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JM, that’s John McCluskey, sent along these photos yesterday.  I’d planned on doing that same trip yesterday, but time got away from me and today it’s rainy and darker!

This shot greatly resembles one of the first set of photos I ever posted on a blog, my very first post. You can see it here.

Alice and two Oldendorff siblings have been sold to Algoma; hence the name change to Algoma Verity.

As John passed the shipyard in the old Brooklyn Navy yard, he also got photos of some of the other vessels there, like R/V Shearwater and in the graving dock behind her, Cape Avinoff.

 

Waiting her turn in the graving dock is Cape Ann.

Many thanks to John McCluskey for sharing these photos of a short stretch of his float-by on the East River.

 

 

Here’s what GL tugs have looked like for a century, and many of them are still working, despite their age, as you can see here by clicking on the state names.  The tug below is Nebraska, launched in 1929.  Grouper–frequently mentioned on this blog–has the same basic design.

A new beginning took place yesterday in Toledo at the National Museum of the Great Lakes, and Paul Strubeck of Vintage Diesel Design as well as all these photos on tugster took these photos of the ceremony:  in front of the Colonel aka Schoonmaker, the 116-year-old tug Ohio was rechristened along with

the new tug Ohio. Below and to the left, the old/new Ohio (originally built as a Milwaukee fire boat) was christened with beer and the new Ohio  . . . with champagne.  Read the ToledoBlade story here.

Click here for a story on the new design, based on the Damen 1907 ICE class design.  This blog did a post on the first of this new design about two years ago here.

 

 

The new Ohio will assist ships in port of Toledo, so juxtaposition of these three vessels will be commonplace in years to come.

Many thanks to Paul for use of these photos.  And if you are ever in the Toledo area, do stop by the National Museum of the Great Lakes.

 

Here are previous installments in the series.  Summer sail can take the form of foil-raised GP racing as will happen in the sixth boro this weekend;  it can also happen on longer courses and require stamina and endurance as happens in some races ending in Mackinac.

All the photos in this post come from Jeff Gritsavage, as he was delivering a yacht from Florida to Lake Michigan.  Some of you will recognize that this shot was taken in an Erie Canal lock.  A few of you will name the lock.  Answer at the end of this post.

I’ll help you out here; this was taken on the Oswego Canal, a spur that was developed to connect the Erie Canal and Syracuse to Lake Ontario.  Name the town?

Another town on the Oswego Canal.  Name it?

This is the same town, and the boats are exiting the same lock as seen above.  In fact, about 500′ beyond the opening mitre gates is the location I took this photo of Urger and a State Police cruiser almost exactly 5 years ago.

This is Oswego.  White Hawk has arrived on its first Great Lake.  The masts await and will be stepped because air draft issues

no longer apply.

Welland Canal is less than 30 miles long, but it’s

 

the way around Niagara Falls in 8 easy steps.

Coexistence with larger vessels is the rule on the Welland Canal.

Above and below is one of the hardest working tug/barge units on the lakes . . . Wilf Seymour and Alouette Spirit

And on any lucky passage through the Welland, you’ll see vessels like Fednav‘s Federal Dee,

Polsteam‘s Mamry, and

Canada Steamship LinesCSL Tadoussac.

Before I give the answers to the questions above, here’s another town/Erie Canal location to identify.  Click on the photo to find its attribution AND the article that explains what’s happening with White Hawk.

So . . . the answers are lock E-23, Phoenix NY, Fulton NY, and finally above . . . .

 

that’s Rome.   Click here for a previous tugster post on the Rome to Oswego run.

Many thanks to Capt. Jeff for sharing these photos here.

And I’ll be looking for White Hawk on the Lakes this summer.

 

 

Recognize the bridge and lighthouses?  A clue . . .  it’s on the freshwater coast of the US.

Here’s a continuation of the bridge above.  More importantly, you see the escort vessel in the background, none other than the venerable Neeskay, originally a 1953 Higgins T-boat and now the primary research vessel for UW Milwaukee, where these photos were taken.

The yellow vessel in the foreground above is an unmanned surface vessel produced by L3 Technologies.  Here’s more on the range of applications.

I’ve not noticed any yet, but I do keep my eyes peeled for USVs in bathymetric survey work in the sixth boro. Has anyone seen any?

Many thanks to Greg Stamatelakys, captain of Neeskay, for these photos.

 

Sarah D makes for Global Terminal,

Helen Laraway passes an inbound container vessel,

Ava M. guides a ULCV in beside a cruise ship,

Rebecca Ann moves a light scrap barge,

Capt. Brian A. tails a box ship into her berth,

Genesis Glory passes GM 11105,

Eric McAllister assists a tanker into its berth,

Rhea I. Bouchard heads westbound light in the KVK,

and Frances pushes a scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who loves that the sixth boro never sleeps.

And now one more, taken this morning in San Juan PR by Capt. Neftali Padilla, it’s the arrival of the cranes towed by Capt. Latham after not quite an 18-day run. See the tow departing NYC here.  Thx much, Tali.

Triton is a fitting name* for the current record-holding largest ULCV to call in the sixth boro.  If the Panamanians call it that after CMA CGM T. Roosevelt-also in the sixth boro this week–call it that, that passes muster as true for me, since they charge fees by this criterion.

The photos above and below come from Marcin Kocoj, who caught it departing Port Elizabeth and then passing Caddell’s in the KVK.

*Triton was built by Samsung in Geoje South Korea in 2016 has already had a handful of names. She’s moved along by 85705 hp.

The photo above and another version of it below come from Capt. Tom Ferrie, Sandy Hook pilot who took it out to sea late Friday afternoon.

Now I imagine someone in an airplane a half dozen miles over the Atlantic Ocean looking out the window and spotting it, a tiny sliver of multi-colored boxes followed by a wake, a massive ship in a much-more immense ocean.

I suppose 10 years from now, we’ll look back at Triton in the context of even larger vessels. 

Here’s more.

Many thanks to Marcin and Tom for use of these photos.

Thanks to Joseph Chomicz, it’s Capt. Latham in Port Elizabeth .  .  .

standing by the barge Atlanta Bridge . . .  So here’s my question . . . and answer will be located at the end of this post . . .  in quo vadis?

I’ve not seen this boat in a while . . . the 1958 Blount-built Vulcan III.

 

The “D” stands for Derrick Marine of Perth Amboy.

The current Kristin Poling stands by as Aramon is lightered before it enters the Kills.

Doris Moran moves Portland into the Kills, headed here for Shooters Island before following the channel around to the north.

Jonathan and JRT make their way home after an assist.

Mary Turecamo assists a lightered Aramon to a berth on the Arthur Kill.

Many thanks to Joe for the Capt. Latham pics;  all others by Will Van Dorp, who lacked his real camera to document the answer to the “where goest they?” question above.

Some older cargo cranes go San Juan-bound aboard Atlanta Bridge between Capt. Latham and Atlantic Enterprise.

. . . which sounds like rymoulká ton syrón, which translates as tugboats of Syros.  Syros is an island in the Cyclades, the archipelago SW of Athens. In fact, it’s THE island group that originally gave us the word archipelago.

I’ve never visited the Cyclades, but now I really want to.  Previously I have traveled from Athens west, then north all the way to Norway.

I’m not positive how to pronounce rymoulká, but the transliteration looks a like like remorqueur or remolcador, the words for tugboat in French and Spanish, respectively.

These tugs have classical names–Orpheus and Kerveros–and both operate for the shipyard, a division of Neorion, an old Greek heavy industry company.

 

 

 

Many thanks to Ben Hall for contacting me with these photos.  For more of Ben’s photography, click here.

For more photos of Syros, click here. And more Greek tugs, here.  For more tugs from the Mediterranean, click here.

First there was one, and Mike

got a close up look of the “boss,” the curvaceous raised metal plate on the bow.  I love the seahorses on either side of that plate, a throwback to an era when mythological creatures decorated ocean charts.

 

 

Then beginning a week ago, there were two,

stern to bow.

Whatever work is underway on these two vintage vessels at GMD,

I’d say it’s akin to a restoration.

 

Many thanks to Mike Abegg for all these photos.

Previous related posts can be found here and here.

 

Quick . ..  name the oldest (or first) verifiable European settlement in current US territory?  Answer follows. Giovanni da Verrazzano visited the bay that became the sixth boro in 1524 but he didn’t settle.

This is the port of Guaymas, visited and claimed for Spain in 1539 by Francisco de Ulloa.  I can’t tell you anything about the tug here, Tolteca-1.  She looks like she could have been designed up north.  Anyone guess the La Paz BSC port of registry?

Click here for info on this port, and  connections between this port, 200 miles south of the Arizona border, and the US.  Here is an article on hopes for the port from the perspective of a few years back.

Rio Balsas is a crude oil tanker.

I’d love to learn more about Tolteca-1.  BCS is an abbreviation for Baja California Sur. 

Meanwhile, if you want to know more about Guaymas and the following:

-the first* ever aerial bombardment of a naval target,

pearls,

Rey Feo

and NASA . . .

 

click here.

And the answer to the question on the oldest settled current US city . . . . is St. Augustine, 1565!!

Many thanks to the Maraki crew for these photos.  More Maraki here.

 

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