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It seems most appropriate to juxtapose that building with an ocean-going ship.  The physical aspect of world trade happens thanks to ships.

And the names allude to this, like Mediterranean Shipping Company (aka MSC) Lucy and Mustafa Dayi.

Or Zim Yokohama and Lian Yang Hu.

Atlantic Journey, 

Ever Linking, and

Ocean Pearl:  they almost make a declarative sentence. And Ocean Pearl‘s cargo comes from North Africa.

RHL Agilitas . . .  Her name is Spanish, she’s recently been in ports in Columbia, Guatemala, and Mexico, but the “H” in RHL is Hamburg.

High Tide seems as English as the 4th of July (:)) but the company D’Amico began in Italy. 

I mentioned to someone recently that the harbor is full of secrets hidden in plain sight, and that’s why I keep coming back.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

When the cold makes it less pleasant outside,  it’s heating season in the sixth boro and region far and wide.  I’m not sure all these units are moving heating oil, but they are all moving fuel of one sort or another.

Can it be that Crystal Cutler has been working here for almost 8 years now?!!  Here was my first time seeing her back in 2010.

 

Here’s a larger unit for a different niche than Crystal.

When I was first paying attention, the tug here was called Huron Service.

She’s been Genesis Victory for about five years now.

 

Diane B does some creek work once she leaves the main channels.  Here’s an article I did on Diane B and John Blanche some years back already.

 

All photos and any errors here by Will Van Dorp, who wishes anyone out there to be safe.

 

Mr. Connor has been in the area for a few weeks now, but here’s the first good set I’ve gotten.

The logo on the stack is unmistakeable, Marquette Transportation Company Offshore, one of three companies under the Marquette banner.  Click here for previous Marquette boats on tugster.

She might be working in dredge support.

Holden Marine Towing is also working in dredge support.

Based on the livery, I thought I’d never seen Bayou Babe before.

But a little digging showed that I’d seen her in 2009 as a Weeks boat, Virginia.  Equipment changes hands;  Bayou Babe now operates under Holden Marine, but before she was Virginia, she was Misener Marine’s Bayou Babe, built as such in 1979.

All photos this month by Will Van Dorp.

A friend once took this photo of a wall in San Francisco.  And Manhattan has this street called Wall that was quite ineffective in keeping the originals of Mannahatta out.

But as you can see from the photo below, Manhattan today is a walled city, with a wall made of lego-colored boxes.

[And this is just a space digression so that

 

you can’t see the next photo

 

on your screen.

 

There are more photos below.

 

I wouldn’t want you to make sense of the first photo

 

right away.

OK, enough, with

 

the digression.]

 

Here’s the rest of that shot, two Maersk ships passing just north of the VZ Bridge.

All these photos were taken within a total of less than two minutes

Alex sees Maersk Shenzhen out, then will likely do a 180 and assist Capt. Brian seeing Gunhilde Maersk into the KVK.

And now I have a question:  NYMaritime defines ULCVs and SULCVs (super ultralarge container vessel) basically as follows:  anything larger than 997′ and 140′ beam is considered a ULCV, and anything with beam in excess of 159′ is a SULCV.  Vessel traffic describes ships of Gunhilde‘s class as SULCV but does not do so for Shenzhen.  But now guess the relative dimensions of these two vessels.

Maersk Shenzhen  1062′ x 157’*  10,000 teu.  Previously she was Hyundai Pluto. 

Gunhilde Maersk  1204′ x 138′ *   7000 teu.

Is there some mistake here?

*These numbers come from shipspotting.com.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to Timothy Cole for this photo . . .

that’s the Hudson, looking south. Croton Point is the near low spit mid photo left side.   Who would guess that more than 10 million people live within a 50 mile radius of this spot?

Timothy took his photo on December 1, 2018.  Bill Moyers called the Hudson  “a waterway of ethereal beauty” .  .  . and more.  But that says it all.  That photo is sublime.

Below are two similar shots I took.  First July 17, 2009 looking south toward the Bear Mountain Bridge and

this one looking west above Saugerties on June 28, 2016.

The Hudson is indeed worth traveling upon whenever,

even when the river looks like a frozen desert,

and critters walk upon it, as here.

Thanks again to Timothy for the top photo, and to Paul Strubeck for the last photo.

 

 

As she leaves for the North Sea port of Hull, finally .  .

I caught Ocean Researcher.  She’s spent much of the summer and fall until now doing survey work in advance of wind farm leasing and development in the New York Bight.

Seeing the vessel confirmed that she’s not a new vessel . . .  built in Devon, SW England, in 1985.

Her original name was RRS Charles Darwin.

RRS expands to Royal Research Ship.  The first vessel of that organization, built in 1901, was RRS Discovery, carrying among others Robert F. Scott and Ernest Shackleton.

The Gardline Group operates several dozen vessels around the world.

After a final salute from the Statue,

Ocean Researcher heads across the big pond.  Next stop Hull, East Yorkshire, England.  ETA . . . Boxing Day.   Bon voyage.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here were previous milestones at post 1000, the four-year mark, and the one decade anniversary.  A few weeks ago when I noticed on my dashboard that I was approaching my 4000th post a week or so after the actual beginning of the 13th year mark, I knew this post was necessary.

4000!!  It can be a small number:  my heart beats more times than that in an hour and I’m still in the healthy range.  I took more breaths than that in the first half day of my life.  I grew up in a town that had fewer than 4000 people.  One dairy farmer I know has about that many cows now, and collects their output in tanks . . . a reefer tank for milk and two large lagoons for  . . . well . . . their other production.

But it’s a huge number of blog posts, especially if I start adding up the time spent:  if I average about two hours per post … counting the photography and the computing –and that’s a low estimate–that’s 8000 hours of work, which is 200  40-hour work weeks, which at 50-week years equals four years of work.  If I paid myself a low $50,000 per year, that’s almost a quarter million dollar bonus.  Nice!!  As to photos, I’ve added at least 40,000 photos to the web, mostly on aspects of the work world on water.

In another way, the number doesn’t matter, because the story never ends anyhow.  Part of what makes the real story elusive is the Heraclitus issue I’ve mentioned before. It also eludes because there’s no one story; not even one person has just one story or even one fixed understanding of a single story, since we –like the water–is protean, ever shifting.  No matter . . .   we pursue nonetheless.

About those photos, hindsight says I should have started “watermarking” them years ago.  Recently I saw one of my photos in a major newspaper attributed to someone else.  The same article had two others of my photos attributed to me, but this third photo was also mine, shot at a unique event where no other photographers were present.   When I informed them that photo was mine, they refused to believe me.  I was traveling at the time, away from my archive, so I decided to drop the matter, but the fact that it occurs to me now is evidence that I’m still irked.

What else could I have done with those 8000 hours?  If I were a competitive sheep shearer, in that time I could have taken 240,000 fleeces!!  If I worked them in fast food, I’d get $80,000.  If I worked as a divorce lawyer, I’d have a Ferrari or two.  If I were a politician, I’d be at the end of my term and starting a gig as an TV analyst.

Now if I could convince my boss to pay up . . . maybe he’ll throw a party instead and buy the first round for whomever shows up …  Maybe she’ll give me some time off.  Oh wait .  . I’m the boss here.

Seriously, I’ve been fully compensated in meeting interesting people, seeing unexpected things, noticing minutae, and learning vital stuff and worthless trivia.  If I had any regrets, it’s that this time commitment makes me a hermit.  I’m not as anti-social as I might appear, only easily distracted  . . . .  Actually, I like people;  I just prefer to not let an interesting scene go unrecorded sometimes.   Although being a hermit allows me to get work done, the downside is that isolation is sometimes corrosive or parching.

Hermits lack physical community.  Since I retired from a human contact career, I’ve much less of an immediate community.  My online community is fabulous and I appreciate it, but it is its own thing.  I need to work on improving my flesh/blood community.

A friend once sent me a photo he’s taken of me photographing.  It was not a flattering photo because I appeared to be scowling.  I wondered why I was irritated at that moment until I realized that is my “focused face.”  I’ll spare you and not post that shot here.  Photography is much more than moving your fingers on the lens adjustment and shutter.  It’s an attitude born of seeing and trying to see more.   Once an overzealous security person asked me to leave an area I had permission to be because he said I was looking around too much, I must be guilty of something and alleged that I was looking around to see if security or law enforcement was around.  But I do look around while shooting to see if I’m too focused on one action and missing another.

Here’s an example from many years ago and not involving my camera:  I was hiking in a wildlife area and approaching a set of bird watchers, all of whom were intently focused with long lenses on some rare birds in the marsh.  They were lined up along a roadway ditch.  While I was still 200 feet away, I saw a red fox exit the marsh grass, walk past all the photographers close enough to brush against their heels, and then disappear back into the marsh.  Not one photographer saw the fox that touched them;  they were all focused on the rare birds 300 feet away in the marsh.

Given some of the places I go to take photos, there are wolves to be wary of, two-legged wolves, if you catch my drift. I should not malign the four-legged ones though.   Whatever to call these potential predators, I try to spot them long before they sense me.  I take chances with wolves, no matter how many legs they have, and so far they’ve all had dignity.

Anyhow, my course remains steady.  I’ll keep it up as long as I continue to enjoy it.

Thanks for reading, commenting, and sending along stories and photos.

The collage at the top comes thanks to bowsprite;  she created it for me back in 2010 for my 1000th post, and I decided to use Skitch to modify her collage as a way of creating a tradition.

 

Nineteen boxes wide!

And stacked higher behind the bridge than in front of it.

It was a windy day, and Alex did her part to ensure she rounded the bend.

Eric on the starboard bow was there if needed to thrust the bow within the channel.

And at the opposite stern, Capt. Brian A.  could do what was needed

to make this rounding of Bergen Point

just routine, as Maersk Shenzhen made a few more turns before setting a course across the Atlantic directly for Suez and points beyond.  I caught her in port earlier as Hyundai Pluto, sister of Jupiter.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous installments of this title all involved McAllister boats as well.

 

I love the morning, and I’ve never gotten a better photo of Tasman Sea.  She’s a product of Main Iron Works, class of 1976.

Kirby Moran heads out on a job.   There’s no angle from which these Washburn & Doughty 6000s look anything but stunning.

Ernest Campbell, from Southern Shipbuilding’s class of 1969, comes by to pick up a barge.

James E. Brown, a recent product of Rodriguez Shipbuilding, leaves the dock and heads to the railroad, rail float that is. Daisy Mae came out of the same yard two years later.

As Robert Burton makes her run with a less than loaded barge, I hope commuters appreciate that this stuff is not traveling by road.

Lucy Reinauer is a powerful local 1973 product;  she came out of Jakobson Shipyard in Oyster Bay.

I’m planning a post on nothing but Brown boats, but I put Thomas J. in here because she’s bathed in that same rich morning light.   She’s a 1962 product of Gladding Hearn and is rated at 1000 hp, same as James E.

Elizabeth McAllister has a dramatic and rich history, which you can read here.  To summarize, in May 1988 as Elizabeth Moran, she was t-boned in the fog in Lower New York Bay.

And finally, two of Brewster Marine‘s workhorses . . .  Helen Parker (2005) and Ava Jude (2013).  In the distance is Neptune, built 1992 and sailing for Dann Ocean since 1996.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Fugro . . .  is not a local name.  In fact, it goes back to 1962, when Kees Joustra started a company called “funderingstechniek en grondmechanica,” shortened to the first few letters of each big word . . .  yields FUGRO.   I first thought it was a Fugro vessel I’d seen a few times a year ago here.

The morning light was almost overwhelming . . .

but you get the idea from these photos.

Fugro Enterprise dates from 2007 and appears to be a US build.  She would certainly look more at home in Louisiana than in the KVK, but

with changes happening offshore, we may see more vessels like this.  I’ve not yet gotten a closeup of Ocean Researcher, which has been spending lots of time in the New York Bight, likely mapping the bottom in advance of wind farms. 

And with green lighting of efforts to seek oil and gas reserves using very loud “air guns” off the East coast, who knows what other exotics may be arriving.  Here’s what National Geographic thinks.  As of this posting, Fugro Enterprise is SE of Atlantic City and stopped.   Her profile is similar to Seis Surveyor captured here almost a decade ago, and now sailing under a Peruvian flag.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who is looking for someone with photos of Ocean Researcher to share.

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