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Not quite half a year ago, I used a variation on this title, but photos I took yesterday necessitate a modification as you see above. 

Imagine my surprise when I saw this nameplate on the most famous–and only–wooden hulled tugboat in the sixth boro.

I’d noticed before on AIS that there was USCG vessel in North Cove, but I never imagined this would be it.  In the background, Mariner III adds an allusion to another time period.

Now does that look like contemporary font the USCG would use?!!  I don’t think so.

And the stack marking and registration board “New York Harbor Patrol” no longer say what it used to . . .  might this be some leasing arrangement.  But hey . . . this is NYC, a movie-making-magnet metropolis, and this just smacks of a made-for-movies-makeover!  Remember this one?  Find a lot more film tugs previously on tugster here.

As to the other part of the title check this out . . .   the name of the barge B. No. 280 follows the Bouchard nomenclature pattern.

Of course, I never imagined Bouchard boats in anything other than their original livery . . .

For now at least the name is the same;  in fact, the name board appears not even to have been refinished.

The stack is unadorned white.

And “Portland OR”  registration on the starboard stern corner of the barge and

on the tug.  Maybe some lion motifs are forthcoming?

All photos, WVD.

 

Quick . . .  what do you know about this white lionine tugboat?  Answer follows.

We’re still being quick here?  What can you tell me about this model of Dianne E. in a display case on the lower level of a barge of Pier 66?  I know nothing about the model, but I stopped by at Pier 66 Wednesday for the first time in way too long.  Any interest in meeting gathering there one of these warm days?

And speaking of piers, I made my first stop at Pier 76 ever Wednesday as well.  It seems I’ve not been out here in a really long time. 

Harvey looked resplendent alongside the seating  . . ..

The NYS Canal system opens officially today, and that means Sparky might be a looper headed up there traveling north and then west to get back to Florida.  I’m just speculating. 

Anne Moore is busy.  Hey, NPS, I’d like to talk with you about this vessel.

Media Boat 5 is always out, always doing and seeing interesting sights.

RCC Africa is a RORO I’ve not seen before.   Here are Autoliner routes. 

Pacific Basin‘s Sharp Island left town light. 

Rolf Williams was returning to base after delivering lube solutions. 

And that brings us back to this tugboat . . .  the former J. George Betz.

All photos, WVD, who suggests you too gallivant around the original boro, the sixth boro, some warm day soon. 

May 2012 was a month of verticality, as in these twin tugboats,

as in the towers of these bridges with a low, long riverboat transiting beneath, and

and in the 156′ air draft of this mega yacht once owned by one of the oligarch’s now sanctioned and hiding his other yachts wherever he can.

It was also time for Opsail 2012, the sixth of six such events to date. 

I recall an evening sail around Gravesend Bay one May evening to see some of the tall ships that overnighted there prior to parading into the confines of the sixth boro.

Above and below were tall ships from Colombia, Ecuador, Indonesia, Mexico, and Brasil.

 

 

 

The tall ships have scattered to the seven seas, but these tugs each returns to the sixth boro as work dictates.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

No sandy beaches here, although I saw a few farther north closer to the US border and the maps point to some farther south.

My first thought was that this was a cross, like the Christ near Rosarito I saw, but it turned out to be an aid to navigation.

The entrance to Ensenada is a breakwater quite built up with tetrapods. 

I don’t know how long ago Kittiwake was sold, but she was built at the very familiar Washburn & Doughty shipyard in Maine.  Click on that link for a walk-through of the 2002 expedition/research vessel built for some folks in Narragansett Bay.

Wan Hai 322 was in port, as was

Ken Yo.

 

On one pier a clutch of tugboats and fishing boats awaits a call.

The two I got the best view of were J. Porres (ex-CMM Cordoba 1998)

and this one I was unable to identify. Boluda Towage Mexico is the leader in Mexican towing and a subsidiary of the second largest towing group worldwide. 

Fish, shipping, and grapes figure of the seal on the city.  

Ensenada has a vineyard culture and a craft beer scene,

the latter of which I sampled after hours and found quite satisfactory.  This drinking establishment had interesting decor on ceiling and walls made from . . . styrofoam!

Salud!  All photos and any errors, WVD.

 

Pete Ludlow’s photos have shown a variety of vessel traffic near Hell Gate.  Here’s a whimsical set, not really work boats for a day I’m having a hard time working or even thinking about working.

Who knew the variety of traffic here?!!

There has to be a story here, and

photos are said to be worth a thousands of words . . . 

I wish I knew the story, or even just the name and itinerary of a boat like this….

Many thanks, Pete.

 

Fast jet boats . . .  like Patriot, doesn’t every major harbor have one?   Oh well, it gets folks out on the water.  There are many other options as well.   Other boats to see as well.

Ocean Valor was over on the far side, and I recall (and quote) some info about her from George Schneider:  “She is a former oilfield supply boat, built as PAUL W MURRILL 20 years ago by Tidewater Marine at their building yard, Quality Marine, in Houma LA.  With the oilfield slowdown of 2015 she was idled and eventually sold.  Her new owner is Ocean Guardian Holdings of Seattle, and her name and other features about her indicate she [may be] owned by Stabbert Marine, who buys ships on speculation in hopes of paying for them with charters-of-convenience.”

George got a photo of her underway in a different season, actually January 2022. 

HOS Dominator was moored nearby.  Both the HOS and the Ocean boat remind me of the views from a half decade back along Bayou Lafourche. 

An intriguing aspect of San Diego’s “bay walk” is the commercial fishing fleet.  I did not find that much about it, given my short stay, but I did stay long enough and walk far enough to learn about the tuna clipper work during WW2. See more here

 

Coyote, Lydorein, Cachalot, and Ebbco all seem they might have interesting histories. 

 

 

Hodor, a “game of thrones” name, would be a terrifying vessel to see if it pulled into a secluded cove somewhere along an unpopulated coastline.   

 

It’s 200+ feet of floating toy box, however, no matter how lethal it all looks. 

The 1970 Admiral Hornblower‘s styling gave me the impression it was much older than its 52 years. 

Finally, it started as an Eisenstaedt [or was it the Jorgensen one?] photo taken in the Manhattan boro.  nonetheless, it has morphed into a 25′ tall controversial statue to mimic, as was happening as it sauntered up. How could I resist a photo??!  That’s the USS Midway in the background. 

All photos, WVD, who managed to get the photos while waiting for an airplane connection.  I realized on this trip how good an impromptu gallivant is for the soul, and I need to do it more.  San Diego . .  I gotta get back.

Separate from that, given my itinerary, the establishment of missions in Baja California shows the progression of settlement early to late in Las Californias from south northward to Alta California

 

Tony A has a sharp eye on the sixth boro traffic, like here, Durable, cable ship that worked off Fire Island for some time this spring.  I did catch Durable‘s fleet mate here a while back.   Durable was working on offshore wind farm elements, but has returned to the UK at this moment. 

He also caught Fort Point transiting the watery boro.

 

A first timer catch though is Miss Jean, a Louisiana-based boat likely working with a dredging company in the area.  

For a few more first-timers on the blog, check out David Steers and Benjamin D. Baxter, up along the Sound. 

So is this retired FDNY fireboat Alfred E. Smith under its own power?

Nope.  She’s at the end of a line towed by Jaguar, frequently towing “second-lives” vessels into or out of the sixth boro. 

Jaguar is a Gladding-Hearn product from 1978. 

And that’s a good place to hold it up.  Thanks much, Tony.  

And if winds are fair, tugster might just be back in the sixth boro soon. 

Let’s get back to some Pete Ludlow photos.  Co Morgan has such a long history of names going back to 1951 1965, I’m just going to paste it in here.  

A high vantage point helps convey appreciation for the train of three Mister Jim tows through Hell Gate. 

Ditto Navigator.  From this perspective, her smart color scheme is clear. 

Meghan Marie heads into Hell Gate with a destination somewhere along the Sound or farther. 

All photos by Pete Ludlow.  Thanks, Pete. 

One of the joys of wandering around an unfamiliar port is getting surprised, as

I was to see an LCS underway.  I also saw some reference to the place of LCS vessels in the USN fleet here and here on gCaptain. More on the ship and the Independence-class variant can be read here

Know the LCS-8?

 

I guess one aspect of the surprise was that she moved through the San Diego harbor without an escort, as if this were a routine transit, and maybe it was.

More San Diego soon, a port I could have spent more time in and one I surely hope to return to. 

All photos, WVD.

 

For what might be considered an exotic among exotics, let’s go back to Pete Ludlow’s photos,  meet Windserve Odyssey.  

As an all-purpose offshore wind farm support vessel, it is just one vessel type that will be more common in the years to come.  The blog alluded to this particular vessel and a possible transit through the sixth boro back last September.   Pete’s photo here confirms that it did transit back on the first day of 2022.  

Hat tip and thanks, Pete, for catching this. 

Tugster is still gallivanting far away from the sixth boro, will be for the better part of a week yet, leaving the robots in charge.  We test the perimeter, push the parameters, but in our own robotic ways, support the mission.

 

 

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