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Dana Alexa is another seldom seen tugboat in the sixth boro of NYC;

although painted DonJon blue, she’s now a Breakwater Marine boat, I believe.

It was good to see the 1958 54′ boat with a barge of what appears to be sheet piling.

William F. Fallon Jr. has appeared here several times recently.

Robert IV has worked in the boro for over 30 years.

 

Linda L. Miller originally was called Frog Belly.  I like that name.

And finally, you most likely by now have heard about the barge carrying scrap metals that caught fire on Delaware Bay and you may have wondered how scrap metals could burn.  What follows is a series of photo I took in mid-April of a similar load.

This load was towed by Mackenzie Rose;  the one that caught fire was towed by fleetmate Daisy Mae. Loads like this have been fairly common on the run from the sixth boro to the Delaware River.

Of course an investigation of the fire, which was confined to the barge, will take some time,

but scrapyard fires are fairly common.  Here‘s an unrelated though germane article from the BBC.

All photos, WVD.

Call this the seldom-seen version of RRT.  I love that blue and the name on this 1954 tugboat.

Kenny G …. I caught her tied up on the south side of Hudson River Pier 25, but by the time I got back there, Kenny G

had moved tow elsewhere. 

And here are a few maybe never before seen in the sixth boro from Capt. μηδέν, who sends along the next four shots.   Meet the 1981 Marcella G. Gondran, which autocorrect insists incorrectly must be Honduran.

Also from the peripatetic sailor, here’s H. J. Reinauer and Iron Salvor, the latter certainly being an unusual vessel.  I know some stories, but i’d love to learn more about this global nomad

 Here’s H. J. with the more familiar Diane B in this framing.   H. J. is a 1979 Jakobson-built tug that appears to be headed to a new life in the very far south. 

This version of Little Toot . . .  is another I’ve not seen in ages.  Often that moniker goes to any much-smaller tugboat. This 61′ x 21′ 1977 tug came from the Blount shipyard.

And to close it out, here’s another shot of William F. Fallon Jr. over by the KV buoy.   The the former J. George Betz from 1995.

Unless attributed to Capt. μηδέν, all photos, WVD.

Not quite half a year ago, I used a variation on this title, but photos I took yesterday necessitate a modification as you see above. 

Imagine my surprise when I saw this nameplate on the most famous–and only–wooden hulled tugboat in the sixth boro.

I’d noticed before on AIS that there was USCG vessel in North Cove, but I never imagined this would be it.  In the background, Mariner III adds an allusion to another time period.

Now does that look like contemporary font the USCG would use?!!  I don’t think so.

And the stack marking and registration board “New York Harbor Patrol” no longer say what it used to . . .  might this be some leasing arrangement.  But hey . . . this is NYC, a movie-making-magnet metropolis, and this just smacks of a made-for-movies-makeover!  Remember this one?  Find a lot more film tugs previously on tugster here.

As to the other part of the title check this out . . .   the name of the barge B. No. 280 follows the Bouchard nomenclature pattern.

Of course, I never imagined Bouchard boats in anything other than their original livery . . .

For now at least the name is the same;  in fact, the name board appears not even to have been refinished.

The stack is unadorned white.

And “Portland OR”  registration on the starboard stern corner of the barge and

on the tug.  Maybe some lion motifs are forthcoming?

All photos, WVD.

 

Quick . . .  what do you know about this white lionine tugboat?  Answer follows.

We’re still being quick here?  What can you tell me about this model of Dianne E. in a display case on the lower level of a barge of Pier 66?  I know nothing about the model, but I stopped by at Pier 66 Wednesday for the first time in way too long.  Any interest in meeting gathering there one of these warm days?

And speaking of piers, I made my first stop at Pier 76 ever Wednesday as well.  It seems I’ve not been out here in a really long time. 

Harvey looked resplendent alongside the seating  . . ..

The NYS Canal system opens officially today, and that means Sparky might be a looper headed up there traveling north and then west to get back to Florida.  I’m just speculating. 

Anne Moore is busy.  Hey, NPS, I’d like to talk with you about this vessel.

Media Boat 5 is always out, always doing and seeing interesting sights.

RCC Africa is a RORO I’ve not seen before.   Here are Autoliner routes. 

Pacific Basin‘s Sharp Island left town light. 

Rolf Williams was returning to base after delivering lube solutions. 

And that brings us back to this tugboat . . .  the former J. George Betz.

All photos, WVD, who suggests you too gallivant around the original boro, the sixth boro, some warm day soon. 

Adeline Marie was at anchor off the Coney Island Light.

Douglas J and a dump scow were shuttling to and from HARS.

 

Mary Emma was arriving from sea.

 

Joyce Brown passed a big unstuck green ship,

 

Stuff is always happening, and all photos, WVD.

The other day I was on the OBX near Hatteras, and when I checked who was passing by at sea,  I noticed an Adeline Marie.  I had to look at the image because it was an unfamiliar name.

When I saw this boat along the KVK on Saturday, I wondered who it was, since the lion was there but no name boards.

The stern was smooth.

Later she turned and

lo and behold!  Adeline Marie must be the newest name in the sixth boro.

A few months ago here she was clearly Rubia, and below longer ago before she was Denise.

Here’s another shot of Centerline’s renamed J. George Betz. Betz mostly recently appeared on this blog in these posts, still mostly or entirely in Bouchard red.

And finally, here’s the former Evening Star, now Jordan Rose, and floating. See Evening Star‘s transformation in these posts.

All photos, WVD.

Thanks to Tony A and a new contributor, Ray M, here is more on the dispersal of the Bouchard fleet.  One boat has been renamed William F. Fallon Jr.  Know the boat?  Know the reference?  I’d say William F. Fallon Jr. is the newest name in the sixth boro.

Tony A sent the photo above and below, showing Susan Rose and Anna Rose.  Do you know their previous names?

Ray M got some closer up photos of the stern of Anna Rose yesterday. 

The barge used to be the 2012  B. No. 250.  More on that and her 2019 sister 252 here. 

And how new is the paint on that name?  Well . . . isn’t that masking tape beside the letters?

Many thanks to Tony A and Ray M for use of these photos.

Here’s more on William F. Fallon Jr:  the namesake was a Port Authority manager who died on 9/11.  The vessel used to be J. George Betz and has been purchased by Centerline Logistics.

Susan used to be Evening Breeze and Anna used to be Jane A. Bouchard.

Unrelated:  Greenpeace is in the sixth boro, protesting Russian crude deliveries here, allowed by the sanctions.  Here is a Greenpeace tracker that follows some of the tankers that have departed Russian ports with petro cargo since the attack on Ukraine began.

 

Five tugs are grouped in the photo below.

Let’s follow these two.

Ava and Ellen are off to assist a tanker into a berth at IMTT.

Shortly afterward, Kimberly Poling passed by with Noelle Cutler and 

Evelyn Cutler followed

with Edwin A. Poling.

 

Beyond Energy Centaur, that would be Kimberly heading upriver.

Meanwhile, Ellen and Ava muscle Lillesand into her berth.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  Ever Forward, the more distant vessel here, is currently aground in the Chesapeake, for some reason outside the channel since Sunday night.  She was headed from Baltimore to Norfolk and then would have come to the sixth boro of NYC.  Speaking of tugs, watch this story evolve, since large tugs may be necessary to get her off.  If you have 17 minutes to spare, here’s Dr. Sal. 

January is named for Janus, the one who looked forward and backward . .  . transitions, this Roman.  The connection is this . . .   one day i post photos from 2022 and the next or two I post photos from the 1950s, supplied by Albert Gayer.

Charles James, framed here by the big green Tokyo Triumph and an Apex barge, pushes a bow wave in front of her.

Here’s the 13, 600 teu Tampa Triumph class ULCV that followed Charles James.  You also notice Maersk Vilnius following the ULCV. 

I know that names are just for convenient, but I wonder why this class of five Costamare ships carry the names Tampa, Tokyo, Toledo, Taipei, and Texas Triumph.  Surely there are larger cities starting with T. In fact, Tampa and Toledo don’t even make the top 50 by population.  And if Texas,  then why not Tennessee?  Taipei is fine because it’s home to Evergreen, the operator.

She’s deep, although I’ve seen deeper.

From the time she starting moving from her berth to the time she departs through the Narrows takes avbout an hour. 

The fact that all those containers can leave safely makes an hour a short time.

She meets Oleander coming in for her usual Thursday appointment, and this meeting shows relative scale of these two cargo ships.

I mentioned Maersk Vilnius earlier in this post;  I don’t recall ever seeing one container ship overtake another as they race out toward the Narrows.

All photos, WVD.

Today was my first chance to get a closeup of the “blonde,” aka Rubia.  I have wondered about the name since it was first given.

Formerly Denise A. Bouchard, Rubia just came off the Sound and 

she pushed a frosty UMS 284.

Aside from the lion logo, 

she’s a uniform blanched out white. 

 

All photos, this morning, WVD, who will get back to the Albert Gayer photos soon.

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