It’s happening now, and all the photos in this post–except the one below–were taken in July and early August by Nate Lopez.

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And providing supply and crew support to get “steel in the water” are Rosemary Miller and

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Josephine K. Miller.

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Again many thanks to Nate for these photos.  More on this project in tomorrow’s post.

 

 

Here’s the index if you want to see the previous installments.

A secret salt along the Saint Lawrence snapped this photo of Algoma Montrealais towed by Diavlos Pride and largely unseen) Ecosse on the stern.  To see photos of Algoma Montrealais’  last season, click here.

Montrealais in tow to scrap

For purposes of the transit to the scrapyard, she’s been renamed (by subtraction) as Mont.

Montrealais closeup

And from endings to beginnings, here from Jonathan Steinman is the arrival of Kirby Moran into the sixth boro via the East River and

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escorted in by the venerable James Turecamo.

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Also from Jonathan, Shelby towing Weeks 297 carrying a  . . . wind turbine vane.

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Anyone know where bound?

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Many thanks to the secret salt and freshwater salt of the Saint Lawrence and to Jonathan Steinman for these photos.

 

Here’s the index.  Here and here are some from far enough back that you can note change on the sixth boro.

Any ideas on the photo below?  I believe that’s Robert Burton in the background?

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Here’s the rest of that image.  The two photos come from Bjoern Kils of New York Media Boat, which has the story on their blog here.

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This photo comes from Ashley Hutto, and shows what I would deem a risky rowing feat over between the tanker Fidias and unseen a barge landing at Bayonne.

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I’ll have more Pacific Link photos tomorrow, but the crewman in yellow jacket and orange hat no doubt circles the globe like some of us circle the town.

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Count them . . . three crew members standing watch.

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Three fire fighters on M4, one of

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four FDNY RIBs out on training.

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I didn’t see the crewman at this point, but I heard him banging on metal structure with a crowbar . . . there under the third row back.

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there.

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Still see him?  I still heard his banging.

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Greetings to the Shelby crew pushing scows northbound.

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Driftmaster crew make a visual assessment of floating debris.

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Way up high there on Torino . . . crew with a white apron, that’s not something you see every day.

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Hail to the chef!

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Here a crewman contemplates the state of the universe from the afterdeck of Laura K Moran.

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Harvesting goes on in the springtime boro.

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Crew of Stolt Sapphire pose for pics on the stern of their parcel tanker as the skyline of Manhattan cliffs passes by.

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And here’s a good bookend to this post, which could otherwise go on and on.  Best wishes to Team Ocean Valour . . .

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All photos unless otherwise attributed by Will Van Dorp.   Thanks to Bjoern and Ashley for their photos.

 

 

As you know, today is the first full day of spring, and this morning roar man looked like this.

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My neighborhood looked like this, and

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a local shipyard looked like this, with snow obscuring the name entirely or

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partly.

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But lest you think I’m glum  . . . my day blossomed as soon as I saw

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this . . . juices–at least orange juice–flowing, infusing by the ton into the port.  And this . . .

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new life–at least a vessel new to me in the sixth boro.  Welcome Josephine K. Miller.

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And you guy below and friends, you gotta go.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp. Snow obscured tug is of course Little Toot, only recently employed in North river icebreaking.

Know the location?

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I took it from a southernmost point in the Bronx looking eastward toward North Brother Island . . . the brick chimney to the right.  I can’t identify either the Weeks tug or the current usage of the red-and-white striped stack to the left.

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What caught my attention was the pink breast cancer awareness ribbon on the front of the house of Mediterranean Sea.

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By the time I got back to the sixth boro, the pink “M” on Moran tugs was once again white.  The only photo of a Moran tug I managed in the whole month of October was the one below, a photo of a photo of a Catherine Moran in the lobby of a restaurant in Lockport.  Label says . . . as you can read it . . . “Lockport 1939.”  Would this have been the vessel built by Neafie & Levy in 1904?

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As to the pink ribbon, I was happy to see it.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

LNYBL?  Gulf of Mexico?  North Sea?  Persian Gulf?  No . . . it’s Lower NY Bay, and these days it’s populated with unusual equipment.

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That’s a spudded jackup barge holding Weeks 751, and off to the right, it’s an exotic

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called Michael Lawrence.  And I’m betting the working is happening in the same place DSV Joseph Bisso was operating about a half year ago.

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Two other tugs tending the work barge Bisso D/B Boaz are Pacific Dawn 1974 (ex-Pelican Magic) –above and below–and

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Smith Invader (2006).

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And what’s going on is the LNYB Rockaway Lateral Project, a  three-mile connection between Brooklyn and the existing offshore pipeline.  A closer-up map can be found here.  Anyone know how long ago the existing Transco pipeline went in?

More details of the deal here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s off the Canal for at least another day and a half.

Here was the first in this series.

The first three photos below–Weeks 535 to the left and Weeks 529 to the right–I took on December 3, 2013.

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The rest of the photos here–taken by Brian DeForest–show cranes including Weeks 535 taken in mid-July 2014.  Note the orange-helmeted man at the lower left point in the crane barge hull.

 

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Here are the cranes of Howland Hook where Grande Morocco 

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prepares for her run along the coast of West Africa.

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Finally . . . a unique perspective for landlubbers . . . Weeks 573 working on the Goethals Bridge southeast side.

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Many thanks to Brian for these photos.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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