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Is this the latest tagster post?  A fan club for an octogenarian who quickened the pulse of boys I knew back in the 1950s and 1960s?

And this?

MV Brigitte Bardot is one of the “Neptune’s navy.”  Almost 10 years ago, I toured another one of their vessels, Steve Irwin, while it was in NYC. Irwin has recently been retired and may already be recycled.

Here’s more about the organization.

 

Bardot is Dominica registered.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks the “interceptor” will be in NYC through at least Sunday evening.   Check the link in the previous sentence for info on Saturday and Sunday tours of the vessel, 11-4 first come first serve.

Click here and here for info on SS fleet.

For some other truly unusual vessels that have called via NYC’s sixth boro, check PlanetSolar here, Abora II here, and Proteus–one that I missed but another blogger caught.

 

This Bob Hill OT/B creation juxtaposes well with the ever-changing skyline of lower Manhattan, as seen from the East River.

Meredith C. is timing her eastbound trip with a fair tide through the Gate.

Catching the same tide, it’s Evening Star.

Farther SW, Gracie M. makes her way around Bergen Point.

Evening Breeze is a Bouchard new build, only recently arrived here.

On this sunny morning, Janet D pushes a Hughes construction barge past

an inbound scrap bulker.

And in closing, notice the soft spring colors of the trees along the KVK as

Dylan Cooper pushes her barge into the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose energy level is rising along with the outdoor temperatures.

Spring means warming temperatures–slowly in the watery realm–and more non-work boats.  Fishermen are usually first, but then I watch for the first long-distance sailors or yachters coming to the land reclaimed from snow and ice.  In a bit, the harbor will be giddy with seasonal users.

I watch the magenta targets on AIS, and here’s the first long-distance sailboat that I’ve noticed so far this year.

If you can identify the flag, you’ll know her registry.   Answer follows.

This local boat was also out.   You rarely see folks sailing in winter, but it does occur.

Evening Star uses the East River all year round, unlike the sloop over on the Manhattan side.

The mystery first-foreign-rivalhas an English name, that my head has transformed into Snow Bird.  

Here’s  that flag again and some lettering on the boom.

And the flag is Czech Republic . . ..

Click here for info on the vessel.  Welcome to NYC, Miroslav.  Snehurka is Czech or Slovenian (?), I gather, for  . . . . believe it or not, Snow White.   Does that mean there might be seven diminutive crew below?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This is a post with a sound track;  you can find the audio here.  Before the monsoon hit the other day, it was 70 degrees, lots of folks walked the esplanade, the saxophonist regaled me with his practice, and the rusty Maersk Bogor came in from Spain.  In front of us, the gulls giggle-squawked as cars on the Belt behind us whooshed by.  If it’d been foggy, the bass ship’s horn would have played to its own beat, giving the musician another instrument to accompany.

The first sailboats were out beyond the Narrows.  I’ll post more on this tomorrow.

Bogor . . .  conjures up a tropical place.

And it was the eve of Good Friday.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you a Happy Easter today.

Here are previous iterations of this title.

What a treat to catch Dina Polaris on an daylight inbound run, and just before the April monsoons happen

She’s been working in the New York Bight for some time, and

I was hoping to see her.    Any guesses on maximum crew size? So her mission?

I’ll let you speculate until the end of this post.

By the way, my usage of exotic here comes from my birder’s guide, which defines an exotic bird as one well outside its usual range.  Imagine seeing a penguin in the sixth boro, or encountering a Chinese junk in our harbor;  when that does happen, it’s noteworthy.  Previous exotic posts can be found here.

These two crew rode atop the bridge all the way in . . . see the bright red jacket even on the top photo.

Bergen . . . in 1985 I visited there and it’s calling me back.

Above . . . no, it’s not a mini-container vessel.  I’m guessing she was core sampling for offshore wind.  See the full specs here.

Here’s more on the company, this vessel, and their other vessels.  Here’s an article about her from the Times, the Marthas Vineyard Times, that is. She is Turkish-built, 2017, from the Europe side of the Bosphorus.  She has berths for 97 crew!!

All photos taken by Will Van Dorp, who was happy to sit on my John Travolta bench again .

 

 

Here was 1 and here, 2.  As others of you, I’ve been waiting for the walkway to open;  it’s been closed since August 2013!!

Today’s photos are all from the past six weeks, and my way of saying that workers are still active on this bridge

 

See the same guys above and below?

My son works in a fairly high “man basket,” but I doubt he’s ever

been in one this high.  These must extend to nearly 200′?

The next two photos I took earlier this week.

 

Since the Bayonne Bridge has appeared on every blog post (as header photo) I’ve done, I do know it better than any other bridge locally. Happy holidays from Will Van Dorp.

Here are posts one through five in this series.

 

 

 

 

 

Just a photo essay, Vane tugs and barges in the KVK through all the daylight hours today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I missed her here five years ago, just barely.  At that time, she was delivering TZ Bridge construction components, more of which arrived a month later here.

Given her rare appearance in the sixth boro, I thought to get photos of her with some iconic parts of NYC skyline,

including Hudson Yards and the Edge.  But what vessel might Miss Lis have spent a two-week voyage delivering?

Eh voila!  So given the size and carrying capacity of this barge, I’m wondered what it came up here for.

I’d chosen my location well, since the tug spun off the wire and did the evolution off alongside the far side right in front of me.  Over beyond the dock, notice the big pink ULCV?  She’s now left the western hemisphere for a couple months.

As of posting, Miss Lis is over by the Global Terminal.

All photos and observations by Will Van Dorp, whose previous posts of Tradewinds Towing can be seen here.

And while we’re at exotics, has anyone gotten a photo of Dina Polaris, currently working “just-over-the-horizon” from Jones Beach?  I’d love to see and post some photos.

Prometheus appeared here once before, but that was a different Prometheus.

 

Years ago when Odin departed the sixth boro, someone said there’d likely never be another tug here of that sort.  Well, there is.  Every time I see either CMT Otter or Pike, I recall the unique Odin.

In CMT colors, Otter looks quite sharp.

Also in these sharp colors, it’s Daisy Mae westbound in the KVK a few days ago, pushing CMT Y NOT 2 with a good 8000 tons of southern Jersey sand.

I have an article about the sand run that will be published later this year.

Eastbound at the same point on another day is Mister Jim pushing

a barge deeply laden with aggregates.

And still fresh from a rehab, it’s Helen Laraway, ISO

a barge to load up with aggregates as well.   Here was probably the first photo of Helen Laraway on this blog.

CMT . . . the company had no tugs, actually was no company, just a half decade ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Uh . . .

Other than that the name of the vessel below seems entirely Thai, I don’t know what to say.

Want a list of Stolt tankers?  Click here. Sypress, I believe, is the Norwegian name for the conifer tree spelled differently in English.  For all the ones already posted in tugster, click here.

Battersea Park . . .  is a park south of the Thames.

Low light photos are only sometimes interesting . . .

At first one might think Glovis is the vessel name, but upon closer study,

clearly it’s not and the company is likely Korean, given the text.  Previous Glovis vessels can be found here.

Cariboo is a 2012 scrap-loaded bulk carrier currently most of the way to Egypt;  where it goes from there I don’t know, but  scrapped beams, cars, trucks, and boats end up in the hold of vessels like Cariboo.

And finally, we return to that first vessel, the nameless one.  My suspicion is that it may be between owners.  The IMO number, however, stays with the vessel like a VIN, and the IMO number says that the name might be/have been Energy Trophy, a crude tanker.

All photos and any errors by Will Van Dorp.

Maybe someone can explain this . . .   late last week, six ROROs, of which one was Glovis Comet arrived in the port.   Six!  Is this odd?  Am I missing something?

 

 

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