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Pete Ludlow’s photos have shown a variety of vessel traffic near Hell Gate.  Here’s a whimsical set, not really work boats for a day I’m having a hard time working or even thinking about working.

Who knew the variety of traffic here?!!

There has to be a story here, and

photos are said to be worth a thousands of words . . . 

I wish I knew the story, or even just the name and itinerary of a boat like this….

Many thanks, Pete.

 

Tony A has a sharp eye on the sixth boro traffic, like here, Durable, cable ship that worked off Fire Island for some time this spring.  I did catch Durable‘s fleet mate here a while back.   Durable was working on offshore wind farm elements, but has returned to the UK at this moment. 

He also caught Fort Point transiting the watery boro.

 

A first timer catch though is Miss Jean, a Louisiana-based boat likely working with a dredging company in the area.  

For a few more first-timers on the blog, check out David Steers and Benjamin D. Baxter, up along the Sound. 

So is this retired FDNY fireboat Alfred E. Smith under its own power?

Nope.  She’s at the end of a line towed by Jaguar, frequently towing “second-lives” vessels into or out of the sixth boro. 

Jaguar is a Gladding-Hearn product from 1978. 

And that’s a good place to hold it up.  Thanks much, Tony.  

And if winds are fair, tugster might just be back in the sixth boro soon. 

Let’s get back to some Pete Ludlow photos.  Co Morgan has such a long history of names going back to 1951 1965, I’m just going to paste it in here.  

A high vantage point helps convey appreciation for the train of three Mister Jim tows through Hell Gate. 

Ditto Navigator.  From this perspective, her smart color scheme is clear. 

Meghan Marie heads into Hell Gate with a destination somewhere along the Sound or farther. 

All photos by Pete Ludlow.  Thanks, Pete. 

For what might be considered an exotic among exotics, let’s go back to Pete Ludlow’s photos,  meet Windserve Odyssey.  

As an all-purpose offshore wind farm support vessel, it is just one vessel type that will be more common in the years to come.  The blog alluded to this particular vessel and a possible transit through the sixth boro back last September.   Pete’s photo here confirms that it did transit back on the first day of 2022.  

Hat tip and thanks, Pete, for catching this. 

Tugster is still gallivanting far away from the sixth boro, will be for the better part of a week yet, leaving the robots in charge.  We test the perimeter, push the parameters, but in our own robotic ways, support the mission.

 

 

x

Clearly, we robots messed up.  To make amends, here’s some info pasted in:

GENERAL RUDDER (IMO: 8835463) is a Training Ship that was built in 1984 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 4.5 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 68.28 meters and her width is 13.11 meters.
Here’s more on Texas A & M’s training ship. 

BERTO L MILLER (IMO: 8964850) is a Offshore Supply Ship that was built in 1999 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 3.1 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 49.71 meters and her width is 13.41 meters.
Here’s more the the Miller’s Launch OSV fleet. 

GO AMERICA (IMO: 8968181) is a Offshore Supply Ship that was built in 2001 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 3 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 44.35 meters and her width is 10.97 meters.

Here’s more on the Guice Offshore (GO) fleet. 

 

Many thanks for all photos to Pete Ludlow.  Tugster might pull our plugs and drain our batteries for our failing to fill in the info yesterday.

xx

 

More photos here thanks to Pete Ludlow.

The Amigo is an asphalt tanker.  That means she moves her cargo around at almost 300 degrees F.

 

She was eastbound with assist by James D Moran.

 

What do you suppose Vinik No. 6 had in tow?

 

Nicholas and Liz assisted as well.

But of course, it was the venerable training ship . . .

from the shipyard on its way back to Fort Schuyler.

Again, many thanks to Pete for sharing these scenes not previously seen on tugster.

Unrelated:  Since we robots monitor harbor events and share news, here’s a surprise that will astonish tugster upon his return:  The Brown tugs have been sold to Seward Marine of Chesapeake VA.

 

Thanks for these shots to Pete Ludlow.  You could call some of this post “Yachts a Million 5 Redux.”

Gene Chaser appeared on this blog back last fall, but from different angles.  As of this late April writing, she’s in Miami. Some great photos of her and the yacht she supports can be seen here.

I strike out here.  I don’t know the Rambler story, but clearly she’s out and rambling, unlike Sea Monster, at least last I heard.  Remember Santandrea?

Jaguar has come into the sixth boro several times towing in schooners for conversion into eating establishments

Magnet, Metal Shark’s expedition catamaran, was in the boro last fall.

Arriva has carried several names since launch in 2001.

As Vajoliroja, she had a quite flashy celebrity owner. She’s Turkish built.

Again, many thanks to Pete for sharing these scenes not previously seen on tugster.

Beyond Celebrity Apex, look!  It’s a container ship

from 1988

escorted into port by 2016 Trident.

The 2016 Trident, 99′ x 44′ and 5730 hp, has an unusual configuration below the hull:   she’s a Robert Allan Ltd-designed advanced rotortug (ART), meaning three engines and three Schottel z-drives, creating triangular propulsion to enhance maneuverability. See more on that here.

National Glory is a 575-teu box ship.  That’s NOT 15000.

In comes another, Galani, 1732 teu.  Assist is provided by a 1995 Broward, 5100 hp, 96′ x 40, a relatively conventional z-drive boat. 

The other assist is from the 1998 St. Johns, 88′ x 50′ 4000 hp and nothing conventional below the waterline.  She is referred to as a “ship-docking module,” aka SDM design.  See a schematic and read all about it here.

All photos by C. Baker, my sister, to whom I am grateful.

Tugster is on an extended trip, so the robots have scheduled these posts.  Later in May, I will get back to Barge Canal-era photos from the Canal Society.  I’ve taken a break from that series to “catch up.” 

Next I’ll alternate in posts using photos thanks to Pete Ludlow, whose aerie high above the East River just “west” of Hell Gate places him in a unique location to get good photos of traffic through there, and he has certainly captured some winners, photos and evolutions I’ve not seen from my preferred places.

Here Jay Michael tows a dead ship Sea Hunter to be scrapped farther downeast.

 

Some years ago I caught Sea Hunter in port of Boston, when she looked bad but surely not this bad. 

Sea Hunter was once the platform for a treasure hunter, but as so often happens, certain treasure becomes just out of reach, if they ever existed at all. 

Another unusual tow, this one westbound, is Ivory Coast towing

GDM 264, a barge-mounted cement unloader.

 

Many thanks to Pete for sharing these scenes not previously seen on tugster.

Many thanks to Jan van der Doe for sending along these workboat photos from various places in the English-speaking southern hemisphere.  As of the moment, Agros, 85′ x 30′, and built in 2009 in Sibu, in Sarawak state, Malaysia, is at the dock in Cairns, AU. The shipyard in Sibu is called Rajang Maju Shipbuilding.   

I just figured out Agros is alongside Trinity Bay, a Sea Swift cargo vessel. 

Gulf Explorer is also currently in Cairns.  The 1971  82′ x 26′ tugboat was launched in Carrington, NSW, AU.  

Storm Cove, currently in Brisbane, is 95′ x 30′ and was launched from the same Carrington AU shipyard in 1971.  She was formerly also known as Shell Cove.

Monowai , currently at the dock in Picton NZ,  is 98′ x 30′ and was launched in 1973 by Oceania Marine in Whangarei NZ. Whangarei is on the north island, and Picton, the south.

Pacific Runner, shown here on the Tamar River in Tasmania, is 211′ x 49′.  She was built in 2003 by Pan United Shipping in Singapore.  She’s currently flagged China and known as Luo Tong 7002 anchored in the greater mouth of the Yangtze. 

Have any readers experience to share traveling in Singapore?  The country/city state has awakened my curiosity.

This photo was taken in New Zealand.

Swiber Torunn, shown here in New Zealand, is a 194′ x 46′ offshore supply vessel built in 2008 in Guangzhou, CH.  She currently is registered in Mexico and is sailing along the south coast of Jamaica this morning.

Taiaroa, 79′ x 36′, was built in 2014 by Damen in Gorinchem NL and currently sailing under the flag of New Zealand.    Are those sheep on the hillside?

Tarcoola, Australian flagged and 92′ x 32′, was built in 2004 by the Batam Indonesia shipyard Nanindah Mutiara in the Riau Islands, right across the Singapore Strait from Singapore.  

Here Tarcoola is working in tandem with Wajarri, a twin. Both currently work out of Cairns.

 

 

Warrender, 220′ x 46′, actually might be called Toll Warrender and previously known as Riverside Cloud and Gulf Cloud, was built in Auckland NZ, 1995. As of this writing, she’s in Cairns, having just completed a cargo run from the northern tip of Cape York, AU.  Anyone ever been there?  I’d love to hear from you if you have. 

All photos come thanks to Jan van der Doe.

Given my inquiry about Singapore and Cape York, you might correctly surmise that spring has me suffering from wanderlust. I’m actually departing soon on a gallivant . . ..  Robots may or may not continue to post while I’m away.  Let’s see how reliable robots are.  Loyal!?  What’s that to a robot?

 

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