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I’m back and–before catching up on my time off the internet–I need to pack the robots back into Cosmoline and close out some January 2016 dredging business . . . here’s my most recent Professional Mariner article.  And below are some additional photos of the research done in June 2015.

This is what 1100 + cubic meters of misplaced river bottom looks like after it’s sucked up and being transported to another location where scour demands it be added.

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And that red boat in the distance is the client, at least the

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verifier for the client.

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Once in the designated discharge site, hydraulic ram start to press the

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hulls apart, and

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all that bottom finds itself in gravity’s grip and

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tumbles out.

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Now only some water remains as the vessel–Ocean Traverse Nord–returns to the worksite and

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lowers the arm to suction up another 1100+ cubic meters

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of gallivanting silt piles, here shown in patches of green.  Notice the darker rectangle, representing the location of the dredger hull.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For video, click here and start at 13:51.

Thanks again to Barrel for sending another dredge photo.  These photos send me looking for background.  So here is what I can figure.

0abdrgDavidson Sasebo JapanNov1951

Davison (records say Davidson, but I’ll go by what I see in the photo above) was built by Dravo in Wilmington DE in 1945.  She was dispatched to Korea in 1951 because of the extreme tides in Inchonaverage range is 29 and extreme range is 36 feet.

Again thanks, Barrel.

Amsterdam has appeared here  a lot, but all the photos in this post come from Jan van der Doe.  This tug looks a little like Odin, the telescoping house well-suited for the low bridges of A’dam.  I like the container-inspired deckhouse as well.

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Here, at the National Maritime Museum, is an exact replica of the East Indiaman Amsterdam, which wrecked on its maiden voyage before it had even left Europe.

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PA4 is a Damen built tug.

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The Zulu-class Soviet sub–well-graffittied over in the maritime area of North Amsterdam was “beyond belief,” not a surprise because a sign at the entrance to this dock calls it a “place beyond belief.”

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Let me digress and put up some photos I never got around to in 2014.

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You have to admit that a vandalized Soviet sub is quite strange.

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Here’s the entrance to this area;  notice the Botel–a repurposed North Sea oil field accommodations barge–in the background.

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For vessels big and

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small, Amsterdam is one of those cities everyone should visit at some point.

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Click here for some of the many port posts I’ve done.

 

All photos here by Jan van der Doe, except for #5–7, which were by me, Will Van Dorp.

This Dutch Girl might be lost . . . parked along the Calcasieu (CAL-ca-zew) River in Cameron, LA.  Anyhow, she’s not to be mistaken for the Dutch Girl that fishes the sixth boro in the cold months.

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Pretty Jewelry . . . getting caught by false promises can be trouble . . .  Click here for the rest of the Pretty  . . .  fleet. Thanks to Ashley Hutto for this photo.

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Overdie .  . sounds frightening, even for a scrapyard.  But here’s the context . .  it’s not English.

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On The Rocks, not an auspicious name for a boat, ever.  Yet, a glance at the Coast Guard records shows over 40 boats in their registry with this name!!   Thanks to Justin Zizes Jr. for this.

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And Atchafalaya, although it sounds like Louisiana, well . . . I took this photo on the Kills about two years ago.  I’ve no idea whether Atchafalaya has headed south to its namesake wetlands.

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Names . .  are just . . . names.

Recently, great names like Herman Hesse, Ever Lasting,  . . .

The photo below comes via Russell Skeris, who seems to have gotten it from Fred Miller II . . . to keep credits where they belong.  Click here for two previous posts Russell contributed to.  I’m curious where this photo was taken, given the US/Canadian flags on the mast.  And when?  It would have to be 1998 or prior, given the stack.  Anyhow, Russell writes, “It was a nice little surprise to log onto tugster this am and see the pics of the Frances. It put a smile on my wife’s face ( little Fran [the namesake. She misses her mom who passed in 2014. I thought you might like this pic probably from the 70’s that appears to have been taken on Kodachrome film.It was also before the sun visor had gotten all banged up like in many of the pictures that I’ve found . I’m going to send some older black and whites of Frances being launched in 1957 at Jakobsons in Oyster Bay.”

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Also, he writes, “The weathervane we had made some years ago for the couple on Fran’s house. She really was surprised when we gave it to her and connected her to her past.

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The life ring is a real relic and has hung in the wall in the kitchen for as long as I can remember.”

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Thanks, Russell.   Sorry it took so long to post this.  I guess it’s good that I go away now and then so that old unused posts finally see the light of day.

Here was the first post in this series.

Jed took these in the Chesapeake a few years back.   I believe that’s TSH dredge Liberty Island on the far side of freight barge Columbia Elizabeth.

photo date 21 JAN 2011

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Prime mover here is Katie G. McAllister, which appeared here almost two years ago.

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Donal G. McAllister is another one of the converted USN YTBs that McAllister operates.

photo date 10 SEPT 2011

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Donal G. last appeared here on tugster.  In the distance, I’m guessing that’s Kaleen.

photo date 10 SEPT 2011

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Jed . . . many thanks.

Since he worked for 35 years on the Delaware, Barrel has a lot of photos from there, including Brooklyn McAllister (1986 and McAllister’s first tractor tug),

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Charles Burton (1967 and now painted red, I believe),

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Ensign (1977), and

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of course, Big Daddy (1954).

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All photos from Barrel, whom I thank.

I first saw this type of derrick boat and heard it referred to as a derrick boat on the Erie Canal, and did a post about it here.

I haven’t been able to find much out about these boats, but enjoy.  Here’s USACE Derrick boat No. 13,

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two views of USACE Derrick boat Erie,

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USACE derrick boat McCauley,

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a newer looking USACE Derrick boat 8,

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And finally, the 500+ ton capacity floating crane Henry M. Shreve.

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Many thanks to Barrel for these photos.

“I have worked on two salvage tugs,” writes Jan.  “The first one, Hercules in 1957-1958, was a seagoing salvage-tug/icebreaker built in 1943 for the German Air Force/Navy to salvage plane wrecks in the Baltic Sea.  After the war the tug sailed for Bugsier and came under the Dutch flag in 1950.  In 1984 [ as Temi IV] it capsized and sank. Salvaged and scrapped.”
jvd1Hercules
“The second one was Zeepaard [ trans. Seahorse] in 1960-1961.   Zeepaard was built in 1947 and used as tug/salvage tug by Tak’s Berging (W.A van den Tak Bergings Bedrijf N.V.),  a sister company of L. Smit & Co. Internationale Sleepdienst Mij. N.V.  Still in service.  Now as a pusher-tug with the name Liberty.”
jvd3ZEEPAARD

 

Thanks, Jan.

Click on the image below for an interactive map of this portion of the sixth boro.  Right now at about the 9 o’clock position you see two small white specks.  They

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are the huge spherical tanks seen off Barbara McAllister‘s stern.

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Consider the size of the wraparound stairs and you’ll understand why locally they’re called “gorilla’s balls.”.

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So here’s what the tugboat fueling station looks like from the north bank of the KVK, and

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here looking west.

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Here’s looking NE across the tank farm, and

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from the landslide looking eastward across Robbins Reef Light to Brooklyn.

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Off the bow of Oleander–the incoming small container ship, would be the Staten Island ferry racks,

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and here’s looking south across tanker Navig8 Spirit toward the salt pile. But here’s the surprise, inside the fence and between the tanks,

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there’s a very old cemetery, which pre-dates the use of this land for oil.

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It’s Constable Hook Cemetery, founded by Pieter van Buskirk.

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Who knew?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Many thanks to Jack Kennedy for arranging for this tour.

 

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