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A new assist boat in town bringing 3800 hp to the job?

Right . . .  I was kidding.  It’s Jones Act non-compliant anyhow. 

Genesis Eagle is a 6140 hp pin boat. 

 

JRT Moran and Capt. Brian McAllister do an assist of an ULCV.

Pegasus gives Mount St. Elias an assist as it moves DBL 82 out of IMTT bound for New Haven. 

Andrea gives HMS Liberty an assist as it delivers a bunker barge to Port Elizabeth. 

Miriam Moran delivers a pilot to the ship. 

Mary Turecamo assists a container ship. 

Doris waits for a job to approach in the Upper Bay, 

and finally, Kirby Moran moves in closer to an incoming ship. 

All photos, WVD.

 

Random Tugs 001” I posted in October 2007, 14 years ago.  The motivation for such a post then, as now, comes from the observation that what passes you by, either on the water, the roadway, or even the sidewalk or hallway, is often just random.  It’s foolish to look for meaning or significance where there is none. So here’s installment 339.

Genesis Glory, 1979, 3900 and 120′ x 34′

Janet D, 2015, 1320, and 67′ x 26′

Sarah D, 1975, 2000, and 90′ x 29′

HMS Justice, 2013, 2000, and 75′ x 30′

Sarah Ann, 2003, 2700, and 78′ x 26′

Charles D. McAllister, 1967, 1800, and 94′ x 29′

Durham . . . I’ve seen her a long time, I believe she’s operated by Ken’s Marine, but I don’t know anything more.

Kodi with Hayward back by the bridge.  Kodi dates back to 1974, under 500, and 43′ x 15′, I think.

L. M. Caddell works near the floating dry docks. The upper wheelhouses at the Reinauer yard in the background, I’d guess Dace, Stephen, and JoAnne III.  I’m sure I’ll be corrected.  I don’t believe the shorter “upper house” to the right is installed on a tugboat.  Now I’m really sure I’ll be corrected.  As for simple specs on the Caddell yard tug . . . sorry.

Coho, 2008, 4000, and 111′ x 36′

All photos, WVD, and happy “fly the official flag day.

I’ve done dense traffic posts, and actually this is one.

The 3-mile strait can get quite busy.

 

Petroleum and all other goods, manufactured and raw, transit.

Key word here is busy.

 

Sometimes large vessels seem to be on a collision course, but that’s just trompe-l’œil ….

Yesterday, at one point it was unusually busy.  Count the tugs and larger vessels here? I count three ships and at least six identifiable tugboats when I blow this photo up.

There’s plenty of room in that 1000′ waterway.

All photos, WVD.

Jeremy Whitman took this photo of the big blue Konecranes #38 crane.  Tail boat is Candace Elise, prior to 2015 known as Stephen Dann, as hereOXBO is managing the transport.

They departed Manitowoc a week or so ago and are now in a very wide portion of the Saint Lawrence, downstream from Gaspé Peninsula.  Manitowoc, among other things, is the western terminus of SS Badger. 

Jake Van Reenen took this photo as they passed Clayton.  Molly M I has replaced Candace Elise.  The barge supporting the barge is Cashman Equipment Corp.’s JMC 253, with dimensions of 250′ x72′ x16′ deck barge.

René Beauchamp got this shot –and more on FB Seaway News-Voie maritime Infos–of the tow.  His vantage point over the South Shore Canal portion of the Saint Lawrewnce Seaway  was the Cartier Bridge.  ETA for the tow at the mouth of the Piscataqua and Kittery ME is June 17.  I look forward to photos from there.

Harry McNeal moved deck barge 1962 with crane away from the IMTT docks the other day, 

Face on, the crane appeared to be straight up.

Allan Seymour caught this Denali with tank barge DBL 104 upbound on Penobscot Bay yesterday.  If I have the right number, DBL 104 has a capacity is just over 105,000 barrels.

I spotted Paul Andrew with the recycling scow DS 171 heading for the Arthur Kill.

The destination for this is PS&S/Visy Paper.

Erich A. caught Emery Zidell up the Hudson in the notch of 83,000 bbl tank barge Dr. Robert J. Beall.

James Turecamo meets the Centerline unit up in the scenic Hudson River below Albany.

And I saw Eastern Dawn aka Toula pushing two

mini-barges.

The minis, one at a time, carry dredge spoils from the depths of Gowanus Canal.  Prior to this project, I’d never seen mini barges, or scows.

All photos, as credited: Jeremy, Jake, René , Erich, and WVD.

Unrelated, the highest bid for tug Grouper as of this morning is $26.00.

 

To highlight the variety, this post will focus on size, horsepower, and age.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969, 92′ x 27′, 2000 hp.  All numbers rounded up if  .5 or more.

Brendan Turecamo, 1975, 107′ x 32′, 3900.

Crystal Cutler, 2010, 67′ x 26′, 1500.

Bruce A. McAllister, 1974, 112′ x 30′, 4000.

C.F. Campbell, 1975, 100′ x 31′, 3400.

Ava M. McAllister, 2018, 100′ x 40′, 6770.

Saint Emilion, 2007, 105′ x 38′, 4800.

Christian Reinauer, 2001, 119′ x 40′, 7200.

Magothy, 2008, 100′ x 34′, 4200.

All photos, WVD.

Two blog-related issues:  Sarah Dann and the big blue crane are now below Quebec City.  And, bidding has begun on Grouper and Chancellor.

 

Click here for the previous 85 posts with this title.  Lead photos today come from former owner of this push boat in West Burlington, Iowa.

The vessel, then known as Izona, has since traveled the Interstates and two-lanes to Highlands, NJ, towed by the much-loved Peterbilt of John Zook, of Lewisburg, PA.

Maybe you saw them on the roads, or since then, at a marina in Highlands NJ?

“Mister __”  is a common name for tugboats.  Here, from a secret salt is Mister C.  

Hobo has appeared here before, but never with this outstanding fendering created here.  Hobo is a 1953 product of Caddell Dry Dock.  She’s now living the good life, in the hands of Donna and Charlie Costa.

Emery Zidell is a Centerline tugboat, currently in the sixth boro.  She’s the older twin of Barry Silverton, a more frequent visitor to the boro.  Photo comes from Capt. Anon E. Mous. Zidell is married to Dr. Robert J. Beall.

And finally, currently underway in the western center of Lake Erie, it’s Sarah Dann, pushing this huge crane on a barge from Manitowoc WI to Kittery ME, almost 3000 nm.

Get ready to see Sarah Dann and “Big Blue” in the Welland Canal and Saint Lawrence.  You might see them passing Strait of Canso too.

Below, Jeremy Whitman caught a fabulous photo of the unit passing the 10th Street lift bridge in Manitowoc WI.  Thanks much, Jeremy.

Here’s part of the story from John Buellesbach and MKE Marine Reports in “Around Wisconsin”   “Konecranes of Finland partnered with Illinois-based Broadwind to build several large cranes for the U.S. Navy at the Broadwind Heavy Fabrications yard in Manitowoc, former site of Manitowoc Shipbuilding. The first, a portal jib crane for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, was completed in early May. It weighs 2.7 million pounds, has a lifting capacity of 140 tons, and stands about 160 feet tall. This custom designed crane incorporates unique features that allow it to be operated on the multiple rail section sizes, straight or curved, located at the naval base.”

ETA in New Hampshire is around the 18th.  Track them on AIS.

Thanks to Jeremy, John, the Powells and the Costas, Great Lakes mariner, and other nameless contributors.

By the way, does anyone have photos to share here of CMA CGM Marco Polo and from the same day, Kurt J. Crosby?

 

 

Because the name and focus of this blog is tugster, you’d expect to see a lot of tugboats, both within the confines of New York harbor, aka the REAL sixth boro, and I hope you are satisfied that you find a plethora of tugboats in installments of this blog.  So here’s Random Tugs #337, post 4877, and the tugboat is Foxy 3 moving an aggregate scow.

In the foreground, it’s Crystal Cutler;  off in the distance it’s Normandy.

Diane B here heads east with a cargo in John Blanche.  I did an article on this unit some years back.

Joyce D. Brown pushes an empty scow east.  Notice anything on the scow that identifies it?  See the end of this post.

James E. Brown passed sister Joyce D. that morning in the Kills.

Franklin Reinauer that morning may or may not have been under control of the author of a tugboat captain who shared his tales a few years back.  I will stay mum. Off to the left, that’s Capt. Brian A. McAllister.

HMS Liberty muscled a barge full of bunkers to deliver to a thirsty ship over in New Jersey.

Centerline operates both Liberty above and HMS Justice below.

Susan Miller moves some material and equipment over to the project just west of the St. George ferry terminal.

Brendan Turecamo heads over to the next and the next and the next job.

Bruce A. McAllister assists a container ship into port.

Bergen Point came off the ways at Blount Shipbuilding way back in 1958.

So that scow Joyce was pushing above is called Maria and

this logo says it was once in the Disch fleet, now sold off in many directions.

All photos, WVD.

Here’s an extraordinarily busy photo;  Nicole Leigh is about to ease right around Shooters.  Beyond that tug, a half dozen or so more tugboats, an antenna, a bridge, a refinery, steam . . .

Gulf Coast waits in front of a 12-pack of IMTT silos.

Navigator continues shuttling around, moving fuel.

Buchanan 5 is not a common visitor here, so I was happy to see her pass.

Brooklyn and Dorothy J  head west although with different goals.

St Andrews moves a barge eastbound.

Ava M. waits for a container ship at sunrise.

Sea Fox moves a loaded recycling scow toward the Arthur Kill, and

Caitlin Ann moves an empty one back.

And finally, C. F. Campbell, first photo here with her upper house, heads west.  Light. 

All photos, WVD.

 

Chem Mercury approaches the VZ.

The surprise for me was the registry:  Luxemburg.  She was in one day and out the next.  The 2018 build has capacity of just under 20000 dwt.

Markos I is a 45999 dwt and  2005 build with more than twice the capacity of Chem Mercury.

Solar Katherine, a 2020 build with a capacity of 49699 dwt, here has Potomac alongside.

With Emily Miller doing a lap, Asprouda (2013) has the capacity of over 74000 dwt.

 

 

Phoenix Admiral is a 2011 build, with a capacity of

114024 dwt.  She’s a frequent carrier of crude into the sixth boro from Point Tupper.

And Songa Winds, 2009, has a similar capacity to Chem Mercury, at the start.

All photos, WVD, in the past month.

 

 

Note the line boat off B. Franklin‘s starboard.  Also, faintly to her port and beyond the green buoy hull down is a Kirby tug, probably one of the Cape-class boats

Actually part of the same scene panning to the left–note the line boat on the extreme right side of the photo–it’s Joyce D. Brown with a crane barge off to do a salvage job.

Not long afterward, Caitlin Ann heads west past Treasure Coast on the blue-and-yellow cement carrier.

Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran bring a ship in.

Kirby Moran follows a ship in with a Reinauer barge right behind.

And again, a few minutes later, Paul Andrew follows the Reinauer unit and the ship westbound.

Resolute, back in the sixth boro, heads out to assist a USN vessel into Earle.

Genesis Victory passes Doris Moran alongside the Apex Oil barge,

Another day, l to r, it’s Barry Silverton, Saint Emilion, and the A87 barge again. Barry‘s sister vessel–Emery Zidell--was in the sixth boro recently, but I got just 

a very distant photo.

 I can’t put names on these vessels, but it’s the Wittich Brothers fleet, formerly (I think) known as Sea Wolf Marine.  And I see Sarah Ann in the extreme left. 

And let’s end on a puzzle . . .  William Brewster with a new paint job.  Last time I saw her, those dark green stripes were red. 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

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