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With apologies all around . ..  I am tardy in posting some of the photos I enjoy getting from you all readers. Tardiness . . . my only argument is that I am very busy with projects that will come out at some point.

Like this one that Ted M sent in response to my Turmoil post some weeks ago.  Jason Reinauer is towing Turmoil–an older iteration– astern.  I believe I saw Acadian Freedom in Chelsea last year, but don’t have a photo to prove it.  Here’s what I did put up from that reconnoitre.

And thanks to Jed, here’s Pearl Coast, taken recently, and

photo 4 MARCH 2017

Pati R Moran, taken not so recently.

photo date 16 OCT 2008

I once had photos of the green boat below and below, but I think I deleted them out of frustration of NOT being able to determine its history.  It stood here in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for a while, but scuttlebutt is that it has been scrapped. These next four photos come thanks to Paul Strubeck, busy with projects of his own.

Can anyone fill in any of the blanks as related to this green boat?

Paul also made a trip around part of Lake Michigan recently and took these photos in Green Bay–GL Texas and North Dakota

and below the bow of Stewart J. Cort, my guess is Minnesota and Oklahoma.  The GL tugs are really amazing, with combined thousands of years of work.  As to Cort, she’s back at work, bow that the Great Lakes has reawakened.

 

The Maraki crew is underway again also, in the Bahamas, but before leaving panther land, which generated these and these unusual photos, they got these photos of Rikki S and

Jane.

 

Thanks again to Ted, Jed, Paul, and the Maraki crew for these photos.  how does the French saying . . . (mien vast hard due jambs.   eh?)   Wow, that’s what autocorrect did with my foreign language.  I’ll try again:  Mieux vaut tard que jamais.

I’ve done a few dozen “port of” posts in the past few years.

I won’t tell you where Akureyri is yet,

but the geography is a clue.

So is the name of this pilot boat, which was built in this port.  Sleipnir was built in 1995, with dimensions 52′ x 16.4′ and is powered by a single 700 hp Cummins.  Mjolnir is slightly older and smaller.

Last chance to guess . . .

And the location of Akureyri is midway east-west along the north shore of Iceland, and about as far from Reykjavik as is Boston-New York.  Sleipnir was built here.

Many thanks to Klaus Intemann, whose site is here.  Klaus is looking eagerly for photos from NYC that relate to the departure this spring of Peking for Germany.

Did you recognize the name Sleipnir, an appropriate name for a pilot boat . . . ?

Answer is here.

 

Stuff happens.  Like cars and trucks, ships too sometimes need a tow.  Pretty World needed a tow to the repair facility a few years back.  Here’s Horizon Crusader towed to the scrap yard.  Here’s CV-60 USS Saratoga getting a tow to the same end.

Thorco Hilde found herself at the end of this tow line in the wee hours of Saturday morning.

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I caught the tow just as I went for a walk along the water’s edge.

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The zoom told me they were surely attached. As of Monday morning, she was in the Brooklyn Navy Yard getting fixed.

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The lead tug here is Marjorie B McAllister, featured in many previous posts indexed here.  In this role, she reminds me of some of Farley Mowat’s best, his novels about salvage tugs, a role once played by the tug below, now dissolving in the Arthur Kill, as she looked when I took her photo in August 2011.  In April 1945, the salvage tug below assisted in towing the torpedoed Atlantic States back to safety in Boston for repair and reuse.

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Many thanks to Thomas Steinruck for use of the top photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Here were the previous posts in this series.

The photos in today’s post all come from the Marinetraffic site, and in cases where the photographer’s name is mentioned, I’ve kept that info.  I’m sure the photographers appreciate that their work is shared with their name attached.  My question is this:  what do they have in common?

Danum 93, built 2009, registered in Malaysia, 115′ x 36′

danum93

SL Tiger, 2012, registered in Cyprus, 108′ x 43′

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Theresa, 1978, registered Mongolia, 131′ x 32′

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Jawar Basra, 2015, registered St. Vincent/Grenadines, 105′ x 43′

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and finally, Al Muthanna, 2014, Iraq, 121′ x 36.’

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And the common thread is that as of last evening,  all were located at the “top” or NW end of the Persian Gulf,  all west of a line drawn between Ahmadi Kuwait and Al Faw Iraq.  I was just curious what tugboats one would see in that area.  The photo of Al Muthanna may have been taken in Umm Qasr, a port near which I spent over three months back in late 1990.  I tell a story about that here, an account that needs to be refocused and possibly shortened.

This reminds me of a project I did back in 2008, which resulted in my tracking down photos for Osen-Hunter of a hijacked tugboat used as a  mothership by pirates off Somalia.  More about that story is here.

 

Thanks to all of you who send me photos.  M & M McMorrow sent this photo taken at Atlantic Highlands just before Christmas.  And yes,

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Delta is the best Christmas red. I can’t seem to find a tugboat in the NMFS.NOAA registry called just “Delta.”   Someone help out?

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Richie Ryden took these photos just before New Year’s, sending them along with the note “I took these pic’s on 12/28/16 on the Hackensack River between Rt 3 east & west Bridges , It looks like they a are rebuilding the marina there !!! I saw Reliable from Coastline Marine Towing out of Belford NJ  switching barges empty for a full one with old pilings on it ! look at your blog all the time keep up the good work !!!! Happy New Year !!!!”

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Happy New Year, Richie!  And I have to admit I can find nothing about previous owners of Reliable also, although the late great John Skelson had a photo of her from a while back sans the upper house here.  Richie’s photos also helped solidify my image of what this vessel looks like compared with another Reliable that languishes up on the Oswego Canal. 

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Jed sent me this photo just after the start of 2017 with the note “Happy New Year from Maryland.  Here is your first tug of 2017, the ten-year-old Belgian Union Grizzly that I saw on the Scheldt in 2012.”   Thx Jed.  And since that time, she’s sent a half dozen more photos of European tugboats, which I’ll post soon.

photo date 6 SEPT 2012

And Tyler Jones must be losing his patience:  he sent me this photo back on November 1, and I still have not put it up.  What I love about this photo, Tyler, is the fog giving the impression that Coral Coast pushing a cement barge upriver at Poughkeepsie  is weightless, floating lazily on the clouds.  Thx much, Tyler.

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Jan van der Doe periodically sends me photos from Canadian Lake Ontario ports.  He didn’t identify this boat although I’m wondering if it’s Lac Manitoba, which capsized on the Ottawa River back in June 2015.

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In Hamilton harbor, here’s (l to r) Florence M, Tony Mackay, and James A. Hannah.   Hannah is a sister of Bloxom, the cover model for my documentary about the Arthur Kill graveyard and the most intact tugboat in the graveyard on the Arthur Kill.

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And finally, on December 12, here are more McKeil boats tied up in Hamilton.

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Thanks much M & M, Richie, Jed, Tyler, and Jan.

 

 

ooops, new pigs, there must have been an incident.

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A little background . . . .  A conductor of the The Timbuctoo, Khartoum & Western Railway Marching Band & Chowder Society emailed me yesterday about what they said was “strange small boat activity” just north of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.   Since I was in the area, I thought I’d check it out, and what I saw would be

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considered at very least unorthodox nets on small boats, now that we are in harbor “fishing” season.  Pannaway is dredging for critters, I believe, although I’m puzzled by her New Hampshire registration, if I’m not mistaken.

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See the rig with “sock” skimming the surface?

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These rigs are designed to soak up stuff that should not be in the water, as opposed to critters that find it acceptable habitat.

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Ken’s Marine does a lot of types of work, and

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responding to spills is one of them.

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The news had nothing I could find, but I’m guessing

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there was something under-reported here.  By the way, a flat oil absorbent product is often called a diaper.

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Again, thanks to the good conductor for the tip.

All photos and speculation by Will Van Dorp, whose already taken but too few rides on the Timbuctoo, Khartoum & Western Railway.

An added plus of my trip here was to have another look at Soldiers and Sailors Monument, which I’ll feature in an upcoming post.

 

Many thanks to Ken Deeley for today’s photos.  The vessel with the red house is surely one of the Standard Boat stick lighter fleet, but I can’t read the name on the bow.  A half decade I posted a photo here (scroll) of a decrepit Ollie, the stick lighter that used to tie up at South Street.   He can’t quite put a date on this photo taken at South Street Seaport Museum’s pier.  Can anyone date these photos?  And what was that green/white dome in the background?

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Coming down the Hudson, Ken got this photo of suction dredger Sugar Island.  Currently, Sugar Island is working off Bahrain.

sugar-island-suction-hoppper-hudson-dreger

 

Many thanks to Ken for sending along these photos.

Click here for a 1992 publication by Robert Foster and Jane Steuerwald called “The Lighterage System in the New York/New Jersey Harbor,” referencing stick lighters and much more.

Back on December 4, two formerly McAllister tugboats departed the home base in Mariners Harbor (typically referred to as “Mariners”) for Muskegon Michigan.  Word is that they have now safely arrived.

A few days after they departed NYC, Nelson Brace caught this photo of the two traversing the Cape Cod Canal.

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On December 19, Michel Gosselin caught these photos of the two unbound from Lock 2 of the Welland Canal, many cold blustery, and icy days later.

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Many thanks to Nelson and Michel for use of these photos.  Hats off to the crew . . . better yet, given that ice, keep your hats on.

Below is the screenshot of the tow arriving in Muskegon late Christmas Eve.

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It would be nice to see some of the photos crew might have taken as they crossed the stormy Gulf of Saint Lawrence and fought their way across Lake Ontario with strong winds out of the NW.  And I’m looking forward to seeing them in Port City Tug colors.

 

 

I must get back to downstream and upstream tows on the Mississippi soon, but I seriously misread this oncoming vessel.  Some of you might figure out my misread before the end of this post.

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What attracted my eye to Florida Enterprise was the superstructure, specifically the cranes overtop the holds.

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I’d seen structures somewhat like these on a ship in the KVK here … but they were not quite the same.

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Because of poor lighting and large distance relative to my position, I missed the really unusual feature of the vessel

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–or rather vessels–which I should have

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seen here.  See it?

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Florida Enterprise is a barge, and the prime mover here

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is now called Coastal 202.  Below is a photo taken by Barry Andersen, which I got permission to use from Fred Miller II, which shows Coastal 202–then called Jamie A. Baxter–light, an ITB out of the notch. The photo below was taken soon after the tug’s launch in mid-1977 from Peterson Builders in Sturgeon Bay WI.  Here’s another taken when the vessel was out of the notch and then known as Barbara Knessel.  

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Click here for some ITB posts I did back in 2008.   Click here for a better view of Coastal 202 and her cargo barge that shows she is in fact an ITB.

Now I’d love to see Coastal 202 out of the notch from all angles and to see ISH’s rail ferry too.

Truth be told, another surprise was that nola hula was nowhere to be seen  . ..  maybe headed out to sea like that humpback that splashed around the sixth boro last month?

 

Here’s a short but motley set of photos.  Can you identify the tug below sporting the Canadian flag?  Answer follows.

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Below it’s Barry Silverton, pushing Fight ALS eastbound on the East River.   Big Allis identifies the location, where Don Jon folks/equipment have recently placed the platforms to the lower right side of the photo.

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And finally, from the Port of Toronto, it’s Mr. Kane, who first appeared on this blog here, although it is not identified except in the comments thanks to Isaac Pennock.

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So the top photo, it’s Cheyenne, quite possibly the last vessel to traverse the Erie Canal this season.  I’m not sure if they have already reached the Hudson River.  She’s flying the Canadian courtesy flag because she had just exited the Welland Canal at Port Weller at that time.  Here’s a photo taken by fire girl two seasons ago, Cheyenne doing the part of the Canal at the east end of Sylvan Beach.

Thanks much to George Haynes, Jonathan Steinman, and Jan van der Doe for these photos.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.  Thanks much for continuing to read tugster.  If there’s interest in the proposal below, I’ll try to fashion a post from your contributions soon if not tomorrow.

Proposal:  If you are working [today] Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in any other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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