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Just photos will appear here today, and I realize I’m contradicting that statement by writing this sentence and the others.  However,  inspiration was failing me, so I decided this post should be not photo-driven, but photo-dominated.  Names are provided in the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday started sunny, but then clouds moved in.

The sixth boro offers many vistas.  Enjoy a few, starting with Sarah D towing a deeply loaded scow past Bay Ridge. 

At sunrise, Atlantic Salvor and Patrice McAllister head in the same direction for different tasks past Stapleton Heights.

Jonathan C works shipside on the ConHook range in the sixth boro

Julie Anne heads north or so inside the VZ Bridge.  I should know what buoys are there, but . . . I don’t.

Sarah D again and here shipside in the KVK.

Mary Turecamo assists alongside a rust-flecked box ship.

Seeley pushes Weeks 250 eastbound in the Kills.

Kirby Moran, Patrice McAllister, and Gregg McAllister assist another box ship, as Marie J Turecamo heads in their direction.

Sea Fox moves a barge past Global terminal in Bayonne.

Navigator rotates clockwise away from St George and heads north.

And finally, Charles James stands by with a scow off Sunset Park.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

Many thanks to Sandy Berg and SkEye Stream for the photo below, drone assisted in Kingston ON.  In the foreground is Group Ocean’s Escorte, a 1967 Jakobson of Oyster Bay product, first launched as Menasha (YTB-773/YTM-761) for the U.S. Navy.  Off Escorte‘s stern it’s Sheri Lynn S, a Lake Ontario tug seen here.

Next, let’s go SW from Kingston to Picton, where CSL Assiniboine is discharging slag, a steel furnace byproduct with multiple uses.  Now if you’ve never seen the inside of a self-unloading ship’s hold, here are photos of one such arrangement, thanks to Picton Terminals.

Since the photo above shows only a bit of deck and the boom, here’s a photo I took in winter 2019 of CSL Assiniboine, 

and two more I took in September 2019 in

the South Shore Canal section of the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

Now let’s get back to Picton Terminals.  Sometimes a land machine gets lifted into the hold to assist.  Balder back in 2013 brought Atacama Desert salt to Staten Island as a “road safety product” and she carried such a machine permanently in her belly.

Whatever the angle of repose for slag, it was just not slumping here. Making it slump to feed into the self-unloading gates at the bottom of the hold

can be tricky. 

Now to move to another continent, Weeks tug Thomas here heads out of Rotterdam last week for Ascension Island.  Now THAT is a long voyage, about 4000 nautical miles, a two-week voyage at 10 knots. 

Thomas is pulling barge NP 476 loaded with various pieces of equipment, including a Eurocarrier 2110, a multipurpose vessel.

Next down to Gulf coastal waters and some photos I received an embarrassingly long time ago . . .  sorry, stuff gets lost in the shuffle . . .  it’s Heide Moran with barge Carolina

Heide is now Dann Ocean’s Helen, and I’ve not seen her in the sixth boro. 

Also from eastriver, another tugboat I’ve not yet seen . . .  the 10,000+ hp Ocean Wave.

Ocean Wave is one of four Crowley vessels of this class;  the others are Ocean Sun, Sky, and Wind.   If you look closely at the photo above, a crewman off the port side of the wheelhouse is providing an ocean–or at least–a waterway wave. 

Many thanks to Sandy Berg, SkEye Stream, Picton Terminals, Jan vander Doe, Ruud Zegwaard, and eastriver.  I have lots more photos that you’ve sent.  If I don’t immediately post, it’s because I’m trying to best position them, and that’s what leads me sometimes to lose sight, aka forget.

If you’re looking for something LONG to read, today is August 2, and that was the date 31 years ago that Iraqi forces overran Kuwait, where I was working.  This account is an attempt to document my late summer/fall of 1990, the strangest months of my life.  I have a more refined version, a pandemic project of revision, that I can send you if you want the latest iteration.

 

Many thanks to my friend Lew who caught this even without a functioning AIS… on the Connecticut River, coming from Windsor Locks CT and heading for the Intrepid Museum . . .

it’s an Douglas F4D Skyray aircraft, not to be confused with an F-4 Phantom.  Here I quote from officials “The Skyray, named for the unique shape of its wing (which resembles a manta ray), went into operation with the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps in 1956. It was designed to be a high-altitude fleet protection interceptor, fast enough to catch and neutralize an approaching enemy bomber flying at 500 knots. Skyrays set many speed and time-to-climb records in their day as they were able to reach supersonic speeds. The specific Skyray acquired by the Intrepid Museum from the New England Air Museum … served in VF-162 and deployed on Intrepid between June 1961 and March 1962 with Carrier Air Wing Six.”  Ah!  So there’s a connection between this plane and the carrier.

Shawn Miller is doing the job with deck barge Weeks 47.

 

I’ll post this early so that folks might be able to catch it on either side of Manhattan Monday morning.  As of 0600 now, she is anchored just east and north of Throgs Neck Bridge.  Once she gets underway, she could be passing lower Manhattan in a half an hour.

Many thanks, Lew.

 

Sleepboot . . .?  it’s Dutch for tugboat.  It’s pronounced more like “slape boat”

See the tricolor courtesy flag between the lower and upper wheelhouse?  The photos were taken Monday (July 5)  by Jan Oosterboer, in Het Scheur, aka “the rip”, a section of the Rhine-Maas-Scheldt delta near Rotterdam.

And those certainly are not buoys you’d see in the US.

Weeks tug Thomas recently arrived in Rotterdam area.

It’s just off the Nieuwe Maas in the Delfshaven section of Waalhaven.  The Plymouth pilgrims ended their Dutch sojourn by departing from the port of Delfshaven.  It’s not too far from all these kinds of sights.

Thomas towed barge Oslo and had an assist from Dutch telescoping-house tug Walvis

Thomas may be doing crew change in Rotterdam;  a few months back they were working off Ascension Island!

Many thanks to Jan and Jan for sending along these photos.  Evidently, a US tugboat in the Netherlands draws attention!  I’d love to hear more of the story.

 

 

Mary Turecamo, 4300 hp and waiting for a ship at the Narrows, could not look better.  She’s an almost 40-year-old product of Matton Shipyard.  In fact, she was their last product.

Christiana heads out as

Virginia, 1440 hp and launched in 1979,  comes in

from sea, out of the haze.

Christiana was launched in Marinette WI in 2007, a year after Brandywine and a few years after the Molinari class of Staten Island ferries.  She’s married to Double Skin 143, another Marinette vessel.

Barney Turecamo (1995 and 5100)  and  barge Georgia gets rotated by Marie J Turecamo (1968 and 2250). Yesterday I started a re-read of the 1956 book Tug Boat:  The Moran Story, and am finding it very satisfying.

Here’s a dense pack over at the east end of IMTT:  Josephine, Evelyn Cutler, and Cape Lookout:  (2018 and 4560), (1973 and 3900), and (2018 and 5000).

Crystal Cutler arrived here from the shipyard in 2010 and works with 1500 hp.

She’s pushing Patricia Poling

And finally, a light Hunting Creek, 2011 and 3000 hp.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

January, once every four years, involves a formality that we mark today.  Inaugurate has a strange derivation, you figure it out.  With this post, I’m in no way intending to divine futures.  Really it’s just sets of photos taken four years apart. 

Ice and lightship yacht Nantucket floated in the harbor in mid January 2009. Do you remember what else was literally in the harbor?

Weeks tugs stood by ready to move a barge underneath the airplane when Weeks 533 lifted the Airbus 320 from harbor waters that had cushioned its fall . . . twelve years ago. 

Next inauguration day, 2013, I watched fishermen drag clams from the bottom of Gravesend Bay.

Rebel, destined not to run much longer, pushed a barge across the Upper Bay with an incomplete WTC beyond.  Many more details had not yet sprouted on the Manhattan skyline.

Mid January 2017 . . . CMA CGM Nerval headed for the port with Thomas J. Brown off its starboard.  Here‘s what I wrote about this photo and others exactly four years ago.

Nerval still needed to make its way under the yet-to-be completed raising of the Bayonne Bridge, assisted by JRT Moran.  This view was quite different in mid January 2017.   As of today, this container ship in on the Mediterranean on a voyage between Turkey and Morocco.

All photos, WVD, taken in mid January at four-year intervals.  Nothing should be read into the choice of photos.  Sorry I have no photos from January 20, 2005, because back then I didn’t take as many photos, and four years before that, I was still using a film camera, took fewer photos in a year than now I do on certain days, and that skyline above was very different.

My inaugural event . . .  cleaning my desk, my office, and my kitchen.   If you’re looking for an activity, something might need cleaning. Laundry?   Yup, work after work.  All inaugurations call for clean ups.

And if you want to buy that lightship yacht above, here‘s the info.

 

Enjoy more late afternoon photos here . . .  like Alexandra, passing in front of a number of cranes, both on the water, near the water, and atop buildings.

Ava transits the Con Hook Range, with three East River bridges in the background.

Miriam heads in the direction of the Bayonne Bridge, with two Arthur Kill bridge and the Linden refinery in the background.

Janet D with a crane barge passes here in front of a lower Manhattan, and a reprise of those cranes.

Brian Nicholas here brings DS159 eastbound for a refill.

Ellen McAllister weaves between KVK vessels on its way to a job.

Gulf Coast transits the KVK in front of Sailors Snug Harbor, with cranes at Caddells defining points in the western sky.

And to close, it’s Calusa Coast with barge Delaware, recently returned from five or so years in the Great Lakes.   Note the Statue, the south end of Ellis Island, and the Jersey City wall of buildings in the distance.

All photos, WVD.

It still says Eastern Star Dawn, but now it’s Toula!

She’s going to look great all buff and green.

Barry Silverton finally

has a lion on its stack!  All those birds?  It’s water teeming with the bunker, the bunker that recently drew a humpback into the Upper Bay.

Pelham, launched in 1960, is always a pleasant sight.  She has a list of previous names almost as long as my seasonal wish list this year.

Here she took a wake on the bow.

James William used the waters off the salt pile

as a turning basin.

And finally, after a long hiatus down south, CMT Pike has returned.  When i caught her, she was being pursued

by this container ship.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated but of interest, below . . .

yes, Grain de Sail is a 72′ schooner coming into the sixth boro with a 50-ton cargo hold, some of it refrigerated, bringing in French wine.  She’ll set up a market in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for about a week.  Contact info and an e-shop can be found here, although you’ll have to use a machine translate if you’re not up to functionality in French.  

Grain de Sail is involved in triangular  trade, French wine to here and the Caribbean, and then Caribbean chocolate and other products to France . . . .  Something similar in sail freight  domestically has been done by Ceres and more recently by Apollonia.  The most recent international sailing cargo into the sixth boro that I know of was Black Seal, a three-masted schooner.

 . . .and barges, of course.  Someone or something has to pay the bills.  This unique bow is the leading edge of RTC 135, 460′ x 72.5′ here building up a lot  of water,

getting moved along

by Nicole Leigh Reinauer.  They both date from 1999.

Crystal Cutler, always a joy to see,

moves a light Patricia E. PolingCrystal is approaching her 10-year mark. 

A surprise tug

moving this past week was Evening Breeze.

although she was light. I first posted photos of this 2019 boat a year and a half ago

McAllister tugs seem to rotate bases.  I hadn’t seen Charles D. for a while, but she’s back.

and working hard.  She dates from 1967, when she was launched as Esso Garden State, part of a large Esso shipping fleet.

Helen Laraway (1957) has been working in a harbor a lot these days. 

Seeley (1981) with a Weeks barge and Frances (1957) heading for fuel were westbound here.

All photos, WVD.

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