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Aleksandr sent me these photos about a month ago.  He took them on April 20 passing Vlissingen and headed generally northward.   And I’m somewhat stumped.  What does Flintercoral look like to you?

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To me it looks like a new build, going elsewhere for completion.

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Multratug 27 takes the bow and

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Multrasalvor 3 at the stern.

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So I guess here’s the story:  it was completed as a container vessel, and although it has a Flinter- name, Flinter- never took ownership because the yard had gone bankrupt beforehand.  It seems then that some time later, the ship was purchased by Necon, and  converted into a semi-submersible.  Necon, it seems, has only this vessel.  But why it was under tow a month ago is a mystery.

My experience with Flinter is from 2009, when Flinterduin brought the Dutch sailing barges to the sixth boro, and then Flinterborg picked them up in Albany and returned them to Dutch waters.

The same day, Aleksandr caught Smit Sentosa on its arrival from a one-month passage in from Capetown.

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Many thanks to Aleksandr for these photos.  Previously his photos and drawings have appeared here.  Vlissingen (origin of the name of the NYC area called Flushing, settled in 1645) is a quite old port in Zeeland.

So here was 1 and in it I said I would answer a question in a few days and now a few weeks have passed.  The question pertained to the device mounted on the stern of vessel

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Husky.  Congrats to Seth Tane, who guessed correctly.  Here’s what Xtian writes:  “It’s a plough.  In French we talk about “nivelage” [leveling], which means after dredging the bottom of the sea is like a field that has just passed a plow.  This tool cuts the bump to fill the gap.  It’s also used in the rivers where the “alluvium” or the mud stays in always same places because of the current and built like “bottom hill” there.  And it happens also in some harbour (like ferries’ harbour) as because the ferries always doing the same maneuver and raise the mud that still lay at the same place.

With the plough used at the right time, ebb tide for example, the mud is raised and leaves the harbour with tidal current.  In some places the plough is used to feed the hopper dredger –  when the dredger is too large, the plough is used to remove a “bottom hill” when they are close to the bank to give the mud at the place where the hopper dredge is working.   The plough is not only used with mud but also with sand or pebble.  Google with words : Dredge – Plough.

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About Husky, the day I took this picture she was working closely with the dredge Rijndelta at the entrance of Maasvlakte harbor.   I add a picture of her below.”
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More of Xtian’s photos follow, like this closeup of the captain of Smit Cheetah,

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Fairplay 24 and 21,

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Union 11 passing the Mammoet headquarters,

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Smit Schelde,

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SD Rebel,

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Multratug 31, 

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Osprey Fearless, 

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Pieter (?) towing Matador 2,

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and finally the recently completed Noordstroom.

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Many thanks to Xtian for these photos of another watershed.

Back to the Caloosahatchee Canal and a few miles east of Cowgirl Way . . .

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more traffic, like MV Sea Star and

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Summer Star pushing a Gator Dredging’s Jesse Marie Ellicott 670 dredge and a deck barge and

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the USACE’s Leitner.  And is that a bovine up on the ridge?

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Many thanks to the Caloosahatchee Canal office for these photos.

Secret salts sometimes send along photos, and I appreciate that, since many waterways I’ll never see . . .  and that means boats I’d never encounter, like Reliance, 1979, 127′ x 40;’

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Grand Canyon II, an offshore construction/ROV/IRM vessel, shown in this link getting towed from Romania to Norway for completion; and more.

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Here’s an unidentified Marquette Offshore boat with an unidentified Weeks crane barge,

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Paraclete . . .  look that word up here  and then see the rest of the names in her fleet,

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Gulf Faith, 

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USCGC Cobia

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Gulf Glory and an unidentified Algoma self-unloader,

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and finally a WW2-era tank-landing ship turned dredger and named Columbia, ex-LST-987.

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All interesting stuff from Mobile, Alabama.   Hat’s off to the secret salt.

If you’re not sure where to place Cuxhaven, the image below may help.  Another clue is that in Cuxhaven inbound, you could choose either to make for Hamburg or for the Kiel Canal. All these photos come thanks to Aleksandr Mariy, whose drawing we featured here recently.

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Wal was launched in 1992.  Dimensions:  101′ x 32.8′ x 17 and Gross Tonnage is 368.

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Luchs, 1991, 95′ x 29.5 x 15.1 and GT 229.

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Wolf, 1993, 105′ x 26.2′ x 17′ and GT 368.

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Bugsier 15, 1991, 92′ x 29.6 x 15.1 and GT 239.

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Bugsier 10, 2009, 108′ x 42.7 x 19.3 and GT 485.

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Steinbock, 1977, 92′ x 26.2′ x 14.1′ and GT 213.

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And Steinbock here is underway through the Kiel Canal.

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Here’s more info on Cuxhaven.

All photos here come thanks to Aleksandr Mariy, to whom I am grateful.

 

Each year around this time, SUNY Maritime cadets go to sea.  Click here for photos from last year’s departure and here, for ports throughout the summer.  You can track the vessel here.

Here was a clue that a ship was headed this way.

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The next three photos here come from Roger Munoz, high atop the 74th St ConEd plant.

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That’s Roosevelt Island on the other side, at the southern tip of which i waited.

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Here the training ship passes under the 59th Street Bridge,

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and past the Empire State Building . . .

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escorted by a fireboat and

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two McAllister tugboats.

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Some of the cadets who made this journey last summer are already employed as professional mariners today.  And somewhat related, any guesses how long ago this particular T/S Empire State, the VI,  was launched?  Click here for info on her former life.   To see some dramatic shots of the knife edge cutting through the middle of the Atlantic, click here.  If you’re impatient, jump ahead to the 3-minute mark.

Thanks much to Roger Munoz, a SUNY grad,  for the three photos from high atop the East River.

And here is a time lapse gif of ES VI passing, thanks to Rand Miller.

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First and foremost, thanks to Nelson Brace for permission to use this photo. See more of Nelson’s work here.

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The tug is 1978 Jaguar.  What schooner is this?

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And here, at the south west end of the Canal, the tow passes Independence.

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Again, thanks to Nelson for use of this photo.

My guess about the schooner is Roseway.

To close out April, here (and at the end of this post) a photo of Grouper in Lyons a few weeks ago before the Canal was brought up to level and opened for traffic.  Thanks to Bob Stopper.

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How lucky can some people get!?@#!  Bowsprite caught this photo last fall as she was leaving New London harbor.  The tugboat is John P. Wronowski.

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From Maraki, it’s Heidi eastbound past cow pastures and

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fleetmate Rikki S westbound.

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How’s this for an unnamed push boat . . . the one that moves

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Martha Lewis when needed, and when no longer needed because the skipjack is under sail, just gets hauled up on davits.    I guess technically this prime mover is not a tugboat, she is a push boat.   Here’s a youtube of Martha Lewis getting trucked away, sans push boat, for repairs.  Anyone have updates on her getting into the water this season?  Click here (and scroll) for a photo of Silk, the push boat dedicated to skipjack Stanley Norman.

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And from my visit to Chelsea Creek last week, here’s another shot of (for me) the unidentified small tug, and

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in gloucester, it’s  Mikey D with Horizon looking over the stern.

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Closing this post out, it’s looking eastbound across Grouper‘s bow.  I’ve said it for years and will say it again, I hope some one takes this project on.

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Thanks to Bob, bowsprite, and Maraki for these photos of really random aka sundry set of tugboats.

All these photos come through Fred Trooster.

Let’s start with the new build Noordstroom which wasn’t splashed until midMarch 2016.  Click here to see the triple-screw vessel at various stages of construction.

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Catharina 7 on the other hand, is from 1958.  Here she passes the Bollard.

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Here’s 1973 built Pacific Hickory.  I’m not sure what’s brought her to greater Rotterdam.

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And we end today’s post with Osprey Fearless, 1997 built.

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All photos by Freek Koning and via Fred Trooster.  Thank you very much.

Frying Pan came back to Pier 66 yesterday after several months at Caddell Dry dock, assisted by Dorothy J.  I use this photo with permission from Renee Lutz Stanley.

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It turns out that I also recently received a photo and spec sheet from barrel, formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers.  When I looked up where Liston, the vessel below, was built, I

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learned that it was being built the same time as the lightship listed as Frying Pan Shoal.  First, it makes me wonder whether a photo exists that shows them both on the ways.  Second, I wondered if there was an error in shipyard site here about the initial name of the lightship, or if there was a time when the word “shoal” got dropped from the name of the vessel.  Third, the shipyard site says that LV115 became a museum in Southport, NC.  Click here and scroll through for a photo I took in Southport five years ago showing where some folks had wanted to build a museum with LV115 as the centerpiece, but it had never happened.

Some years ago, I used to spend a good amount of summer evening time at Frying Pan/Pier66.  If you’ve never been, you should try it once.  Here are some photos I took way back then. I must have many more somewhere.  Pier 66 opens in early May, and I think it’s time to have a large gathering there once again.  Let’s agree on a date and meet there, eh?

Many thanks to Renee and barrel for use of these photos.

But a closing shot, barrel writes:  “USACE TUG LISTON    became ARGUS of Salter Towing in 1970. #561597. At a later date became fishing vessel MR. J.C. now out of documentation.”

USACE TUG LISTON

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