You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘tugster’ tag.

In several hours yesterday, a diverse set of vessels came by.  I could begin with Chemical Pioneer, a 1968 vessel that’s been calling here in some form for half a century.  She first called here as a container ship, until  her big fire.

As Chemical Pioneer was assisted into a berth in Bayonne, an MSC vessel came in,

MSC Vittoria.

She was followed by a tanker, Hellespont Promise, about the same vintage as the MSC ship.

A 2012 ULCV was next, the 13k teu Cosco Hope.

 

As Hope departed, two other vessels came in, each a different sort from what has preceded in this post. 

Here Grimaldi’s 2017 Grande Torino passes Chemical Pioneer,

followed by 2014 bulk carrier Genco Weatherly, under a beautiful sky.

Two months ago, Weatherly was in Turkey, no doubt discharging scrap metal and she’s likely here to reload.

All photos, WVD, who feels fortunate to have a chance to see this variety in just a few hours sitting by the dock of the bay.

Posts focusing on the tugboats to follow.

Just photos will appear here today, and I realize I’m contradicting that statement by writing this sentence and the others.  However,  inspiration was failing me, so I decided this post should be not photo-driven, but photo-dominated.  Names are provided in the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday started sunny, but then clouds moved in.

The recent period of extended summer in the boro means crew are out, enjoying fresh air, like these guys.  I always wonder who these seafarers are, where  they are from, how seafaring has shaped their lives and families, as well as how long they’ve been at sea, both on this voyage and over the course of their lives.  Last year I saw masks, but none are here to be seen.  Are most seafarers vaccinated, I wonder.  Have they received boosters?

This crane operator is bringing the companionway aboard to be stowed

for sea, as two additional crew ensure that it seats properly and can be locked down.  When were these guys last ashore outside a port?

Similarly, as the vessel approaches the terminal crew need to deploy the companionway safely before they shift stations to the mooring lines.  Once moored, the companionway can be used without additional delay.

Forward of the breakwater, this crewman serves as eyes.  A perennial question is what a seafarer thinking of the life and people–like me–on the banks.  During the 1960s and 1970s, there were instances of crew from countries jumping ship, sometimes literally,  to defect.

Local vessels use the balmy weather for training, and

other monitoring activity.

Making up a tow is an activity performed no matter the weather, as are many other duties on the boro.

 

 

All photos, WVD, who is mindful that this period of warm, sunny fall can become icy blasts in a week or a month . . ..

 

The sixth boro offers many vistas.  Enjoy a few, starting with Sarah D towing a deeply loaded scow past Bay Ridge. 

At sunrise, Atlantic Salvor and Patrice McAllister head in the same direction for different tasks past Stapleton Heights.

Jonathan C works shipside on the ConHook range in the sixth boro

Julie Anne heads north or so inside the VZ Bridge.  I should know what buoys are there, but . . . I don’t.

Sarah D again and here shipside in the KVK.

Mary Turecamo assists alongside a rust-flecked box ship.

Seeley pushes Weeks 250 eastbound in the Kills.

Kirby Moran, Patrice McAllister, and Gregg McAllister assist another box ship, as Marie J Turecamo heads in their direction.

Sea Fox moves a barge past Global terminal in Bayonne.

Navigator rotates clockwise away from St George and heads north.

And finally, Charles James stands by with a scow off Sunset Park.

All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

I happened onto a very busy sunrise this morning, five ships of which two were ULCVs and a half dozen of so tugboats can be seen.

The first ULCV was CMA CGM Chile,

and the light, as last night’s Hunter’s Moon settled in the west, was perfect.

Marie J Turecamo and Margaret Moran assisted,

Here were Mexico and Brazil.

The sixth boro terminals are doing something right, because no backups as in southern California and Savannah are happening here.

All photos, WVD.

Some names might be terrifying, like “This is Conqueror, approaching the Narrows.”  By the way, this vessel was here some years back as Energy Conqueror.  It seems sights and ambitions have broadened. 

Equally chilling though oxymoronic might be this one:  “Big Bang has anchored.”

A lot of vessels are named for birds, like ONE Stork and

Endelo Swan.  With a name like Swan, I’d expect a white hull.

Grand Eagle is hardly aquiline;  the bow might be more aquiline if they’d have consulted the folks at Ulstein.

Then there’s the occurrence of serial multiple names.  Can you make out the raised letter name that’s been painted over here?

Above is on the stern and below is high on the starboard bow.

Previously it was NYK Aphrodite.  Well . . . there once were temples to Greek goddess Aphrodite east of the Dardanelles, although I’m sure that has not an iota to do with the choice of new name.

Many thanks to eastriver for Big Bang.  All other photos and any lame jokes . . .  WVD.

I knew some of what was arriving there, just not everything.  How it was configured I didn’t know, and this fata morgana version from a half dozen miles out didn’t help, especially since it looked a bit like a sea monster.

It had rained twice already this afternoon, and with a long rain the day before,  even more moisture stretched the lines of the illusion. 

HOS Mystique came into the boro yesterday for the first time ever, I believe. In that link, you’ll see specifics on the entire fleet of Hornbeck Offshore support vessels.

Some specifics on HOS Mystique include launch date  2008, offering 49 berths, sporting a 100t knuckle boom crane, and  measuring 250′ loa x 54′ x 14′ .  That crane can connect to a host of applications “dangling” in the water column.  I’m not sure what application(s) she has recently worked with.

She came into the boro late yesterday afternoon and

headed over to Elizabethport.  Currently she’s there, no doubt, to refuel, resupply, shift crew, discharge any physical samples, or do a host of other shoreside activities.

All photos, WVD, who was first introduced to Hornbeck in the sixth boro when they had a petroleum transportation fleet. That fleet is now operated by Genesis Energy.  A few years back, I saw lots of HOS vessels was along Bayou Lafourche.

 

I’ve been meaning to ask about this lumber on the piers at Red Hook container terminal.  Not quite a year ago an unusual looking vessel called Mozu Arrow deposited these bundles of lumberHere‘s another shot showing all the bundles.  All through the stories of lumber being outrageously expensive,  this lumber stayed here.  In some places, the coverings have ripped off leaving the wood exposed to the weather, wasting away.  Can anyone tell me the story of this lumber and why it hasn’t moved in 11 months.  As of this writing, the lumber carrier is traveling between South Korea and British Columbia, light maybe, having deposited lumber on piers in Busan perhaps?  On second thought, would this vessel travel sans cargo across the Pacific?  What cargo might it be carrying to Canada?

Brendan Turecamo is a regular on this blog;  behold about nine feet of the boat you never see when she’s working.

Here’s a limitation of gantry cranes;  if you have a container ship loaded higher than the cranes can accommodate, getting a last box in place means lifting to the height and then sliding it in aft to fore.  Understand what’s happening here?  The box was lifted farther “back” than the empty slot, and now the crane operator is sliding it in laterally, toward the right in this photo.  Is this a common occurrence on these “tall ships,” to give a new meaning to the phrase?

Do you remember “you go girl” graffiti on a ferry just west of the Bayonne Bridge?  Well, clearly it has shifted over toward the Bayonne, New Jersey, side and is showing a different and more corroded side.  I wonder where she goes next.

From this angle, there appears to be quite a few Reinauer tugs in their yard.  While we’re playing an Andy Rooney and asking questions about everything, has anyone learned more about the WindServe Marine toehold within the Reinauer real estate here?  Isn’t it hard to believe that Andy Rooney has been gone for almost a decade now?

Getting back to the warehouse sheds in Red Hook, is it possible this very experienced tow truck is there to prosecute any violators who choose to trespass and/or dock?  I saw a more intimidating sign and sight in Belfast ME some years ago in the second photo here.

To show location of these signs and the antique tow truck, note it in the wider view photo below.

Shall we leave it here?    I suppose.  All photos, WVD, with conveyance from the New York Media Boat.

 

Barry Silverton first came to the sixth boro five and a half years ago.  Her twin Emery Zidell appeared here earlier this year, and i believe this is the first time to catch the ATB light and head on.

Roughly the same size, Haggerty Girls waits alongside as RTC 80 loads.

Mary Turecamo heads out  to meet a ship.  Mary Turecamo, Haggerty Girls, and Emery Zidell are all over 105′ and 4000 or more horsepower.

Margaret Moran here hangs close to a bulk carrier she’s escorting in.

Like Margaret above, Buchanan 12 is rated at 3000 hp and each has worked under the same name for the same company since coming from the shipyard. Buchanan 12 is a regular shuttling stone scows between the quarries up the Hudson and the sixth boro.

Franklin Reinauer has operated under that name since coming from the shipyard nearly 40 years ago.

I first saw Fort Point in Gloucester here over five years ago.

Joker seems to have become a regular in the sixth boro since this summer.  She used to be a regular here as Taurus.

Known as Brendan Turecamo for the past 30 years, this 1975 3900 hp tug is getting some TLC up on the floating drydock.

All photos here where we leave it today, WVD.

I’d thought to call this “summer yachts,” but in spite of sublime weather, it’s not summer any more.  “Yachts a million” works too, with these two unusual vessels.  And we’ll start with this one, Magnet.  Now that I’ve learned a little more about this 148′ catamaran yacht, I regret not having walked around to the far side and gotten more photos.  Like NYC Ferry vessels and USCG 29′ Defiant craft, this yacht is made by MetalCraft Metal Shark, and it’s certainly impressive:  it has a range of over 12,000 miles, i.e., round trip across the Atlantic twice!

I hurried on down the Chelsea Piers, though, because I wanted to see Gene Chaser without obstructions to view.  I have yet to figure out if the symbols below the vessel name are more than decorative.  The 182′ vessel was launched last year as Blue Ocean, then soon afterwards, refitted as a “support vessel,” which makes her an unusual work boat. As of her launch, there were seven other vessels on the seas with this design.

 

Some folks inherit wealth;  the owner of Gene Chaser earned it in a lab.  Dr. Jonathan Rothberg, a chemical engineer with a biomedical focus by training, says he spent six years working in a lab for his Ph.D, six years! sequencing 9000 DNA fragments.  That led to multiple companies, new tools to fight disease, and this “lab/chaser vessel.” 

Rothberg asserts that it chases genes and genetic sequences that underlie diseases. The “chaser” concept came up in an entirely different situation this past week, when I dredged up that name of a short story by John Collier, one that many of you may have read in high school.  I did, and really hadn’t appreciated that all these years later, it would seem so true, as in “be careful what you wish for.”

“Chaser” enters the name because it chases with main yacht, serving as a mobile garage–yes, that’s a four wheeler and some small motorcycles–as well as a lab. Click here for info about and photos of some of the scientific equipment on board. 

Here’s the mothership, actually older and shorter than the support vessel.

That brings us back to the symbols.  They don’t appear to be anything genetic or genomic, but I would really like toknow the answer to that myself.  The fundamental units of our genetic code would involve the following letters, which I don’t see here:  G, C, A, and T, for guanine, cytosine, adenine, and thymine. So I conclude it’s an art project, not a scientific statement.

All photos yesterday, WVD, who’s intrigued by these boats as well as the folks who own and work on them.  I’m also reminded by this vessel —Ocean Xplorer–in the boro almost a year ago. 

And  while we’re on innovation, consider lignin . . .  More on that fuel idea here.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,492 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2021
M T W T F S S
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031