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Evergreen Marine ships have a unique profile.  Ten of the 30 vessels in this L class have been built in Taiwan, including the one below, Ever Lovely. 

 

Meeting Ever Lovely were Alex and Eric McAllister.

 

 

Inside the Narrows, the docking pilot

came aboard from Alex.

 

As Lovely arrived, Legacy departed.

Only a few years ago, vessels of these dimensions would be the largest container ships calling in NYC.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

In my effort to catch up on shared photos, let me start with one I’ve heard about for a few years but never seen yet.

Al Circeo shared these next two over a month ago.  Is this tug still over at Mariners Harbor?  Does anyone know what her owners plan for her?

At one point she went by Sea Monster. ..   as in Monster.com.  Before that she was the Port Athur-built Mars, launched in 1953 and which you can see in the link here.  I don’t know if she’s been renamed, but right now as a yacht she appears to have come out of Monster Garage.

Over a month ago as well, I got this set from Russell Skeris, who took them from his Boston Whaler over by the Moriches Inlet.

Sea Cypress and Hercules were involved, as

were Capt Brennan and

Camie.

All of them in a group shot can be seen below.

A glance at AIS this rainy October morning shows some of these vessels are still working there, as seen below.

Many thanks to Al and Russell for these photos.

 

 

Here was the first, but back then I had no idea what was to come.

On yet another gray day in the sixth boro, the pink cherry blossom magenta pink containers spiced up the load.  I saw my first pink containers on a truck heading through a small town in upstate New York already this spring, and it caught my eye, has continued to catch my eye.

ONE is the acronym for Ocean Network Express, a new consortium of Japan’s biggest container shipping companies.

I’ve alluded several times to ONE Stork, which I’ve missed twice because it arrived and departed in darkness.  But one of these times . . . .

Read that lettering above?  Check the hiragana.

To reiterate,

I like that new color in containers.  And consortiums make sense for the shippers.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been a few months to do a sixth-boro look around here.  Of course it’s never the same.  Never. Not even from one day to the next.  Let’s start with Weeks tug Elizabeth.  If I’m not mistaken, this machine’s carried that name ever since it was launched in 1984.

James William has been a regular in the sixth boro the past five years or so, but she started  as a Moran tug in 2007.   Note the eerie fog around the base of the Staten Island-side bridge tower.

Choptank [which the pesky auto-correct insists should be spelled Shoptalk] passes in the foreground;  Mary H in the distance. Choptank is back from several years in the Caribbean.

Paula Atwell is almost 20 years old, having started out as Crosby Express.

Northstar Integrity . . . quite the mouthful of syllables . . . seemed an unknown to me, until I realized I knew her as Petrel . . .

Not long ago I caught Marjorie at work on the Hudson down bound.

Mary Gellatly emerges from the fog.

Evening Star rests B. No. 250 at anchor with Brooklyn in the background.

Mister T heads for the mooring . . .

All sixth boro photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a backlog of so many collaboration photos that I might be alternating much-appreciated “other peoples photos” posts for a while.

 

 

All these photos come from Christine Douglas, who frequents areas along the Calumet River.

Pere Marquette 41 and Undaunted . . . I’ve seen in the distance several times each of the past two years.  This is why I was excited when I saw Christine’s photos of the unit close up in the Calumet river.

 

Remember the Joseph H Thompson and Joseph H Thompson Jr. story here (scroll)? What makes Pere Marquette 41 so interesting is that it too was once a Manitowoc 1943-built self-propelled ship.  She looked a lot like Badger.

And Undaunted, started her life in 1943 as an ATR Navy tug, worked the Pacific, and has had many lives since then.

Many thanks to Christine for use of this photo.  I’m eager to see them close up and Undaunted out of the notch soon.

 

Here are previous installments.

Let’s start with a shot from Oswego.  To me, it captures the magic of the Canal in that city and the stately buildings that surround it.  The photo is by Jennifer Mays, who calls it “Old man Winter is on his way #headedsouth #oswegocanal.  It shows research vessel DelMor (ex-Kaho) upbound in the Oswego Canal between lacks E-8 and E-7.  DelMor is in the “canalized” portion of the Oswego River;  the wild portion of the river–divided by the ruins of central dock–distinguishes itself by its obvious current.   The yellow building farthest left is the 1913 Pontiac Hotel.  For more sights along the Oswego Canal, click here. Pontiac, the Odawa leader of his confederacy post-French & Indian War, signed a peace treaty in Oswego in July 1766. 

The next two photos come from Patrick Gallagher. The shots taken from the East River show the Brooklyn Bridge and Clipper City beyond that.   The colors are the magic of sunset as recorded by a smartphone camera.

 

Clipper City is a 158′ replica of a Great Lakes schooner built in Manitowoc in 1854.  The image below comes from the must-have book The Freighters of Manitowoc by Tom Wenstadt.

And last but certainly not least, Paul Strubeck got a close-up photo of a newcomer in the sixth boro, a floating electronic billboard created by Ballyhoo Media.  A floating billboard . . . would that be a bill boat?

Matt OHara caught the billboat departing Morris Canal, leaving the NJCRR terminal to starboard.  If you do FB, you can see a sped-up version of it being built here.  Since that shipyard is upriver, it must have escaped detection by river watchers upstream.  Glenn?

When I saw the billboat Sunday, the image/advert changed every few seconds.  The vessel size is estimated at 72′  . . . with 65′ screens.  What’s next . . . a billboat that carries sports events, political debates, feature films, documentaries about the harbor?  What else?

Many thanks to Jennifer, Patrick, Matt, and Paul for use of these photos.

Meanwhile, I’m waiting for a sunny day and for a certain pink-hulled ship called ONE Stork to either arrive or depart in bright daylight.  She arrived in the sixth boro and departed again, twice . . . in the dark hours.

 

Here’s an expanded view of a photo from yesterday’s post here.   What you see in the distance is bridge inspection unit, 2018.

The small tug is Seaway Maid, and it’s hard to believe I’m posting a photo of it today for only the first time.  Last year this bridge inspection unit was moved through the Erie Canal by Arnold D.  Actually, Seaway Maid used to be Lil Joe.  Here is a complete page of Seaway Marine Group equipment.

Once the tugs had full facilities and transportation to and from the job site was arranged network-wide, but this is a new era.

The primer painted barge, here Fort Plain, has floated around the NYS Canals for a long time.  Note the rivets?

Judging by the dimensions of the barge, it was once Dipper Dredge #1 aka Fort Plain a by the NYS Barge Canal.  The dredge was acquired by the state in 1931.  As acquired, she was Derrick Boat #10, shown below 95 years ago!

I’m wondering what tug that was moving the derrick boat around.  Any help?

All photos by Jake Van Reenen and the archives.

And another reminder . .  . the NYS Canal Conference is happening on Staten Island next week.  I will show Graves of Arthur Kill and speak on a panel about the hidden places of the sixth born this coming Monday and Tuesday.

 

 

I caught the beginning of Jay Bee V‘s epic here, a few days after the summer solstice.  A bit later I caught her here at some different locations on the Erie Canal.

So we are all fortunate that Jake Van Reenen caught her here at a lock in central NYS that I’m not disclosing.  The voyage of the Glass Barge is complete, and at some point, the tug will return to the sixth boro and the barge dismantled and repurposed.

The color in the trees speaks to the season.

Folks upstate will talk about this epic for a long time.

And the small tug in the background?  I’ll post about that another day . . . maybe tomorrow.

All photos thanks to Jake Van Reenen.

Related:  Accompanying Jay Bee V and the Glass Barge all summer were Lois McClure and C. L. Churchill.  See them in this retro-season video under sail on Lake Champlain.

 

What I noticed first about Johanna G is

the cranes.

Never have I seen cranes that stripped of recent paint.  Maybe rust-busting is happening as we speak, but

 

new coating of paint –IMHO– should be applied soon.  See a photo of her possibly new and with blue/gray cranes here.

As of this posting,

she’s already headed into the Atlantic . . . Gibraltar bound I believe.

The zoom lens foreshortens the distances here;  there was adequate time between Johanna G clearing the bridge and the lowering of the span.  There’s no room for a repeat of the Windoc incident. 

This photo clearly shows what “seawaymax” means.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who noticed that the other photographer working in proximity to me was stopped shooting for a while to wave the Portuguese flag, not the Madeiran.

This is a reminder also of the NYS Canal Conference happening on Staten Island next week.  I will show Graves of Arthur Kill and speak on a panel about the hidden places of the sixth boro.

 

I’d first assume this was a small tanker, but I was wrong.

 

 

Here’s the answer to cargo:  dry bulk cement.  In previous lifetimes, it had carried grain as well.

 

A hint of ghostwriting midships and to the right of “SPIRIT” shows another name or several namesGagliarda and Arditawere there earlier.

Arriving soon after Mckeil Spirit, was this vessel that I’d seen in Buffalo earlier this summer, wedged in alongside the Lafarge dock.

All this up-high piping suggests cement carrier as well, reminding me of English River, less than a mile away waiting for the scrappers’ torches.

Covered over with paint is the Arklow fleet logo. I never have been able to learn if there’s a technical term for a vessel logo situated on the bow, almost like a harkening back to a figurehead, not unlike the one of the barque Peking.

 

Now I understand:  this is not saying a “new [division] of Algoma; it’s a joint venture between Algoma and Nova, the latter a company from Luxembourg.

 

 

Here’s the rest of the fleet.  For a photo/article of NACC Argonaut in Oswego, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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