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Megalopolis roadways see dense traffic, and so do waterways in these areas.  I hope these photos convey a sense of that.  All but two of the seven vessels are underway.  Underway vessels, l to r, are Frederick E. Bouchard, MSC Athens, Jonathan C. Moran, C. F. Campbell, and Fort McHenry.

Dense means tight quarters, Brian Nicholas looking barely larger than the bulbous bow.

Here everything is in motion.

Again, everything here is in motion.  I’m not sure what the Reinauer units there are.

All are moving here too . .   Frederick E., Pegasus, Meaghan Marie, one of the Moran 6000s, Mister T, a bit of the bow of Mary Turecamo, and CMA CGM Nabucco.

 

Sometimes a confluence of schedules make the KVK resemble rush hour.  Photos, WVD.

I’m fortunate to live within easy distance of all this activity:  Nathan G, Treasure Coast, B. Franklin Reinauer, an ULCV, Doris Moran, and who knows how much is obscured behind these . . .  And then there’s the crane atop the building to the left and the gull lower right.

Or here . . . Margaret Moran and a tanker off her stern.

Or here, HMS Justice and Mary H  . . . .

Philadelphia outbound with her barge and Ava M. McAllister inbound with an ULCV.

Mister Jim crosses in front of the slower moving Captain D with a Covanta barge.  Note the cranes at Caddells, with the diagonal lines off the left from  Left Coast Lifter.

Jonathan C Moran, Doris Moran, and Kimberly Turecamo . . . follow a ULCV and 

and here head east for the next job.

Tugboats cross.

 

All photos, WVD.

I caught this small open boat eastbound on the KVK.

She passed Ernest Campbell.  Clearly by her markings, she’s a survey vessel. 

Between traffic, they seemed to focus their work near the transition between the KVK and the ConHook Range . . .

returning to their area of interest, as I said, between traffic.

Work completed, they headed back west

from where they’d first come. 

That might be a cold job with minimal protection for employees of Aqua Survey Inc.  in

a crowded waterway . . .!

All photos, WVD.

It appears that Aqua-Survey Inc. (ASI) has another boat called RV Tesla, which I’d love to see.  I caught R. E. Hayes here over 10 years ago, also an ASI boat.

It still says Eastern Star Dawn, but now it’s Toula!

She’s going to look great all buff and green.

Barry Silverton finally

has a lion on its stack!  All those birds?  It’s water teeming with the bunker, the bunker that recently drew a humpback into the Upper Bay.

Pelham, launched in 1960, is always a pleasant sight.  She has a list of previous names almost as long as my seasonal wish list this year.

Here she took a wake on the bow.

James William used the waters off the salt pile

as a turning basin.

And finally, after a long hiatus down south, CMT Pike has returned.  When i caught her, she was being pursued

by this container ship.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated but of interest, below . . .

yes, Grain de Sail is a 72′ schooner coming into the sixth boro with a 50-ton cargo hold, some of it refrigerated, bringing in French wine.  She’ll set up a market in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for about a week.  Contact info and an e-shop can be found here, although you’ll have to use a machine translate if you’re not up to functionality in French.  

Grain de Sail is involved in triangular  trade, French wine to here and the Caribbean, and then Caribbean chocolate and other products to France . . . .  Something similar in sail freight  domestically has been done by Ceres and more recently by Apollonia.  The most recent international sailing cargo into the sixth boro that I know of was Black Seal, a three-masted schooner.

Bobbie Ann departs the sixth boro with some GLDD equipment. 

Little did I know at the time that Bobbie Ann had left the sixth boro a decade ago, then as Vera K.

Ernest Campbell wrestles along a double hull bunker barge. I wonder why the Centerline Logistics lion has not yet been added to her stack.

When tugs like Mary Turecamo assist a deeply laden tanker, the perspective from the upper wheelhouse is so much different than when assisting a ULCV, with their much higher freeboard.

Sometimes the 46′ x 15′ Rae is just the right size.  Recall Rae‘s role in getting Wavertree back into her berth after the big renovation?

One of the newest tugboats in the boro, Cape Canaveral, 105′ x 36′ and generating 5000 hp, has the most evocative name.

She has two siblings, Cape Henry and Cape Lookout.

Again, is it me?  I don’t believe I’ve seen Justine in a long while. She’s also 105′ x 35′ and 4000 hp.  She has an elevating wheelhouse, which you can see here, scroll.

This is crowded:  (l to r) Diane B, Saint Emilion, Meredith C. Reinauer, Lois Ann L.  Moran, and Pathfinder.

 

Escorting from a distance astern, it’s Kimberly.

And finally, a photo from some time back, Vane’s New York, now working on the Great Lakes, Vane’s only freshwater unit . . .  that I know of.

All photos, WVD.

Long Island, eastbound, gets overtaken by a small fishing boat.

B. Franklin, light, heads to the Reinauer yard.

Doris Moran, light, heads east.

Ellen McAllister assists a Maersk ship through the channels to her berth.

Helen Laraway heads east to pick up a scow.

HMS Justice pushes HMS 2605 through the KVK.

Charles A. and Matthew Tibbetts follow a ship so that they can assist as needed when called upon.

Ava and Kimberly head out to different assignments.

Brendan Turecamo provides port assist.

Mister Jim follows Seeley.

Gulf Coast has been a Dann Marine vessel since it was launched way back in 1982.

All photos, WVD.

It’s the season.

I wonder if the Kimberly crew has marked other holidays and I missed it.  I did catch the red-clad guy almost a year ago.

Mary H and her barge Patriot is likely headed for Newtown Creek.  The 1981 build, such a clean looking tug, has been working in the sixth boro for 33 years.

We’ve had a spate of foggy days.  Beyond Franklin here, notice the bright lights at Bayonne Shipyard where work proceeds on Mendonca even at night.

The mechanical dredge J. P. Boisseau here gets moved to a new worksite by Sarah Ann, with Brian Nicholas standing by.

A Maersk ship came in recently with a gaggle of assist boats:  l to r, Ava, Ellen, and Matthew. Not visible is Charles D. McAllister, and the visible Thomas J. Brown is not assisting.Yes, Matthew Tibbetts is doing a fair amount of ship assist work these days, and why not. 

Here are two more photos of Matthew Tibbetts doing ship assist.

Helen Laraway passed through with a load of scrap.

Poling & Cutler’s Crystal and Evelyn pass in opposite directions.

HMS Justice has eluded my eyes for quite a while, but here she is, with the Centerline Logistics feline on the superstructure.

All photos, WVD.

The first boat I saw in the morning fog was buff and green . . .  Meaghan Marie, moving what appeared to be a Cashman spud barge.

Meeting her was Vane’s Philadelphia.  I’m curious . . . do any readers have a photo of a Vane unit operating on thew Great Lakes or arriving there via the Saint Lawrence?

I could hear Shannon Dann‘s EMDs throbbing as she moved Weeks 105

Pathfinder moved light trash containers to a marine transfer station.

A light Treasure Coast headed from Duraport to the Upper Bay.

Seeley pushed sand scow Weeks 250 eastbound.

As the sun started to burn through the morning clouds, Janet D made her way to a job.

Pegasus returned from a job, out ahead of two Moran assist tugs.

St. Andrews got underway from the Centerline dock.

Brendan headed off to an assist.

And just as I needed to leave, Franklin showed up to assist Gracie out of her dock.

All photos, WVD.

This title goes back more than 10 years.  But I got some congested photos recently, so I dredge up an old title.  Count the boats of all sizes here.  Of course, foreshortening makes them seem much closer to each other than they really are.  I count at least 12 vessels on the photo below, including some I had not noticed when I took it.

There are five here, and maybe two miles of separation between the two container ships.

Three operations were happening simultaneously in this stretch of the channel, and all were either stemming or moving very slowly.

Again, there’s lots of foreshortening here.

It may be exhilarating to get this close to a large ship, but if your engine stalls . . .  stuff’ll happen really fast.

Here’s a different sort of “traffic” photo from august 31, 2008 . . . exactly 12 years ago.  And it gives me an idea for a post.  By the way, left to right, can you name at least half of the 12 boats at least partly visible here?

All photos, WVD.

x

Franklin crossed over the KVK to

assist Haggerty Girls and RTC 107 out of IMTT.

Patrice just finished assisting a box ship, and then turned around to help a government ship out of port.

Ernest Campbell with no lion yet on its stack.

Kings Points eases Double Skin 307 out of IMTT.

Marjorie B. is about to do a power turn and assist that box ship.

Meredith C. is heading offshore with RTC 135.

And let’s end with a throwback to yesterday’s “golden hour,”

Lincoln Sea and a stealthy Sarah D westbound light just after my first coffee hour.  I have more of these recent golden hour photos…

Here’s a better shot of Sarah D beside a stealthy USS Slater in Albany earlier this month.

All photos, WVD, who is now ready for the big 300.  If you want to assist with a photo of a tugboat, especially one never before seen on this blog –or never before seen in its current or previous iteration, send one along.  I’ll take a few days.

 

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