You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘tugster’ tag.

The whale happens to be a 2007 1284-teu container ship previously called Beluga Constitution and CMA CGM Corfu, but has carried the “whale” name for almost a decade now. I’ve seen other Warnow–named for a river in NE Germany– vessels in the sixth boro, but never posted any of them until now. 

Some time ago I saw Warnow Dolphin and was intrigued, but I never followed up.

So I felt fortunate the other day

when I passed Kirby Moran assisting the Whale into Red Hook container port.

 

Light and color and composition all came together as

her crew eased her in.

 

She’s left port now and is currently heading for the Panama Canal.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

All day long, one ferry or another crosses the harbor, and one tug or another

travels light from point A to

point B and

makes up to another vessel

to move it to where it’s needed.

I was fortunate to see this vignette

of one part of someone’s day play out.

All photos, WVD.

Crushed stone is a commodity indispensable for construction.  Previous commodity posts can be seen here from 2010, here 2011, here 2013, here 2017, and many other instances not identified as such, like this one.

Here was the post I’d planned for yesterday, put together in a moment when I thought a single focus was too elusive, random scenes, like a container ship anchored off Stapleton, elusive detail in a set all diverging from usual patterns. 

Or seeing a Mein Schiff vessel in town after a hiatus… with Wye River passing along her stern?

Or this bayou boat discovering it offers solutions all over the boro and beyond, here passing a lifting machine?

How about this speedboat chasing a tugboat, or appearing to, with lots of hulls in the distance?

Or a single terrapin crawling out of the surf in a non-bulkheaded margin of the wet boro?

Two pink ONEs at Global terminal?

A ketch named Libra or Libre heading south with a scrap ship at Claremont?

Two commercial vessels out at Bayonne?

Two Ellens?

And finally two elongated RIBs with

camouflage-clad Coasties aboard?

All photos, seen as slight deviants from existing patterns, WVD.

 

I had a different post and an entirely different morning planned, until I looked at AIS, and saw that after almost exactly four years, Big Lizzie (HMS Ro8) was inbound.  So whose was this when 

these were coming into view?

More specifics in the link above the first photo, but check out the info here

“But sir, I’ve been fighting this trophy striper . . . !”

 

Notice Stockham (T-AK-3017) in the distance?

 

Why eight?

Danmark, owned by the Danish Maritime Authority,  is simply called that;  although a naval training ship, it does not go by Margrethe II.   More photos of Danmark appeared own this blog earlier this week. 

 

Note a second helicopter now?

 

Wednesday and Thursday the “Atlantic Future Forum” will occur no doubt right  there. 

Kirby has the stern as they Ro8 enters the nUpper Bay.

HMS Richmond (F239) escorts Queen Elizabeth in. 

All photos, any errors, WVD.

 

This series goes back more than a decade to here

But this is only the second time the 2019 NYNJR200 (rail) carfloat is identified.  Metal Trades of Yonges Island SC built it less than a half dozen years ago. 

The previous time the carfloat appeared here, it was handled by the Brown boats, now history.  James E. Brown is now Kayla T.  Any updates on Thomas J. Brown?

The contract to move cross-harbor rail is currently with McAllister, and Marjorie B. does that and other jobs daily. Click here and here for more on this car floating operation. 

There’s also a NYNJR100 float here.

All photos this week, WVD.

Cormorant and I talk sometime; yes, the one on the piling and not the former DEP boat.  Anyhow, cormorant prompted me to get these three photos.

So, evidence here is that I did.  A red . . . Freightliner Summit Hauler was preparing to tow an odd bundle off M8001 barge held in place by Michael Miller.  Might those be bundled barricades?  Any idea where this post is going?

Then another Hauler backed onto the barge to tow off another oddly loaded trailer. This was Monday, I believe.

Then last night, I was messaging with some friends and learned about this . . .  to the right side of this photo . . . a building on Governors Island.  Know it?

It appears that this week, in addition to being UN Week, is New York’s leg of a global show jumper tour, and if not the horses, then certainly all the bleachers and everything else arrives on the island . . .  by barge.  I’m not knocking anything in this post, but the fact that Governors Island hosts such an event boggles my mind, although you’d think that after living in NYC for 20 years now, nothing would surprise me.  Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, it’s not, and Staten Island hosted those horses over 130 years ago!

Three top photos mine, WVD.  Previous Governors island posts can be seen here. Hat tip to cormorant.

Millers Launch pushes a lot of interesting cargo around the harbor, like this one (scroll) from July 2014, this one I missed in September 2018, and the five boros sometimes spill out onto the sixth boro with their show business pursuits.  And consumer side of show business, I think this 2020 concept was nixed because of Covid?

The previous 70 “something different” posts can be seen here.  Not included is the 2006 “floating island.”  Recall any other odd barges in the sixth boro?

I’ve done “new hulls, new names” and “old hulls and old and new names” and “new hulls, lines, and liveries.”  Sorry I could not have come up with more streamlined nomenclature.

But I hope, as always, you enjoy these photos all taken on an ideal last day of summer.  If summer has to end, this is the way to see it . . . no wind, low humidity, and clear skies.  Polar Circle came in two days ago here, and I was too far away and detail was lost in the early afternoon haze, but yesterday I caught her before she returned to the Long Beach anchorage.

I’m guessing she took on supplies here after an almost seven-week voyage from Busan.

She’s big but Cape Wraith tempers that size.

Miss Madeline came in on Prometheus just over a month ago, although she had a different name then.

As I said, yesterday was the perfect time and place to see her close up.

 

Welcome, Miss Madeline and crew.

 

All photos, last day of summer 2022, WVD.

 

Danmark, a 90-year-old full-rigged ship, is in town again.  She first came here in 1939 for the World’s Fair.

South Street waterfront of Manhattan then was a very different place, as of course was the whole city and world.

I’m not sure where she berthed back then.  A year later, after her homeland was invaded, she stayed in the US (Jacksonville FL for starters) because she had no homeport to return to.  In 1942, she was temporarily commissioned as a USCG vessel.

The brightwork is impeccable, as

is the gilt work.

Rigging like this is dense as a jungle, yet it’s all functional. 

And many of the current crew of Danish cadets, four of whom are mostly hidden but busy in the image below, 

were busy polishing the brass.

I’d love to see how the figurehead is polished. This figurehead has appeared on this blog once before back in 2007.  To see Danmark underway sail-powered, click here.   For a guided tour of the ship, click here

Meanwhile, I recently spotted another sailing vessel, one I’d not seen before, S/V Red Sea.  Thanks to Michele McMurrow and Jaap Van Dorp for the identification, although they called it by different names, they were both right.  For some backstory on this well-traveled schooner, click here

She’s arrived in the sixth boro from the Wisconsin side of Lake Michigan.

 

Some Danmark photos, thanks to Tony A;  all others, WVD.  Enjoy the last day of summer 2022.

 

This exotic is extraordinarily exotic.   Any guesses based on appearance of  the red and white vessel below?

I’ll give a little more time to study while you prepare your guess.   Given her specs, which I share below, she’s not for offshore wind or the sixth boro, unless we have extraordinary weather  ahead.

I wish I’d been able to get closer, but 

that’s why I have a distance-shrinking lens.

Built in 2006 by Vard Langsten in Tomrefjord Norway with some construction at the Vard yard on the Black Sea in Romania, for the Russian Federation, the 243′ x 56′ icebreaker (technically, icebreaking tug) Polar Circle sailed into the sixth boro in 86-degree F weather.    The Vard facility in Romania is about 40 miles up the Danube from the Black Sea.

Previously she was home-ported in Kholmst, Sakhalin, formerly Maoka in Japanese Sakhalin.  At some recent point, she left there, registered Maltese (or maybe she was registered Maltese while up in eastern Russia, and she arrived in the sixth boro after a month-and-22-day voyage from Busan Korea.  Click here for more info and great photos of her in ice.  A previous name was Polar Pevek, “Pevek” being a settlement on the “north coast” of Russian, above the Arctic Circle.  

I’m wondering if there’s any connection between her arrival here and the “embargo” on Russian gas/oil.  Here her Norwegian owner lists her as available for charter. 

 

 

All photos, yesterday, WVD, whose previous major ice breaker photos are listed below.

Fennica and Nordica here and here.

Mackinaw and Polar Star and Sea.  I never did get closer photos. 

And a surprising set, scroll through for Soviet-era icebreakers built in St. Louis MO!!

Thanks to Tony A, behold Patriot Marine’s Mulberry, still in the USAV livery from when she was ST-914

Photos are from New Haven, a port I’ve not visited, and with those raked masts . . . that appears to be Amistad along the shore in the distance.

I’ve looked unsuccessfully online for a list of USAV ST-900 series tugboats.  Anyone help?

Also, McCormack Boys has worked locally, ie, in the sixth boro, recently.

Here Boys tows some dredge equipment out of the KVK, as seen from a different angle.

Still another from Tony, Crosby Trojan appears to have done some assist work while in the sixth boro on its way to Maine. Trojan is currently enroute between Maine and Narragansett Bay.

 

I’m not sure which Genesis energy unit she is assisting.

And to close out this post, here’s an extraordinary set: USS Yorktown ( CG-48), a Ticonderoga-class cruiser being towed in the direction of the breakers in Brownsville by Miss Rui, which folks in the sixth boro might recognize as the former Norwegian Sea, and tailed by Annabelle Dorothy Moran, appears to be delayed.  As of this writing, she might be heading back to Philly.

Photos thanks to M’r Polychrome, who just happened to be transiting the area.

Miss Rui had been laid up herself near the Philadelphia Navy yard for some time before being purchased and rehabbed by Smith Maritime Ocean Towing & Salvage.

Many thanks to Tony a and M’r Polychrome for sending along these photos, extraordinary all.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,562 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

September 2022
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930