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January, once every four years, involves a formality that we mark today.  Inaugurate has a strange derivation, you figure it out.  With this post, I’m in no way intending to divine futures.  Really it’s just sets of photos taken four years apart. 

Ice and lightship yacht Nantucket floated in the harbor in mid January 2009. Do you remember what else was literally in the harbor?

Weeks tugs stood by ready to move a barge underneath the airplane when Weeks 533 lifted the Airbus 320 from harbor waters that had cushioned its fall . . . twelve years ago. 

Next inauguration day, 2013, I watched fishermen drag clams from the bottom of Gravesend Bay.

Rebel, destined not to run much longer, pushed a barge across the Upper Bay with an incomplete WTC beyond.  Many more details had not yet sprouted on the Manhattan skyline.

Mid January 2017 . . . CMA CGM Nerval headed for the port with Thomas J. Brown off its starboard.  Here‘s what I wrote about this photo and others exactly four years ago.

Nerval still needed to make its way under the yet-to-be completed raising of the Bayonne Bridge, assisted by JRT Moran.  This view was quite different in mid January 2017.   As of today, this container ship in on the Mediterranean on a voyage between Turkey and Morocco.

All photos, WVD, taken in mid January at four-year intervals.  Nothing should be read into the choice of photos.  Sorry I have no photos from January 20, 2005, because back then I didn’t take as many photos, and four years before that, I was still using a film camera, took fewer photos in a year than now I do on certain days, and that skyline above was very different.

My inaugural event . . .  cleaning my desk, my office, and my kitchen.   If you’re looking for an activity, something might need cleaning. Laundry?   Yup, work after work.  All inaugurations call for clean ups.

And if you want to buy that lightship yacht above, here‘s the info.

 

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

It still says Eastern Star Dawn, but now it’s Toula!

She’s going to look great all buff and green.

Barry Silverton finally

has a lion on its stack!  All those birds?  It’s water teeming with the bunker, the bunker that recently drew a humpback into the Upper Bay.

Pelham, launched in 1960, is always a pleasant sight.  She has a list of previous names almost as long as my seasonal wish list this year.

Here she took a wake on the bow.

James William used the waters off the salt pile

as a turning basin.

And finally, after a long hiatus down south, CMT Pike has returned.  When i caught her, she was being pursued

by this container ship.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated but of interest, below . . .

yes, Grain de Sail is a 72′ schooner coming into the sixth boro with a 50-ton cargo hold, some of it refrigerated, bringing in French wine.  She’ll set up a market in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for about a week.  Contact info and an e-shop can be found here, although you’ll have to use a machine translate if you’re not up to functionality in French.  

Grain de Sail is involved in triangular  trade, French wine to here and the Caribbean, and then Caribbean chocolate and other products to France . . . .  Something similar in sail freight  domestically has been done by Ceres and more recently by Apollonia.  The most recent international sailing cargo into the sixth boro that I know of was Black Seal, a three-masted schooner.

 . . .and barges, of course.  Someone or something has to pay the bills.  This unique bow is the leading edge of RTC 135, 460′ x 72.5′ here building up a lot  of water,

getting moved along

by Nicole Leigh Reinauer.  They both date from 1999.

Crystal Cutler, always a joy to see,

moves a light Patricia E. PolingCrystal is approaching her 10-year mark. 

A surprise tug

moving this past week was Evening Breeze.

although she was light. I first posted photos of this 2019 boat a year and a half ago

McAllister tugs seem to rotate bases.  I hadn’t seen Charles D. for a while, but she’s back.

and working hard.  She dates from 1967, when she was launched as Esso Garden State, part of a large Esso shipping fleet.

Helen Laraway (1957) has been working in a harbor a lot these days. 

Seeley (1981) with a Weeks barge and Frances (1957) heading for fuel were westbound here.

All photos, WVD.

Long Island, eastbound, gets overtaken by a small fishing boat.

B. Franklin, light, heads to the Reinauer yard.

Doris Moran, light, heads east.

Ellen McAllister assists a Maersk ship through the channels to her berth.

Helen Laraway heads east to pick up a scow.

HMS Justice pushes HMS 2605 through the KVK.

Charles A. and Matthew Tibbetts follow a ship so that they can assist as needed when called upon.

Ava and Kimberly head out to different assignments.

Brendan Turecamo provides port assist.

Mister Jim follows Seeley.

Gulf Coast has been a Dann Marine vessel since it was launched way back in 1982.

All photos, WVD.

Larry J. Hebert has been in the boro a few months, following a GLDD dredging project. She’s from 1981 and rated at 3600 hp.

She headed eastbound in the KVK here with a fair amount of wire out, it seems to me.

Helen Laraway, light, heads west.  She’s the oldster here, 1957, and 2000 hp.

Bergen Point, 1958 and 600 hp,  heads east

and ducks behind an Evergreen ship.

Kristy Ann, the youngster in this batch, launched in 2018, and 4560 hp, left her barge in the anchorage and came in . . . to check in a the yard on Richmond Terrace.

James William, 2007 and 2800 hp,  brings two light scows out of the Kills.

and gave the photographer, I believe, a friendly whistle.

Virginia passes by, the first time in an age that I’ve seen her.  She’s from 1979 and generates 1400 hp.

And Genesis Vision makes an impressive turn in front of Caddells.  She’s a 1981 boat with 3000 hp of push.

All photos, WVD, who is solely responsible for any errors.

 

Call this “thanks to Steve Munoz 20:  the 9th Annual North River Tugboat Race September 2, 2001.”   As Steve writes,  “The tug race on 9/2/2001 was  nine days before 9/11/2001. I was on board the tug Janet M McAllister for the race. My son was on board a Seabulk oil tanker docked in Bayonne and he could see the Twin Towers from his cabin porthole. As the tug headed up the Upper Bay I was going to take a picture of the Twin Towers and decided not to since I had so many already. Little did I, or anyone else, know that they would not exist nine days later. I wish I had taken a picture.

[Participating] include tugs McAllister Bros, Janet M McAllister, Empire State, J George Betz, Mary L McAllister, Irish Sea, Dory Barker, Powhatan, Dace Reinauer, Beaufort Sea, Resolute, Growler, Z-TWO, Janice Ann Reinauer, Katherine, Amy C McAllister, James Turecamo, Kathleen Turecamo, Emil P Johannsen;  also, includes fireboats John D McKean, John J Harvey.

I’ll not identify all the boats here.  As you know, some of these boats, like Dace Reinauer, look quite different now. Also, many boats here, like Janet D. McAllister and Powhatan,  are no longer in the sixth boro,

Z-Two is now Erin McAllister, and in Providence RI.

Emil P. Johannsen is laid up, I believe,

in Verplanck NY.

 

Beaufort Sea has been scrapped.

There were tugboats to port and

tugboats PLUS a fireboat to starboard.  Two things here:  I love the water thrusters deployed from Z-Two.  And Powhatan is now a commissioned Turkish naval vessel known as TCG Inebolu;  as such it was involved a month ago in the tow of a Bangladeshi corvette, BNS Bijoy, which had been damaged in the explosion in Beirut harbor.

 

 

 

Again, many thanks to Steve Munoz for taking us back to September 2, 2001 with these photos.

A different series of tugboat races happened decades earlier, as attested here.  An indicator of how different the world then was is the fact that back then, a rowing contest was included, and crews of ships in port took part.  Those days of break-bulk cargo had ships in port for much longer periods of time,  and “port” included places along the Hudson.

 

This title goes back more than 10 years.  But I got some congested photos recently, so I dredge up an old title.  Count the boats of all sizes here.  Of course, foreshortening makes them seem much closer to each other than they really are.  I count at least 12 vessels on the photo below, including some I had not noticed when I took it.

There are five here, and maybe two miles of separation between the two container ships.

Three operations were happening simultaneously in this stretch of the channel, and all were either stemming or moving very slowly.

Again, there’s lots of foreshortening here.

It may be exhilarating to get this close to a large ship, but if your engine stalls . . .  stuff’ll happen really fast.

Here’s a different sort of “traffic” photo from august 31, 2008 . . . exactly 12 years ago.  And it gives me an idea for a post.  By the way, left to right, can you name at least half of the 12 boats at least partly visible here?

All photos, WVD.

x

Installment 1 was a long time ago.  But the hazy days of summer bring the inspiration back.  Any idea what this is?  Answers follow below.

Or this?  I took all the photos in this post a few days ago–Sunday–afternoon from near the VZ Bridge.

Here’s an easier one maybe.

This one is a bit weird.

This one’s truly unusual.

Below . . . in the foreground that’s the same vessel as seen directly above in profile.

I liked this shot in the camera, but when I put it on the computer, I noticed that bow and stern are bookended by recreational boats.  Have you identified the hazy profiles above?

Here’s the same Capt.Brian A. McAllister following a ship in and the deckhand on the bow prepares to capture the messenger line and tie it to the big line lead from the forward winch.

Answers:  1)  Ram VII     2)  USNS Supply (T-AOE-6) departing Naval Weapons Station Earle   3)  Ellen McAllister  bow first  4)  two large container ships passing in Ambrose Channel, a Maersk ULCV and a Hyundai one  5 and 6) USNS Mendonca (T-AKR-303) with dredger RN Weeks bound for sea in 6)

All photos, WVD, who’s making the best of hazy summer light and air conditions.  Snow-reduced visibility can be seen here, fog here and rain does the same here.

On we go . . .  Alexandra does not appear frequently here. If my count is correct, this is only the third time since and including 2008 that this 120′ x 34′ 4000hp boat’s been posted here.  She’s currently working on a dredging project near Sandy Hook.

An action shot here of Mister T doing what the 82′ x 24′ 2400hp Mister T does.

Pegasus has to be among the cleanest looking boats, a fact accentuated here by the rusty stains on the hull of the tanker beyond her.  Dimensions . . . 75′ x 26′ x 1900hp.

The Browns . . . James  and Joyce, move this car float across between Owls Head and Greenville.  The absence of leaves on the trees shows how long ago I took this and most of these photos.  They are 74′ x 30′ x 1000 and 78′ x 26′ 2400, respectively.

Patrice, 105′ x 34′ 4500, has been here almost 10 years.

Nathan G, 73 x 24′ 1200′, moves a scow  westbound on the KVK.  I’d have guessed her larger than that.

Paul Andrew does the paper barge.  She’s 64′ x 23′ and 1200hp.

And finally, JRT sees one ship out and positions herself for the next job.

Here was my first photo of the 6000hp 89′ x 38′ tugboat back in late 2015.  The photo reminds me I should use the fisheye more often.

All photos, WVD.

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