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Some names might be terrifying, like “This is Conqueror, approaching the Narrows.”  By the way, this vessel was here some years back as Energy Conqueror.  It seems sights and ambitions have broadened. 

Equally chilling though oxymoronic might be this one:  “Big Bang has anchored.”

A lot of vessels are named for birds, like ONE Stork and

Endelo Swan.  With a name like Swan, I’d expect a white hull.

Grand Eagle is hardly aquiline;  the bow might be more aquiline if they’d have consulted the folks at Ulstein.

Then there’s the occurrence of serial multiple names.  Can you make out the raised letter name that’s been painted over here?

Above is on the stern and below is high on the starboard bow.

Previously it was NYK Aphrodite.  Well . . . there once were temples to Greek goddess Aphrodite east of the Dardanelles, although I’m sure that has not an iota to do with the choice of new name.

Many thanks to eastriver for Big Bang.  All other photos and any lame jokes . . .  WVD.

Gene Chaser appears to be a sister of Ad-Vantage, which appeared here a year and a half ago.  Click on the link at the beginning of the first sentence and you’ll see some interior shots of this 55-meter yacht support vessel. At some point, yacht support vessel Ad-Vantage was available for charter for a mere 67,500 Euro per week.

The script below the name Gene Chaser puzzles me, especially since I see signs for multiplication and addition.  Maybe someone can translate?

Shooting into the sun from a low-on-the-river angle provides this unsatisfactory image. 

 Shooting down from Brooklyn Heights, as Claude Scales did for this shot, gets this image.  Is that a submarine near the stern of Gene Chaser?  In case you were wondering about the name, it makes sense when you consider the vessel below is the annex to Dr. Jonathan Rothberg‘s Gene Machine, currently off Connecticut. Rothberg is an American chemical engineer, biologist, inventor and entrepreneur. His business involves developing a high-speed “next-gen” DNA sequencing process.  I think these vessels make him a polymath on the seas, an early 21st century version of Jules Verne’s Captain Nemo.  

On the west side of Manhattan North Cove the other day, I walked past this eye catcher . .  .

The cockpit of this “center console” Alen Yacht 45 is quite narrow and not enclosed,

but don’t underestimate this

Turkish beauty.

And to go to the other end of the tech and financial spectrum, what’s the story with the heavily loaded red 16′ Old Town Penobscot Royalex canoe?  The paddler is not yet IN the sixth boro, but heading this way.

It’s Neal Moore, heading 7000+ miles from Astoria OR, city of the fisher-poets, TO the sixth boro, with an ETA of . . .  whenever he gets here, but likely in December or January, depending on the assistance of “river angels” and relying on his own fortitude. As of this posting, he’s paddling the Erie Canal somewhere east of Lyons and west of Oneida . . . .  That trip is longer than and tougher than the Great Loop.  Technically, the Erie Canal is closing soon, but it’ll be open for him.  Wave if you see him.

t o

Check out his website for lots of photos and articles like those excerpted below.

 

Many thanks to Claude and to the webmaster at 22Rivers for their photos;  all others, WVD.

Many thanks to Mage in Southern California for following up so quickly with her own “seldom seen” vessel.  Maybe group sourcing can help fill in some of the info about this boat.  I had suspected it was a CALCOFI boat but a clue on the wheelhouse got me this info on the 1972 offshore supply vessel.

Many thanks to Mage for sharing this photo. 

 

Many thanks to Tony A for these photos.  As it turns out, the Bouchard fleet is dispersing, and eight of the boats at least have names like

Susan Rose, formerly Evening Breeze.  The explanation is that these boats are now assets of Rose Cay, LLC.  Their saltwater name notwithstanding, given a look at their website, I’d never guess they have taken over a large percentage of the former Bouchard fleet.  They are an investment group.  And their statement of “real asset special situations targeting ESG forward investments” requires some explanation;  ESG is “environmental, social, and governance,” itself an opaque string.

Getting together a set of formerly Bouchard, now Rose Cay boats might be an interesting group sourcing project.  You can help by sending me a photo(s) of the former Bouchard boats with new names.

Here’s a list to date that I know of: 

Bouchard Girls is Joan Rose,

Brendan J. Bouchard is now Cindy Rose,

Danielle M. Bouchard is now Rebekah Rose,

Evening Star is now Jordan Rose,

Kim M. Bouchard  is now Lynn M. Rose,  [I’ve never seen Kim ]

Jane A. Bouchard  is now Anna Rose,

Morton S. Bouchard IV is now Jesse Rose. 

Thanks to Tony A for these photos;  any errors  . . .  WVD.

 

How to structure some at photos sent along by eastriver while at sea had flummoxed me too long.  But looking through some old titles, a eureka moment happened . . . I’d used this title once before . . .  here.

Twilight on a hot asphalt-hauling steel barge

looks pretty good.

When the horizon retreats, twilight has a bigger canvas on which to fling color over a bigger expanse of sea and sky.  The photos remind me of ones in this tugster post, also taken at sea under Maxfield Parrish skies.

Thanks, east river . . .

 

As you read this, I’m west of the Mississippi following the muddy tributary of the muddy Mississip, but I thought I’d remotely set signals to go up.  Here’s a WW2 story that intersects the sixth boro in a way I’d never heard . .  .  the Chicago museum I and most of you know as U-505 spent some time in the the sixth boro as USS Nemo, and I don’t mean the Florida eatery.  Note that there’s no mention of USS Nemo in this wikipedia account.

Click on the grainy b/w image of the Moran tugboat with the submarine below to get the story.

Hat tip to Bill Orzell for this story;  here are more of his stories in New York Almanack.

And here’s my question:  has any seen photos of USS Nemo in the sixth boro?

Click here for photos of and links to previous submarines I’ve encountered in NY waters since beginning this blog.

 

 

Postcards is the 9/11 memorial I visit most.  I was there just a week ago;  this is looking mostly north from Staten Island. 

From the water at night for a short period of time, a Tribute in Light can also be seen.  This is looking SW from the East River.

RIP.

Many thanks to Tony A for sending the night photo along.

August 2021.  Samatha Miller follows the channel just north of the Staten Island Yankees stadium.  Note today’s skyline.

1970.  The rest of these photos I share thanks to Steve Munoz. Note the early night skyline here shows the Towers under construction.

1970 Dalzelleagle in the Buttermilk Channel passing USCG cutters tied up alongside Governors Island.  Dalzelleagle, a 1958 Jakobson product, later became McAllister Bros, which was scrapped earlier this year.   In a comment in an earlier post, Tony A identifies one of the cutters as the storied USCG Dallas (WHEC-716), now BRP Ramon Alcaraz (PS-16),  pride of the Philippines Navy.

1971.  McAllister Bros southbound in the Upper Bay.

1971.  The aircraft looks to be amphibious.  Anyone help?  I’d say that’s a Kennedy-class ferry,  And at the foot of the Tower, note the fireboats tied up at Pier A, occupied by FDNY from 1960 until 1992.

1973.  SS Olympia headed for sea.  Her career spanned 1953 until 2009, when she was beached in Alang.

1973.  McAllister Bros. northbound off Hoboken.

1973.  Dalzellera.  That makes her 58 years old at this point.

1973. Concordia Gulf bound for sea. 

1985.  Statue scaffolded for repairs.

1992.  As seen from a ship on Newark Bay at dawn.

1992.  Kerry Moran seven years before her wheelhouse and propulsion were reconfigured.

Many thanks to Steve for sharing these photos, pre-dating my time here.  I moved to the area and started working in Brooklyn in 2000.

It should go without saying what the focus here is.  More to come. Here‘s what I posted exactly 10 years ago, when it seems to me, we were still a united people sharing common losses and goals.

Yesterday, Labor Day, I took no photos, except one of a wood sign carving project in progress.

It turns out . . .  Labor Day 2020 I took no photos either;  these were sent to me though by Josh Watts, and embarrassingly, I’ve not posted them until now.  Sometimes I get into a groove and lose track of things. These are two new generation NYS Canals tugs and a floating gradall, maintaining canal depth.  It’s a great shot.

Here’s anorther from that date and that area of the west-of-Rochester portion of the canal, Adams Basin. The vantage point is a house barge from Erie Canal Adventures.

Labor Day 2019 I had the good fortune to be laboring, and taking photos, and doing that in Cleveland.  Self-unloading freighter Algoma Buffalo was winding its way down the Cuyahoga

with assistance from  two tugs, Cleveland and Iowa, launched 2017 and 1915 respectively!! You caught that 102-year difference in age, right!  Also, that waterway used simultaneously for commerce and recreation . . . that’s the Cuyahoga, you know, the one that caught fire a number of times a half century ago.  That is a story of concerted problem-solving, concerted means people with different ideas solving problems together.

Labor Day 2018 I was exploring Chicago and saw this massive Muddy Waters mural.

Just beyond this navigation aid, you turn to port and enter the federal lock that leads to the Chicago River.

Labor Day 2017 I was in Manitowoc.  Then and many other times I’ve seen and wondered about Halten, a 1966 Swedish Coast Guard vessel (maybe not since painted-over raised letters on the stern say Oslo)  that appears to be a yacht that might not move much.  Maybe it just moves when I’ve not been paying attention.

Avenger IV passed us on Lake Michigan, where lots of fishing was happening from small boats.

Labor Day 2016 I had just left Ogdensburg downbound, and was passing the Canadian port of Johnstown, where the 1943 freighter Mississagi

was discharging cargo,

and a half hour later, we were still looking back at Johnstown in the beauty of the morning colors.

I could go farther back but won’t now.  I’ve no idea why I’ve not taken any photos the past two Labor Days.  September 5, 2022,  I need to get back to work. Thanks to Josh for the first two photos;  all others, WVD.

Looking ahead, just a reminder that after the TugBoat RoundUp, I’ll be road foto tripping a lot, and that might be no posts some days.

Philadelphia Express came into the sixth boro yesterday with stated destination . . . . Karachi!@#!  Made a wrong turn?  More on Karachi later in this post.

But here’s my question . . .  see that flag to the left of the name?  That’s the country of registry.  Recognize it?

Here’s more of a clue to that ship’s registry . . .   GA.  Got that?

Here’s the ship, photo by Michele McMorrow, as taken in the humid afternoon from Sandy Hook.  I wonder if the Hapag is deliberately painted out.

Back to the flag . . . Gabon!@#!   Could you locate that on a map? 

Before you go to google, have a very informative 21-minute listen to Sal Mercogliano’s “Ships and the Flags They Fly.”  Gabon is not mentioned.  

I’d missed the fact that Gabon has even had a ship registry since 2019, when it was created as a joint enterprise between the government of Gabon and an Emirati company based in Dubai.  Read more about it here and here.

As for location, the country has as neighbors, the Gulf of Guinea, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon, and Republic of Congo.  The Bongo family, father and then son, have held the presidency since 1967.   That should speak volumes.

Back to Karachi . . .  have a listen to Dr. Mercogliano’s post “The Fall of Afghanistan:  Its Impact on Shipping and the Silk Road” from a few weeks back on the unexpected supply chains that were used during the 20-year US presence in Afghanistan.  The role of such ships as SS Algol, SS Cornhusker State, MV Maj. Bernard F. Fisher, and MV A1C William H. Pitsenbarger are mentioned.

I still find it odd that the first Gabon-registry vessel enters the sixth boro with Karachi as its stated destination.  By the way, it’s a Hapag-Lloyd ship previously US-registered.  Or is it?  Is there significance to the fact that all the “Hapag” and the tops of the “l”s are painted out.  And what does the stern list as port of registry, Gabon or Libreville, its capital city?  And then, I might just be missing the key detail(s) here.

If you want to check it out, it’s currently on the outside in Port Elizabeth.

 

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