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Here are previous posts in this series.

There is some self-disclosure here:  since last winter and thanks to my movie-buff son, I’ve gotten hooked on movies based on comics.  So, recently, to my surprise, while watching Gotham, I saw Marie J. Turecamo and one of the 6000s in a CGI-noir of an East River scene.  She’s unmistakeable.  Season 1, episode 11 has all these, along with some FDNY vessels, a NYCDEP tanker, and recognizable barges.

And with apologies to the actor, that is one of the Harley boats, St. Andrews (my guess) or Liberty.

And this . . . ABC-1, with a very odd mast.

I realize some of these are not tugs, but categories are made to be challenged.  In the next two photos, I’d heard that Lilac was used for a Daredevil scene, so I watched the series–not liking it at first–until I got to the scene.  By the time I got there, I was a fan.

Clearly filmed in the Navy yard, I have to say I’m impressed by the magic of cinema, and that’s why it’s the economic powerhouse it is.

All “screen-grabs” by Will Van Dorp.

Somewhat related:  Come celebrate the launch of film maker Thomas Halaczinsky‘s “Archipelago New York”: June 18th, 6PM at Rizzoli Bookstore at 1133 Broadway Manhattan.

In the first installment of this series, I mentioned photographers.

They/we do trip over each other trying for that perfect shot.  Imagine how many heads and elbows have intruded on my careful framings.

The need to protect electronic/optical gear from rain enforces unusual costumes, quickly ditched when precipitation stops.

The parade attracts automobiles as well as exhibitionists, and this photographer seems to have missed that lovely Chevy passing her by, unless

she was trying to capture this Mercury.

Cars aplenty and supporting causes, and even

tractors  . . . might serve as props for urban cinematic settings….

Finally, mermaids seem to be as opinionated as the rest of the population these days, some even

escorting aliens from far beyond the planet.

For next year, consider putting together a uniform with a friend, or even

bringing your place of employment to the streets of Coney.

By now, I’m looking for photos folks took during the 2018 parade.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

The parade–rain or shine–starts with music, specifically the bass drum played by founder Dick Zigun, accompanied by whatever ensemble pulled together.

But there’s so much more music.  Batala New York is among my favorites;  hear them here but turn volume way up to replicate how they sound on the street.

 

Gypsy Funk Squad is another favorite.  Hear them here.

And so many more groups whose names I never knew.

 

 

These dancers sponsored by a Mexican restaurant were fabulous.

 

Lots of groups . . .

 

. . some just marching, because that’s what you do in a parade.

Even the emergency services seem to enjoy

 

the duty. . .

rain or shine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

I’m going to miss the mermaid parade this year.  And, yes,  I AM going to miss it.

But you don’t have to.  Click here for info to get started on your way.   It’s free, although you can choose to pay for access to the staging area where I took some of these photos.

This’ll be the second time I miss since I first went in 2004.   I go because of the mermaids, of course.  Mermaids tell me they often linger below the surface in boat photos I take.

Seriously, while making my way around the five boros and beyond, I see scenes that would make powerful images, but it might be creepy to intrude into strangers’ lives to get those shots.  In fact, I’m not really a people-photographer, yet the mermaid parade is all about posing.  Paraders want their photos taken.  Once a mermaid even asked to take MY photo, but some sort of electromagnetic pulse zapped her camera.

If you’re not from the greater sixth boro, the parade happens on Coney Island, now a barrier beach.  Some history of the esprit of the beach I alluded to in this post from 2010.

Hints of NYC’s diversity emerge along with the denizens of the deeps.

 

 

 

 

A body paint artist there seems to take inspiration from coloration on amphiprioninae.

 

 

There are even mermen, or in this case someone I know posing as a navigator about to be dragged off course and possibly to see Davy Jones by a siren.

A lot of families come to the parade; in this case, a friend’s daughter attracted the attention of a mermaid with magic powder.

 

 

Each year a king and queen are named . . . as is true for many of the parades that happen each year in the boros, and

this royalty needs to be there before the marchers step off.

As I said, I’ll miss it this year, which has prompted me to have another glance at my photos of past years.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

. . . illustrating what will be lost if present course is maintained.   If you don’t know what’s likely to happen imminently, Urger is NOT to be reefed.  But, it’ll be beached at Thruway Lock 13 “living history” exit, with holes “punched” in the hull and that beaching will cost –I’m told–over $3 million.

Why should you care?

First,  listen to this engine, as I recorded it four years ago on a calm day above Amsterdam NY.  Click the thumbnail below left for the sound from inside the engine room and . . . right, from outside.  It’s like the steady panting of a racing horse.  Click here for a list of remaining Atlas-Imperial engines, although I don’t know how out-of-date this info may be.

  

Here’s that same engine as seen from below, starboard looking aft, and

here, the camera is looking aft along the port side.

Here’s the view port side looking down.

For whatever value it has, Urger is

one of about two dozen NY vessels on the National Register of Historic Places, has been on that list since November 29, 2001.    Click here for what that means in terms of significantly changing the historic floating structure.

Urger was built by Johnston Brothers Shipyard in Ferrysburg, Michigan, in 1901, originally as H. J. Dornbos, a fish tug.  My point . . . if she’s been around this long and is in this good shape, that’s prime reason to keep her that way.

Urger faced significant change before, back in the late 1980s, ending Canal maintenance duty in October 1987.  Then, Schuyler Meyer (1918–1997) stepped forward with a proposal to save her by making her the “ambassador vessel” of the NYS Canals that she did become.  During those ambassador years, scores of thousands of folks–especially school kids–saw her, walked on her, learned from her about NYS.  Read the whole article below if you have time, but signifiant info is concentrated in the rightmost column.   Look at the image he’s holding in the photo.

Urger is a flagship of NYS history, having made public appearances all over the confluent waterways of the state from Lockport (I don’t have photos of her in Buffalo) to

the famous culvert east of Medina to

Oswego, shown here at Lock O-8 with tug Syracuse to

the Upper Bay of New York City, and all the great little towns in between.   I lack the photos myself, but I know she’s been to the southernmost point of the Finger Lakes and upper reaches of Lake Champlain from this video clip.

So what can be done . . .  especially since, given the imminence of converting Urger to a “static display,” time is so short?

First, share this post with anyone you know who might care about Urger.  Seek out your loud, articulate, reasonable, and well-known advocates who know [connected] people and can speak out in the meetings, press, and blogs.  It’s summer, so key political and agency leaders might not be reading their mail, forwarding it to folks with less decision-making power.  Congressman Paul Tonko would like to hear from you. State legislators might be contacted in their home districts, where you can even walk into their local offices.   Talk to your local mayors, business leaders, and union officials.  I was born upstate but haven’t lived there since the 1960s.

Educators, especially in Canal corridor towns,  have benefitted from the Urger program over the past quarter century.  They might choose to exercise power through NYSUT rather than as individuals if anyone in to better get the attention of government.

Finally, if the choice were between spending no money to beach Urger vs. spending money to keep it afloat and active, that would lend support to the idea of beaching her.  BUT, significant money (in the seven digits) will be spent to beach her at Lock 13 Thruway exit.

Thanks for your attention.  All the color photos here were taken by Will Van Dorp, except the one below, taken by Chris Kenyon in Port Gibson in 2014.

Personal disclosure:  I worked as deckhand on Urger during the 2014 season, on a leave-of-absence from my other life.  I spent about 100 nights and days aboard her between June 6 and October 30, i.e., about 2/3 of the time between those dates.  Some of the hundreds of references to the boat on this blog can be found here.

I hope you agree with me that NYS gains more by keeping her afloat and active than by beaching her.  Pass it on, if you agree.

 

Let’s start with a baseline, exactly seven years ago.  I got this photo of Harvey putting on a water display just south of Yonkers on June 12, 2011.

These next photos came from Lisa Kolibabek a few days ago, following up on the post of a week ago where I said “watch this space.”.

Never has a vessel been painted thus!

Note the master plan lower left.

 

The art is in progress . . .

so I hope you’re intrigued enough to continue watching this space.  Once the superstructure is painted, watch the space between the KVK and Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Many thanks to Lisa for snapping these photos as she works on W. O. Decker, which you can see at work 39 years ago here.

I seem to recall bowsprite had a similar idea back in 2010.

 

I missed the sixth boro fleet week this year, so here’s my compensatory post.

A French FREMM visited the port a few years ago, and here’s the first Italian one I’ve seen, built by Fincantieri.  FREMM . . . well for the French frigate it would expand to Frégate européenne multi-mission.  The Italians would call it Fregata europea multi-missions.”  The acronym for a US version would be MMEF, which seems nomenclature I’d avoid.  As it turns out, the US is considering the design and calling it FFG(X), which can not be pronounced.

The vessel’s name is Alpino.  Almost 10 years ago, I caught another Italian naval vessel, Salvatore Todare, a submarine.

To go from stealth of the Marina Militare to lake and fish science of NOAA–Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, it’s Shenehon,  the same T-boat below taken in Bayfield WI last month and

here, in Muskegon (?) MI in 2008.  Then as now, the 1953 Fort Leavenworth (on the Missouri river) KS vessel works for NOAA.

Let’s have a CCGS 47′ motor lifeboat.  Thunder Cape was built in Kingston ON by Metalcraft.

Question:  How similar are the Canadian CG and US CG designs/perforance?  I photographed these two MLBs in Montauk harbor a few years back.

One of the Park Ranger boats at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore is this RIB by Almar with two 225 hp Hondas.  I haven’t found much about this particular model, between 25′ and 30′.

Burger Boat is a company that manufactured a number of fish tugs;  in 2014 they delivered this research vessel Arcticus, which was going to be called Grayling.  Read this typically astute review by Brian Gauvin.

From Burger now to Burger then, Hack Noyes came off the ways in 1946.  Although originally built for a private fisherman, it has been a government vessel since the early 1950s.

 

For compelling text and photos effectively showing the mission of and activities aboard the boat, click here.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who needs to take a break after this whirlwind tour of government boats of all missions.

 

OK, if old songs make for “classic rock,” then old photos of tugboats could be called classic roll or pitch, yaw, or some such.

Let’s start with one from March 2008 . . .  American Patriot over NW of Shooters Island as seen from the Port Elizabeth shoreline.  I’ve no idea why she was here and have never seen her again.

Given recycling of names, check out Dean Reinauer of June 2008 over by Gracie Mansion.

Same time period, here’s the Curtis Reinauer of that era.

Labrador Sea . . . she’s the first boat in this post that’s still around here.

Emma M. Roehrig  has changed colors twice since 2008 and has not been in the sixth boro for at least five years, maybe longer.

Great Gull still around back then.  She’s gone down to Panama.

And finally, June 2008 saw the transition from the Roehrig fleet into the K-Sea one.  Note the new name on the nearer tug although the colors were still Roehrig.  Aegean Sea had been Francis E. Roehrig.  The farther tug had been Vivian L. Roehrig, renamed Caribbean Sea under K-Sea, and now still works in the boro as Emily Ann.   Did Aegean NOT have a mast?

All photos from a decade ago by Will Van Dorp.

 

Naming the setting is easy, but can you name this tug?  I thought it was Emerald Coast with a modified paint job.

It’s a newbie in town from the Harley Gulf fleet, appropriately named Lightning, given that sky. .

Iron Salvor I’d seen before, but at the dock.  The other day she loaded some fuel at the IMTT pump.  Her intriguing history was commented on here from two months ago.

I don’t believe I’ve seen Kodi before.

She comes from across Raritan Bay, from Belford.

Let’s mix things up with a photo from about 10 years ago . . . Swift, a 1958 tug out of New Haven.

I’ve never seen Miss Circle Line away from the dock, but getting this photo on a stroll along the Hudson the other day led me to discover (maybe again) that she’s a 1955 product of Matton’s shipyard, although she doesn’t appear on this shipyard list, unless my eyes fail me or the list is incomplete.

To go over to Europe, from Jed . . . it’s Union 5. 

photo date 15 JUNE 2017

And a rare shot from Jed, it’s Japanese tug Azusa.  Since then, she’s been sold to Indian concerns and operates as Ocean Marvel out of the port of Krishnapatnam.  Scroll down on that link to see a drawing of elephants being loaded . . . likely more than a half century ago.

photo date 16 Jan 2008

And in closing, here’s Decker and Matilda, photo I took on May 26, 2008.  Where does the time go?

Thanks to Jed for use of his photos, many more of which are in the hopper.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I still have lots of these. If I were to spend money for a boat and lived in a place where I could walk to it every day, I’d get a fish tug.  All boats today are within a three-minute walk of the market at Bodin Fisheries.

Let’s start with the 1938 Ruth, which has become a static display at the Bayfield Marine Museum, which–to my disappointment– was closed when I visited.

Noree Jo was built in 1948.

Let’s have a look from all angles.

 

Cassie-K is slightly older, a 1945 boat.

John R seems to have gone to the birds . . . She’s from 1942.

 

The smaller red-hulled boat beside John R gave no clue of her name.

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